Chrissy Teigen says she’s been put on ‘serious bed rest’ during ‘difficult’ third pregnancy

‘I honestly thought bed rest was you have to really, really relax, stay home. I thought it could be couch rest,’ model says


Load more
Read full article on: independent.co.uk
Petr Cech puts new Chelsea signing Edouard Mendy through his paces during first training session
The definition of a Chelsea legend.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
Name of east Manchester's new £350 million arena revealed
Plans for the 'world class' indoor music and sports venue next to the Etihad Stadium were given the green light by the council's planning committee on Thursday
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Coronavirus news live: 6,874 new cases recorded in the UK and Tfl says no change in passenger numbers despite work from home push
Live updates on the latest news, developments, and guidance on the Covid-19 pandemic.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
5 Coronavirus Fibs You Were Told This Week
Hello, and welcome to a special coronavirus edition of 5 Fibs.If you read that intro and are still expecting to see something not wholly depressing, please say hello to this puppy then turn around and exit the article.We only rate dogs. Unfortunately this is a tiny house hippo. Please send dogs. Thank you... 13/10 pic.twitter.com/CpuKqdnHxi— WeRateDogs® (@dog_rates) August 21, 2020Still here? OK, let’s begin...The false positives debacleOur first fib comes courtesy of journalists Julia Hartley-Brewer and Toby Young who, along with a few others, promoted the apparently alarming statistic that 91% of coronavirus tests in the UK are “false positives”.THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT: Matt Hancock told me on @talkRADIO that the False Positive Rate of Covid tests in the community is "under 1%". Sounds good, doesn't it? WRONG! An FPR of 0.8% when the virus prevalence is so low means that at least 91% of "Covid cases" are FALSE POSITIVES. https://t.co/f2Z85Lj4cj— Julia Hartley-Brewer (@JuliaHB1) September 18, 2020Obviously this would be quite alarming if true – it would basically mean the pandemic isn’t really a pandemic and we’ve all been sitting in our homes under various forms of restrictions for months all for no reason.But it isn’t true. You can read about it in detail here but it’s a bit lengthy so in short, Young and Hartely-Brewer are basing their wild claims on one article written by someone who got their maths a bit muddled.Alas, they have yet to retract their claims and out in the real world it’s having an actual effect on the country’s ability to fight the pandemic.A tier-2 contact-tracer (tougher-to-reach cases) just told me they're finding people citing the false positive rate back at them when justifying why they shouldn't self-isolate. Obviously, it's the moronic mAthS trUthErs who've just discovered Bayes, rather than a real thing.— Chris Cook (@xtophercook) September 24, 2020Dominic Raab and ‘consistency’On Wednesday Dominic Raab claimed the four UK nations have overwhelmingly taken a “consistent” approach to making decisions on how to tackle coronavirus.Now we can’t be certain, but it would appear Raab is unaware of a little something called the historical record. Armed with some tidbits from aforementioned record, Welsh first minister Mark Drakeford appeared on Sky News shortly after and preceded to dismantle the claim with the calm precision of a neurosurgeon.He said: “Of course, we have done things differently in Wales, more cautiously, more slowly and answered many questions over the last few months about whether we should have done things more quickly.“I think we’re glad now that we didn’t because in Wales I don’t need to take a number of the measures the PM had to announce for England yesterday because we’ve never been in that position. “We’ve always had a policy of encouraging people to work from home wherever they can and we don’t need to go into reverse because that’s always been our policy.”The four nations have also been out of step on a number of other major decisions:In May, Nicola Sturgeon asked the UK government not deploy its new “stay alert” message north of the border.In June, England published a list of countries on so-called “travel corridors” for holidaymakers. Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales did not immediately follow suit, describing the move as “shambolic”.Scotland introduced mandatory face masks in shops on 10 July with England only following suit 13 days laterThe PM and NHS Test and TraceWednesday was a big day for fibs, as Boris Johnson claimed testing and tracing has “very little or nothing to do with the spread and transmission” of coronavirus.Again, that pesky historical record returns to bite the government on its collective Tory bottom because in May, when it was first touted, that very same collection of bottoms said it would “help identify, contain and control coronavirus, reduce the spread of the virus and save lives”.And that’s it for this entry. Short, sweet and still managed to get the word “bottom” in three times.Bottom. Four.The PM, againTuesday saw what has quickly become a portent of varying levels of doom as Johnson addressed the nation and invited everyone to live round his gaff when he said “we will get through this winter together”.OK, that bit isn’t strictly accurate, but he did say this: “When the sickness took hold in this country in March, we pulled together in a spirit of national sacrifice and community. We followed the guidance to the letter. We stayed at home, protected the NHS, and saved thousands of lives.”Just read that again. Yes, it does contain the words “we followed the guidance to the letter”.Now one can only assume the PM is referring to the Great British Public and in no way including his own circle of colleagues and advisors which includes a certain Mr Cummings, who only followed the guidance to the letter after days of squirming and reinterpretation of exactly just which letters they were.Cummings was under intense pressure to resign after he drove some 260 miles to Durham and made another trip to the town of Barnard Castle while there during lockdown in March.He refused to resign and stuck to his decision. To the letter.TrumpAnd so we come to our regular glance across the Atlantic to see what absolute nonsense President Trump has uttered this week and, even by his own standards, this week’s is quite something.Speaking at a definitely-not-Covid-secure rally in Ohio, he said coronavirus only affects “elderly people with heart problems and other problems.”He added: “That’s what it really affects. That’s it.”"It affects virtually nobody," Trump says of the coronavirus, which has now killed 200,000 Americans and counting pic.twitter.com/qHrZvUWNhX— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) September 22, 2020According to the CDC, some 400,000 people under the age of 18 have been infected with the coronavirus. While many cases were mild or even without symptoms, at least 576 patients under the age of 18 were hospitalised for the infection between March and July. The president’s comments also contradicted his own past statements.“It’s turning out it’s not just old people,” Trump told journalist Bob Woodward in March in comments that were only recently made public. “Just today and yesterday, some startling facts came out. It’s not just old – older. Young people, too. Plenty of young people.”Related... This Is Why NHS Covid-19 App Privacy Concerns Are Massively Overblown Trump Horrifies Everyone By Refusing To Say He’ll Leave The White House Peacefully
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Coronavirus - all you need to know as 1,700 Manchester students in isolation
Residents at the Birley campus and Cambridge Halls at Manchester Metropolitan University have been told to stay in their rooms for 14 days after 127 students tested positive for the coronavirus
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
WWE SmackDown results: Roman Reigns destroys Jey Uso, The Fiend possesses Alexa Bliss and more
All the action from the go-home show for Clash of Champions.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
Four Reasons Why NHS Test And Trace Isn't Working
NHS Test and Trace is vital in the fight against coronavirus – but it’s not working.Now the long-awaited Covid-19 app has finally arrived, we take a look at what’s gone wrong with the system that aims to reduce the spread of coronavirus.It’s not testing enoughThe UK’s Pillar 1 testing for hospital inpatients and health and care workers, for which results are analysed at NHS and Public Health England labs, appears to be meeting demand. The problem lies with Pillar 2 testing, which focuses on testing people in the community – at local drive-in and walk-in sites. In recent weeks stories have abounded of people unable to access tests, being told there are no appointments available at centres in England and no home tests kits available either. In some cases people were told to travel hundreds of miles and wait in long queues at testing sites. One whistleblower told HuffPost UK they were working at a testing centre where work was running at a fraction of capacity, saying: “We’re supposed to turn people around and say we’re too busy, but we’re not busy.” Last week it was revealed up to three quarters of a million Covid test requests are going unanswered every day. Government statistics published last week said 25% of people getting Covid tests between September 8 and 14 had to travel