UK - The Huffington Post
UK - The Huffington Post
Diver Finds Precious Wedding Ring Lost In Lake... The Morning After
A bride has said she is “over the moon” after a diver found her husband’s wedding ring when he lost it in a lake on the day they got married.Newlywed Annabelle Balchin, 22, described the moment Lake District Divers volunteer Angus Hosking retrieved the white-gold ring which is engraved with the couple’s initials from Lake Windermere in Cumbria.The customer services advisor got married to Mick Balchin, 30, a canal boat builder, at Town Head Estate in Windermere on Thursday. During the heatwave that day, they took a dip in the lake from a private jetty on the estate along with their wedding guests.Calling from her honeymoon in Wales, Annabelle Balchin said: “On Thursday it was 33°C, so us and all our guests decided to go for a dip in the evening. We were all jumping in off the jetty and my husband didn’t take his wedding ring off.“When he was jumping in, it slid right off – he felt it slide off when he jumped off the jetty.”The couple called Lake District Divers the next morning, and were “relieved” when Hosking retrieved the ring “within minutes”.“Within five minutes of them being in the water, they found it. We were absolutely over the moon,” Balchin, from Sedbergh, Cumbria, said.“We tried not to panic too much, but it cost us quite a bit of money, we had it engraved, and it’s the sentimental value that came with it.“We had just said our vows and just exchanged rings so we were literally just panicking so it was a massive relief.”Balchin said they offered Hosking payment but he would only take a donation to a gofundme account as a gesture of thanks.Related...The Wedding Rules You Need To Know From June 21The 9 Most Common Reasons A Marriage Struggles In The First Year21 Tweets From People Living Their Best 'Main Character' LifeHow To Extend The Life Of Your Fancy Flowers
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Stormzy's Nephew Can't Believe His Eyes As He Meets His Uncle's Waxwork In Adorable Video
Stormzy’s nephew couldn’t get over his uncle’s waxwork as he was introduced to his the Madame Tussauds figure for the first time in an adorable video.The grime star is being immortalised in wax for the London tourist attraction and has spent the last year attending a number of sittings with artists to have hundreds of precise measurements and reference photographs taken. A video of Stormzy seeing the nearly-finished product for the first time has now been shared, and it features the sweet moment his young nephew also sets eyes on it. “Uncle Junior is not moving,” he says.Stormzy then appears from behind a wall and the little boy exclaims: “Hey you scared me! Hey look, you’ve got two Uncle Juniors!”Stormzy, can also be seen on FaceTime with his mother, showing off the likeness.When Stormzy met... Stormzy ? Coming to Madame Tussauds London this summer ? pic.twitter.com/0yInTBPpcM— Madame Tussauds London (@MadameTussauds) July 26, 2021The Vosi Bop star will continue to work with Madame Tussauds on putting the finishing touches to the waxwork before it is officially unveiled to the public and goes on display later this summer.Stormzy said: “I’m proud, and I hope, when my fans see my figure, they feel proud too.“I was told Madame Tussauds London wanted to make a figure of me just after I performed at Glastonbury, and it really felt like the icing on top of the cake.“Growing up, going to school, we’d go to Madame Tussauds London all the time.“For me to be there, it feels like, flipping heck, I’m going up in the world.”READ MORE:Stormzy Joins Jubilant Football Fans Celebrating England's Euros Win And We Love To See ItStormzy's Foundation Donates £500k To Fund Students From Under-Resourced And Under-Represented CommunitiesStormzy Surprises Fan By Redecorating His Bedroom In Heartwarming Video
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Met Police Investigate After Anti-Vaxxer Compares NHS Doctors And Nurses To Nazis
The Metropolitan Police are investigating after an anti-vaxxer used a rally in Trafalgar Square to talk about doctors and nurses being “hung” like Nazis.Both Boris Johnson and Labour’s Keir Starmer condemned the remarks by former nurse Kate Shemirani used the protest to ask for details of NHS staff to be collected and sent to her.The rant by Shemirani, who has built a social media following for her anti-lockdown and anti-vaxx views, was referred to the police by London Mayor Sadiq Khan.In her speech to the crowd, she referred to the Nuremberg Trials, which took place after World War Two to prosecute prominent members of the Nazi regime for their role in the Holocaust and other war crimes.“At the Nuremberg Trials, the doctors and nurses stood trial and they hung,” Shemirani said.“If you are a doctor or a nurse, now is the time to get off that bus. Get off it and stand with us, the people, all around the world they are rising.”A spokesperson for the Met Police told HuffPost UK: “We are aware of video circulating online showing a speech that occurred during a rally in Trafalgar Square.“Officers are carrying out enquiries to establish whether any offences have been committed. No arrests have been made.”Shemirani was struck off as a nurse for spreading misinformation about Covid-19.Dear @SadiqKhanSeveral of us are keen to report the individual in this video to the Prevent Radical Extremism programme. Might you direct us to the appropriate local contact for Trafalgar Square? https://t.co/4jIfGLqafV— Trisha Greenhalgh (@trishgreenhalgh) July 24, 2021This is utterly appalling, and I have raised it directly with the Met Police. Our NHS staff are the heroes of this pandemic and Londoners from across this city roundly reject this hate.— Sadiq Khan (@SadiqKhan) July 24, 2021Earlier, a spokesperson for the PM said that the issue was a matter for the police and prosecutors but said: “The prime minister absolutely condemns those comments.“Doctors and nurses have done a truly heroic job throughout this pandemic and continue to do so. Any violence, threats or intimidation is completely unacceptable.”When asked by LBC whether the remarks constituted a crime, Starmer, a former director of public prosecutions, said: “Yeah.“I do hope it’s going to be investigated and dealt with appropriately, but it was absolutely shocking.“And some of the things that are said and done, in the names of some of these protests, I think are an affront to all of us that believe in everything the NHS and the frontline are doing.“The Royal College of Nursing said the incident was “reprehensible and could put nursing staff at risk”.Many NHS staff have been alarmed by the footage circulated online, and the Mayor of London tweeted that the incident was “utterly appalling”Shemirani was suspended from practising as a nurse by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) in May this year, and struck off in June.The NMC said she had “been using her status as a registered nurse as a way of promoting her own distorted version of the truth” and risked “putting the public at a significant risk of harm during a pandemic”.In an interview with BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Shemirani’s son Sebastian said that the authorities had to take action on the incident."My mum is definitely beyond help... It's impossible to talk to somebody when they've got that level of God complex"Sebastian Shemirani. His mother is former nurse Kate Shemarani whose speech at a protest event has been condemned by nursing leadershttps://t.co/PvfwQrUZrzpic.twitter.com/bUSAqEECnL— BBC Radio 4 Today (@BBCr4today) July 26, 2021Sebastian, who said he no longer has a relationship with his mother because of her beliefs in conspiracy theories, said she had mental health issues and “a God complex”.“My mum is definitely beyond help... It’s impossible to talk to somebody when they’ve got that level of God complex.
