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Cina-Usa: l’offensiva si sposta su Twitter per influenzare l’opinione pubblica «nemica»

Cina-Usa: l’offensiva si sposta su Twitter per influenzare l’opinione pubblica «nemica»

Dallo scontro su Hong Kong alle accuse di razzismo, fino al coronavirus: la battaglia si gioca sui social


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EPA boss rips Cuomo, de Blasio over protests, threatens to relocate NYC office
WASHINGTON — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency on Monday threatened to yank the federal agency’s office out of Lower Manhattan, blaming the ongoing protests that have roiled the city for months and targeted federal workers. In a letter to Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio, a copy of which was obtained...
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nypost.com
Meghan McCain Warns the Media Against “Kavanaugh”-ing Potential Supreme Court Nominee Amy Coney Barrett
"When you start talking about Christian women like we're all commanders' wives in The Handmaid's Tale ... I implore the media to be careful."
9 m
nypost.com
Lenny Kravitz’s skincare secret: ‘Sand from the ocean’
From right outside his home on the island of Eleuthera in the Bahamas, of course.
nypost.com
Preorders for the new Xbox crash Amazon, Walmart, Microsoft sites
Microsoft’s new Xbox consoles sold out across all major American retailers within minutes of preorders going live Tuesday morning. Demand for the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S systems crashed the preorder pages of Amazon, Walmart, GameStop and Target shortly after being made available. It even took down Microsoft’s Xbox ordering website. Gamers hoping...
nypost.com
SI Swimsuit star Camille Kostek topless in comedy skit as park ranger
Sports Illustrated model Camille Kostek went topless for a recent photoshoot at the Joshua Tree National Park.
foxnews.com
These four states, including Arizona and Minnesota are back on New York quarantine list
Travelers from Rhode Island, Nevada and Minnesota are among those who will have to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.       
usatoday.com
Party City Apologizes for Selling Children's Confederate Soldier Costumes
Store said it had pulled the offending items from its branch in Bailey's Crossroads, Virginia, after complaints from a customer.
newsweek.com
Beta downgraded from tropical storm as it dumps more rain on already soaked Texas
Flash flood watches are affecting nearly 11 million people along the coasts of Texas and Louisiana as Beta, now downgraded to a tropical depression, moves slowly inland, dumping more rain on an already saturated region.
edition.cnn.com
Connecticut man charged with killing mother ‘showed no emotion’
A Connecticut man who was on probation for stabbing his cousin is now accused of killing his mother — and showed “no emotion” when detectives told him she was dead, police said. Thomas Walker, 31, was charged with murder Friday after he walked into the Stratford Police Department and told an officer he wanted to...
nypost.com
Dems’ DC, Puerto Rico statehood push could intensify if Trump gets another Supreme Court justice
Republicans appear ready to move forward on confirming a new Supreme Court justice as soon as President Trump announces his nominee for filling the seat left vacant after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, but some Democrats are already looking to drastic measures of retaliation should this happen.
foxnews.com
20,000 American Flags Placed at Washington Monument to Honor COVID Victims
The flags honor the more than 200,000 people in the U.S. who have lost their lives after contracting COVID-19.
newsweek.com
Six Louisville police officers under internal investigation for actions on night Breonna Taylor was killed
Six Louisville Metro Police Department officers are under internal investigation for their actions the night Breonna Taylor was shot and killed in her home, police confirmed Tuesday.
edition.cnn.com
77-year-old man suffers fractured skull after Midtown assault
A stranger randomly slugged a 77-year-old man in the face in Manhattan, leaving the oldster with a fractured skull when his head hit the sidewalk, police said Tuesday. The septuagenarian was walking by 300 Park Avenue when “an unknown individual punched him in the face” around 11 a.m. Monday, an NYPD spokesman said. The man...
nypost.com
Va. Tech will have new defensive coordinator, no lunch pail for first time since 1995
Justin Hamilton takes over for retired Bud Foster in rapid rise within the Hokies' coaching ranks.
