California governor and unions clash over school openings

An effort to reopen schools in California is foundering, stoking the frustration of parents and the governor of America’s most populous state
Read full article on: independent.co.uk
Timo Werner on Chelsea goal drought: I’ve never missed so many big chances, I felt guilty
Chelsea striker Timo Werner says his first half a season in the Premier League was "the worst time of his career".
8 m
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Jurgen Klopp feels ‘awkward’ commenting on Mohamed Salah’s Liverpool future
'It's just a bit awkward'
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Abigail Breslin ‘in shock and devastation’ after father dies from coronavirus
‘Little Miss Sunshine’ actress shares devastating news on Instagram
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Rishi Sunak will use ‘income tax stealth tactics’ to plug £43bn black hole in Britain’s finances
Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak is expected to raise £6 billion in Wednesday’s Budget by freezing income tax thresholds for at least three years.
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Chelsea fans hail ‘the next Mason Mount’ after Conor Gallagher’s West Brom display
Chelsea fans were on Saturday hailing their latest academy star Conor Gallagher after a standout display for West Brom.
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Hong Kong detains 47 activists on subversion charges
Hong Kong police have detained 47 pro-democracy activists on charges of conspiracy to commit subversion under the sweeping national security law
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Inside the longest, deepest canal tunnel in the UK - just outside of Manchester
Exploring the canal passage under the Pennines after a TikTok video introduced it to a new audience
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Sheffield Utd vs Liverpool: Prediction, TV channel, team news, lineups, h2h results, live stream, odds today
Liverpool will look to get their Premier League season back on track with a trip to Sheffield United this evening.
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Comment on Almost every adult in England and Wales could receive ‘£750 share of £34BILLION claim against Experian’ by Alex Winter
The Sun
Chelsea vs Manchester United: Prediction, TV channel, team news, lineups, h2h results, live stream, odds today
Thomas Tuchel and Ole Gunnar Solskjaer face off this afternoon as Chelsea host Manchester United in a game that could be crucial to both teams’ Premier League top four hopes.
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Philippines to receive COVID-19 vaccine after delays
The Philippines is due to receive its first batch of COVID-19 vaccine
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Tottenham vs Burnley: Prediction, TV channel, team news, lineups, h2h results, live stream, odds today
Tottenham will be desperate to begin replicating their European form on the Premier League stage when they play host to Burnley today.
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Leicester City vs Arsenal: Prediction, TV channel, team news, lineups, h2h results, live stream, odds today
Arsenal will hope to keep confidence high after their thrilling win over Benfica as they face a tough trip to Leicester this afternoon.
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Air fares from Heathrow Airport to rise thanks to ‘pandemic tax’
An additional tax has been added to outbound flights from Heathrow airport, adding pressure on families who want to travel abroad after a year of restrictions.
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Alex Salmond to twist the knife again: Blow for Sturgeon as he prepares new evidence
Alex Salmond will give evidence in private tomorrow or on Tuesday to a second Holyrood inquiry, set up to establish whether Ms Sturgeon has broken the Ministerial Code.
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Crystal Palace vs Fulham: Prediction, TV channel, team news, lineups, h2h results, live stream, odds today
Crystal Palace and Fulham lock horns in a London derby this afternoon.
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Liverpool XI vs Sheffield Utd: Predicted lineup, confirmed team news and injury latest today
Liverpool have this week been dealt a serious injury blow with the news that captain Jordan Henderson faces a long spell on the sidelines ahead of Sunday’s Premier League trip to Sheffield United.
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Manchester United XI vs Chelsea: Predicted lineup, confirmed team news and injury latest today
Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has a few selection dilemmas to solve as Manchester United prepare to face Chelsea in today’s huge Premier League clash at Stamford Bridge.
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Thought-provoking images show 3.5 tonnes of clothing thrown away every FIVE minutes in the UK
The thought-provoking photo was captured as part of a London Fashion Week campaign designed to shine a light on the waste caused by fast fashion which is worn once and never again.