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Gary Lineker Speaks For All Of Us After Piers Morgan Claims ‘No One Cares’ About The Tokyo Olympics
We know Piers Morgan has just had Covid, but does he really have to be such a Debbie Downer about the Olympics?Gary Lineker certainly doesn’t think so.The former professional footballer and BBC Sport presenter defended the Tokyo Games after Piers claimed that “nobody cares” about them.On Sunday, the former Good Morning Britain presenter tweeted: “Nobody cares about these Covid-ravaged Olympics.“I feel incredibly sorry for all the athletes still trying to live their Olympic dream, but that is the harsh reality. And the great champions like @adam_peaty know it.“It should have been either further postponed or cancelled.”Nobody cares about these covid-ravaged Olympics. I feel incredibly sorry for all the athletes still trying to live their Olympic dream, but that is the harsh reality. And the great champions like @adam_peaty know it. It should have been either further postponed or cancelled.— Piers Morgan (@piersmorgan) July 25, 2021But Gary wasn’t having any of it, telling Piers “you’re wrong”.“You’re wrong on this one,” Gary replied on Twitter. “It’s exhilarating, uplifting and inspiring.“Exactly what’s needed in these most depressing of times.”You’re wrong on this one. It’s exhilarating, uplifting and inspiring. Exactly what’s needed in these most depressing of times. https://t.co/Rv8nc3PyFn— Gary Lineker
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Tokyo Olympics: Why There’s Less Coverage On The BBC This Year
If you’ve been feeling like there’s much less Olympics coverage on the BBC than previous years, you are not alone – many others have been voicing their disappointment at the broadcaster’s scaled-down coverage of Tokyo 2020 on social media. However, there’s actually an explanation as to why the BBC hasn’t been able to cover the games as extensively as they have in the past, and it’s all to do with rights rather than editorial decisions. You might not have realised but a £920m deal struck between Olympic bosses and Discovery back in 2016 meant that the BBC lost its exclusive rights to air future games.The American TV giant now has the European television rights to show 445 hours of live action from Tokyo on their Eurosport subscription channels and streaming service Discovery+. As part of the deal, Discovery was required to make some of the coverage available on a free-to-air channel, with the BBC sub-licensing the rights from them here in the UK. This means that the BBC can only air one live event on one of its channels and one live event on the red button at any one time, as well as edited highlights. In previous years – such as for the 2012 London Games and the 2016 Rio event – sports fans had been able to enjoy comprehensive coverage for free on the BBC, with various livestreams of different events. Explaining the changes, a BBC spokesperson said: “The BBC is no longer able to offer livestreams of every sport during the Olympics due to the terms of the licensing arrangements laid down by the rights holder, Discovery.”BBC Olympics presenter Dan Walker also responded to some viewer complaints on Twitter, writing: “I know we’ve got used to being able to see every sport – on various streams – at the Olympics but, this time, the BBC is only allowed to show two sports at the same time. It is an issue about TV rights and not an editorial choice.”Thanks for watching this morning.I know we’ve got used to being able to see every sport - on various streams - at the #Olympics but, this time, the BBC is only allowed to show 2 sports at the same time.It is an issue about TV rights & not an editorial choice.— Dan Walker (@mrdanwalker) July 24, 2021So how can I watch more Olympics coverage?If the BBC’s coverage is leaving you wanting more, you can subscribe to Discovery’s streaming service Discovery+, but it’s going to cost you. It is available for £6.99 a month, although there is also a free three-day trial available, but only if you sign up to their yearly subscription, which is priced at £29.99 per year.You can also watch Olympic coverage on Eurosport, which is available as part of the Sky News & Events Pack and the Virgin Media ‘L’ package. BT TV customers with either the Big Sport or VIP package will be able to watch Eurosport.Those with Amazon Prime are also able to add on a £6.99 per month subscription for Eurosport to their membership.MORE OLYMPICS:The Moment Tom Daley And Matty Lee Discover They’ve Won The Diving Is TV (And Olympic) GoldThe Funniest Tweets From The Opening Weekend Of The Tokyo OlympicsNot Sure Where To Start With Tokyo Olympics? Here's Team GB's Key Events And Ones To Watch
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Tom Daley Sends Inspiring Message To LGBTQ+ Community After Olympic Gold Win
Tom Daley has sent an inspiring message to the LGBTQ+ community after his Olympic gold medal win. The British diver and his competition partner Matty Lee triumphed in the men’s synchronised 10-metre diving event at the Tokyo games on Monday.After four Olympics and two previous bronze medals, it marked 27-year-old Tom’s first gold at the games. Speaking during a press conference after his and Matty’s win, Tom said he felt empowered to say he was a gay man who is now an Olympic champion. “I feel incredibly proud to say I am a gay man and also an Olympic champion.” Gold medal winner Tom Daley says he hopes his performance will inspire young LGBT people to realise “you can achieve anything”. Read more: https://t.co/9b5sr5kcZepic.twitter.com/XCFyZR5S7A— LBC (@LBC) July 26, 2021Addressing the fact the 2020 event features more openly LGBTQ+ athletes than any other previous games, Tom said: “I came out in December 2013 and when I was younger, I always felt like the one who was alone and different and didn’t fit in and there was something about me that was never going to be as good as society wanted me to be.“I hope that any young LGBT person out there can see that no matter how alone you feel right now, you are not alone and that you can achieve anything. There is a whole lot of your chosen family out here ready to support you.”He continued: “I am incredibly proud to say that I am a gay man and also an Olympic champion. I feel very empowered by that.“When I was younger, I thought I was never going to be anything or achieve anything because of who I was and to be an Olympic champion now shows that you can achieve anything.”Tom’s words were hailed as inspirational and powerful as people shared his comments on social media...Absolute inspiration to so many. Well said and well played @TomDaley1994
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
The Funniest Tweets From The Opening Weekend Of The Tokyo Olympics
We might only be a few days in, but the 2020 Tokyo Olympics have already served up plenty of truly memorable moments.From a certain Australian swimming coach getting just a little excited and a frankly terrifying basketball robot.Twitter, as ever, had a lot of thoughts...Tom Daley finally got his gold medal, much to the delight of this fanI’m a big fan of the #Olympics
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
UK Covid Cases Are Down And 2 Things Explain The Dip
Covid cases are consistently falling for the first time since February – but we’re not home and dry just yet. A total of 29,173 cases were reported by the government on Sunday, down from the 48,161 recorded a week ago on July 18. It is the fifth day in a row that the number of daily reported cases has dropped, with average daily cases down 15% week on week. The last time cases fell for five consecutive days was between February 5 and 9. Minsters have been quick to applaud the UK’s swift vaccination programme in limiting the spread of coronavirus. The vaccine programme is indeed largely to thank – and getting a vaccine remains the best way to protect yourself and others from the virus – but it doesn’t tell the whole story. Paul Hunter, a professor in medicine specialising in infectious diseases at University of East Anglia, says some case reductions could simply be the result of school closures for the summer holidays – and the fact that children are no longer being tested as regularly.  It’s also still “too early” for the data to reflect the impact of the July 19 relaxation of lockdown, he says. “I would caution that this may just be a temporary slowing in reports before we start to see a return to exponential growth towards the end of [this] week as a result of the ending of restrictions last week,” he says. “We will start to have some idea towards the end of the week, but it won’t be until August 9 (three weeks after ‘Freedom Day’ before we know for certain.”Children are suddenly not mixing in the same way and we are yet to see the impact the summer holidays have on transmission, says Dr Simon Clarke, associate professor in cellular microbiology at the University of Reading, who warns that “any good news about lower cases as schools close can expect to be reversed come September”.“It remains the case that mixing of people will remain the most significant driver of infection numbers, while vaccinations will have the largest effect to reduce those numbers,” he adds. “Of course, the vaccines are not 100% effective at reducing transmission, and the virus cannot spread at all without social interactions, so ongoing care needs to be taken while numbers are still high.”There is some good news, though, particularly in relation to the Delta variant. While cases may increase as a result of the July 19 unlocking, Professor Hunter is hopeful a spike may be temporary. “If you look at the course of the Delta epidemic from early May it was clear that the rate of increase in cases was already slowing by June. But there was a significant acceleration in new cases about eight to 10 days after the first England game in the Euros,” he explains.“There was also a subsequent acceleration around the same time after the quarter finals. But after both events, the increase started slowing fairly soon after that despite the fact that the games were continuing. Also, in Scotland case numbers started to fall about 11 days after they left the Championships and case numbers have continued to fall since.“If such a perturbation as the Euros caused only a temporary acceleration in the increase in case numbers, despite games continuing, this may bode well for the impact of July 19. It could suggest we will see only a short-term boost towards the end of next week followed by slowing or even a decline in the days following. Time will tell.” READ MORE:Just Because Vaccinated People Are Getting Covid Doesn't Mean The Jabs Don't WorkThis Is The Optimum Gap To Leave Between Your Two Pfizer JabsHow To Bring Forward Your Second VaccinationHow To Ask Someone To Wear A Face Mask If You're Feeling Anxious
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Dieter Brummer, Home And Away Actor, Dies Aged 45
Australian actor Dieter Brummer has died at the age of 45. He was best known for playing Shane Parrish on Home And Away between 1991 and 1996. In a statement (via BBC News), Dieter’s family confirmed he died on Saturday morning.“On behalf of my family, I post this today with a heavy heart. We lost our handsome, talented, funny, complicated and beloved Dieter on Saturday morning.“He has left a massive hole in our lives and our world will never be the same. Our thoughts go out to all of you who knew him, loved him, or worked with him over the years. We appreciate you respecting our privacy at this terrible time.”A spokesperson for New South Wales Police told News.com.au that his death is not being treated as suspicious. Those at Home And Away said they were “deeply saddened” by Dieter’s death. A post on the show’s official Instagram page read: “Dieter was a much-loved Home and Away cast member and celebrated by Australian and international audiences. “We send our sincere condolences to Dieter’s family and friends during this very difficult time.” View this post on InstagramA post shared by Home and Away (@homeandaway)Dieter rose to fame when he joined the cast of Home And Away at the age of 15. His character, Shane, became part of one of the soap opera’s greatest ever love stories thanks to his romance with Angel Brooks, who was played by Melissa George. The role won Dieter two Logie Awards for Most Popular Actor in 1995 and 1996.He was written out of the Home And Away in 1996 when Shane died from septicaemia during a headland walk with Angel. In 2011, Dieter went on to join rival soap Neighbours, playing Troy Miller, who was the biological father of Toadie and Sonya Rebecchi’s son Callum Jones. The soap also paid tribute to Dieter on Twitter, writing: “Dieter Brummer, joined the Neighbours alumni in 2012 as Capt. Troy Miller.“Our thoughts are with his family and friends.”Vale Dieter Brummer, joined the Neighbours alumni in 2012 as Capt. Troy Miller. Our thoughts are with his family and friends.