washingtonpost.com
Why Walmart thinks TikTok is the future of its business
Photo Illustration by Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images The brick-and-mortar retailer is trying to invent a digital future where it’s a leader of Amazon rather than a follower. For the past five years, nearly every one of Walmart’s big moves has seemingly had one goal: to narrow Amazon’s embarrassingly huge lead in e-commerce. From Walmart’s $3 billion acquisition of Jet.com in 2016 to its $16 billion deal for India’s Flipkart in 2018, as well as its recent launch of the Walmart+ membership program, Amazon and its Prime membership service seemed to always be at the forefront of Walmart’s corporate mind. For the first time in a long time, though, the giant brick-and-mortar retailer is expected to make a big bet that isn’t solely about chasing the Seattle-based tech giant founded by Jeff Bezos: a multibillion-dollar investment in, and multifaceted business partnership with, TikTok, the global sensation and short-form video-sharing app. And whether the partnership with TokTok turns out to be a brilliant chess move for Walmart, or a disastrous distraction, the moves still send a message that the traditional retailer is trying to invent a digital future where it will be a leader of Amazon rather than a follower in at least one arena. If successful, Walmart could become a leader in online video commerce — an area of retail that has been a hit in Asia, but is still nascent in the US. Some background, first, on the dramatic and winding business and geopolitical story that set Walmart up for this opportunity in the first place: In August, President Donald Trump cited security concerns over TikTok being owned by the China-based company ByteDance when he signed an executive order that would essentially ban TikTok in the US unless it sold itself to US entities. Over the weekend, Trump said he would approve a deal that would set up a new entity, called TikTok Global, of which Walmart and the database software company Oracle would own a combined 20 percent. ByteDance investors — some of which are US-based firms — would own the rest for now. As of Monday morning, though, there was still confusion about whether the deal would result in TikTok Global being majority-owned by US businesses or China’s ByteDance instead, so Trump once again threatened to scuttle the deal if US firms did not in fact gain majority control. Assuming the deal gets done, Walmart says it will “provide our ecommerce, fulfillment, payments and other omnichannel services to TikTok Global.” The details on these arrangements are scarce, but the mentions of “e-commerce,” “fulfillment,” and “payments” indicate that Walmart could help TikTok incorporate shopping features into its app. That means TikTok users could buy merchandise created or promoted by their favorite TikTok artists without leaving the app, and TikTok could potentially use Walmart’s existing warehouse and “fulfillment” services to deliver the merchandise. Today, when an influencer or a consumer brand advertises a product on TikTok, users almost always have to click through to an external shopping website to make a purchase. Sure, Walmart could provide incentives for TikTok or its most popular creators to link to Walmart.com in those instances, but a deeper integration into the app could be the longer-term vision. Last month, for example, TikTok experimented for the first time with allowing a popular creator to sell goods through a pop-up page within the app. The Chinese version of TikTok, called Douyin, is an example of what Walmart and TikTok could do together. Douyin has a deeper e-commerce integration for shopping than TikTok currently does, including strength in live-streaming video commerce, which allows app users to watch live as their favorite personalities or brands show off new merchandise and then have an easy way to buy what they see. Such online shopping trends — a more interactive version of QVC for the digitally-savvy — are already popular in Asia. No US company, not even Amazon, has figured out how to make this idea mainstream in the states, but they’re trying. Amazon has dabbled in video commerce via its Twitch streaming service and on Amazon.com. But it’s early enough stateside that if that behavior does end up growing popular in the US, a TikTok relationship could help Walmart lead the way among retailers. Walmart’s recent statement also says the commercial agreements with TikTok would “grow our third-party marketplace, fulfillment and advertising businesses.” Like Amazon, Walmart allows outside merchants to sell goods through Walmart.com — on its “marketplace” — so that the retailer can offer Walmart.com visitors a larger variety of goods for sale than it can in its physical stores. The language in Walmart’s statement implies that Walmart might work out a deal so that some of those influencers or brands that sell goods through TikTok might also make those items for sale directly through Walmart through its marketplace. Walmart could also introduce features that let its existing marketplace merchants more easily advertise or sell their goods through TikTok. Today, the selection on Amazon’s third-party marketplace is much bigger than Walmart’s, but a TikTok-branded storefront, or a direct link for Walmart merchants to advertise through the video app, could help the retailer attract a new set of younger consumers that might otherwise look to Amazon or other e-commerce websites as their main shopping destination. The move wouldn't be to directly match Amazon’s sheer marketplace size, but to give TikTok users and/or Walmart marketplace merchants access to goods or customers that they can’t get anywhere else. To be clear, a potential Walmart investment and partnership with TikTok could still turn out to be a costly distraction for the retailer, and even for the app. Walmart’s leadership team is already busy with the launch of its Amazon Prime competitor Walmart+ in the US, which requires an expensive expansion of grocery delivery to combat Amazon and Instacart along the way, as well as a brutal and costly battle in India with Amazon (via Flipkart) for the future of one of the fastest-growing e-commerce markets in the world. And Walmart has to also deal with the day-to-day logistical complexities of handling the rapid growth in online shopping that the pandemic has spurred. There’s reason for healthy skepticism about whether the world’s largest brick-and-mortar retailer can execute on this lofty vision even if it gets the chance. But for once, Walmart seems to be looking past Amazon while making a big bet, instead of simply aiming for Jeff Bezos’s back. Help keep Vox free for all Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.