thirteen miles or more, with 5% having to travel 47 miles or more to get tested.Dido Harding, chair of NHS Test and Trace, has defended testing failures by saying there was an “unexpected” surge in demand, with many people without symptoms said to be seeking checks.It’s not quick enoughA fast turnaround for test results is crucial to tackling the spread of Covid-19. The government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) has stressed the importance of delivering rapid test results, ideally within 24 hours.Boris Johnson has previously told parliament that he wanted a 100% completion rate by the end of June, but that ambition has never been met.Latest official figures showed that between September 10 and 16 just one in 10 Covid tests met the PM’s own target of being completed within 24 hours.The median time taken to receive a test result at regional test sites increased to 30 hours from 27 hours in the previous week. Similarly, mobile testing units increased to 31 hours up from 26 hours. Times for results from local test sites decreased slightly to 34 hours from 35 hours during the same period.Crucially, the total number of test results processed decreased by 19% compared to the previous week.Government insiders have said this was more about results taking longer to be communicated to people, rather than a fall in tests being processed.It isn’t tracingAt the centre of all the concerns surrounding NHS Test and Trace are questions about how many people are actually being reached by contact tracers.Figures from just two weeks ago showed just 69.2% of those “close contacts” – defined as being within two metres of a Covid carrier for more than 15 minutes – are actually being reached.The PM’s independent scientific advisers have repeatedly warned that stopping the spread of the disease requires more than 80% of “close contacts” of people with Covid reached by the system to be identified and then told to self-isolate.The statistics for the week up to September 2 were the lowest weekly percentage since the service launched in May.Latest figures show the percentage of “close contacts” of those who test positive edged up 73.9% to 74.7% – but is still well short of the 80% that experts say is needed to make the service viable.The public doesn’t trust itAs we’ve already mentioned, at least seven million people will need to download the new NHS Test and Trace Covid app for it to start reducing the spread of the virus.Considering there are 49 million people over the age of 16 eligible to use the app in England and Wales, that would mean a minimum of 15% of the population need to install the app for it to make any “meaningful impact” on the reproduction or R rate of the virus.This could be a challenging task. Social media is currently awash with people voicing concerns and refusing to download the app because they’re concerned about their data and privacy regarding the NHS Test and Trace Covid-19 app. But here’s why those privacy concerns are overblown.There has also been widespread public anger over ministers and government officials breaching Covid lockdown restrictions, reinforcing the “one rule for them, another for everyone else” argument as the rest of the country toes the line.Just this week Tory MP Danny Kruger was caught out by a member of the public travelling unmasked for the entire duration of an hour-long train journey, later claiming he “quite simply forgot”.And of course there was the time the PM’s chief aide Dominic Cummings visited Barnard Castle with his wife and son to test his “eyesight” having travelled from London to Durham at the height of the pandemic.Related... How The NHS Test And Trace App Works No, 90% Of Coronavirus Tests Are Not 'False Positives' And This Is Why The Covid Contact-Tracing App Is About To Launch. But There Are Big Concerns
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
West Brom vs Chelsea, Premier League: What time is kick-off today, what TV channel is it on and what is our prediction?
The Telegraph - Telegraph Online, Daily...
Gigi Hadid shares rare glimpse of baby girl as she shows off presents from stars
New mum Gigi Hadid has given fans another look at her newborn baby daughter as she shared snaps of all the presents she and Zayn Malik have been sent by fellow celebs
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
The road-rage father and son who chased a motorist onto the M62
Lewis Booth, 26, who works as a driver, recruited his dad Jason, 46, after the younger man had been involved in a road rage incident in Harpurhey
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Brighton vs Manchester United, Premier League: What time is kick-off today, what TV channel is it on and what is our prediction?
The Telegraph - Telegraph Online, Daily...