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Students Face Ban From Lectures And Halls Of Residence Unless Double-Jabbed
Students could be required to be double-jabbed in order to attend university lectures in person and live in halls of residence, an education minister has signalled.Boris Johnson, who is reportedly “raging” at the low levels of vaccine uptake among the under-30s, is said to have floated the university plan in private meetings last week.When asked about the Times’ report, children’s minister Vicky Ford repeatedly refused to rule out the idea of making access to key student facilities conditional on a full vaccination record.Ford told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “So obviously, I can’t comment on things that haven’t been announced. But one does need to look at every practicality to make sure that we can get students back safely and make sure that we can continue to prioritise education.”She then told Times Radio: “We don’t want to go back to a situation where large parts of education were closed to many young people and children, and a key part of doing that is having that double-vaccinated population.“So I think we need to continue to encourage our young people to step forward, have the vaccination, and that is the way that they can have that freedom and confidence that they’ll be able to have that full university life.”Students have protested throughout the pandemic that they are being forced to pay tuition fees in return for online lectures, disrupted stays in accommodation and drastically reduced social contact.HuffPost UK understands that ministers have become alarmed in recent weeks at the levelling off of vaccine uptake among younger people. Although over-50s have take up rates of more than 80%, in the under-30 age group the rates are between 55% to 63%.Johnson announced last week a plan to make full vaccination a requirement for entry to nightclubs from the end of September, a timetable that also appears aimed at universities’ “freshers weeks”, when students socialise.However, the “i” newspaper reported a concern that some 17-year-olds heading to university, but eligible for jabs, are not yet allowed access to the NHS Covid Pass on their smartphones.The Times reported that the prime minister made the university suggestion, subject to medical exemptions, during a virtual meeting from his isolation at Chequers.But Robert Halfon, Conservative MP and chairman of the education select committee, told the newspaper: “This is wrong-headed.“It’s like something out of Huxley’s Brave New World where people with vaccine passports will be engineered into social hierarchies — ie those who will be given a higher education and those who do not.“Where does this stop? Do we fire apprentices who have not had the vaccine? Do we remove older students from FE (further education) colleges? Do we close down adult education courses where adults have not had the vaccine? I hope not.”It comes after England manager Gareth Southgate was recruited to help push up vaccination rates among young people.Related...An Ode To House Parties – Freedom Isn't Just About ClubbingThis Is The Optimum Gap To Leave Between Your Two Pfizer JabsVaccine Passports Could Make People *Less* Likely To Get Jabbed
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
The Most Painful Moment Of The Olympics Yet Left Nearly Everyone Wincing
Skateboarding made its Olympic debut in Tokyo, and along with some incredible feats of agility the event was marked by at least one moment that made nearly everyone wince.It was when Peru’s Angelo Caro Narvaez did... well... he did this:This is Peruvian skateboarder Angelo Caro Narvaez. Just figured that if we're all going to see the poor guy nutshot himself in the Olympics, we should be able to know his name and wish him well. pic.twitter.com/ghHmtz0HOO— Jesse Spector (@jessespector) July 25, 2021Amazingly, Narvaez got back up... got back into the competition... and made it to the finals, where he finished fifth. Japan’s Yuto Horigome won the the gold. Related...Tony Hawk Barged The Tokyo Olympics Skateboard Park And Showed How It's DoneThe Moment Tom Daley And Matty Lee Discover They’ve Won The Diving Is TV (And Olympic) GoldAdam Peaty Drops The F-Bomb Twice In Live BBC Interview After Tokyo Olympics Gold Win
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Love Island's Casa Amor Bombshells Are About To Spell Trouble For The Current Couples
Just when the Love Island villa had begun to settle after the drama of Hugo’s recoupling speech, things are about to be turned upside down once again with the return of Casa Amor. The boys and girls are about to be separated into two villas, with 12 new bombshells entering to try and turn heads and put the existing couples to the ultimate test. It already looks like there could be trouble for some of the most established pairings, as many of the newcomers have already admitted they have their eye on Islanders who are in relationships, and are not afraid to step on a few toes to get what they want. Ahead of their arrival on Monday night, get to know all the new bombshells a little better below...Amy Day Age: 25From: SurreyOccupation: PerformerShe says: “I definitely bring fun. I’m always being stupid.”Who she has her eye on: “I’m just going to see what the vibe is. So we’ll see.”Clarisse Juliette Age: 23From: LondonOccupation: Brand owner/influencerShe says: “I have a tattoo under my bum. I wanted it to say ‘Love Life’ in Spanish. But it actually says ‘God’s gift’… two totally different things.”Who she has her eye on: “Teddy - he’s tall, confident and smooth.”Lillie HaynesAge: 22From: South ShieldsOccupation: Trainee accountantShe says: “If I want something I’ll be the first one out there, trying it, doing it and I’m not scared to take risks.”Who she has her eye on: “I’ve definitely got my eye on Jake. He’s 100% the type of boy I would go for at home. It’s too good of a match not to just go for. Liam is definitely a dark horse for me, he’s like James Bond when you look at him, absolutely gorgeous. So he could be a very close second.”Dale MehmetAge: 24From: GlasgowOccupation: BarberHe says: “I’m not a bad guy who is going to steal somebody’s girl. But if I want something then I’m going to pursue it. I would go about it all in the right way.”Who he has his eye on: “I like Faye’s attitude and personality. I feel like we would get on.”Jack Barlow Age: 26From: East SussexOccupation: Racing driver and coachHe says: “I’m there for myself and I’m trying to find love. My competitive nature will come out when I’m there.”Who he has his eye on: “From what I’ve seen and going off their energy, Chloe has been top of my list. It’s been nice to see her be herself and not care what anyone thinks. I think she’ll be a lot of fun.”Sam JacksonAge: 23From: ClitheroeOccupation: Maintenance engineerHe says: “I’m happy to step on someone’s toes to get what I want. If that’s what I’ve got to do, I’ve got to do it.”Who he has his eye on: “They’re all stunning girls. I’m open to getting to know them all really.”Salma NaranAge: 20From: DublinOccupation: Model/influencerShe says: ”[I’ll bring] definitely a lot of vibrant energy. I’m the bubbliest person in the room.”Mary BedfordAge: 22From: WakefieldOccupation: ModelShe says: “If I go in there and I really like Liam I’ll have to step on Millie’s toes”Who she has her eye on: “Liam. He’s just beautiful. He’s 6ft6 for a start, he seems really old-school, like a gentleman. Other than that Teddy or Toby.”Kaila Troy Age: 28From: DublinOccupation: International DJShe says: “I am very competitive. I wouldn’t have gotten where I am in work and my career if I wasn’t prepared to have a little drive and oomph in me.”Harry YoungAge: 24From: GlasgowOccupation: Car salesmanWho he has his eye on: “Kaz has always been in my top three. But once I’m in there and speaking with people, it could change.”Bonus fact: Harry is the first ever Islander to be recruited for Love Island directly through Tinder after applications were accepted through the dating app.Medhy MalandaAge: 24From: Belgium, now lives in LutonOccupation: American football player and modelHe says: “I’m always trying to be funny and wanting to be around people. And a very loyal person.”Who he has his eye on: “Definitely Kaz. Kaz’s personality is fiery, she’s got energy, she’s funny and she’s got a beautiful smile and she’s a nice girl in general. And Millie seems like a nice girl and she’s obviously good looking as well.”Matthew MacnabbAge: 26From: BelfastOccupation: Strategic marketing consultantHe says: “I feel like I’m pretty chilled and very adventurous. I’m very laid-back in the sense I like to laugh and I don’t care too much about what people think.”Love Island continues on Monday at 9pm on ITV2 and ITV Hub.READ MORE:Love Island Sparks More Than 1,000 Ofcom Complaints Over Danny Bibby Casting23 Things You Probably Never Knew About Love Island38 Memorable Love Island Moments That Got Everyone Talking
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The Moment Tom Daley And Matty Lee Discover They’ve Won The Diving Is TV (And Olympic) Gold
Tom Daley has finally achieved his Olympic dream of winning a gold medal after he and his diving partner Matty Lee triumphed in the men’s synchronised 10-metre diving competition in Tokyo.The pair were overcome with emotion after they topped the leaderboard, beating China’s Yuan Cao and Alsen Chen in the event on Monday morning.The moment Tom Daley and Matty Lee realised they had won Olympic gold!
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Adam Peaty Is Just ‘So F***king Relieved’ To Have Won Gold At The Tokyo Olympics
After winning Britain’s first gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics, swimmer Adam Peaty can be forgiven for dropping not one, but two F-bombs live on the BBC.The swimmer was the favourite going into the 100-metre breaststroke final on Sunday and didn’t disappoint after he posted the fifth-fastest time in history to become the first British swimmer to ever defend their Olympic title.Speaking to the BBC, seconds after after his triumph in the pool at the Tokyo Aquatic Centre, Adam turned the air blue.Adam Peaty won another Olympic gold medal...... and then gave an interview we won't forget in a hurry.