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Drawing comfort: the sketchbooks that got Chris Riddell through 2020
For the Observer’s cartoonist, keeping a daily pictorial record of events was the only way to make sense of last year. He tells how a new book was the resultOn 13 December 2019 I woke up and reached out for the “on” button of my bedside radio. I lay back and listened to the familiar voices of Radio 4’s Today programme tell me the results of the general election. As the interviews and analysis washed over me, I felt that mixture of emotions that had become all too familiar. Anger, sorrow, disbelief and helplessness. It was how I had felt when Nick Clegg became David Cameron’s useful idiot, when Boris Johnson and Michael Gove stood at the podium dumbfounded by their Brexit victory and when Donald Trump’s tiny hands grasped the reins of power and he became the leader of the free world. Now a bumbling buffoon had won a working majority and was going to “Get Brexit done”.As I shouted at the radio, I noticed the sketchbook next to it. I love drawing in sketchbooks. I have hundreds of them all over my house and studio in various stages of completion. My advice to all aspiring illustrators is to keep a sketchbook and draw in it every day. For two years, during my time as the children’s laureate, I drew a daily sketch charting my travels and posted the pages on social media. I found it therapeutic and cathartic in equal measure. Now, as the country woke up to the prospect of five years of Tory government, I stifled my shouts and reached for my sketchbook. I drew a troll in a nappy holding a spiked club and felt momentarily better. Continue reading...
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Seed sowing time is here, but don’t rush
It’s the right season to get things growing, but you may get the best results by holding off a little longerAs someone who grew up in the tropics, I feel absolutely no shame in admitting that I am a total fair weather gardener. With plant growth slowed or at a complete standstill for six months over the UK’s long winters, every year at precisely this time I feel like a sort of starter’s pistol has been fired: it’s finally time to spark new things into life. However, hard as it may be, here’s why suppressing an itchy horticultural trigger finger can be a huge bonus in the race to spring.By the end of February each year, my big stack of seed catalogues is well and truly dog-eared. My huge stash of seed packets – from tomatoes to cosmos – is neatly lined up and my compost and seed trays are all ready to go. Try as I might, I inevitably succumb to the temptation to sow at least one of these at the earliest possible date recommended by the guide on the back of the packet. I always justify it to myself as a great way to give many of these delicate plants a bit of a head start, meaning earlier crops and a longer season on interest. Yet, every year within just a few weeks I regret it. Continue reading...
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Chelsea XI vs Manchester United: Predicted lineup, confirmed team news and injury latest today
Thiago Silva will miss Chelsea’s clash with Manchester United – but the defender is expected to be back for the trip to Liverpool next week. 
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Tottenham XI vs Burnley: Predicted lineup, confirmed team news and injury latest today
Tottenham manager Jose Mourinho is close to having a fully fit squad at his disposal for the visit of Burnley, but Giovani Lo Celso is still working towards match fitness and unavailable today.
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Lady Gaga’s dogs recovered safely
Lady Gaga’s two French bulldogs, which were stolen by thieves who shot and wounded the dogwalker, have been recovered unharmed
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The Mystery Of The Covid Deaths Taking Months To Appear In NHS Data
They are called the “daily death figures” – and they provide one of the starkest illustrations of the devastating loss of life caused by Covid-19.Over the course of the pandemic this sobering dataset, issued every 24 hours by NHS England, has given real-time statistics on the number of people with coronavirus dying in hospitals.For journalists, politicians and the wider public, the rising death toll has formed a vital part of our understanding of the severity of the pandemic over time.It has also informed vital policy decisions, such as when lockdowns should be lifted.But something unusual is happening to a small number of deaths in the data. These rare cases aren’t being reported to the public until much, much later than they occur – in some cases, up to nine months on.The lag in reporting has effectively resulted in deaths from the first wave of the pandemic being logged during the current second wave.And no one seemed to know why it was happening.Deborah Coles, director of the charity Inquest, threw the question back to us: “Is it just because the system is overwhelmed and it’s not coping?