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Boicottare Via col vento? C’è chi dice no, ecco perché

Boicottare Via col vento? C’è chi dice no, ecco perché

John Ridley regista di «12 anni schiavo» chiede di rimuovere il film perché razzista. Ma una reporter afroamericana dissente: Serve a riconoscere quella mitologia sugli schiavi felici e fedeli ai loro padroni che resiste ancora oggi»


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'Skinny clown' Israel Adesanya plans to blow casual fans' minds by finishing Paulo Costa at UFC 253
UFC middleweight champion Israel Adesanya plans on blowing the casual fans' minds by finishing Paulo Costa at UFC 253.        Related StoriesUFC 253's Hakeem Dawodu questions Colby Covington's 'rude, racist' commentsDominick Reyes 'could give a (expletive)' if people question title reign legitimacy after UFC 253UFC 253 'Embedded,' No. 2: Dominick Reyes hoops it up 
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usatoday.com
Special Report: Supreme Court ceremony honors the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Chief Justice John Roberts paid tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg at a ceremony at the U.S. Supreme Court, where her casket will lie in repose following her death Friday at age 87. CBS News' Gayle King, Anthony Mason and Tony Dokoupil anchor this Special Report with chief legal correspondent Jan Crawford.
cbsnews.com
Notre Dame football game against Wake Forest rescheduled for Dec. 12
Postponed this week by COVID-19 concerns, the college football game matching Notre Dame and Wake Forest will take place Dec. 12.        
usatoday.com
Ohio State athletics projects $107 million deficit in 2021 fiscal year
With projected deficit in the fiscal year, the athletic department plans to implement furloughs for employees and cut jobs, but maintain sports teams.       
usatoday.com
Pandemic Fizzle: Sizzler Steakhouse Chain Files For Bankruptcy Protection
The restaurant chain, which first opened 62 years ago, says it wants to keep all of its locations open. There are more than 100 Sizzler restaurants in the U.S.
npr.org
Gwyneth Paltrow says she saved ‘every red carpet look’ for daughter Apple
The mogul calls her daughter a "beauty queen."
nypost.com
I clerked for Ruth Bader Ginsburg while raising a young baby. She was a model of empathy.
As a young law professor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg hid her second pregnancy beneath baggy clothing. Her legal work meant I never needed to do the same.        
usatoday.com
Hall of Famer and Bears legend Gale Sayers' life in photos
Gale Sayers, the Chicago Bears legend and youngest player ever to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, died at 77.        
usatoday.com
Biden says he'll begin prepping for debate ‘really heavily’ on Thursday
Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden said on Wednesday that he’s begun to prepare for next week’s presidential debate, but that more intense preparation begins on Thursday.
foxnews.com
Aaron Rodgers embracing ‘better head space’ after Danica Patrick split
Rodgers and Patrick called it quits over the summer.
nypost.com
Ruth Bader Ginsburg to lie in repose at Supreme Court Wednesday to begin formal farewell
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's casket will be brought to the Supreme Court Wednesday where the icon will lie in repose. Jan Crawford reports on what can be expected from the day, and what big names may turn out to honor Ginsburg.
cbsnews.com
HHS Secretary Says It's 'Safe' to Go Back to School, if We Put Our Mind to It
"Being in a physical school environment is vital for our kids for their physical well-being, their emotional and mental health and also nutrition services," Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said.
newsweek.com
TBS adds Curtis Granderson in MLB playoffs shakeup
TBS’ postseason studio show will have a new look led by familiar faces, The Post has learned. Ernie Johnson and Curtis Granderson are in, while Casey Stern and Gary Sheffield are out, according to sources. Jonhson is renowned for his work as a host of “Inside the NBA,” and had been miscast on play-by-play for...
nypost.com
Murray, Nuggets hang on in Game 3, cut Lakers' lead to 2-1
They had just lost a playoff heartbreaker, and two nights later the Denver Nuggets quickly went from in control to in trouble.
foxnews.com
UFC 253's Hakeem Dawodu questions Colby Covington's 'rude, racist' comments
Hakeem Dawodu, who fights at UFC 253, didn't like Colby Covington's recent "rude, racist" comments toward Tyron Woodley and Kamaru Usman.        Related StoriesDominick Reyes 'could give a (expletive)' if people question title reign legitimacy after UFC 253Vince Murdock defies odds, cleared to pursue UFC dreams after rare brain disease threatened lifeYoussef Zalal excited to show off his Dutch kickboxing style vs. Seung Woo Choi 
usatoday.com
Landlords rip ‘green’ rules adding heavy costs amid COVID-19 recession
Landlords have blasted a new push by left-wing city lawmakers to require environmental retrofitting of about 1,000 Big Apple apartment buildings in a 2019 green buildings law expansion, saying the rash measure would require millions in upgrades they cannot afford during the COVID-19 economic downtown. “This bill would add a six-figure, and in some cases...