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Hillary Clinton vows to ‘tackle big subjects’ in new ‘You and Me Both’ podcast
With topics like grief, mental health and bouncing back, Hillary Clinton’s new podcast sounds like it could be a retelling of her last four years. The twice-failed Democratic presidential hopeful, whose podcast will be called “You and Me Both with Hillary Clinton,” promises to “tackle big subjects, like faith, leadership and food” on the show...
nypost.com
Beware of covid-19 vaccine trials designed to succeed from the start
Pharmaceutical companies seem to be rushing vaccine candidates to market. We can and should demand better.
washingtonpost.com
Five States Where Coronavirus Cases Are Rising Fastest
New infections were reported to have increased in Wisconsin, Utah, Tennessee, North Dakota and South Dakota in recent weeks.
newsweek.com
Video Shows Mountain Lion Stalking Kids in California Neighborhood
"I thought it was somebody's dog that had gotten into the yard, and I was like, 'Hey, get out of here!' Then it turned, and that's when I was like, 'Oh my God! It's a mountain lion!'" Timothy Kerrisk said.
newsweek.com
5-Year-Old Boy With Autism Says His Name for the First Time in This Heartwarming TikTok
Millions of TikTok users celebrated Micah's achievement.
newsweek.com
Who created Nirvana's famed smiley-face logo? A legal battle gets a new claimant
In Nirvana's copyright dispute with Marc Jacobs over its smiley-face logo, the band said Kurt Cobain created it. Now, their art director says he did.
latimes.com
Chinese tycoon who called Xi Jinping a 'clown' and ripped his coronavirus response gets 18-year sentence
A Chinese real estate mogul who once called President Xi Jinping a “clown” and criticized his government’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic was sentenced to 18 years in prison on corruption charges, a Beijing court announced Tuesday. 
foxnews.com
Egypt discovers 27 sarcophagi more than 2,500 years old
CAIRO – Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered 27 coffins at the ancient necropolis of Saqqara, a burial ground that is also home to one of the world’s oldest pyramids, the ministry of tourism and antiquities said. The wooden sarcophagi are ornately painted and covered in hieroglyphs and were found stacked in two burial shafts, the...
nypost.com
Health department chemist allegedly cooked up LSD for Air Force members
A Hawaii health department chemist was busted for cooking up LSD — which was then advertised on Snapchat and sold to active-duty Air Force members, prosecutors said. Trevor Keegan, who works for the state health department’s Disease Outbreak Control Division, was charged earlier this month on one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, the...
nypost.com
U.S. reimposes "public charge" wealth test for immigrants
Advocates have warned that the policy deters immigrant communities from accessing critical government assistance during the pandemic.
cbsnews.com
Epcot's annual food and wine festival still on at Walt Disney World, but on a much smaller scale due to COVID-19
Disney's annual celebration of all things food and drink may be smaller this year due to the coronavirus pandemic, but it still packs a lot of flavor       
usatoday.com
US coronavirus death toll passes 200,000
CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta remembers those who have died from coronavirus as the United States surpasses 200,000 coronavirus deaths.
