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Le più affascinanti di Milano: le sciure (con talento) che hanno ispirato un blog

Le più affascinanti di Milano: le sciure (con talento) che hanno ispirato un blog

Mattia Boffi Valagussa ha ideato un blog e un profilo Instagram ispirato alle donne milanesi. Il segreto per essere una delle “affascinanti”? «Avere stile e soprattutto talento»


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Reddit Squashed QAnon by Accident
Two years ago, most Americans knew nothing about QAnon, the ever-growing, diffuse, and violent movement devoted to a loosely connected set of conspiracy theories, most of which tie back to the idea that Donald Trump is leading a holy war against a high-powered cabal of child traffickers, some of whom drink blood. But at the time, it was a massive problem on Reddit, where conspiracy-minded members of the Trump-themed subreddit r/The_Donald had long stoked theories such as Pizzagate, and where a QAnon subreddit called r/TheGreatAwakening had racked up 70,000 subscribers, some of whom posted hundreds of times..Last week, new polling showed that nearly half of Americans have now heard of QAnon. But on Reddit, the movement no longer has any meaningful presence.Reddit is where QAnon first went to attract a mass audience when it left the dark, unnavigable threads of 4chan, and Reddit is where it found a new group of people who were willing to spend hours a day doing “research” and analyzing “clues.” QAnon’s presence on Reddit ballooned throughout 2018. By August of that year, the 70,000 members of r/TheGreatAwakening had misidentified a mass shooter and doxxed an innocent person. They also started posting threats to murder Hillary Clinton, inspired, they said, by their rage over her superhuman ability to make military planes fall out of the sky.Today, the QAnon problem is everywhere. The New York Times speculated last week about whether Facebook “will be locked in an endless fight with QAnon,” as the platform’s latest and most dramatic efforts to slow the movement’s spread through groups with millions of members seem to be failing. Twitter is similarly struggling, despite a significant overhaul to its “coordinated harmful activity” policy that gives the company more latitude to slash-and-burn clusters of QAnon-related accounts. On Instagram, QAnon theories have been so thoroughly laundered and mainstreamed by wellness and lifestyle influencers, they’re almost impossible to separate from aestheticized “sponcon.” But on Reddit, new discussion threads don’t take off, and the major subreddits are gone.[Read: The women making conspiracy theories beautiful]In 2018, Reddit and Facebook both had QAnon-related groups with numbers in the tens of thousands. Yesterday morning, the most popular post about QAnon on my Reddit homepage was from r/conspiracy—a large and sometimes dicey community where truly anything goes, the wilder the theory the better. It read, “Q-ANON … i want to believe, but let’s be honest, it’s bullshit.” Reddit has plenty of problems, but QAnon isn’t one of them. Understanding why could be a valuable first step in dealing with the broader problem, one of the biggest and strangest that social-media companies have yet to face.Unfortunately, Reddit is not particularly good at explaining how it accomplished such a remarkable feat. Chris Slowe, Reddit’s chief technology officer and one of its earliest employees, told me, point-blank: “I don’t think we’ve had any focused effort to keep QAnon off the platform.”He suggested that Reddit users are more skeptical and discerning than other people online, making it difficult for conspiracy theories to gain traction on the platform. When I reminded him that the Pizzagate subreddit grew to 20,000 subscribers in its first 15 days, he conceded that November 2016 was a “dramatic period in history,” during which a number of communities took off with surprising speed. Reddit banned r/Pizzagate “pretty rapidly,” he added. This is true: r/Pizzagate was created in early November 2016 and was banned by Reddit the day before Thanksgiving. But to see that as a success story, you do sort of need to excise the chapter in which a man deluded by the online conspiracy community stormed into a pizza restaurant with an assault rifle 11 days later.