Covid patients dying as they REFUSE to go on ventilator amid fears it will kill them, medics warn

Dr Alison Pittard, dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine, says ICU colleagues are watching patients die because they refuse to go on a ventilator over a misguided fear it will kill them.
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New variants ‘very unlikely’ to stop great British summer, expert claims
New variants of Covid-19 are unlikely to stop Britain returning to normal this summer, an expert has claimed.
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MI5 involvement in drone project revealed in paperwork slip-up
Exclusive: Document produced by university cited agency as secret funder of researchFor an agency devoted to secrecy and surveillance, it is an embarrassing slip-up. An inadvertent disclosure on a university document has revealed that MI5 is partly behind what was meant to be a covert bug and drone research project.Ostensibly, Imperial College’s research was to create a quadcopter system for charging remote agricultural sensors – but MI5’s participation has emerged because somebody involved stated it was the secret second funder of the programme. Continue reading...
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Coronation Street spoilers: Steve McDonald and Tracy Barlow are kicked out after a huge betrayal
Steve's mistake has serious consequences.
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Arsenal sent Willian warning by club legend despite improved recent form
Arsenal star Willian has picked up some form in recent weeks in two huge games for their season against Benfica in the Europa League and Leicester in the Premier League
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Elvis Presley's granddaughter Riley Keough 'cast' in Amazon's The Terminal List
Elvis Presley's granddaughter Riley Keough is said to be the latest star to have signed up to to the action-thriller series which will also feature Constance Wu and Taylor Kitsch
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England fourth Test score: Sundar stranded on 96 as India bowled out for 365
Breezy partnership between Sundar and Axar Patel hands India a commanding first-innings lead of 160
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Solskjaer provides hopeful double injury boost ahead of Manchester derby
Manchester United take on Manchester City this weekend in what could be the most important match of the season with both sides first and second in the Premier League
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Bolton seeking to improve certain aspect of League Two table
The Trotters now have a positive goal difference for the first time this season after the midweek win over Oldham Athletic
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Man City's midfielder emulating Kevin De Bruyne away from the Etihad
"They're really friendly people here, it’s a really good city and in normal times there would be loads to do"
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Sydney's LGBTQI Mardi Gras goes ahead _ with restrictions
Sydney’s annual iconic Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras is going ahead, only in a different format due to coronavirus restrictions
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Inside United's academy... transfers, Brexit and finding the next Shoretire
Our exclusive interview with United head of academy Nick Cox: "We've got a great record over the last 83 years and it's our job to make sure we don't break the cycle over the next 83 years"
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Pope to visit Iraq church damaged by IS militants
In a stop rich in symbolism, Pope Francis will visit a church damaged during the Islamic State's reign of terror in the town of Qaraqosh, a center for Christian life in Iraq
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Hong Kong court puts off release of pro-democracy activists
A Hong Kong court says 11 Hong Kong pro-democracy activists accused of subversion will stay in jail for at least another five days while judges consider whether to release them on bail
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Shiite powerhouse al-Sistani helped shape today's Iraq
One highlight of Pope Francis’ historic visit to Iraq is his meeting Saturday with a revered religious leader for Shiite Muslims, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani
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Covid crackdown on holidays as Brits forced to apply for travel permits
BRITONS will need to show a travel permit to prove they are journeying abroad for essential reasons in the latest Covid crackdown on holidays.
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Pope Francis meets with top Shiite cleric in Iraq
Pope Francis is meeting with Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, one of the most senior clerics in Shiite Islam, in Iraq’s holy city of Najaf
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Everything inhabitable: a poem by Marieke Lucas Rijneveld
Published here exclusively in English, the Dutch writer responds to the controversy over their decision to resign as Amanda Gorman’s translatorNever lost that resistance, that primal jostling with sorrow and joy,or given in to pulpit preaching, to the Word that says what isright or wrong, never been too lazy to stand up, to faceup to all the bullies and fight pigeonholing with your fistsraised, against those riots of not-knowing inside your head, Continue reading...