edition.cnn.com
Cybersecurity experts: Requesting ballots by email is safe
A group of leading cybersecurity experts told an Ohio court that absentee ballot applications can be safely transmitted using email
abcnews.go.com
U.S. won't play or train during FIFA window in October because of COVID-19
The U.S. men's national soccer team will not conduct a training camp or play matches during the FIFA window in October because of continuing issues with COVID-19.
latimes.com
Nearly 50 Percent of Americans Say They Oppose McConnell's Decision to Vote on Trump's SCOTUS Nominee
In a statement issued on Monday, McConnell said that "President Trump's nominee for this vacancy will receive a vote on the floor of the Senate."
newsweek.com
Beta is the 9th storm to make landfall in the US this year, tying a century-old record
With Beta making landfall in Texas last night, it is now the ninth named storm to make landfall in 2020. This hurricane season now shares the record for the most landfalling named systems in the US in a single year with 1916.
edition.cnn.com
Spinning Back Clique: Colby Covington, Donald Cerrone, UFC 253 and more
Check out "Spinning Back Clique," which dives into Colby Covington, Donald Cerrone, UFC 253 and much more.        Related StoriesNiko Price wants to run things back with Donald Cerrone in a main eventAfter quitting his day job, UFC 253's Brandon Royval blessed to focus full time on fightingUFC 253 'Embedded,' No. 1: Leaving Las Vegas 
usatoday.com
As rich nations struggle, Africa’s coronavirus response is praised
JOHANNESBURG — At a lecture to peers this month, John Nkengasong showed images that once dogged Africa, with a magazine cover declaring it “The Hopeless Continent.” Then he quoted Ghana’s first president, Kwame Nkrumah: “It is clear that we must find an African solution to our problems, and that this can only be found in...
nypost.com
Watch live: Trump makes campaign swing through Pennsylvania
Polling shows former Vice President Joe Biden is leading President Trump slightly in the state.
cbsnews.com
David French and I debate polarization, secession, and the filibuster 
A crowd on New Yorkers gathers at Washington Square Park for a candlelight vigil and memorial to mourn the loss of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. | Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images How polarization is cracking America apart — and what to do about it David French is a senior editor at the Dispatch, a columnist at Time, and one of the conservative commentators I read most closely. French and I have rather different politics — he’s a Christian conservative from Tennessee, and I’m a secular liberal from California — but his upcoming book, Divided We Fall: America’s Secession Threat and How to Restore Our Nation, tracks some of the same problems I’ve been obsessing over for years: political polarization and the way it’s cracking America apart. But French goes further than I do: He fears not just governmental dysfunction and paralysis, but full-on secession and even civil war. He constructs two in-depth scenarios — one quite violent — by which America fractures into separate red and blue nations following secession, and argues the only viable solution is a supercharged form of federalism in which both sides accept that in a nation this polarized, America can only hang together if it permits different regions to govern apart. But is that an answer to our problems, or simply a form of submission to them? In important ways, French’s solution is the opposite of the path I tend to favor, and the result is a constructive debate about the nature of group polarization, the possibility of secession, the importance of the filibuster, what we can learn from James Madison, the virtues and vices of democracy, and the feedback loops of governance. There are, of course, no perfect answers here. But perhaps we can discover the least terrible solution on offer. (One note: This conversation was recorded shortly before Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death. But as you’ll hear, much of what we talk about is unnervingly relevant to the kind of political crisis, and particularly the questions of minoritarian versus majoritarian rule, that we’re now facing.) An excerpt from our conversation follows. The full conversation — which goes much deeper into our various solutions for this problem — can be heard on The Ezra Klein Show. Subscribe to The Ezra Klein Show wherever you listen to podcasts, including Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher. Ezra Klein You open the book with this really ominous line, “It’s time for Americans to wake up to a fundamental reality: the continued unity of the United States of America cannot be guaranteed.” Why not? David French The reason I say that is because, as you’ve written a lot about, we are not just drifting apart as a people — in many ways, we’re sprinting apart. And my simple proposition is you can’t do that indefinitely: you cannot continue to move apart indefinitely and stay together as a country. There’s not some sort of magic elixir that keeps America united. There has to be some sort of fundamental hared tolerance, some sort of shared regard for each other, some sort of shared sense of what this country is and should be. Ezra Klein You go in this book somewhere I didn’t go in my book: to the question of secession. And you believe that we are beginning to experience the conditions that would make secession from either a group of blue states or group of red states plausible. Why I should see secession as a real threat or possibility? David French What I did was look at two previous American secessions. One is the Revolutionary War, which was a secession from the British Empire. And then you had the Confederacy, a secession from the United States. There were some common strands there. One was this notion that you have a geographically contiguous area that has a shared, independent culture that it views as being under threat. With the Confederacy, what they viewed as under threat was the continued viability of slavery. But what was needed to really set the spark was not just a sense of our culture is under threat but our lives are under threat. So prior to the American Revolution, you had the British regulars quartering in people’s homes in Boston