nypost.com
Chief Justice John Roberts remembers Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts said the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the "leading advocate" against gender-based discrimination as he remembered her life and legacy.
edition.cnn.com
‘Hey Siri, where are the terrorists?’ directs iPhone users to police stations
Apple’s virtual assistant Siri has been directing iPhone users to police stations when they ask for the locations of terrorists, according to a series of disturbing videos being shared online. In a video posted to Facebook, Joel Overstreet asked Siri, “Where are the terrorists?” and received four police departments in South Carolina as recommendations. “We...
nypost.com
Australia says majority of 470-strong beached whale pod has died
SYDNEY – The majority of a 470-strong pod of pilot whales found stranded off Australia’s remote southern coast has died, officials said on Wednesday, as rescuers struggled in freezing waters and fading light to free those still alive. The group, which is the biggest beaching in the country’s modern history, were first spotted a wide...
nypost.com
In RBG's Legacy, Echoes of a Feminist President: Jimmy Carter | Opinion
If Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the Notorious RBG, Jimmy Carter was a masterful MC, nominating her—and a number of other pathbreaking women to the Second, Third, Fifth, Tenth, Eleventh, and D.C. Circuit Courts of Appeal.
newsweek.com
Wells Fargo CEO apologizes for ‘limited pool of black talent’ comment
Wells Fargo CEO Charlie Scharf apologized for a controversial comment that his bank’s diversity issues are caused by a shallow pool of minority talent. Scharf sent an all-staff memo Wednesday morning after reports swirled on Tuesday that he had repeatedly defended Wells Fargo’s inability to reach its diversity goals over the summer with the rationale...
nypost.com
Five States Where Coronavirus Deaths Are Falling Fastest
A handful of southern states have each reported a drop in new COVID-19 deaths in recent weeks.
newsweek.com
Kristin Cavallari: My divorce from Jay Cutler ‘didn’t happen overnight’
"We tried really, really hard for years and years. It was the hardest decision I've ever made."
nypost.com
Seattle City Council votes to override the mayor after she vetoed a bill to cut police funding
The Seattle City Council voted Tuesday evening to override Mayor Jenny Durkan's veto of a nearly $4 million cut from the police department's budget.
edition.cnn.com
Democratic lawmakers kill job-creating Industry City deal
The bid to rezone Brooklyn’s Industry City was yanked on Wednesday — killing a deal that would have created tens of thousands of jobs amid the COVID-19 downturn, but was staunchly opposed by top Democratic lawmakers. Andrew Kimball, the CEO of Industry City, said the rezoning application that would have repurposed the sprawling, 16-building waterfront...
nypost.com
Patio heaters are hard to find—here's where you can still buy one
Both restaurants and individuals are trying to extend the life of their patios with patio heaters. Here's where you can still buy one.       
usatoday.com
De Blasio announces furloughs of 9,000 NYC employees, saving $21 million
Another 9,000 city employees will be furloughed, saving the city $21 million, in a bid to balance the budget, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Wednesday.
nypost.com
Outrage After Louisiana Voter Registration Website Shut Down on National Voter Registration Day
Those who sought to register to vote on National Voter Registration Day in Louisiana through the state's online portal found a "scheduled maintenance" message.
newsweek.com
Using weed during pregnancy linked to psychotic-like behaviors in children, study finds
If you're one of the growing numbers of women who use weed while pregnant, think twice: A new study found it may increase psychotic-like behaviors in your child.
edition.cnn.com
Newborn gorilla spotted cuddling with mom in viral photos
Photos of a baby gorilla and its mother have gone viral after the mother was spotted cuddling the miniature mammal.
foxnews.com
Amy Coney Barrett, Handmaids and Empathy for the Unfamiliar | Opinion
I wish some of the pundits weighing in on Judge Amy Coney Barrett's religious practices could display half the empathy of my students. Many religious practices seem unfamiliar, weird and even threatening to outsiders.
newsweek.com
Amazon's climate pledge: New program makes it easier to shop for sustainable products
Amazon customers can browse through over 25,000 products with one or more 19 sustainability certifications.       