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Diplomats: UN fails to approve call to end Tigray violence
U.N. diplomats say an attempt to get U.N. Security Council approval for a statement calling for an end to violence in Ethiopia’s embattled Tigray region and to spotlight the millions in need of humanitarian assistance has been dropped after objections from India, Russia and especially China
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Silence about my race kept my family apart. Could a rescue dog bring us together?
I craved unconditional love. Then I met Jasper, a nervous greyhound with a habit of running awayEveryone told me that adopting a dog was a bad idea. I was an avid traveller; a freelance writer, and no great respecter of routine. My longest commitment to anything remains the direct debit for my phone network provider. But in March 2020, just as the world began to change, I headed to Battersea Dogs & Cats Home in London to meet an anxious greyhound called Jasper.I had told no one but my housemates of my plans to adopt. They had courteously agreed to cohabit with a canine and we had perused a site filled with drooling pit bulls and champagne puppies. Privately I dreamed of a dachshund. Then I met Jasper. Continue reading...
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Blind date: ‘The best thing about him? His shirt’
Robyn, 32, credit controller, meets Danny, 36, radio presenter/DJWhat were you hoping for?Another way to meet someone. Failing that, another way to spend my Saturday night. Continue reading...
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Tim Dowling: an unsettling force has upset my equilibrium… hope
The sun is drying the dew off on the ivy. I can hear birds singing and children playing. It’s too earlyA year ago, I was contending that as someone who had always worked from home I’d been in training for a global pandemic for 30 years: I’ll do your lockdown standing on my head – bring it.That was a couple of lockdowns ago, but it’s only recently that something has arrived to upset my mental equilibrium: hope. After months safely cloaked in the armour of despair, hope has suddenly left me unpeeled and paranoid: in my dreams, dark forces range against me, and the police are often involved. Continue reading...
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Hypothermia, paradoxical undressing and the Dyatlov Pass
Feeling strangely hot, some hypothermia victims remove layers of clothes before dying from the coldThe mysterious deaths of nine Russian hikers in Dyatlov Pass in 1959 has spawned many outlandish theories and a bad horror movie. Some of the victims had traumatic injuries. New research suggests these may have been caused by a slab avalanche that battered rather than just burying them.This theory does not account for why some victims died of hypothermia having fled almost naked from the campsite after the avalanche. However, an effect known as paradoxical undressing is well known in cold weather medicine and may occur in up to half of deaths associated with hypothermia. Snowbound victims remove coats, sweaters and even trousers before dying from the cold. Continue reading...
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Nadiya Hussain urges British Bangladeshis to get Covid vaccine
Great British Bake Off winner among trio of TV chefs calling for wider take-up of coronavirus jab Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe Great British Bake Off winner Nadiya Hussain has appeared in a video campaign urging members of the British Bangladeshi community to get vaccinated against coronavirus.Hussain, Asma Khan from the Netflix series Chef’s Table and MasterChef’s Dr Saliha Mahmood Ahmed have joined with the NHS in an effort to tackle hesitancy surrounding the jab. Continue reading...
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How to cook and eat a whole celeriac, skin and all – recipe | Waste not
The knobbly bits, stems and leaves of celeriac often get discarded, but the whole plant is edible, so long as you know howCeleriac is a notorious vegetable, known for its ugly appearance and gnarly, rough and pockmarked exterior. Its tendril-like roots, stalks and leaves are usually removed before it’s put on sale, but they’re all edible, too. Shop directly via a veg box scheme or farm stall, and you may be able to procure the whole plant.Celeriac was bred for its root from the same plant as celery, which is why the stem and leaves are so similar to a bunch of celery, if a little more intense in flavour. They’re especially useful when used as an aromatic herb to flavour sauces, soups and stews. Contrary to popular belief, the skin is also edible, so long as it’s cleaned, and it roasts and boils well. Continue reading...