“It would be good to try and get some questions answered as to why that is.”Everyone we spoke to had different suggestions ranging from delays issuing death certificates to admin errors as hospitals work under phenomenal pressure.But the NHS’s own guidelines state that these deaths should be reported onto its live-tracking system within 24 hours. The data collection process is meant to be straightforward.So what could possibly be taking nine months?The SystemThe story of how the Covid-19 daily death figures came into existence is fascinating in its own right. In March 2020, in the early days of the pandemic, NHS chiefs had identified there was a need for timely data on coronavirus deaths and the Covid-19 Patient Notification System (CPNS) was built in just five days by a company called Arden & GEM, working with the NHS.The firm had a track record of building similar reporting tools for deaths in custodial settings.The bespoke IT system replaced a manual data return spreadsheet which hospital trusts were previously using over email, as a temporary measure, to record deaths.As soon as the system was up and running hospital trusts began entering information about each Covid-related death into CPNS. The user guide highlights the importance of this reporting being “accurate and timely”.“Ultimately, the information you provide supports vital public health messaging regarding the containment of the virus,” the guide says, adding that the statistics are used to “inform short- and long-term policy and important guidance”.These CPNS death records are then validated by regional and national Incident Coordination Centres before they appear in the official daily deaths data published by NHS England showing deaths in hospitals.Many of the organisations HuffPost UK spoke to about the delayed death cases in the data believed referrals to coroners or inquest proceedings could account for the time lags.Human rights lawyer Elkan Abrahamson, of Broudie Jackson Canter, who is acting for bereaved families seeking a public inquiry into the pandemic, said: “I suppose the question is, is [Covid-19] on a death certificate and, if it isn’t, it may be that a hospital wasn’t sure if Covid was factor and took some time to investigate that before deciding to register it.”It is possible to check whether this is the case because deaths registered in NHS England’s daily data fall into two separate categories.One subset of the data shows deaths following a positive Covid-19 test in the previous 28 days, and another subset shows deaths where Covid-19 is mentioned on the death certificate.We found 20 cases in the “death certificate” subset between March 2020 and January 2021 where there had been a registration delay of more than three months.It’s easier to see how there could be delays in this, smaller, section of the data: if, for example, a coroner added Covid-19 to a death certificate following an inquest hearing or further enquiries into the death.The patient safety charity Action Against Medical Accidents (AvMA) is working with 76 families in relation to Covid-related deaths who are calling for inquest hearings.These include some cases where the deceased did not have Covid but there was disruption to other non-Covid medical treatment due to the pandemic.Peter Walsh, the charity’s chief executive, said: “We know that patient safety investigations and complaints investigations are taking much longer to conduct because of the circumstances. “If there is going to be an inquest, obviously that might have a bearing [on delays] and I’d imagine there’s a lot of pressure on the parts of the system that register deaths.”But he admitted: “I’m not not quite sure why there should be as long a delay as the examples you were talking about.”Even if coroner’s proceedings are a factor, they also cannot account for all of the delays.HuffPost UK found 44 deaths with a three-month delay, or longer, in the supposedly more straightforward dataset: people who have died within 28 days of testing positive for coronavirus.These are cases where no death certificate or even cause of death is needed, and the CPNS user guide clearly states they should be reported within 24 hours.Yet in one case it took eight months and 23 days for a death to show up. Could it really take that long to confirm simply that someone had received a positive test, and subsequently died?!function(e,i,n,s){var t="InfogramEmbeds",d=e.getElementsByTagName("script")[0];if(window[t]&&window[t].initialized)window[t].process&&window[t].process();else if(!e.getElementById(n)){var o=e.createElement("script");o.async=1,o.id=n,o.src="https://e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js",d.parentNode.insertBefore(o,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async");NHS England Covid-19 Daily Deaths delayed reportingInfogramThe Positive Test Covid Death CasesAll the data in the spreadsheets is anonymous, but we can still tell where each death took place.The 44 deaths after a positive Covid test with a registration delay of longer than three months were at a number of different hospital trusts across the country.There were 25 in London, seven in the north east and Yorkshire, five in the north-west, three in the south- east, three in the Midlands, and one in the east of England.We approached the hospital trusts, who highlighted a number of different reasons for the delays – ranging from missed Covid cases being identified in later audits, to admin or technical errors.North Cumbria Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust, which had five cases of deaths with registration delays of longer than three months, said its staff would not enter death data into CPNS until additional information about the patient had been gathered – even if the death itself had been formally confirmed.The trust said some of this data could only