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Australian Gold Medal Winner's Coach Has The Best Reaction To Her Stellar Swim
Australian swimmer Ariarne Titmus took home the gold in the 400-meter freestyle event at the Olympics on Monday, while Katie Ledecky of team USA took silver and China’s Li Bingjie won the bronze.And if there were a medal for reactions, Titmus’s coach, Dean Boxall, probably would’ve captured a gold of his own.  Spare a thought for the Japanese official in the background who’s read a 400-page Covid compliance manual that contained precisely no detail of how to deal with this pic.twitter.com/2caZBscuzL— The Shovel (@TheShovel) July 26, 2021Boxall went viral with his post-race exuberance: “He means everything to me,” Titmus said after the event, according to the Sydney Morning Herald. She said she saw him crying as she put on the medal.“It was actually hard to contain it. I could see Dean on the other side bawling his eyes out,” she said. “You don’t see that that often so that made me want to tear up.” On Twitter, people just couldn’t get over Boxall’s celebration ― so naturally, he became an instant Olympic meme: Live look at Australian swim coach Dean Boxall pic.twitter.com/KNf1Frl88I— Michael Jett (@MichaelRyanJett) July 26, 2021I’ll have what Dean Boxall is having. pic.twitter.com/LlQoQ0cwWv— Ben Stevens (@BenScottStevens) July 26, 2021Synced up Pete Weber’s infamous who do you think you are,I am with Dean Boxall reaction to Titmus’ gold medal performance and honestly I’m surprised that it fits so well pic.twitter.com/NplXL7nXHr— Sam (@_SamanthaCleary) July 26, 2021Hi where do I apply to have my allocated Dean Boxall Enthusiastic Head Cheerleader I need someone to hype me after I complete menial tasks at home— corgi (@courtwhip) July 26, 2021My pup when I say we're going to the dog park #TokyoOlympicspic.twitter.com/M6Etamdwsk— Josh Jordan (@NumbersMuncher) July 26, 2021Australian swim coach Dean Boxall's celebration set to @JohnCena 's entrance music... ?? pic.twitter.com/GeWvICS6KU— Ben Heisler (@bennyheis) July 26, 2021Just want to watch a video of Australia swim coach Dean Boxall losing his mind, while a somewhat terrified #Olympics staffer tries to calm/redirect him, on a loop forever.— Matt Brickman (@Matt_Brickman) July 26, 2021Ask and you shall receive! ?Dean Boxall with Ultimate Warrior music!Go Australia and Congrats Ariarne Titmus! ??????#Tokyo2020#OlympicGames#Swimming#AUS#TokyoTogether#olympicspic.twitter.com/87j0Hcmng7— Todd TEAM AUS ?? ( “MAMBA 4 LIFE !”) (@cyrilicioushawk) July 26, 2021It feels like we’re going to need Matthew McConaughey to play Dean Boxall in some sort of movie— Tom Eschen (@TomEschenJr) July 26, 2021Related...Team GB Has 8 Sets Of Siblings And We're Cheering Them All OnThe Funniest Tweets From The Tokyo Olympics Opening CeremonyNot Sure Where To Start With Tokyo Olympics? Here's Team GB's Key Events And Ones To WatchTony Hawk Barged The Tokyo Olympics Skateboard Park And Showed How It's Done
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What It Really Means When Companies Say 'Pay Is Competitive' In Job Listings
If you look for a job long enough, you’re bound to run into the phrase “pay is competitive.” This vaguely promising but subjective line appeared in more than 500 job listings on LinkedIn in the US alone this week – retail positions in particular – but it ultimately doesn’t hold companies accountable to committing to any particular salary level.“Saying ‘pay is competitive’ doesn’t really add much to the job description, but companies will often throw it in there because it sounds good. Who doesn’t want competitive pay?” said Tracy Cote, chief people officer of online marketplace, StockX. “Most companies think they are paying competitively, whether they are or not.”“Pay is competitive” is meant to signal great salaries, but it’s also a warning sign. “Pay is competitive” – along with its cousin, “salary commensurate with experience” – is not only a subjective phrase, but it can also be a potential red flag about how the company views compensation and labour.This belief that you shouldn’t share salary information in a job posting is a part of an “old school” approach many employers follow, said Danny Speros, vice-president of people at the software company Zenefits. “They may feel it limits their negotiating power in a compensation discussion, which is a bad reason to do it. I think you should pay people fairly for the work that they do.”Speros said that he’s used the phrase “pay is competitive” in the job listings in the past, but that his thinking has evolved. “Ten years ago, that was a very common phrase,” he said. “At this point, I don’t use that phrase. I think it’s understood that pay should be competitive.” Every employer has a sense of what they can or will pay for a role, so why not tell candidates upfront unless the goal is to pay people less than they’re worth?Lauren Ruffin, Fractured AtlasAt Fractured Atlas, a nonprofit technology company that provides tools and services for artists, salaries are posted on job listings to save “us and candidates time and guesswork,” said Lauren Ruffin, the company’s chief external relations officer. She said Fractured Atlas believes that a candidate should have a sense of salary prior to doing any work in the interview process, like a writing sample or case study response.”‘Pay is competitive’ feels like a bit of a smokescreen. Is it competitive to the industry? To the region?” Ruffin said. “Every employer has a sense of what they can or will pay for a role, so why not tell candidates upfront unless the goal is to pay people less than they’re worth?“Although it’s still not common, transparency about pay in job listings is now required by law in one US state. A law went into effect in Colorado this year requiring employers to list salary ranges for job roles open to state residents, even when remote. If companies fail to disclose this in their job openings, they can face fines between $500 and $10,000 per violation. But again, not every company wants to share salary information upfront in a job listing. In Colorado, some employers are purposefullyexcluding state residents from job openings to get around the requirement. Here’s a job tip: If you’re a candidate who sees “pay is competitive” on a job listing, you should wait until the end of your first real interview with the hiring manager to bring it up, rather than doing so early on, said Phoebe Gavin, a career coach who specialises in supporting early and mid-career professionals. That way, your curiosity about compensation is just one piece of all the information you’ve given about who you are as a professional, and won’t leave the interviewer with the impression that pay is all you care about. You can simply ask, “Would you be willing to share the budget for this role? I’d like to make sure we’re on the same page with compensation expectations,” Gavin said.When the job market is hot, “pay is competitive” doesn’t cut it. Speros said companies typically calculate whether their pay is actually competitive in a particular industry through compensation services like Radford’s data and analytics platform and PayScale.With hiring on a major upswing right now, the competition for talent is heating up. Speros said he expects Zenefits to offer salary ranges in job listings for all of its open roles in the coming year. “There is so much competition for talent out there right now. We’re at a point – and companies that don’t do this are at a point – where it’s just spinning wheels.”“The last year has helped people re-prioritise what they expect from employers and how they hold workplaces accountable,” Ruffin said. “Workers want transparency, decency, and a bit of a sense that while the workplace isn’t about building an ‘office family,’ their employers have just some of their best interests in mind. The job description is often that first signal, so candidates hold it to a high standard.”Related...In A Work Slump? Here's How To Motivate Yourself AgainThis One Move Makes All The Difference If You Want To Hire DiverselyHow To Make Sure Your Work Is Noticed (Without Being Obnoxious)
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The Most Incredible Photos Of Surfing's Olympic Debut
For the first time in Olympic history, 40 surfers will compete for a spot on the winners’ podium.Each surfer competes in a 30 minute heat, trying to catch as many waves as possible. Their top two scoring waves at Tsurigasaki beach are combined for their final total.See the athleticism, grit and each drop of water in these amazing photos from the first two days of training and competition.It has taken a century of advocacy to get surfing into the Olympics. Hawaiian surfer and Olympic swimmer Duke Kahanamoku started the push in 1912 when he first asked the International Olympic Committee to include the sport. Related...The Funniest Tweets From The Tokyo Olympics Opening CeremonyThe Aerials, Slides And Wipeouts Of Skateboarding's First OlympicsTeam GB Has 8 Sets Of Siblings And We're Cheering Them All OnNot Sure Where To Start With Tokyo Olympics? Here's Team GB's Key Events And Ones To Watch
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TV Network Admits It Covered Olympic Opening Ceremony In ‘Inappropriate' Way
South Korean TV network MBC’s coverage of the Tokyo Olympics opening ceremony on Friday went awry when it used what it has now admitted were “inappropriate” photos and captions to refer to countries competing in the games.The broadcaster drew the most ire on Twitter after it showed a photograph of Chernobyl — the site of the 1986 nuclear power plant disaster ― as Ukraine’s athletes entered the National Stadium, reported Agence France-Presse.South Korean broadcaster MBC used images to "represent" each country during the #Tokyo2020 Opening Ceremony.Italy: pizzaNorway: salmonHaiti: upheavalUkraine: Chernobyl pic.twitter.com/KpUXATuZld— Raphael Rashid (@koryodynasty) July 23, 2021MBC also used pictures of pizza when Italy’s representatives arrived, salmon for Norway, sushi for Japan, a scene of unrest for Haiti, and a depiction of the fictional Dracula for Romania, according to Reuters.They ran a picture of...Dracula alongside Team Romania last night. *facepalm* pic.twitter.com/7GYtZoo7iG— Hyunsu Yim (@hyunsuinseoul) July 24, 2021Critics called out the network for propagating national stereotypes with its choice of images.The Chernobyl image prompted the most anger.MBC used a photo of Chernobyl to introduce Ukriane. What the.. pic.twitter.com/uN2TTbrQVJ— Korea Football News (@KORFootballNews) July 23, 2021Today is the day that Korean news network MBC used Genghis Khan and Chernobyl to introduce countries in the Olympics. Jeeeeeeeez
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The Aerials, Slides And Wipeouts Of Skateboarding's First Olympics
Skateboarders have their first-ever chance for an Olympic gold.The men’s street competition began Saturday, giving audiences their first taste of the rebel “anti-sport” on the global athletics stage. Women’s street begins Sunday, and the park competition for women and men debuts August 3 and 4.Two of the Olympic’s youngest stars will participate in park — Team GB’s 13-year-old Sky Brown and Kokona Hiraki of Japan, who is 12. The street course was created to model real-world obstacles like stair cases and railings. The park course has the giant bowls and half-pipes seen in skateparks. Check out these incredible images of Olympic Street Skateboarding’s debut.Related...Tony Hawk Barged The Tokyo Olympics Skateboard Park And Showed How It's DoneNot Sure Where To Start With Tokyo Olympics? Here's Team GB's Key Events And Ones To WatchTeam GB Has 8 Sets Of Siblings And We're Cheering Them All On