[Read: Reddit is finally facing its legacy of racism]So here are the basic facts of what Reddit did to quell QAnon, whether it meant to or not: In March 2018, the site shut down the original QAnon subreddit, r/CBTS_stream, which had about 20,000 subscribers. It was banned for inciting violence and for sharing people’s personal information without their consent, a harassment tactic known as doxxing. In September 2018, r/TheGreatAwakening was banned as well, along with the 17 other major QAnon subreddits, for similar reasons. Only a handful of small and largely inactive communities were left behind, as was one oddly dedicated poster. The last remaining somewhat-Q-related and somewhat-significant subreddit, r/Pedogate, was banned last week.The most obvious—and least replicable—factor in Reddit’s success is its timing. Reddit’s QAnon problem started several years ago, before QAnon became as much a part of offline culture as it was a part of online culture. Reddit was able to isolate QAnon’s influence on its platform before the community grew too large to control. Now Facebook has to deal with QAnon as a full-fledged social movement. It reemerges on the site, over and over, because it has such life off the site, James Grimmelmann, a professor of digital and information law at Cornell Law School, told me. “It’s a problem on Facebook because it’s a problem in society,” he said. The mostly boring, basic facts of Reddit’s infrastructure play a role too, says Robyn Caplan, a platform-governance researcher and doctoral candidate at Rutgers University. Though conversations on Reddit are open to all users, they are somewhat siloed in that they have to occur in a specific subreddit. There are no viral retweets and no trending hashtags. “The subreddit structure,” Caplan told me, gives Reddit an advantage because “at least things are discrete and you can restrict and ban.” Twitter, which has to track and ban QAnon adherents one by one, on a decentralized platform where anyone can easily see anything that’s been publicly posted, has a much taller order.Though Reddit is sometimes criticized for its short list of rules, the company has in some respects given itself more enforcement latitude than the other big platforms. The most significant rule is a policy on ban evasion. Reddit prohibits not just individual users from trying to create new accounts and get back on the site after they’ve been kicked off, but also entire communities. If a subreddit is shut down, the same people can’t create a new subreddit discussing the same topic. So in effect, even though Reddit has never come out and said, “QAnon is against the rules,” once the major QAnon communities broke the rules, re-creating them became against policy. That’s not something Facebook has ever attempted, or that Twitter realistically could.[Read: Reddit is done pretending The Donald is fine]“When we ban a community, the first thing that happens is a bunch of copycats appear,” Slowe said. “It’s probably five minutes between us banning [The Great Awakening] and The Great Awakening 2 getting created.” Reddit quickly takes down such copycat groups, but more importantly, for several weeks after any major punitive action, Slowe’s team will monitor the site for more subtle attempts to regenerate toxic spaces, paying attention to who is creating new communities and who joins them. (Reddit has about 430 million active users, so some of this is automated. The company declined to provide more details about the monitoring process, citing security concerns.) When someone does start a suspiciously similar page, Reddit doesn’t have to wait for them to defy any policies against violence or doxxing or harassment. The new subreddit just gets removed for ban evasion on the spot.Reddit also has a powerful sitewide norm—what Slowe referred to as a “hard line”—against doxxing, a fundamental QAnon tenet. Because the site was founded as a place for pseudonymous and anonymous discussion, this is one of its core values. “The kinds of behaviors QAnon promotes are kinds of behavior that Reddit polices pretty closely,” Grimmelmann said. “Doxxing in particular is something that is a huge no for Reddit and is not as high up on the priority list for other platforms.”The tale of how Reddit squashed QAnon seems like it must hold a tangible lesson for the rest of the social web, but the internet is messier than that. The particularities of Reddit, its culture, and the timing of its QAnon purge cannot be replicated by other companies. QAnon has found fertile ground on even more mainstream sites than Reddit. It simply doesn’t need the platform anymore.[From the June 2020 issue: The prophecies of Q]Slowe summed up Reddit’s stance on QAnon as follows: “They can believe whatever crazy shit they want. But they started harassing users and doxxing them, so that’s something we banned.” Today, the concept of QAnon as a coherent and sanctionable group is almost quaint. QAnon is dangerous precisely because it isn’t hanging out in isolated subreddits, full of people who are committing obviously bannable offenses. Its hashtags are floating around otherwise-normal-looking Instagram posts. Its general philosophies—about the media covering up innumerable evils, the Democrats conspiring to harm children, a global cabal that wants you to suffer—are lacing your mom’s friend’s Facebook updates. Its supporters are retweeted by the president.Reddit’s approach may have kept QAnon out of one corner of the internet, but QAnon still spread into the real world. Now it's become irreversibly baked into American culture, that style of banning simply won’t do much good. It’s not too late to do something, but it’s too late to do something as simple as this.