Quarantined Books And Confusion: Teachers Reveal What It’s Like Inside Schools Right Now
From cleaning and sanitising all equipment in between classes to quarantining books before they can mark them, teachers have admitted the demands of teaching in a coronavirus era has massively increased their workload.“We are all just dazed,” one teacher admitted.Another revealed: “Teaching is a very full-on job at the best of times, but now there is literally no breathing space.”“Testing is a major issue,” Vic Goddard, principal at Passmores Academy in Essex who featured in the Channel 4 programme Educating Essex, told HuffPost UK.“It shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone that when you put 1,500 children and staff into the same building, they are going to catch things.” Goddard said the usual germs that fly around after the summer break are hitting staff and pupils now, but the fear is they could be symptoms of coronavirus – so it is hitting staffing levels.“I have staff who probably have colds,” explained Goddard. “But the guidance is if you have signs which could be coronavirus symptoms, isolate until you have a negative test.“If too many teachers are off, staffing is affected and we’d have to get supply teachers in and the learning isn’t the same for the children. It is also going to lead to year groups closing down.”Goddard says that parents view teachers as being in a position of authority in the community and look to them for advice surrounding the constantly changing coronavirus guidance.“Parents are anxious and clueless about when they should or shouldn’t send their children into school. It is confusing and I constantly have to read the guidance to double-check."Vic Goddard, principal at Passmores Academy in EssexBut he admitted it is confusing even for them. “Parents are anxious and clueless about when they should or shouldn’t send their children into school,” he said. “It is confusing and I constantly have to read the guidance to double-check. “Parents want to do the right thing. But when they can’t get a test, they don’t know what to do and are keeping their children off school.”Goddard told HuffPost UK that stress and anxiety levels among teachers are high as they take on extra duties to ensure school can operate safely.“At the start of every lesson, they are overseeing cleaning and making sure everything is sanitised. There is a real element of vigilance and teachers are on high alert with no off switches.“Teaching is a very full-on job at the best of times, but now there is literally no breathing space.”Goddard says that while schools have done everything asked of them – such as getting all children and staff back in, the government has failed to keep its side of the bargain.“We are not getting the things we asked for,” he said. “We need the basics in place and can’t survive without that backing.”Goddard added that teachers at his school were providing extra catch-up lessons for children after school – and they weren’t asking for any extra money for doing it.“It is humbling to see. Staff are doing it for the children. It’s the job and it’s what we do.”Francine Beckett, head of modern languages at Carr Hill High School in Kirkham, Lancashire, told HuffPost UK that this is her 29th year of teaching – and it is the most overwhelmed she has ever felt.“I am finding it all overwhelming – but it’s not the teaching that is difficult; it’s everything else before you can even begin to teach.”Beckett described how teachers are changing classrooms all the time to restrict the movement of children and keeping pupils in their bubbles.For the language teacher, this means spending an extra hour a day moving between classes with all her resources and logging into different computers into several applications.“Physically, it is overwhelming and hectic,” she admitted. “You are always on the back foot and rushing around.”Beckett explained schools are trying to limit the movement of pupils as much as possible so are having many lessons in double blocks. However, she admits two hours is “not a good length of time for anyone to concentrate.”“It is difficult when you are standing at the front of the classroom and cannot wander around and peer over the children’s shoulders and do the activities you would normally do,” she said.“We also have an issue where if we take books in for marking, we have to quarantine them for 48 hours before we can touch them to mark them.“You then have to try and remember which classes they are from and make sure no one else touches them.”“Physically, it is overwhelming and hectic.You are always on the back foot and rushing around.”Francine Beckett, head of modern languages at Carr Hill High School in LancashireAs well as having extra duties supervising pupils at break times, Beckett says every time she leaves a classroom, she makes sure she sanitises the keyboard and mouse ready for the next teacher.One of the hardest things she says, is not being able to socialise with colleagues as they know if they unknowingly passed on the virus to each other, the impact on staffing would be catastrophic.