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Britney Spears Goes Topless On Instagram In Latest Bold Move
An increasingly confident Britney Spears went topless in new posts on Instagram.The two images posted Friday and Saturday book-ended a photo of a printed message reading: “Do you know what really turns me on? What I find incredibly sexy? Kindness.” The passage is from “Dirty Pretty Things” by New Zealand poet and novelist Lang Leav. Can’t believe @britneyspears is reading Dirty Pretty Things right now
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Jennifer Lopez Posts Makeout Pic With Ben Affleck, Finally Confirming Their Relationship
“Bennifer” is officially back!Jennifer Lopez on Saturday appeared to finally confirm her relationship with Ben Affleck, posting a photograph of them kissing on Instagram and Twitter.Jennifer, who turned 52 on Saturday, posted the steamy picture as part of a series of photos in which she donned a printed string bikini, marking her birthday.“5 2 … what it do,” she wrote in a caption with a heart emoji.5 2 … what it do …
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Team GB's 8 Amazing Sibling Pairs We're Cheering On in Tokyo
So, we’re finally feeling mega pumped for the Tokyo Olympic Games after Friday night’s opening ceremony. Though low-key and mostly audience free, it still managed to get the internet all of a chatter – and not just for Team Tonga!Now the sport is underway, an impressive roster of British stars are flying the flag for us. And if having one Olympic hopeful in any family weren’t enough, Team GB has a whopping eight – count them! – pairs of siblings competing this year, mostly in the same events, and among them three sets of twins.Seven sibling pairs have won medals at past Olympics, so the odds aren’t bad for this lot. Here are the family connections you need to know about in Tokyo.Athletics: Jodie and Hannah WilliamsEvent: 4 x 400m relay (both), and 400m individual (Jodie) View this post on InstagramA post shared by J O D I E (@jodiealicia)What to know: Welwyn Garden City’s Jodie Williams, 27, started off sprinting the 100m and 200m events, and was nicknamed Miss Moneylegs, but sadly missed out on London 2012 after a hamstring tear. These days she competes in the individual 400m, and will also be racing with younger sister Hannah, 23, in the 4 x 400m relay team, with the pair surely hoping for sibling glory.Athletics: Tiffany Porter and Cindy SemberEvent: 100m hurdles View this post on InstagramA post shared by Tiffany Porter (@tiffofili)What to know: Despite being born and raised in Michigan, these sisters happily have British passports thanks to their mum and both made the final of the 100m hurdles in Rio in 2016 for Team GB. Cindy, now 26, finished fourth but a year later ruptured her Achilles. She’s now back fighting fit, while her sister Tiffany, 33, is making a comeback of a different sort after becoming a mum in 2019.Gymnastics: Jennifer and Jessica GadirovaEvent: Artistic Gymnastics View this post on InstagramA post shared by Jennifer Gadirova (@jennifergadirova)What to know: The 16-year-old Gadirova twins, born in Dublin to Azerbaijani parents, are half of Britain’s four-strong artistic gymnastics team. Just as one twin is always born before another, Jessica had her Olympic spot confirmed an agonising 20 minutes before sister Jennifer got her news. Amazingly, their team-mate Amelie Morgan is a twin, too, while her brother Finlay is also a gymnast.Cycling: Simon and Adam YatesEvent: Road Race View this post on InstagramA post shared by Simon Yates (@simonyatess)What to know: The Yates brothers, 28, are also twins and both started cycling as teenagers in Bury. Adam placed fourth in the 2016 Tour De France and though he and Simon have gone separate ways when it comes to their regular cycling teams, they’ll both be sporting the same Team GB jerseys in Tokyo.Swimming: Joe and Max Litchfield Event: 200m Medley (Joe), 400m Medley (Max) View this post on InstagramA post shared by Joe Litchfield (@joelitchfield_)What to know: Joe Litchfield, 23, is making his Olympic debut in the pool, and has probably been getting tips from older brother Max, 26, who placed fourth in his own event at Rio in 2016. The Pontefract pair have been compared to fellow Yorkshire men, the Brownlee brothers, who won Triathlon medals in the 2012 and 2016 Games. And when it comes to Tokyo, the Litchfields aren’t the only siblings swimming – Carson and Jake Foster are also competing for the US.Boxing: Pat and Luke McCormackEvent: Welterweight (Pat) and Lightweight (Luke) View this post on InstagramA post shared by Pat Mccormack (@patmccormack14)What to know: Some more twins – this time from Sunderland. Brothers Pat and Luke, 26 both qualified for Tokyo in Paris earlier this summer, and have spoken about the “jail craic” of Japanese quarantine keeping them focused for their fights ahead. Team GB has a great track record in boxing with three golds for Anthony Joshua, Luke Campbell and Nicola Adams in London 2012.Rowing: Tom and Emily FordEvent: Men’s Eight (Tom) and Women’s Eight (Emily)  View this post on InstagramA post shared by Tom Ford (@tom_g_ford)What to know: Siblings Tom, 28, and Emily, 26, both started rowing at the same school, captaining their respective boats, and have followed each other through the sport ever since. They admit they are competitive but drive each other on – all the way to Tokyo. As Tom says: “To be going with a sibling makes it even more special because it’s something we’ve both dreamed of growing up.”Rowing: Mathilda and Charlotte Hodgkins-ByrneEvent: Woman’s Quadruple Sculls View this post on InstagramA post shared by Mathilda Hodgkins Byrne (@mathildahodgkinsbyrne)What to know: Mathilda, 26, and Charlotte, 24, from Hereford, have also made Team GB’s rowing squad. Charlotte previously said she only got into rowing as the “annoying little sister” copying her older sibling – but it’s obviously worked out for them. “We both want one thing going to Tokyo,” Mathilda told her local paper, “and hopefully we can bring a medal home.” Go, Team GB!Related...Not Sure Where To Start With Tokyo Olympics? Here's Team GB's Key Events And Ones To WatchThe Funniest Tweets From The Tokyo Olympics Opening CeremonySimone Biles Drops Jaws With ‘Incredible’ Training SessionThe 2012 Olympics Opening Ceremony Is Still A Heart-Swelling, Lump-In-The-Throat Moment
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He Exposed The World’s Worst Humanitarian Crisis. US Partners Jailed And Tortured Him.
Not long after midnight on September 18, 2020, Adel Al-Hasani knelt down with a blindfold over his eyes and his hands tied behind his back and thought about where he had seen fellow journalists in that position: in Islamic State videos, broadcast as chilling propaganda.Al-Hasani, 34, pictured his three sons and his pregnant wife. He silently asked God to forgive his misdeeds. Like the journalists captured by ISIS, he expected to be murdered. He had already imagined that his body would be found on a beach days later; though he wasn’t certain where he was, he could smell sea air.But his captors had a different plan. A guard grabbed him by the right shoulder and took him to an interrogation room. At one of the two detention facilities Al-Hasani had already passed through that night, he had faced dozens of questions while being kicked and beaten for hours. This time, he only had to provide his name and address. Then the guard searched him and led him to the cell that would be his home for the next three weeks: a tiny space filled with mosquitoes and bottles of urine where the lights were kept on all night and no fresh air could temper the September heat. Al-Hasani ultimately spent six months detained in the custody of the Southern Transitional Council, the US-linked militia that has taken over southern Yemen amid the country’s ongoing civil war. The organisation ― which receives American weapons and other support from one of Washington’s closest partners in the Middle East, the United Arab Emirates ―  never fully explained why Al-Hasani was detained, and a local judge ultimately determined that he had to be released.In Al-Hasani’s first interview since his release in March, he said he sees a clear reason for his six-month imprisonment: The group wanted to silence him. Journalism in Yemen is being slaughtered from ear to ear.Adel Al-Hasani, reporter and fixerAs a reporter and fixer for international news outlets, Al-Hasani’s work has been vital to global awareness about the devastating humanitarian crisis in Yemen, where fighting has killed thousands of civilians and forced millions of people to live in famine-like conditions. He has contributed to groundbreaking stories, including work that has won an Emmy, and been nominated for an Oscar and a Peabody Award, while almost never receiving public credit for the work.In the US, that reporting has sparked a furore over America’s role in Yemen’s suffering. Since 2015, the UAE and Saudi Arabia have used American support to fight a Yemeni militia called the Houthis — whose chief ally is the longtime US bugbear Iran. American-backed forces have killed civilians, targeted political opponents and restricted access to vital supplies. Al-Hasani helped CNN produce a 2019 package on illegal Saudi and UAE weapons transfers to extremist militants and other Yemeni partners that prompted a congressional uproar and a Pentagon investigation.Bipartisan pressure and intense activism ultimately led to former President Donald Trump cutting off aerial refuelling for bombing runs by the Saudis, the UAE and their allies in 2018, and to President Joe Biden ending most other assistance.Biden now says that ending the war in Yemen is a top priority. But America’s partners there are still making peace and stability less likely. Al-Hasani, who experienced intimidation by representatives of the UAE and the Southern Transitional Council firsthand, believes those forces are suppressing independent voices so they can behave as ruthlessly as they want, with ongoing US support.“Journalism in Yemen is being slaughtered from ear to ear,” he told HuffPost.And it’s not just journalists who suffer ― it’s millions of people trapped in conflict who are losing their best hope of holding their rulers accountable.Representatives of the UAE and the UAE-backed southern council repeatedly tried to bribe and bully Al-Hasani, he told HuffPost. Although he was released this spring, after HuffPost revealed his detention and the Biden administration pushed the UAE for his release, Al-Hasani still fears for his safety ― and for the fate of the country he has now fled. A State Department spokesperson confirmed to HuffPost that the US advocated for Al-Hasani’s release, the first time the agency has done so.“Targeting journalists for doing their jobs is unacceptable,” the spokesperson wrote in an email. ”We will continue to advocate for the immediate release of anyone arbitrarily detained, including with partner governments like the UAE, and urge all parties to the Yemen conflict to respect human rights.”If the Biden administration is serious about maintaining that standard ― and getting Yemen on a path to recovery ― US officials will have to work to make America’s partners change course.“They don’t want the reality to come out,” Al-Hasani said. “They are doing their best to make Yemen a big prison.”