usatoday.com
With iOS 14, more iPhone owners are customizing their screens. Here's how they did it
In case you haven't noticed, several users have hopped on social media to share their iOS "aesthetic," highlighting the custom themes and app icons.       
usatoday.com
This 8-course training is a great place to start your financial growth
Whether you want to kickstart a career in finance, grow in your existing role, or you are in the process of launching your own small business, a firm understanding of financial accounting is of utmost importance. An online training like the Ultimate Financial Accounting & CPA Certification Training Bundle, which aims to enlighten you with...
nypost.com
Japanese giant Gundam robot shows off its moves
A giant robot based on a character from a classic anime series has undergone testing in the Japanese city of Yokohama.
edition.cnn.com
Rochester's police response to Daniel Prude protests cost city nearly $1.4M in overtime
Rochester Police Department’s response to the civil unrest involving the death of Daniel Prude has cost taxpayers almost $1.4 million in overtime hours since the end of August.
foxnews.com
U.S. surpasses 200,000 COVID-19 deaths
The official COVID-19 death toll in the U.S. has surpassed 200,000, the most of any nation, according to Johns Hopkins University. Internal medicine specialist and immunologist Dr. Neeta Ogden joined CBSN to discuss this devastating milestone.
cbsnews.com
Hunter fatally mauled by grizzly bear in Alaskan national park
A grizzly bear has killed a moose hunter at a national park in Alaska – the first known fatal mauling by the animals at the site since it was established in 1980, according to reports. The hunter was on a 10-day moose-hunting trip with a friend when he was attacked by the beast Sunday in...
nypost.com
Xbox Series X vs PS5: Every Launch Game For Each New Console
Some titles will be available for both consoles at launch, such as "Assassin's Creed: Valhalla."
newsweek.com
WWE Hall of Fame inductee Joe Laurinaitis, aka Road Warrior Animal, dies at 60
Joe Laurinaitis, known to wrestling fans as Road Warrior Animal, has died, WWE announced. The father of former NFL LB James Laurinaitis was 60.      
usatoday.com
Partisan fight escalates to fill Justice Ginsburg's Supreme Court seat as she lies in repose
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is lying in repose Wednesday and Thursday at the Supreme Court. It comes as Republicans and Democrats escalate their fight over how to fill her vacancy. CBS News chief congressional correspondent Nancy Cordes joined CBSN with the latest from Capitol Hill.
cbsnews.com
Sweden, Initially Praised for Lack of Lockdown, Now Considering Restrictions As Coronavirus Cases Rise
Health officials are discussing the possibility of additional regulations in Stockholm, Sweden's capital city, in response to a recent uptick in COVID-19 cases.
newsweek.com
Trump tells U.N. General Assembly to hold China accountable for COVID-19
President Trump heavily criticized China in his pre-taped remarks to the U.N. General Assembly. Former U.S. Ambassador to China, Max Baucus, who is also a former U.S. Senator and longtime friend and supporter of Joe Biden, joined CBSN's Elaine Quijano to discuss the president's remarks and the impact on U.S.-China relations.
cbsnews.com
Fact check: Eric Trump posts video that falsely claims Joe Biden used teleprompter in Telemundo interview
Eric Trump, son of President Donald Trump, tweeted a video on Wednesday that falsely claimed to show Joe Biden being "caught-red handed using a teleprompter" in an interview with Telemundo anchor José Díaz-Balart.
edition.cnn.com
Paging Dr. Hamblin: What If the Vaccine Only Works Half the Time?
Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com.Dear Dr. Hamblin,I heard an immunologist on the radio today say that a coronavirus vaccine could be only 50 percent effective, in which case we’d still have to “live” with the virus even after it arrives. With all the talk of the vaccine being the way out, this is terrifying. What if the vaccine isn’t totally effective? Will the virus really be with us forever?Sydney LevittToronto, Canada No vaccine is perfectly effective. That isn’t bad news; it’s just a basic fact. No medicine is perfectly effective, no parachute is perfectly effective, and no person is perfectly effective at … whatever it is they do. But though vaccines are only partly effective at protecting a single person, they can still be extremely effective collectively.Vaccine “effectiveness” takes into account lots of different factors: What percentage of vaccinated people develop antibodies? How many antibodies? How long do the antibodies last? How well do they protect the person from disease? Ultimately, you’re left with a rough average: what percentage of people who get vaccinated are protected for a meaningful amount of time.The most successful vaccines that we have, such as those against measles, are about 97 percent effective—meaning almost everyone develops fully protective, long-lasting immunity. Not every vaccine is so reliable. Technically, all that a vaccine does is stimulate our immune systems. From there, it’s up to our bodies to develop and maintain immunity—without inadvertently attacking our own cells in the process. Vaccines are developed to try and thread the needle of stimulating a robust and lasting antibody immune response while not making anyone too sick. As we’ve seen with the flu vaccine, which fewer than half of Americans choose to get most years, even a slight chance of a sore arm or a mild fever after a shot will deter some people from getting it—let alone a one-in-a-million chance of a more serious reaction.The variability of our immune responses is the quintessential challenge of vaccine making. It is why safe and effective vaccines take so long to develop. Even once you have an effective formula, the process of vaccination has historically happened over decades, not months or years. The first polio inoculation studies were initiated in the 1930s, and a viable vaccine wasn’t discovered until the 1950s. Even though global eradication efforts began in the 1980s, there are still dozens of known cases of the disease every year, mostly in children. Through a century of vaccination efforts, smallpox is the only virus that has ever been totally eliminated through vaccination.Developing a vaccine is never easy, but the coronavirus makes it uniquely challenging. The virus can affect people in many ways and to varying degrees of severity, largely because our immune systems respond very differently from person to person. When the vaccines eventually come, we should expect that some people will respond differently than others. For that reason, especially with a new vaccine that’s being produced at a fraction of previous record speeds, drugmakers and regulatory agencies could have an incentive to err on the side of under-stimulating the immune system, rather than overstimulating it and potentially causing unwanted symptoms. This would mean that fewer people would be fully protected after taking the vaccine, but might mean that more people take the vaccine. (The Food and Drug Administration doesn’t specify an exact minimum level of effectiveness in order to take a product to market.)We don’t know how the numbers will play out yet, but we should have a preliminary sense as clinical trials wrap up near the end of the year. Each vaccine candidate—and there are dozens—could have different numbers. During the Phase 3 trials that are happening right now, people are being monitored to see whether they contract COVID-19 despite having been vaccinated. The process could have been sped up with a controversial approach known as vaccine challenge trials, in which people volunteer to be purposely exposed to the virus. But the scientific community opted not to do that for ethical reasons.Instead, we are waiting to see whether people are infected organically. This takes time. The longer that trials go on, the more valuable the results. But even if a trial lasted five years, the results wouldn’t be able to account for every possible long-term, real-world condition. The process can give only a window into what’s likely to happen when billions of people take the product. But do not expect a vaccine to give you 100 percent certainty of protection.Still, if everyone in a population takes a vaccine that is, say, 70 percent effective, the effects add up quickly. The result is a population that is protected—and that more quickly achieves “herd immunity” than a population with a less effective vaccine. Occasional cases of COVID-19 might arise, but enough people will be protected to prevent widespread outbreaks. When Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institutes of Allergies and Infectious Diseases, mentioned the possibility of a vaccine being 50 percent effective, he wasn’t saying it as though the vaccine would be a failure. He was saying he would consider it a success—an intervention worth using, and better than nothing. Though, his hope would be to start with a product that’s somewhere closer to 75 percent effective.No matter how effective the coronavirus vaccines prove themselves to be, their overall impact will ultimately depend on how many people take them. That means how many people have access to them globally, as well as how many people consent to taking them. In a Pew Research Center poll out this week, only 21 percent of Americans surveyed said they would “definitely” take a vaccine if it were available now. This rate is half of what it was in May, and has decreased in step with the president’s unsubstantiated and impossible claims about a vaccine being widely available before the election. People will rightly require transparency and rigor from their politicians and public-health officials if a vaccine is to be widely trusted and used. The most valuable thing that any population can have in a pandemic is clear, accurate information. Without this, even a mythical, perfectly effective vaccine could fail to stop the pandemic.“Paging Dr. Hamblin” is for informational purposes only, does not constitute medical advice, and is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. By submitting a letter, you are agreeing to let The Atlantic use it—in part or in full—and we may edit it for length and/or clarity.
theatlantic.com
Deer hunting season will be different in Michigan due to pandemic, officials say
Not even hunting is safe from changes this year.
foxnews.com
Volkswagen ID.4 electric SUV revealed with free charging deal
The compact SUV will have 250 miles of range and a host of standard tech.
foxnews.com
Face mask fogging up your glasses? This $13 spray solves the problem
Soon after the pandemic took hold, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) put out a statement recommending that individuals wear face masks as a way to limit transmission. While covering your mouth and nose is a small price to pay for slowing the spread of the virus, people who wear glasses are stuck...
nypost.com