theatlantic.com
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Troubled Blood sees J.K. Rowling at the mercy of all her worst impulses
J.K. Rowling at HBO’s Finding The Way Home world premiere at Hudson Yards on December 11, 2019, in New York City. | Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images In her latest detective novel, Rowling spends most of her time explaining why she’s mad at modern feminism. J.K. Rowling’s latest novel made headlines for generating controversy well before its US release date of September 29. That’s becauseTroubled Blood, the newest installment of the detective series Rowling publishes under the pen name Robert Galbraith, features a serial killer who lures his victims into a false sense of security by dressing as a woman. Fears of a bad man in a dress are one of the main justifications for anti-trans legislation across the globe. In the US and the UK over the past few years, that’s taken the form of the bathroom bill controversies: Trans people want to be able to use public restrooms and changing rooms that correspond to their gender identity. But opponents argue that if trans people were allowed to use the public bathrooms that corresponded to their gender identity, women and children will undoubtedly be menaced by sexual predators using this legal loophole to ogle women in their most vulnerable state. In practice, however, US states that have allowed trans people to use the facilities corresponding to their gender have seen no increase in sexual harassment or assault in public restrooms. Rowling, however, has stated that it is “the simple truth” that allowing trans women to use women’s bathrooms will lead to violent men using those loopholes to attack “natalgirls and women.” She began outlining her views on gender in a series of tweets last fall, then elaborated on them in a long essay published this June. There, Rowling perpetuated a series of outdated myths about trans people while repeatedly stating that she’s not transphobic, because she knows and likes trans people. She just also thinks that trans women aren’t real women, that they’re taking advantage of resources meant for “biological women,” and that they are enabling predatory men to commit violence against those “biological women.” To be clear, regardless of Rowling’s personal feelings toward trans people, all of the ideas she expressed in her essay are transphobic. They actively seek to take rights away from trans people, and they treat trans identity as something that is up for debate, rather than an intrinsic part of human beings who deserve to be treated with dignity. But Rowling has threatened to sue publications who describe her and her views as transphobic, forcing at least one children’s site to issue a public apology. So to some critics, Troubled Blood is just the latest sign of J.K. Rowling’s increasingly outspoken and retrograde ideas about gender. Others havecountered that the book contains no trans characters, that detractorswere judging the book without reading it, and that dismissing Troubled Blood before its publication over worries about a trope is cancel culture at its worst. What it would mean to cancel J.K. Rowling, a billionaire with theme park attractions built around her intellectual property, remains unclear. But in any case, Troubled Blood debuted at No. 1 in the UK. I’ve read all of Troubled Blood’smany pages, and I can say that this book is transphobic. But it’s also just not very good. What Troubled Blood is, above all else, is an example of Rowling at the mercy of all her worst impulses. Troubled Blood is the fifth volume in Rowling’s Cormoran Strike books, a series of noir-inflected murder mysteries. The name of the series comes from their protagonist, a grizzled army police officer-turned-private detective named Cormoran Strike, who solves crimes with his partner/obvious eventual love interest, Robin. The Cormoran Strike books have never been perfect, but they’re usually fun. The part of writing that Rowling is best at is constructing a mystery, so her whodunnits are always absorbing and twisty. And writing under a (masculine) pen name seems to grant Rowling freedom to be playful and flippant in a way she hasn’t been since the very first Harry Potter novels. (Rowling published the first volume in the Strike series, 2015’s The Cuckoo’s Calling, in genuine anonymity. She was unmasked a few months after the book came out, but she’s continued to use her Robert Galbraith pen name for all the books in the series that have followed.) But Troubled Blood is not fun, and it’s not playful. It feels bloated and resentful, turgid with an ethos of grim duty. It’s the writing of someone who feels she has no choice but to bring some home truths to you, the reader, and damn the consequences. Troubled Blood also reads like nothing so much as astylisticsequel to Rowling’s incredibly boring 2012 novel Casual Vacancy. Casual Vacancy was a dour class satire that seemed to be animated most strongly by Rowling’s desire to be taken seriously as an author of literary fiction for adults. Troubled Blood seems to be animated most strongly by Rowling’s desire to share her political opinions on feminism and other gender issues with the world. It features Strike and Robin setting out together to solve the disappearance of one Margot Bamborough, a feminist doctor who vanished from the world in 1974. The police strongly suspected that Margot was abducted by the serial killer Dennis Creed (the one who wears women’s clothes), but they were never able to solve the case. And now,40 years later, Margot’s daughter Anna — a lesbian, Rowling notes with an air of