be collected from next of kin and with clinicians working under vastly increased pressure, it had occasionally taken longer to finalise the data.Other trusts also mentioned difficulties contacting next of kin as being a factor, while some said Covid cases had been picked up during audits and others pointed to system error.Tameside and Glossop Integrated Care NHS Foundation Trust said it had a case where a death notification was saved in April 2020, but for some reason did not upload to the CPNS system, and the trust was not made aware of this until December, when it was resubmitted.Reading the CPNS user guide also provides some insight into why delays might occur.The guide sets how deaths of NHS staff must be reported in CPNS, along with their staff group, role and their last place of work, adding: “This information could feasibly take time to gather, and so may result in a delay in registration.” Certain deaths also have to go through an additional admin process to be validated rather than undergoing “auto-validation” within CPNS and so could take longer to process. These include deaths where the patient is under 18 or over 109 years of age, where the patient was an NHS worker, if there is no NHS number, where the gap between Covid swab date and date of result is greater than five days, and where the patient died in A&E and the length of stay was greater than one day.Registration Delays This issue of registration delays, as the statistical phenomenon is technically known, is not unique to Covid-19 deaths.Reports by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) on the subject show that some death registration delays can be significant – in 2019, the longest time it took for a death to be registered was nearly 32 years.The ONS says such cases tend to be where there is no body of the deceased, but where they are presumed dead, or if a body is found after many years. There are also some special cases where deaths are re-registered later because of a retrial or an official inquiry.But perhaps the most surprising thing we found was this: despite the intense pressure facing the health service, NHS England’s Covid-19 daily deaths data is actually performing extremely well in terms of registration delays compared to other mortality data.Some 93% of deaths in the NHS England covid dataset are being recorded within a week of the date of death, compared to 75% of all deaths in 2019.The last time this level of efficiency was seen within the national mortality statistics was in 2001.The number of deaths with registration delays of longer than three months in the NHS England data is also very small as a proportion of the total.The 64 deaths we found represent only 0.09% of the 69,704 hospital deaths in England from March 2020 to January 2021, so have no statically significant impact on the data.The picture is rather different when you shorten the delay. The CPNS system was designed for deaths to be entered within 24 hours because the data is intended for use in informing decisions and directing public policy.Yet HuffPost UK found a much more significant number of cases are taking more than 24 hours to be reported. During one week in January 2020, we calculated 47% of deaths with a positive Covid test took more than 48 hours to be recorded.We asked NHS England and Arden & GEM why these delays are occurring and whether they affected the robustness of the data.NHS England said: “Hospitals have recorded more than 70,000 Covid deaths over the last year with 93% of these being recorded within a week, and on the rare occasion they are not, NHS regional teams urgently investigate these with the relevant hospital.”Arden & GEM did not comment, saying: “Your enquiry would be best responded to by NHS England.”Impact On Bereaved Families None of the grief support charities HuffPost UK contacted about this issue were aware of families who had direct experience of these registration delays in relation to their loved ones’ deaths.But the charities were handling cases where families had experienced battles to get answers over deaths in which Covid-19 was a factor.Action Against Medical Accidents has had two Covid-related enquiries from bereaved families in the past week that demonstrate the complexities in some cases.The charity said one case involves a woman who presented with what were assumed to be Covid symptoms and was told to isolate at home, when in fact she actually had lung cancer that went undiagnosed, and she later died. The family is arguing that in a pre-Covid world she would have been assessed properly, and the lung cancer diagnosed and treated sooner. In the second case, the hospital thought the deceased had Covid and were treating him as such but the post mortem found no evidence of Covid and determined the cause of death to be inflammation of the heart muscle.Inquests are due to take place in both these cases but Walsh said, if anything, families often found it difficult to officially raise questions about deaths in the current climate.“There’s the added guilt, if you like, about people not wanting to cause a problem to a system already under stress,” he said. “So some families would tend to not even ask questions because they know how difficult things are at the moment, whereas in ordinary times they’d be more forthcoming in expressing concerns.”Linda Magistris, chief executive of The Good Grief Trust, spoke of the wider impacts on families when official proceedings surrounding deaths are subject to delays.