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Gioco legale, il settore chiede chiarezza sulla riapertura

Gioco legale, il settore chiede chiarezza sulla riapertura

Piazza del Popolo gremita per la protesta degli operatori del gioco legale. Oltre 15 associazioni e gruppi online per chiedere una data certa per la ripresa delle attività nel rispetto delle misure di sicurezza


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vox.com
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