‘When My Father Came, He Didn’t Recognize Me’Al-Hasani’s nightmare began on a Thursday that was busy, but not out of the ordinary. As he often did, he was using his contacts and expertise to help foreign journalists. Authorities in Yemen’s port city of Mokha had detained two French correspondents he was set to work with, and Al-Hasani set off to secure their release. He texted Saeed Al-Mahiri, an Emirati who works with southern Yemeni forces like the ruling militia in Mokha, to seek help.Like many players in the war’s various factions, Al-Mahiri knew Al-Hasani and his work. He had even granted the reporter a rare interview in 2018. That night, Al-Hasani told him he was en route to his French colleagues. Al-Hasani believes the Emirati may have learned more about their reporting plans from UAE allies who had confiscated the French journalists’ phones. (Al-Mahiri did not respond to a request for comment on his involvement.)Thirty minutes after the two men stopped messaging, Al-Hasani reached a checkpoint called Al-Alam, on the outskirts of Aden. He had negotiated his way through hundreds of checkpoints over years of reporting. But the rules had suddenly changed. The guards arrested him and took him to the nearby Dawfas checkpoint, run by a notorious southern council official named Hussein Halboub, who is identified in Yemeni media as the deputy commander of the post. Halboub told guards to move Al-Hasani from his car to a back room.For three hours, they kicked and punched him while accusing him of murder and espionage. The interrogation only ended so Al-Hasani’s captors could move him to the next phase of his ordeal. They took him, blindfolded, to Beir Ahmed ― a makeshift jail where UAE officers have deployed sexual torture against detainees.Bruised and terrified, Al-Hasani was left alone in a brightly lit room with a small window. He saw two pickup trucks pull up after about an hour; two men got out, one in the uniform of the UAE-backed southern forces and the other in a black jacket with a black scarf covering his face. It was an outfit Al-Hasani associated with al Qaeda, and it made him panic: Would he be transferred to the custody of one of the extremist militant groups known to work with America’s partners in Yemen?Instead of answers about his fate, he got a new blindfold, instructions to kneel, and a loud soundtrack for a long, bumpy ride that seemed designed to confuse his sense of direction. The jerks and shudders made his hands bleed as they scraped against the car’s metal floor.Al-Hasani guessed that his final stop of the night was one of two infamous military camps by the sea. He later learned he was right: It was Al-Jala, an unofficial prison where the Yemeni human rights group Mwatana has documented the use of electrocution and sleep deprivation. It was his home for the next 25 days. Placed in a fetid cell and unable to communicate with the outside world, Al-Hasani was referred to only as “number 5” ― unaware of who numbers 1 through 4 were because the guards never allowed them out at the same time for their brief toilet trips or long interrogation sessions.Al-Hasani usually took his family out to lunch on Fridays. He spent the night thinking about how they would react when he didn’t return home to be with them that Friday.During “investigations,” his captors echoed the narrative of the UAE and its local allies. They said he should use his skills to contribute to a future independent southern Yemen. He retorted that they looked more like a brutal militia than freedom fighters and that he was more likely to believe them if their top leaders were actually fighting in Yemen rather than safely in the UAE. He had nothing left to lose, so he was frank. After one particularly humiliating interrogation, he told the guards a bullet in the head would be better than more of their sessions. Al-Hasani made simple requests. He would like clean clothes to pray in to avoid disrespecting God. He didn’t mind the kicks, slaps and shouts during his near-daily interrogations, but could the self-appointed investigators stop insulting his mother and his wife?The men in charge didn’t let up. Placing him in the middle of a group of men chewing the leafy stimulant qat, prison officials would ask the same questions over and over, every so often randomly throwing in surprise punches. They realised insulting language hurt Al-Hasani the most, so they heaped more abuse on his family.After one particularly humiliating interrogation, he told the guards a bullet in the head would be better than more of their sessions. He went on a hunger strike that left him so weak he could barely stand, crawling on all fours. That brought some results. Six days in, after he promised to eat some olives, the guards allowed him a two-minute phone call to his wife, to tell her he was alive and ask about her pregnancy. His plea for death got him better access to the toilet.But he had to do more to get what he most wanted: a transfer to the official jail in the city of Aden, where his family could at least visit and the formal legal system still functions to some degree.His jailers eventually told him he could have his life back if he would make one small, secret change. They wanted him to become an informant, betraying his fellow reporters, abandoning his journalistic principles and quietly helping to break Yemen apart.After weeks of despair, Al-Hasani agreed, privately deciding he would flee Yemen after briefly appearing to follow through. It was risky — the guards said they knew his father’s name and where he worked — but it was a deal.One week later, the southern council officials moved him to the central jail in Aden, known as Al-Mansoura. And after 12 more days, Al-Hasani was allowed to see his wife and his father-in-law. He wished he looked more like himself: After weeks of eating barely anything ― two olives for dinner on some nights ― he was rail-thin. When his father visited the next day, he couldn’t even recognise him.Al-Hasani spent another two months in solitary confinement before being moved to a dormitory containing more than 30 prisoners. The authorities finally appointed a prosecutor for his case who could draw up charges based on the southern council’s claim that Al-Hasani was spying for foreign countries. The prosecutor had to try three times before he could even visit in person to present Al-Hasani with the charges. The first time he came to the prison, guards told him the jailed journalist could not meet him because he hadn’t yet been issued a uniform. At the next visit, they said they had lost the key to his cell. The prosecutor waited for two hours the third time he came, telling officials he would not leave until he saw Al-Hasani. When they ultimately met, he said the court had no evidence for the accusations that he was a spy. Al-Hasani’s supporters ― his family, his attorney Liza Manea Saeed and foreigners who had worked with him ― were privately pushing influential figures to get him released. Repeatedly, they heard promises that made them think his freedom was imminent.They were let down each time, with excuses like the court needing to close for a strike ― and by late December, began describing their efforts to HuffPost and others to prepare to take Al-Hasani’s plight public as a last resort.  His jailers eventually told him he could have his life back if he would make one small, secret change. They wanted him to become an informant, betraying his fellow reporters, abandoning his journalistic principles and quietly helping to break Yemen apart. Al-Hasani wanted more than freedom. He didn’t want to let his family down by leaving any shred of doubt that the allegations were true. And he worried that a public fuss would make a future ― and more reporting ― in Aden impossible.But after four months of working backchannels, he and his allies concluded that going public was the only possibly effective option left. HuffPost published the news of his detention on February 8. The Committee to Protect Journalists and Human Rights Watch soon released additional details. In Washington, US officials began to lean on the UAE. As before, pressure worked. The guards began treating Al-Hasani better, permitting his family to bring him food and clothing. On March 14, the UAE-backed authorities released Al-Hasani. He hugged his children for the first time in six months and finally met his daughter, who had been born while he was behind bars. He quickly started to plan for their future in a safer location. Four days after his release, Al-Hasani left Aden on a Friday ― the day after the first night of the Yemeni weekend, an evening usually filled with qat and bound to leave guards at checkpoints drowsy. He traveled to his family village in the province of Abyan, controlled by Saudi-backed forces rather than those working with the UAE. And a few weeks later, he drove to the Seyoun airport. A local friend from his time in jail accompanied him and waited until Al-Hasani called to say he was in the air. Soon afterward, Al-Hasani’s wife and children left too. (HuffPost is not revealing their location to protect their safety.)Now they’re all together, Al-Hasani is still planning out the stories he wants to tell about Yemen. In between, he’s playing video games with his kids. They have a lot of lost time to make up for.‘The War Against Journalists’Before America’s friends in Yemen decimated Al-Hasani’s old life, he was already desperate to show the world what was happening in his country. Documenting the toll of the civil war ― meeting people who had lost loved ones and uncovering cynical strategies that would only make peace less likely ― had made him more determined to convince the world to end Yemen’s pain. Al-Hasani valued global awareness over nearly everything else: Though he relied on journalism to pay his bills and was becoming warier of outsiders who could dip in and out of the war, he started charging international reporters less for his help. Even as he saw correspondents win acclaim for work he helped produce, he doubled down on anonymity to ensure he could keep reporting; he started asking the journalists he worked with not to even take photographs of him. Two factors were making his journalism more challenging, even before his arrest, Al-Hasani said. In 2019, the Southern Transitional Council took over his city of Aden. That made it hard for reporters to alternate coverage of the council with stories on its rival, Yemen’s internationally recognised government. Any critical articles were suddenly perceived as direct attacks on the council. Meanwhile, the internationally recognised government and its ally Saudi Arabia made it far more difficult for foreign journalists to travel to Yemen, shutting down the process for issuing permits in Aden and barring reporters on flights in. In the north of the country, where the Houthi militia rules with Iranian support, authorities have tortured and starved journalists. Four reporters there are currentlyfacing the death penalty.Even if US diplomacy to end the Yemeni war succeeds, all those factions will still wield serious power. Highlighting their tactics could be the only way to shame them out of future repression. With less coverage, “they won’t hesitate to make it worse,” Al-Hasani said. And their alarming tendencies ― and willingness to escalate ― are clear. Al-Hasani told HuffPost he was detained overnight in 2019. A week later, a mysterious vehicle bashed into the rear of his car. His family was terrified. He got the message: We’re still watching you. He stayed quiet and kept working, confident that if he followed the unspoken rules he had