“We are absolutely worn out and overwhelmed, but we can’t let our hair down and socialise together due to the risks of coronavirus,” said Beckett. “Everyone is desperately trying to keep everyone safe.”On top of the normal teaching, Beckett says they have plans in place for live lessons for those who are isolating. And at the back of her mind, she has to plan in case a whole year group is sent home. “We are all just dazed,” she admitted.Beckett said the attitude of pupils has been heartening as they have coped and adapted “amazingly well” to all the changes.“While this is the most overwhelmed I have felt since teaching, it’s not the teaching itself which is the issue – it’s the things that are completely out of our control.”Chris Wardle, deputy head teacher at St George’s Secondary School in Blackpool, who teaches science, told HuffPost UK the best thing since the full return to school has been the attitude of the pupils and how they have embraced the changes – including the wearing of masks in corridors.“There is a real passion for learning and the children have really knuckled down after the loss of learning during the lockdown.“There are challenges such as keeping two metres away from pupils and not being able to sit down next to them to explain things to them. But we are combatting this by using visualisers on a big screen to work through problems with them.”Wardle said while there are extra duties such as making sure desks are cleaned and that pupils regularly apply hand sanitiser and enter through the correct routes, he feels coping with the crisis has united the school.“Pupils can see that the teachers and senior leaders in the school are in control. If they saw them running around like headless chickens, they would feel insecure.”One secondary school teacher, who did not wish to be named, told HuffPost UK she was delighted to be back at school. “Being back in the classroom is a much happier place for me and where I feel more effective teaching can take place.” she said. “I think it’s healthy having schools back operating and the pupils are in good routines and having that familiarity and interaction with other children and staff.“There are extra duties and responsibilities. But we just pull together and do it as we want it to work and for schools to stay open.Mary Bousted, joint general secretary of the National Education Union, told HuffPost UK that teachers across the country are committed to making the wider re-opening of schools work – but are “holding their breath preparing for the worst.”“Teachers already work the most unpaid overtime of any profession.The average working week is 55 hours."Mary Bousted, joint general secretary of the National Education UnionShe says the lack of a proper testing system is deeply concerning and is making life extremely difficult when it comes to the staffing of schools, particularly in secondary schools.She says they have also had reports from teachers about how exhausted they are finding keeping abreast of all the extra demands.“Teachers already work the most unpaid overtime of any profession.” she said. “The average working week is 55 hours. “But now they are physically exhausted too as the constant movement in schools is a real challenge and is making a difficult job even harder. “In addition to the increasing workload, there is a feeling of isolation as many staff rooms are closed. Teaching is a very collegiate profession and getting support from your colleagues after a difficult lesson is very important.”Bousted criticised the government for failing to give teachers the conditions to make them confident of a whole school return amid the pandemic being a long term prospect.“This government has continued to be woefully underprepared with an: ‘It’ll be alright on the night’ attitude.“Teachers needed things like an increase in school sizes by using public buildings and a fully functioning test, track and isolate service to approach anything like normality.“The government has been inadequate, inefficient and ineffectual and the people who will lose out the most are children and young people.”Related... The Other Frontline - Inside The Classrooms Still Operating Amid The Coronavirus Pandemic Teachers Reveal Why Government’s £1bn Tutoring Plan Won’t Work Dozens Of Schools Forced To Send Home Pupils Amid Covid Cases 'My Biggest Concern Is A Sudden Outbreak': How Teachers Feel About Schools Reopening
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Conor McGregor vs Manny Pacquiao confirmed by Filipino’s team
It's on!
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
Have DIY stores run out of shed paint?
Early in lockdown, I did what thousands of Britons did: cleared out the garage. Among all of the junk, I found a pot of black Cuprinol Ducksback 5-year Waterproof paint. So I painted the shed.
Home | Daily Mail Online
What are the best duvet COVERS and how do they affect a better sleep?
Most people overlook the most important aspect of a duvet cover in favour of making sure it is aesthetically pleasing - but we reveal what you really need to consider when buying one.