“We know people are having to wait months and months and months, sometimes six or eight months before they even get an inquest, sometimes a year – it really is quite shocking,” she said. “And, of course, the grieving process is really difficult. “We had somebody yesterday whose son died 14 months ago and she still hasn’t got the answers she needs. It really is shocking because of the huge volumes [of deaths during the pandemic] – 100,000 people extra.”Inquest is supporting calls for a public inquiry. Coles said the wider issues in relation to deaths, including the death registration delays, demonstrate the need for it.“When you look at covid in the round, I think there is no doubt that there are very important questions to be asked about the government’s handling of this pandemic and a lot of lives lost that could well have been prevented had that been a more effective response very early on. “I think every family will say what they want is a proper, effective investigation and scrutiny in the hope that no other family goes through what they’re going through.”Have you been affected by a death registration delay or are you pursuing an inquest or formal inquiry into a loved one’s death related to Covid-19? If so, contact emma.youle@huffpost.com or DM @emmayoule on Twitter.Related...How The Government Could Be Held Accountable For The 100,000+ UK Covid DeathsHow Britain Succumbed To CovidWhy Lockdown Is Lasting So Long Even With Effective Vaccines
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Crystal Palace vs Fulham lineups: Predicted XIs, confirmed team news and injury latest today
Roy Hodgson has been dealt another injury blow this week, with Nathaniel Clyne joining the lengthy list of unavailable Crystal Palace players.
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Ministers 'plan a "Listen to Nan" vaccine campaign'
Ministers are planning a 'Listen to Nan' campaign to persuade younger adults to get the coronavirus vaccine, it was claimed today.
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Arsenal XI vs Leicester City: Predicted lineup, confirmed team news and injury latest today
Thomas Partey is today hoping to make his first start since the beginning of February when Arsenal face Leicester City.
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Woman wants to end weightloss challenge with friend
The bride-to-be, 34, believed to be from the US, teamed up with her friend to shed some weight ahead of her wedding later this year. But while the friend has lost weight, the bride-to-be has put it on.
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‘I call it a mutual break-up’: When stars ‘disappear’ on their fandoms
Often a celebrity’s pivot to lifestyle or out of the public eye means that their dedicated fansites are left bereft, unsure what to post about. Adam White speaks to the Twitter armies who’ve been deserted, from Rihanna to Sarah Michelle Gellar
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A new vegan 'fish' and chip shop has opened in Manchester
There's one pretty major ingredient missing from Manchester's newest chippy
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Ole Gunnar Solskjaer provides injury updates on Edinson Cavani and Paul Pogba
The Red Devils play Chelsea on Sunday afternoon
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Jorge Masvidal confirms UFC return date and reveals plans to fight Canelo Alvarez
'Gamebred' says he will return in August.
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Prison reform is slow, but could the will to change be growing?
The penal system perpetuates racial and economic oppression, is criminally expensive for something that doesn’t work, and dehumanises all of usFake German heiress Anna Delvey was released from prison last week. She spent 19 months at Rikers Island awaiting trial, and then another 21 months at Albion Correctional Facility after she was convicted of scamming hotels, restaurants and banks out of more than $200,000. Features in Vanity Fair and New York magazine led to that sticky sort of fame, sickly and delicious to so many of us, so of course people were clamouring to interview her when she came out. Prison, she told the press, two days after her release, “It’s just pointless. It’s a huge waste of time… I feel like it’s insane. To take people, to lock them up, take everything away from them, and just to expect them to reform.” She continued: “They have this universal solution for everyone and that should not be the case.” And the thing is, even if you can only hear this as a whinge, the bored complaints of a bratty grifter, spat through a mouth of gum, she’s right.The pandemic, along with its horrors, has also offered an opportunity to reshape how we live. From the small, like the clothes we wear, to the large – a move away from offices, or the provision of hotel rooms for homeless people. There was even a moment for prisons. Last April, justice secretary Robert Buckland launched an early-release scheme to ease the pressure on prisons. But despite around 4,000 prisoners being eligible, by the time it “paused” in August, just 275 had been released. The moment passed. Now, one in eight prisoners in England and Wales has tested positive for Covid-19, and staff warn of a “mental health crisis” as prisoners are confined to their cells, with visits and education programmes restricted. Continue reading...