and marching out to raid the surrounding countryside. And there’s this really powerful part of Battle Cry of Freedom, the phenomenal single-volume history of the Civil War, that talks about how the South had whipped itself into a frenzy believing that it was in imminent danger and that abolitionists were trying to foment a genocidal kind of slave rebellion. So you had this sense of shared geography, shared culture, and a sense of mortal threat that together made the unthinkable thinkable. And my central proposition is there are many regions where you have the shared geography and the shared culture, but we don’t yet have the sense of mortal threat or the total loss of confidence in democracy. But you can [see it] emerging. That’s why I wrote the book: in part to say we just can’t assume everything’s going to be okay and continue to behave as we’re behaving when the way we’re behaving is making the unthinkable eventually thinkable. Ezra Klein I was struck by what kinds of secession scenarios you felt were plausible. They revolved around political violence and policies that are driven first by an effort to address violence. But when I worry about where we could go, I see something much more directly nearby, which is a legitimacy crisis. I see an election coming that has the possibility to end in a scenario where one side will not accept the legitimacy of the outcome and there’s not really going to be a way to resolve that. We don’t really have a way to resolve it now. We do if both parties act responsibly, but I have not found that the Republican Party has been all that responsible around reining in what their base wants recently. So my version of this is: What if we have an election where it looks on election night like Donald Trump won? Then the mail-in ballots slowly begin overturning that. But there’s an effort to disqualify a bunch of them. And then, soon enough, you have a situation where the two sides think they won and the other side disagrees. David French Yeah,if I had been writing the book starting in July or August of this year and was rushing it to print, my scenario would be a little bit different. Now, I don’t think that we are at the conditions where something like what I’m warning about in the book is imminent. So I think that even in the worst-case scenario of the current election, we would have potentially a constitutional crisis, but I’m not sure that we would have a constitutional crisis that severe. I don’t think that all of the conditions have moved to such a state that we could break apart in 2020. But I agree with you completely. Let’s take a scenario where we have this incredible polarization around mail-in ballots and you have Trump leading after Election Day on the counted ballots from people who voted in person. Then, as the mail-in vote is coming in, you’re noticing that an unacceptably high percentage of these mail-in ballots are being disqualified. We’re already seeing disturbing levels of disqualification in North Carolina, a swing state. You’re then creating a situation where there’s a very real fear that we may not ever know who was supposed to have won the state, and the people we trust the least in life are declaring the victor. And then let’s say the Supreme Court ratifies the result. He’s sworn in and he begins to behave in a punitive way toward some of his political opponents or in getting engaged in an increasing number of executive actions that are not even. There’s no even attempt to pass things through Congress. There would be enormous pressure on blue-state governors to reject the authority of that administration, which would then create more pressures. And what we’ve found, I think, is that we have very few people who are willing to take any risk at all to lower the temperature. People are willing to raise it; very few people are willing to lower it. And that’s, again, where I see that we’re in a dangerous situation — the last person on earth who’s willing to lower the temperature happens to be the most powerful person on earth, and that’s the president of the United States. Ezra Klein I want to talk about the 1960s because the point I make in my book is that a space of optimism for me is that in the ’60s, we had more political violence. We had more fundamental issues that were being fought over all at once. We also had more war. We had a draft. There’s a lot happening. And my fear is that we had a political system better able to find consensus then than we do now. So if you begin to have something more like the ’60s now, you can have a real crisis. I’d say in many ways, we have begun to have that — this has begun to feel more like ’68 than it did a couple of years ago. But you’ve a really interesting discussion in the book about why what happened in the ’60s didn’t lead to fracture. Can you talk through that? David French The short answer is that in the 1960s, you didn’t have the same kind of red and blue dynamic that you have today. Violence was scattered around the country. It was definitely more serious than it is now, but it was scattered. And you had the political conditions that existed for a strong majoritarian rejection of that violence. There’s a couple of things today that are quite different. One is this incredibly polarized geographic and political separation that we have where we don’t have that ability to engage in that huge majoritarian rejection. And, at the same time, we have a social media environment and news environment that amplifies every single violent incident that occurs. There might have been a mail bomb in Des Moines in 1968, and if you’re growing up in Kentucky, you would never hear of it. Now, if you’re politically active and somebody knocks a MAGA hat off a kid’s head at a Des Moines Burger King, you immediately know about it in Kentucky and are talking about how horrible and intolerant they are. So you have a very different geographic situation. You have a very different political polarization, and you have a very much greater ability to amplify each violent act and amplify public knowledge of each violent act. And it creates, in my view, more instability. David French’s book recommendations The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay Dune by Frank Herbert Help keep Vox free for all Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.