Home | Daily Mail Online
Ancelotti makes Everton admission as Blues look to go top of Premier League
Everton travel to Crystal Palace on Saturday, looking to continue their perfect start to the season under Carlo Ancelotti
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Casualty spoilers: Lockdown in the ED as skipped episode is shown
The answers we've been waiting for.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
'Our first case of Covid. Parents are hounding me, staff are afraid': diary of a headteacher's week
The exhausted head of a school in England wonders how much more he can takeCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThree weeks into the autumn term and we are all wrecked. I look around at my leadership team in our Monday morning meeting at 7.45am. Everyone is drained from poor sleep, working over the weekend and managing colleagues’ worries. Some are snappy and then quickly apologise, each frustrated with their own raw nerves. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the...
The Dele-José story is far from over but the fear is Alli may have peaked at 21 | Barney Ronay
Tottenham midfielder’s talent shone brightly against Real Madrid three years ago – but when Mourinho starts calling you talented you need to worryLast year Sport England announced it would be spending £85m on The Talent Plan For England. The idea behind the Talent Plan is to create “the world’s best talent plan” – a shoot-for-the-moon ambition that becomes more achievable if you accept the rather pedantic objection that a Talent Plan is something you’ve just made up, and thus, technically, nobody else in the world has one anyway.What is certain is that the Talent Plan has a lot to say about talent, so much that its 35-page outline mentions it 258 times in total. This is the big takeaway from the Talent Plan: talent is definitely very important. To be clear, nobody here is suggesting we don’t care about talent. It is a doubly interesting read given one unarguable truth about talent is that nobody seems to know exactly how it works. It has even become fashionable in coaching circles to say talent is overrated, that it is a kind of chimera. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the...
The Morgan dynasty: meet the family driving Leicester City Women's rise
Captain, manager and general manager are children of the chairman and City are thriving in the Women’s ChampionshipLeicester’s captain Morgan. There is only one. The image of the centre-back of the 5,000-1 outsiders lifting the Premier League trophy in 2016 made Wes Morgan a household name.Except there is another captain Morgan at Leicester. One who also wears the No 5 shirt. In 27-year-old Holly Morgan, Leicester City Women have a centre-back who has inadvertently influenced the progress of the club far beyond the pitch. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the...
What we know about Michael Schumacher since F1 legend's tragic skiing accident
Official Michael Schumacher news has largely been kept out of the public domain since his devastating skiing fall in 2013. Here's what we know about the seven-time Formula 1 champion
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Android warning - 'Alien' malware found that can steal passwords from 226 apps
Cybersecurity researchers from ThreatFabric have discovered a new malware dubbed Alien that can steal passwords from 226 apps
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Diana and Fergie's rivalry ended when 'brave plot' brought them back together
Princess Diana and Sarah Ferguson were friends before they joined the royal family, but constant rivalry pushed them apart and caused tension between them
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Harding Jr's road to redemption after three prison spells - with help of Whyte
EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: John Harding Jr turned his life around after being released from prison for a third time in 2015 - and he says his journey is only just beginning with Dillian Whyte in his corner
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Man United can equal Premier League record in Brighton fixture
Man Utd are looking for their first Premier League win of the season in their game against Brighton on Saturday.
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Hundreds occupy Brooklyn Bridge as crowds of Black Lives Matter supporters take to the streets
Protests continued Friday in New York and in other cities including Boston, San Diego, LA  and Louisville  over a grand jury's decision not to charge the officers over Breonna Taylor's death.
Home | Daily Mail Online
SNP humiliated: Boris dismantles Sturgeon for 'baffling' plot to betray Scottish fisheries
BORIS JOHNSON humiliated the SNP in the Commons this week, after he questioned Nicola Sturgeon's "baffling" decision that would "allow the EU to take back control" of Scottish fisheries.