triumph, as if to say, see, she’s not homophobic — has hired Strike and Robin to try to bring her closure on the mystery once and for all. Over the course of the year-long investigation that ensues, Strike and Robin manage to establish the following: Fourth-wave feminism, with its Slut Walks and pro-porn stance, is nothing but a bunch of idiotic children having airy, academic discussions about words, while enabling the sexual assault of women and the sex trafficking of children. In contrast, Margot’s brand of ’70s second-wave feminism was correct and righteous, except for its lamentable pro-choice stance. (All sympathetic characters in Troubled Blood, except for poor misguided Margot, are pro-contraception but anti-abortion.) Moreover, women are all bound together by their biological destiny, which leaves them in danger of being victimized by predatory men. And the most dangerous predator of all is the predator who cloaks themselves in femininity. This final category of dangerous predators includes Creed the serial killer, who is obsessed with women’s clothing. Creed wears a wig and a women’s coat and lipstick to abduct his victims, because his disguisemakes the drunk women he targets perceive him first as another woman and then as a harmless drag queen. But his interest in cross-dressing isn’t purely utilitarian. He also steals trophy garments from his victims and masturbates into them. “I felt I stole something of their essence from them,” says Creed of his penchant for taking women’s underwear, “taking that which they thought private and hidden.” (Per Rowling’s Galbraith website, Creed is loosely based on two real serial killers. Per the Guardian, both of them stole women’s clothes from their victims, and one of the two may have worn them, although the evidence there seems to be fuzzy.) But there are other predators besides Creed in this most dangerous category of deceptive femininity, and one of them manages to fool Strike. “Like the women who’d climbed willingly into Dennis Creed’s van,” Strike muses of this villain at the end of Troubled Blood, “he’d been hoodwinked by a careful performance of femininity.” This particular predator who manages to best Strike is cis. But within the world of Troubled Blood, it’s this predator’s cold-blooded and inauthentic performance of femininity that makes them monstrous. And in her nonfiction writing, Rowling has strongly suggested that she believes trans women are cold-bloodedly performing a gender identity that does not truly belong to them, and that, in the process, they are stealing away resources that exist to help what Rowling calls “biological women” cope with the world’s misogyny. In Troubled Blood, the overt performance of gender is done with an eye to deceive, to misdirect, to harm. Cis women may experiment with their femininity — there’s a recurring motif that sees Robin test driving different perfumes as she decides what kind of woman she wants to be in the wake of her divorce — but men who take an interest in femininity are dismissed even by open-minded Robin as “camp.” Meanwhile, the good gay man who Robin lives with is clean-cut enough to get an acting job playing a straight army vet. Anna the good lesbian is non-threateningly feminine, by which Rowling usually means pretty. (When Rowling writes a woman in touch with her masculine side, the result tends to look like Harry Potter’s wicked Aunt Marge.) And anyone in this book who wields their gender across boundaries with deliberate intent is a monster. All of these political ideas are what Troubled Blood is, broadly speaking, “about:” They are where the narrative tension lies, where the juice of the book is. But Troubled Blood is also ostensibly a murder mystery, and the murder plot provides the skeleton from which the political ideas are hung. So is it a good murdermystery? Not really. It is way, way, way too fucking long. Rowling’s always had a tendency to go long and sprawling whenever the pressure is on. The Harry Potter books turned into doorstoppers with Goblet of Fire, right at the time they’d become such a phenomenon that the midnight release parties were starting. And Troubled Blood, which comes just as Rowling is beginning to speak more and more publicly about her views on gender, is even longer than they are, clocking in at a hefty 927 pages long, and with the plot stretchedout across a full year. Within that year, Strike and Robin sift their way through innumerable red herrings. Ordinarily, this is a part of plotting at which Rowling excels; she’s very good at flashy authorial sleight of hand, directing the reader’s attention this way while she seeds the information that will turn out to be vital just where you’re not looking. But in this case, the red herrings pile on so heavily and for so long that they begin to feel meaningless. There’s no pleasure to be had in trying to sort through them to figure out what’s worth paying attention to and what can be discarded, because there’s just more information than any reader could possibly hold on to. I began to feel unpleasantly reminded of that part of Deathly Hallows that turns into a long, sad, pointless camping trip where nothing happens: Are we really just checking every random tree in this forest for clues? That’s how we’re going to solve this one? But in a way, the plotting in Troubled Blood is even less satisfying than it is in Deathly Hallows and its fellows. While the second half of the Harry Potter series is bloated, there’s still pleasure to be had in those books from all the genre-blending Rowling is doing. When the mystery fails, the fun of the magic and the friendships and the boarding