vox.com
George Biggs, a Tuskegee Airman recognized by Congress, dies at 95
George Washington Biggs, one of the last living Tuskegee Airmen from Arizona, died on Saturday at the age of 95, his daughter told The Arizona Republic.        
usatoday.com
DOJ announces largest drug, gun and cash seizure in darknet history
The Justice Department on Tuesday announced what it said was the largest drug, gun and cash seizure in darknet history.
abcnews.go.com
Uber Eats' new ad pits Luke Skywalker against Capt. Picard
Mark Hamill faces off against Patrick Stewart in a new commercial for Uber Eats. Since the pandemic, the food delivery service has grown larger than Uber's ride-hailing business.
edition.cnn.com
Michael Jordan, Denny Hamlin Form NASCAR Team With Bubba Wallace Behind The Wheel
"The timing seemed perfect as NASCAR is evolving and embracing social change more and more," says Michael Jordan, the basketball icon and majority owner of the Charlotte Hornets NBA franchise said.
npr.org
The media needs to do more to show real Americans' pain during the pandemic
"For some reason, I just can't get no help whatsoever," said Thea, a woman who called into C-SPAN last week. She described her economic pain and said she fears she will be living in her car soon.
edition.cnn.com
Researchers hypothesize coronavirus immunity from dengue exposure
A new study suggests a mosquito-borne illness called dengue may afford some immunity against coronavirus.
foxnews.com
‘GoT’ star Kit Harington is done playing ‘masculine’ hero roles
"It is not a masculine role that the world needs to see much more of," he said.
nypost.com
Why Trump can’t wait on the Supreme Court nomination until after the election
He's a quid quo professional.
washingtonpost.com
Boris Johnson: This is the moment when we must act
Faced with a surge in coronavirus cases, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced new measures to combat the virus in England, including restrictions - enforceable by the police - on how people can socialize. CNN's Scott McLean reports from Westminster.
edition.cnn.com
Flags planted in DC to mark grim virus milestone
Flags were planted in the grounds near the Washington Monument Tuesday to mark the grim milestone of 200,000 people dead from the coronavirus in the United States. (Sept. 22)       
usatoday.com
Donald Trump seems to think he has already won the Nobel Peace Prize
At a campaign rally in Ohio on Monday night, President Donald Trump went on an extended attack of the media for not adequately covering the fact that he has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.
edition.cnn.com
Elite firefighter identified as fatal victim of wildfire sparked by gender reveal party
The boss of an elite crew of firefighters has been identified as the fatal victim of a California blaze sparked by a gender-reveal party. Veteran US Forest Service worker Charles Morton — the head of a squad with a special federal firefighting force that swoops in to help stem US wildfires — died last week...
nypost.com
Who is Latasha Harlins? Netflix Doc Remembers Teen In 'A Love Song for Latasha'
The name Latasha Harlins has long been associated with the 1992 Los Angeles race riots after the 15-year-old was murdered in a store over a $1.79 bottle of orange juice.
newsweek.com