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
People flock out of pubs and restaurants on first weekend of 10pm curfew
Police patrolled the streets and staff cleared away tables and chairs as the strict time limit enforced across the country.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
Alison Steadman: ‘The idea you have to be young and sexy to get work is absolute nonsense’
<p>The ‘Gavin & Stacey’ and ‘Life’ star talks to Charlotte Cripps about more reflective roles and why she wants to improvise again  </p>
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Frank Lampard reveals Christian Pulisic concern with Chelsea star set to miss West Brom clash
The USA international hasn't featured at all yet this season.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
Bollywood star Deepika Padukone questioned in drugs case relating to Sushant Singh Rajput’s death
Padukone is among six people brought in for questioning.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
The 9 biggest coronavirus myths debunked as UK hit by record daily infections
Dr Andrew Lee - a public health expert at the University of Sheffield - helped Mirror Online debunk some of the most regularly repeated coronavirus myths circulating months after the pandemic began
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
The best TV to look forward to this autumn and winter
Whether you’re into drama, comedy, thrillers or hard-hitting docuseries, there’s a little something for everyone as we head towards the end of the year
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Heat's Bam Adebayo takes blame for Game 5 loss to Celtics
Bam Adebayo has not wanted much credit for anything this season, always deferring to others in the Miami Heat locker room when things are going well
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
BBC Weather: Temperatures to plunge BELOW FREEZING as deep chill hits Britain
BBC WEATHER has forecast a decidedly cooler weekend for the UK as autumnal conditions start to set in and temperatures across the country plunge to below freezing.
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
'Black Aces' in bubble have toughest job in NHL playoffs
Being on the taxi squad of extra players has never been a more difficult job given the confines of the NHL playoff bubble and no guarantee of getting into a game
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
The 'secret' infinity pool Mancs are trekking to - and its worried farmer owner
"The door is open and a part of me would have liked it be kept a secret"
1 h
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
The 'biggest' Starbucks money-saving hack revealed - but not everyone is happy
While some customers described the hack as 'awesome' others warned that you will be judged
1 h
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Boxing on TV tonight as Josh Taylor and the Charlo brothers return to the ring
Taylor defends his two super-lightweight titles, Jermall and Jermell Charlo are in world title fights while Yunier Dorticos takes on Marius Briedis in the WBSS cruiserweight final
1 h
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Where Friends' guest stars are and how they look including Ross' lesbian wife
Where Friends' lesser known stars - including Ross' lesbian wife and Phoebe's sister-in-law Alice - and what they look like now
1 h
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Jumps guru Paul Ferguson's five horses to follow this winter
Every National Hunt season, Paul Ferguson’s Jumpers To Follow publication finds many winners. Here's a rundown of his five top horses led by Shishkin
1 h
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Playboy mansion left to rot and stripped by looters after Hugh Hefner's death
Hugh Hefner's iconic Playboy mansion was left to rot for years but it is now being stripped down for a total makeover following Hugh Hefner's death
1 h
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
The £7m transformation plans for Salford's historic Islington Mill
Islington Mill is a hub for creativity in Salford
1 h
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Almost half of Manchester's city centre car parks are set to disappear
A question mark hangs over parking provided by the council - and development is expected to continue claiming land
1 h
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Coronavirus: Boris Johnson calls for global pandemic early warning system
<p>International community ‘tattered’ from experience of Covid-19, says PM</p>
1 h
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
China pushes emergency use of COVID vaccine despite concerns
Hundreds of thousands of people have taken one of the four leading vaccine candidates in China
1 h
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Millie Radford 'loved every second' of labour as baby has photo shoot at 14 days
The latest addition to Britain's biggest family did not cause her mum much pain as she came into the world - and has already posed for pictures in a Radford family tradition
1 h
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
The big hotels, including a new five star one, changing the face of Blackpool
The town's first five-star hotel opens in 2021 and will offer stunning views of the Promenade and Irish Sea
1 h
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...