become used to, he would remain safe.He has also repeatedly fended off attempts to buy his silence. In 2018, the UAE official Al-Mahiri sent Al-Hasani messages offering to hire him to set up a new media project. Al-Hasani quickly understood the real task: to serve as the UAE’s “eye in the region.” He refused. When he went to interview Al-Mahiri a few months later, he asked tough questions and got “bullshit” in response ― as well as an envelope. He opened it when he got home, finding wads of cash.An official with the southern council twice tried to hire him to be their representative to international groups in 2019. A spokesman for the council did not respond to a request for comment for this story.And soon after he left Yemen, Al-Hasani got an unexpected WhatsApp message from a man who said he commanded UAE-backed forces in the province of Hadramaut. The man, who called himself Abu Muhammed, suggested that Al-Hasani could build a new life in the UAE ― an idea that still makes Al-Hasani laugh out loud. But there are depressing precedents of such offers working: In 2017, a journalist who was jailed for more than a year by UAE allies in Egypt took $250,000 from an Emirati official to launch a public campaign attacking Qatar, the UAE’s regional foe. (HuffPost’s calls and messages to the number used by Abu Muhammed went unanswered.)The scale of the battle to suppress independent journalism was clear in how hard it was to get Al-Hasani released. After HuffPost revealed that he was detained, Democratic Representative Ro Khanna, prominent journalists and major human rights groups spent weeks highlighting the case — specifically calling out the UAE and its well-connected ambassador in Washington, Yousef Al Otaiba. Amid the pressure, Emirati representatives privately claimed to US officials that they knew nothing about Al-Hasani, a congressional aide told HuffPost. (The UAE’s embassy in Washington did not respond to a request for comment.)There’s no guarantee other cases will be able to attract attention in that way. “I would recommend any foreign journalist visiting Yemen to be more aware of the situation there. It’s not safe anymore,” Al-Hasani told HuffPost. He reflected on the last reporters he helped, the Frenchmen who were briefly detained back in September. “I cannot say I was smart to get them out safely — it was the will of Allah.” He’s still thinking about his homeland, though; particularly the situation in Aden, where the southern council and its opponents have waged a bloody, secretive war for years while most international coverage of Yemen has focused on fighting elsewhere. The people killed and injured there deserve to be covered, too, Al-Hasani said. He plans to help get them their due: He’s working on what he describes as the “best story” of his career while struggling with establishing himself in a new setting.“It’s a painful experience to leave your home against your will,” he said. “And the worst feeling is when you’re very loyal to your home and you get such a painful reward.”Rowaida Abdelaziz contributed reporting.
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Trump Org Is Basically Just Donald Trump — But That Won’t Make Prosecuting Him Easy
WASHINGTON ― In Detroit, General Motors has a board of directors that oversees the company’s management. In Bentonville, Walmart has shareholders who can ultimately hold its board accountable.And in Manhattan, the Trump Organisation has, basically, only Donald Trump.Which means that even as Trump and his various defenders attempt to claim that Trump personally is in the clear because only his company is facing charges, in this case it is largely a distinction without a difference.“The Trump Organisation is an avatar for Donald Trump, in every way imaginable: financially, emotionally and psychologically,” said Tim O’Brien, a Trump biographer whom Trump unsuccessfully sued for printing that his net worth was a fraction of what he had claimed. “The core company is a mom-and-pop shop on Fifth Avenue.”It’s a company that was also hit with a fraud indictment on July 1. Prosecutors say the Trump Organisation, along with its chief financial officer, Allen Weisselberg, dodged taxes by improperly treating salaried income for top employees as fringe benefits or as contractor compensation.Trump himself was not personally charged, but O’Brien said it was inconceivable that Trump would not have known about the scheme described in the 25-page indictment, given that only a handful of employees there had any decision-making authority. “None of those others would dare tie their shoes without asking Trump,” he said.But showing that Trump personally profits from and is involved in every aspect of the business does not necessarily mean that prosecutors can convict him for its illegal actions.To do that, the state of New York, through district attorneys in Manhattan and possibly the state attorney general’s office, would have to show that Trump knew that what his company was doing when it arranged payments to employees to avoid taxes was illegal, but approved it anyway.“There has to be personal, specific knowledge,” said Danya Perry, a former federal prosecutor in New York City. “You can’t just impute knowledge.”Neither Trump’s spokesperson nor the Trump Organisation responded to HuffPost’s queries on this topic.That Trump is the central figure in his companies is made clear in the annual financial disclosures Trump was forced to file during his presidency. Those documents show elaborate, interlocking links among the Trump Corp., Trump Payroll Corp. and the hundreds of “limited liability companies” that Trump created to hold his various assets.O’Brien said the impulse to form a different LLC for each different asset Trump owned ― down to individual condo units in various buildings ― was an overreaction to his near personal bankruptcy in the 1990s, when he pledged his personal wealth to back business loans. Despite the Byzantine structure, O’Brien said, in the end it essentially all comes back to Trump. “This is basically a corner grocery with a guy behind the counter munching on a hamburger. And he’s the owner of the store,” O’Brien said.If the intent of the various entities, each with its own governance structure, is to obfuscate their ownership and control, the strategy has clearly succeeded.In 2018, for example, the local newspaper in Palm Beach, Florida, reported that a company run by Trump’s elder sons, Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump, had bought a beachfront house across Highway A1A from Mar-a-Lago from their father’s sister, Maryanne Trump Barry, for $18 million. Its address: 1125 South Ocean Blvd.But in May 2019, when Trump filed his annual financial disclosure, a new company, 1125 South Ocean LLC, showed up with assets between $5 million and $25 million. Elsewhere in the document, it states that the new LLC was 100% owned by DJT Holdings LLC.DJT Holdings LLC is, in turn, owned 1% by DJT Holdings Managing Member LLC and 99% by Donald J. Trump Revocable Trust, which also owns 100% of DJT Holdings Managing Member LLC. The argument that [Trump] was unaware of these funds being given to Weisselberg or others is pure nonsense.Former Trump attorney Michael CohenAnd that trust ― which Trump created to give the false appearance of separating himself from his businesses when he took office ― benefits Trump personally.“There’s nothing that went on at the Trump Organisation that did not pass through Donald’s desk,” said his longtime former lawyer and “fixer” Michael Cohen, who served time in federal prison for helping Trump arrange hush-money payments to women who said they’d had affairs with him.Notwithstanding Trump’s obvious control over his family business, he, his children and his supporters have made efforts to separate themselves from Weisselberg and the accusations against him.In a deposition last year in a case looking into the 2017 inaugural committee’s finances, for example, Trump’s daughter Ivanka Trump said of Weisselberg: “I don’t know what his exact job title is, but he’s an executive at the company.”And Weisselberg, following his indictment, in recent weeks has been removed as an officer from dozens of the Trump enterprises under the Trump Organization umbrella.Whether publicly excommunicating Weisselberg will work, though, is unclear. The indictment spells out that bonus checks to Weisselberg and other employees ― labeled as payments to contractors, rather than salary, thus letting the Trump Corp. avoid paying federal payroll taxes ― came from various Trump companies, such as Trump International Golf Club and the Mar-a-Lago Club. And both of those entities are owned by Trump, through a similar series of steps as the beach house.Norm Eisen, who served as an ethics lawyer in the Barack Obama White House and more recently worked for the House committee overseeing Trump’s first impeachment, said trying to blame Weisselberg for everything would be a tough sell.“It would be beyond implausible. It would be ridiculous,” he said. “Prosecutors have built the framework for a future case targeting Trump personally. ... Prosecutors are on the hunt.”“The checks for bonuses were all signed by Trump,” Cohen said. “The argument that he was unaware of these funds being given to Weisselberg or others is pure nonsense.”If Trump does, in fact, intend to claim that he did not know that such payments were illegal, he may have offered the first clue at a rally he held in Sarasota, Florida, two days after the indictments were unsealed. After attacking the prosecutions as politically motivated and defending the payments in question as examples of his generosity, he wondered aloud to the audience whether it was possible to know whether you have to pay taxes on such benefits: “I don’t even know. Do you have to? Does anybody know the answer to that stuff?”Perry said that while Trump may have been trying to lay the groundwork for a defense, he also wound up revealing that he knew quite a bit about the payments in question. “It certainly could be seen an admission,” she said. “I’m sure the prosecutors are watching him very closely.”Related...Trump’s New Spokesperson Is Spreading His Election Lies On Twitter For HimTrump Told Tell-All Authors He Refused Masks In Order To Look Strong, ImpenetrableTop US General Compared Trump To The Nazis, Book Claims
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7 Sneaky Signs Your Kid Is Dealing With Reemergence Anxiety