school coziness can take over. Maybe you don’t particularly care about where Voldemort’s Horcruxes are, but there’s still magical camping and teen angst and wizarding revolutionary radiosto be had, right? Maybe you’re getting distracted by the frankly wild ethics of the house-elves and their slavery, but boy, that Marauder’s Map sure is a blast, right? In Troubled Blood, when the mystery falters and you aren’t taken by the political ideas animating it, what’s left for you to care about is the long slow-burn romance between Robin and Strike. And I do more or less want Robin and Strike to be together, in the same way I sort of vaguely wanted Ron and Hermione to be together but never particularly bothered too much over it either way. But I definitely don’t care about them one-thousand-pages-of-refusing-to-talk-about-feelings much. At this point, with both of them single and both of them gazing endlessly at each other, what is even keeping them apart anymore? It’s exhausting just to contemplate. There’s a plotline in the Cormoran Strike books that I’ve been thinking about ever since Rowling first began to talk about trans issues in public. Other critics have already discussed the way she treated trans women in the second volume of the series, The Silk Worm. In that book, the two trans women Strike meets in the course of his investigation are ostensibly sympathetic characters, but Strike treats them as mockable. When one of them isn’t forthcoming with the information he wants, he casually threatens her with prison rape. But what’s been haunting me is a subplot from the series’s third volume, Career of Evil. In Career of Evil, Strike’s investigation leads him to a subculture built around people who want to become physically disabled. On hidden forums, they discuss the operations they plan to get in order to manifest the disabilities they believe they already spiritually possess, and they complain bitterly that the rest of the world doesn’t understand their plight. Does anyone think they would choose to live like this, with such inaccessible and easily mocked desires? Don’t people understand that they were born with these wishes, that these desires are an intrinsic part of their identity? Strike, who lost a leg in the war, takes this group’s obsession personally. He is incensed and offended by them. How dare they try to playact at an identity which became his so painfully, at such great cost? How dare they try to appropriate his own personal, private pain? He has lunch with two people from the forum, and they rudely force him to pay while ordering the most expensive options on the menu. One of them is in a wheelchair. Strike at last loses his patience and pushes her out of the chair, only to find that she can walk just fine without it. I don’t know what’s going on in J.K. Rowling’s mind or how she sees the world. But she writes about trans people the way Strike thinks about this particular subculture: as people appropriating a disability — and Rowling does write about womanhood, and its attendant dangers, as if it were a disability — that is rightfully hers. And that idea is becoming more and more central to every book she writes. I don’t know what to do with J.K. Rowling anymore. I don’t know what anyone should do with her and her books. I don’t believe that it’s sustainable or valuable or even really possible to ask every author you follow to enact some sort of ideologically pure, progressive worldview in every book they write. Most readers, I think, would agree with me on that. That’s part of why so many readers stuck with Rowling despite the politics embedded in the subtext of the Harry Potter novels, which have always been centrist at best, and through the increasing crankiness of the Cormoran Strike series. I don’t think that you have to throw away the Harry Potter series to prove you’re a good person. I don’t know if it’s even possible to avoid those books: They’re so embedded into the grid of pop culture by this point that they feel like a utility, like an electric company. How do you avoid electricity every single day without becoming a hermit? How do you choose to throw out a series you grew up on, that you built beloved childhood memories around? Every reader has to have their own dividing line between what they are willing to work with and what they are not. Every reader has to choose the way they will approach a text, and what they’re going to take out of it and what they’ll leave behind. And that’s a choice you have to make for yourself. I’ve written positively about the Cormoran Strike books before, despite what happened to the trans women in book two and that bizarre trans-disability subplot in book three, and despite that ongoing thing where Rowling always treats fat people as inherently grotesque and probably evil. I thought the mysteries were fun, and I found it easy to ignore the politics. That was a choice I was used to making after growing up on Harry Potter, and because I am a thin cis non-disabled woman, it was easy for me to make that choice without thinking too hard about it. But I can’t ignore the politics of Troubled Blood, and I don’t think that’s just because of all of the essays and tweets Rowling’s written over the past year. I think that’s because the politics are the only part of Troubled Blood she really cares about, and that shows in the writing. So here is what I do know. Troubled Blood is a book in which aesthetics have been rendered subordinate to politics. There is no “there” there besides Rowling’s political ideas. And those ideas are reactionary and hateful. I don’t see anything left in this book worth sticking around for.