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Lakeith Stanfield: ‘I don’t hold anything back’
Imagination, energy and a surrealist streak have made Lakeith Stanfield one of Hollywood’s most unusual – and sought-after – stars. Here, he talks about his toughest role yetTo spread the word about his anarchic, brilliantly batshit 2018 comedy Sorry to Bother You, the actor Lakeith Stanfield adopted an anarchic, brilliantly batshit strategy. He went to one of his favourite stores, Iguana Vintage Clothing, in Los Angeles, and cleared out every wig they had. Then he drove around cinemas in Hollywood, bought tickets for the film, stashed them inside the wigs, and hid them outside the cinemas.“Then people engaged in it, on a wild goose hunt,” explains Stanfield, his voice deep and languid. “There’s a lost art in being able to have fun with a film in the release. But it was a film that I thought was fun, right? So I wanted to have fun, and I wanted people to engage in that fun with me. Also I loved the movie so much, I wanted people to see it for free.” Continue reading...
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The United States vs Billie Holiday review – Andra Day's film all the way
As the blues singer, Day is magnetic in Lee Daniels’s often chaotic biopic, built around a speculative romance between Holiday and a government agent“It was called ‘the United States of America versus Billie Holiday,’” wrote the jazz legend in her 1956 autobiography, “and that’s just the way it felt.” Holiday’s 1947 conviction, when she was sentenced to a year and a day for possession of narcotics, was just one chapter in a sustained campaign against the singer, whose performances of Abel Meeropol’s anguished, anti-lynching ballad Strange Fruit had become a lightning rod for civil rights awareness and activism.Holiday’s steadfast refusal to stop singing that song was perhaps the greatest indication of her indomitable spirit, forged in the fires of a tough-as-nails upbringing that saw her survive horrific childhood abuse to become a superstar in an age of often deadly racial and sexual prejudice. Yet in Precious director Lee Daniels’s timely but muddled biopic, which boasts a revelatory performance by Andra Day, the authorities’ harassment of Holiday is given a perverse romantic twist in the shape of a federal agent ordered to spy on the star. Continue reading...
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Miami Beach to cut back on famous palm trees over climate concerns
City to plant shadier trees to preserve its environment, keep people cool, reduce urban warming and improve air qualityAs a poster child for the climate emergency, Miami Beach has become a world leader in mitigating the effects of sea-level rise. Now the subtropical Florida city is cutting back on its famous swaying palm trees as it seeks shadier alternatives to preserve its environment and try to keep residents and visitors cool. Related: Republicans push 'blue-collar comeback' – but is the party a true friend of the worker? Continue reading...
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New haircuts, old ideology: film warns of shifting far-right strategy in Europe
They’ve ditched the shaven heads but, despite recent setbacks, they remain a threat, says film-maker Christian SchwochowInside a university auditorium in Prague, a young man in a crisp black shirt and white trainers is railing against the pro-immigration politicians he holds responsible for a recent Islamist terror attack in Berlin. To build a safer Europe, he yells, “we have to get rid of those responsible for these murderous policies”.A woman in the crowd voices her support with a shout of “Sieg heil!”, but he is quick to shut her down: “That was yesterday.” Like-minded movements of the future will succeed by remaining outwardly respectable: “We can protect the foundations of Europe by occupying them,” he proclaims, his blue eyes sparkling, “by becoming economists, teachers, judges.” Continue reading...