The coronavirus pandemic has presented countless challenges to children from an academic, social and mental health perspective. But the shift back into more “normal” ways of life can also be difficult for kids. Of course, we’re not exactly in a post-pandemic world (especially for children younger than 12 who have yet to gain access to any Covid-19 vaccines) as concerns rise about case counts and highly contagious variants. But there’s no doubt things seem different this summer with travel and back-to-school preparations in full swing. And even these positive changes can be challenging and anxiety-provoking. “Children thrive with consistency, and consistency has gone out of the window over the past year,” licensed clinical social worker Nidhi Tewari told HuffPost. “Many kids became accustomed to attending virtual school and limiting in-person contact, so it’s understandable that there may be increases in anxiety as we ‘return to normal.’”And in the midst of this new transition, children – like adults – are also still processing the trauma of the past year and a half.“After any disaster or traumatic experience, while the wish and hope is for a rapid return to ‘normal,’ the psychological and emotional aftermath greatly exceeds the more defined boundaries of the trauma itself,” said Dr. Ilisse Perlmutter, director of child and adolescent psychiatry at Talkiatry in New York City.“Children’s reactions may appear immediately… or may not appear for days, weeks, even years. We also need to remember that innumerable children and adolescents lost parents, grandparents and other loved ones during this pandemic. The resulting grief and anxiety can take many forms, and recovery, or moving forward from these losses, is not necessarily correlated with a return to life as it was before.”   If we’ve learned anything from this experience, it’s that “normal” is relative.″‘Normal’ looked at neurologically and behaviourally, is what we have experienced for the past couple of months (on a rolling basis),” said psychotherapist Noel McDermott.“We normalise as we go along, so normal is not what happened 18 months ago pre-pandemic. Normal is the last three months generally. So currently we are not transitioning back to normal; we are transitioning out of the normal we have been in for the last few months into a new normal. Transitions of our life circumstances are always potentially anxiety-provoking.” Signs of reemergence anxiety will vary depending on the child’s personality, but parents and other trusted adults can look for shifts in behaviour as indications of potential anxiety. But what kinds of behaviours should they look out for? Below, Tewari, Perlmutter, McDermott and other experts share some expected signs of “post-pandemic” anxiety in children.Fear of separationWith so many adults working from home and students engaging in remote or hybrid learning throughout the pandemic, children have unsurprisingly formed strong attachments to their families, which may lead to separation anxiety as life outside the home resumes. “Many kids have been attached to their parents’ sides for the past 18 months,” said Dr.Dyan Hes, founder of Gramercy Pediatrics in New York City. “Now all of a sudden parents have to return to the real world or some semblance of it. This will require sending kids to day care, a babysitter or school. Overnight a child will go from being with their parents 24/7 to being with lots of strangers. This can be extremely anxiety-provoking for even the most resilient child.”Through her work, she said she’s observed more fear of separation in children than she did before the pandemic. “Children who come to my office do not want to leave their parent’s hip. They scream when a stranger, like a nurse, approaches,” she said. “Other school-aged kids are having a huge amount of separation anxiety when they have to leave for camp or school.” You may notice that your child starts to withdraw or avoids experiences that make them anxious.Nidhi Tewari, clinical social workerIt’s important to keep in mind that this clinginess is expected and appropriate, noted Jacqueline P. Wight, director of mental health services at DotCom Therapy. Plenty of adults have experienced similar emotions around returning to work and socialising. It may also be helpful to examine the concerns behind the separation anxiety to develop coping mechanisms. “This is a natural response to the recent circumstances that will require extra sensitivity as the child begins to practice developmentally appropriate separation from a parent,” Wight said. “Some children may have preferred being home with their immediate family and are overwhelmed by the idea of returning to school or being around a group of children. This concern might be related to anxiety about being in a social situation, or it could be related to fear of illness and concern that being outside of the home is unsafe. It can feel unpredictable and outside of the child’s control.”Withdrawal and avoidanceOther natural signs of anxiety that may emerge are withdrawal and avoidance.That extra sense of attachment or clinginess in kids with regard to their families often goes hand-in-hand with a detachment from their friends and other factors outside the home. Children may show a lack of interest in activities they once enjoyed. “You may notice that your child starts to withdraw or avoids experiences that make them anxious,” Tewari said. “Some children may be worried about their social skills, like being able to socialise with friends and carry conversations face-to-face. They don’t want to feel judged or out of place, so they may try to avoid social gatherings.”Nervousness and worryAn increase in nervousness and worry is another expected manifestation of post-pandemic anxiety. Kids may be feeling a general sense of doom or an inability to relax. “Multiple stressors – illness, death of loved ones, fear of infection, income insecurity, closure of in-person school and activities, lack of child care, reduced access to community resources – have severely disrupted daily life for children and families,” said Dr Helen Egger, a child psychiatrist and co-founder of Little Otter in San Francisco. “As we emerge from the pandemic to a new normal, children are facing ongoing stress and uncertainty about the return to school (Will we wear masks? Will I get sick? Will school be interrupted again?), worries about being behind in school subjects, worries about seeing old friends and making new friends, and separation anxieties and fears after spending more time at home.”Meanwhile, other children may feel very eager to return to school and in-person social interactions. These emotions can create strong feelings of anticipation, which often feels like anxiety, noted Wight. Parents can help children understand and manage worry through regular check-ins to get them comfortable talking about it. “Helping children connect their physical experience in their body with their emotional experience is a critical skill that will benefit them long term,” Wight said. “Parents can ask their children how they are feeling in their bodies. Some examples of a child’s reply might be butterflies in the stomach, sweaty hands, fidgety legs. Then the parents can help the child connect this feeling to an emotion. So a parent might say, ‘Sometimes when I have butterflies in my stomach, I am feeling nervous about something.’”The key is naming the emotion and normalising the experience to make it clear feelings aren’t “bad” but can be uncomfortable and challenging. “Once the feeling is identified, then the parent and child can work together to come up with a plan for what the child can do when they are having that emotion, such as coping skills,” Wight said. “Helping children feel as though they can cope with an emotion can reduce the power that emotion might have over the child.”Irritability and temper IssuesWhile we often associate anxiety with sadness, it can also lead to feelings of irritability and anger. School-aged children may be easily agitated and experience temper outbursts. “They may become agitated and lash out when you encourage them to resume ‘normal life,’ and their reactions may seem disproportionate,” Tewari said. As with worry and other signs of anxiety, parents can support their children by encouraging them to share their feelings, providing a safe space for honest expression and taking a calm, nonjudgmental stance, she added. “Ask open-ended questions to deepen your understanding of your child’s anxiety triggers, and normalise your child’s worries so that they do not feel alone,” she said. “Providing children with the language to better understand their inner experience allows them to connect with what they’re feeling and communicate their feelings more effectively. Parents can use an emotions wheel with their children to help them identify and label specific emotions.”Declining academic performanceWith so many of the pandemic-related changes involving school, it wouldn’t be surprising for the anxiety around this moment to manifest in declining academic performance. “Anxiety about the pandemic can persist, even as we move forward, and common responses from school-aged children include school refusal and performance deterioration (which in many cases was exacerbated by the necessary virtual platform) and concentration difficulties,” Perlmutter said.  Some of my patients start to wet their pants again, some have insomnia, some vomit from anxiety.Dr Dyan Hes, Gramercy PediatricsTewari noted that many students have concerns about returning to school and “the unique pressures of the in-person school grind.”“For many children, the pandemic had some benefits, such as increased flexibility in their schedule and more down time at home, so the idea of going back to the way things were may feel scary,” she said. Parents can ease this specific anxiety by talking to their child about the return to the classroom and perhaps visiting the school or meeting the teacher ahead of time.Regressive behavioursAnother common sign of anxiety in children can be regression to younger behaviours, which has been a common phenomenon around the pandemic. “Kids are regressing,” Hes said. “Some of my patients start to wet their pants again, some have insomnia, some vomit from anxiety. Older children can perhaps express their fears, but for the younger ones, we have to look out for these signs.”Thumb-sucking, tantrums and clinginess are other typical regressive behaviours. One of the best things parents can do in these situations is to approach the regression without judgment. Offer comfort and reassurance rather than shame. “Stand there and listen,” said Perlmutter. “It is critical to recognise and process our own emotional response to all of this, and to avoid passing on our own anxiety and uncertainties to the children. Create an open and supportive environment where children and teens know they can ask questions and express their worries. Answer questions honestly, using words and concepts that are geared to the children’s developmental level. Explain that the things they are experiencing and doing are often how we express our feelings of anxiety and sadness.”Changes in eating and sleeping“Classic signs of anxiety are issues emerging around food and appetite, or sleep,” McDermott said.Sleeping patterns may shift – with sleep disturbances, nightmares, waking in the night and insomnia. Children may have trouble falling or staying asleep or end up sleeping more during the day. Parents should also pay attention to changes in eating habits, including loss of appetite, fussiness around food or extra comfort eating.“It is developmentally appropriate for children to experience some of these behaviours and emotions, but concerns begin to mount when it interferes with their lives on a daily basis and/or in significant ways,” Wight noted. In this case, she advised exploring professional support options, as changes in sleeping and eating patterns can strongly affect a child’s ability to function and regulate their emotions. The same goes for any of the above signs of anxiety. “Parents do not need to wait until their child’s struggle feels like a crisis,” she said. “It’s best to proactively seek support. While parents know their children best, there are qualified and thoughtful professionals that can help parents and their children navigate through challenging situations.”Related...Can My Child Get The Covid Vaccine? A Guide For Parents8 Practical Ways To Get Your Kids To Talk About Their Feelings5 Ways Covid Changed The Little Things About Family Life20 Cheap Holiday Destinations Right Now, Even If Travel Is A Pain30 Too-Real Tweets About Yelling As A Parent
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