vox.com
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usatoday.com
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usatoday.com
More Than 90 Percent of Americans Still Susceptible to Coronavirus, CDC Director Warns
Dr. Robert Redfield joined other top health officials in testifying in front of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions to discuss federal response to the coronavirus pandemic.
newsweek.com
Photos: Remembering the Life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Charles Dharapak / AP The passing of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being marked across America, as, today, she lies in repose on the Lincoln catafalque in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. Ginsburg died at her home in Washington, D.C., on September 18, at the age of 87, after a long battle with cancer. She was the 107th Supreme Court justice, and the second woman to serve on the high court. In her years on the court, she became an influential icon to many. Chief Justice John Roberts called her “a jurist of historic stature.” Ginsburg will lie in repose at the Supreme Court today and Thursday, then will be taken to the U.S. Capitol on Friday, where she will lie in state, becoming the first woman so honored. Collected below are images from her life, and from the memorials in recent days.
theatlantic.com
McDonald's all-day breakfast menu may be gone for good 
Customers plead for McDonald's to bring back its all-day breakfast menu, but some franchisees are reluctant.
foxnews.com
Dr. Fauci to Sen. Paul: You are not listening to what the CDC director said
Dr. Anthony Fauci responds to Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) after the senator accuses him of contributing to an economic lockdown due to Fauci's coronavirus mitigation recommendations.
edition.cnn.com
Jussie Smollett demands court dismiss 2nd wave of charges against him
Jussie Smollett is once again asking that the charges against him be dismissed in a Chicago court, arguing that the grand jury testimony used in his second indictment is invalid. 
foxnews.com
Bobcat fire investigation includes Southern California Edison equipment
The U.S. Forest Service is investigating a piece of the utility's equipment that reported an incident about the time the Bobcat fire started near Cogswell Dam.
latimes.com
Senate report links Hunter Biden to ‘prostitution or human trafficking ring’
Hunter Biden sent “thousands of dollars” to people who appear to be involved in the sex industry, according to a report released Wednesday by Republicans in the US Senate. The report says unspecified records show that Biden “has sent funds to non-resident alien women in the United States who are citizens of Russia and Ukraine...
nypost.com
This corgi’s trick shots are a slam dunk
This corgi took quarantine improvement to the next level. Using the energy she would normally get from socializing with other dogs, owner Denny Ku has been using lockdown to train his corgi, Lilo, to make basketball trick shots. The 5-year-old Pembroke Welsh corgi can now make baskets from seemingly anywhere, even with a moving target.
nypost.com
FDA boss, Dr. Fauci assure public that COVID-19 vaccines will be safe
Stephen Hahn, whose agency would approve a vaccine, and Fauci told a Senate committee they would take a vaccine themselves.
nypost.com
US experts get grilled on Trump's virus response
edition.cnn.com
Keira Knightley protests a beauty pageant in 1970-set 'Misbehaviour'
Keira Knightley, Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Greg Kinnear star in the dramedy 'Misbehaviour,' about London feminists who disrupt the 1970 Miss World pageant.        
usatoday.com
Cody Bellinger’s model girlfriend shares snap of Dodgers star in bed
Chase Carter is giving fans a close-up encounter of the Cody Bellinger kind.
nypost.com
Tokyo Game Show 2020: Schedule and How to Watch Online
Capcom, Square Enix and more companies are bringing some of their most anticipated titles to TGS 2020.
newsweek.com
Kelly Dodd and Rick Leventhal get marriage license
It's almost time to say "I do."
nypost.com
Grizzly bear fatally mauls hunter in Alaska state park
The victim was in Alaska’s Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve during a 10-day moose hunting trip on Sunday when the bear attacked.
foxnews.com
'Most' Americans likely vulnerable to coronavirus infection, CDC director says
Most Americans likely remain vulnerable to coronavirus infection and its associated outcomes, per comments from a top official at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
foxnews.com