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Gossip, sex and social climbing: the uncensored Chips Channon diaries
Sir Henry ‘Chips’ Channon’s diaries caused a stir in 1967. Now edited by Simon Heffer and published unredacted, they reveal even more juicy detail about British high society between the 1920s and 50sWhen the diaries of an obscure politician called Sir Henry “Chips” Channon were first published in 1967, they caused a sensation, and not only among those whose names appeared in their index (“vile & spiteful & silly,” announced the novelist Nancy Mitford, speaking for the walking wounded). Channon, an upstart Chicagoan who’d unaccountably managed to marry the daughter of an exceedingly rich Anglo-Irish Earl, moved in vertiginously high circles. As a friend of Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson, he had enjoyed a ringside seat during the abdication crisis; as the Conservative MP for Southend he had looked on with fawning admiration as Neville Chamberlain negotiated with Hitler, and abject horror as Winston Churchill succeeded him as prime minister (Channon was in favour of appeasement). Most eye-popping of all, during a visit to Berlin for the Olympics in 1936, he and various other of his smart English friends had partied wildly with leading Nazis, among them Hermann Göring, whose floodlit garden had been made over to look like a cross between a Coney Island funfair and the Petit Trianon in Versailles – a theatrical coup that seemingly drove both Joseph Goebbels and Joachim von Ribbentrop half mad with jealousy.But dripping with juice as these diaries were – Channon’s chief virtue as a writer is his abiding awareness that dullness is the worst sin of all, and for this reason they’re among the most glittering and enjoyable ever written – they were also incomplete. When Channon died in 1958, aged 61, his son Paul (later a transport secretary in Thatcher’s government) green-lit their publication. But they would need, it was agreed, to be heavily redacted. Quite apart from his father’s sexuality – among Channon’s male (and often married) lovers were the playwright Terence Rattigan and, almost certainly, Prince Paul of Yugoslavia – pretty much everyone named in the book was still alive. As Chips’s ex-wife, Honor, said at the time: “Some of the catty remarks (which fascinate) MUST be cut.” She was especially worried what Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother might think. When the book did appear, then, it was as a single, slim volume: enough words to fill a Penguin paperback, the edition I owned. Continue reading...
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The tourists who flock to Dubai seem happy to overlook a few missing princesses | Catherine Bennett
Human rights abuses cut little ice with holidaymakers who rush to the beachHow many abducted and imprisoned princesses would it take for British tourists to turn their backs on Dubai? Three? Four? Ten? Because two “disappeared” princesses doesn’t look like being enough, even now that a secretly filmed account by one of them, saying she had been captured, assaulted, drugged and repatriated, has appeared on the BBC – corroborating the fact-finding judgment of a UK judge, published a year ago.Sir Andrew McFarlane accepted, following claims by lawyers for Princess Haya, a fugitive ex-wife of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum of Dubai, vice-president of the UAE, that his daughters Latifa and Shamsa had both been forcibly returned to Dubai after escaping in 2018 and 2000 respectively. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, it emerged, was withholding information that might shed light on Shamsa’s rendition from the UK. Continue reading...
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Evatt pinpoints improved aspect of Bolton's game after third clean sheet
The Trotters are now in the League Two play-offs after the victory over the Bluebirds
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Premier League's greatest hat-trick - from "perfect goal" to "mixed emotions"
Leicester City vs Arsenal will always evoke memories of Dennis Bergkamp and the greatest Premier League hat-trick of all-time scored in an unforgettable 3-3 draw at Filbert Street in 1997
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Arteta's Arsenal concern comes to light ahead of crunch Leicester showdown
Arsenal have a dismal record going into their match against Leicester that they must rectify or face further embarrassment in a Premier League season that is already one to forget
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Hong Kong: 47 democracy activists charged with subversion under security law
Group accused of organising an unofficial election last July in the largest single crackdown on campaigners Forty-seven Hong Kong democrats and activists have been charged with conspiracy to commit subversion, in the largest single crackdown on the democratic opposition under a China-imposed national security law.Sam Cheung, a young activist and a participant in an unofficial primary election last summer, was charged after reporting to a local police station on Sunday, dressed in a black mask and accompanied by his wife. Continue reading...
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Vanessa Bryant blasts 'vile' Evan Rachel Wood for branding dead Kobe a 'rapist'
Evan Rachel Wood sent the tweet in question just a day after Kobe's death alongside his 13-year-old daughter Gianna and seven others in a fiery helicopter crash last year, but Vanessa had just seen it for the first time
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'Not a good idea:' Experts concerned about pope trip to Iraq
Infectious disease experts are expressing concern about Pope Francis’ upcoming trip to Iraq
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Former Dancing On Ice judge Jason Gardiner scolds ‘predictable’ series for going ahead during pandemic
Jason quit the show in 2019.
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Kim and Kanye divorce documents reveal separation date is still 'TBD' 
The divorce documents, which were filed on behalf of Kim on February 22, cited 'irreconcilable differences' as the reason for the celebrity couple's split.
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