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My Sister Became My Brother 50 Years Ago, Before Many Knew What ‘Transgender’ Meant
Transgender people have been back in the headlines as President Joe Biden lifted ex-President Donald Trump’s ban on their service in the military, hired them in his administration, and signed an executive order barring discrimination on the basis of gender identity.This much-needed show of support for a group that is too often the target of misunderstanding, derision and abuse has predictably stirred up debate. In fact, just this week, Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene hung a transphobic sign up outside of her office and Sen. Rand Paul wrongfully referred to gender affirmation surgery as “genital mutilation” during a confirmation hearing for Dr Rachel Levine, who is the current surgeon general of Pennsylvania and transgender. As a gay man with a trans brother, I’ve personally seen how difficult this path toward acceptance has been for the community.  * * *I didn’t sleep the night after my mom told me the news. She sat me down and looked very grave as she asked if I knew what a transexual was. I was only 12 years old and I didn’t. In 1972 I doubt anyone in my Midwestern suburban neighbourhood would have. I worried it might have something to do with me preferring Barbies and Easy Bake Ovens over Hot Wheels racing cars or baseball gloves. Was I going to have an operation? I didn’t like having my tonsils out and this seemed a lot worse. But I soon realised she was referring to my sister, who was 18 and what people referred to as a tomboy.  I worshipped my big sister. We both loved bringing home stray animals and filling our home with those misfit pets, and she never tired of trying to teach me to be handy with tools no matter how hopeless I was. Even though she often had dark, intense moods, I knew I could always charm my way to her tender side. When our mother mentioned the surgeries my sister was planning, I began to feel overwhelmed. What exactly were these operations? I had so many questions but didn’t dare ask them. Those parts of the body weren’t something I was eager to talk about with my mother.  “She has done a lot of research and is convinced this is the issue she has struggled with her entire life,” she told me. With her commanding voice, bleach-blonde hair, midi-skirts and fringe vests, my widowed mom was a mix of Dinah Shore and Bea Arthur.  “We are going to respect and support her wishes,” she said firmly. “This is a very brave thing she is doing. She just wants to be happy.” I wanted my sister to be happy too, but as I stared at my bedroom ceiling that night, I wished I knew how I was supposed to help.* * *“Do you want orange or grape juice?” my mom called out cheerfully as she dropped two frosted brown sugar cinnamon Pop-Tarts into the toaster the next morning. My sister had already graduated from high school and as I sat down at our kitchen table, I was relieved she’d slept in late that day. I was planning my escape to the bus stop before any awkward encounter with her when I heard the creak of the stairs. My stomach knotted as she appeared at the doorway and sleepily shuffled past me. She looked exactly the same. I had thought the hormones my mom said she started taking might instantly transform her.“Good morning...” I stuttered. I didn’t know if I was supposed to use the girl name I had always known her by or her new boy name, and realised I couldn’t even remember what her new boy name was.  But my sister just grunted at me grouchily like she did every morning before her first cup of coffee. “You’re going to be late,” Mom reminded me. I felt like I was in the ”Bewitched” episode where Samantha acted like everything was normal even though Ben Franklin was lounging on the sofa. At my Catholic elementary school, I kept to myself and could barely focus on my lessons. I wanted to try to find out more information from the school library but realized that would be impossible. What could I possibly say? ”Hi, I would like some books on the great battles of the American Civil War, and could you toss in anything you have on transsexualism?”Since there was no episode of “The Brady Bunch” where Jan feels like she was assigned the wrong gender at birth, I realised I pretty much had to figure out this hybrid brother/sister thing all by myself. My mom’s guidelines were clear: we will accept this, but we will not talk about it — not even with each other. That first conversation I had with her was also our last. Only a few days later, I arrived home from school and was stunned by my sister’s new buzz cut. Soon after, I noticed a slight moustache and some facial scruff. She still wore her usual jeans and t-shirt, but her short frame began to noticeably bulk-up. Soon, even her voice was changing. She talked like my sister but lower and deeper. And she never used this new voice to talk about the past. Then we began calling my sister “he,” which was easier than I ever would have guessed. It was soon like my big sister had never existed.   But no one outside our house understood the new rules. The neighbours had tolerated mom mowing our front lawn in her lime green bikini, but the girl-next-door turning into the boy-next-door was harder to ignore. I tried to convince myself that everyone thought my sister was just trying out a new summer cut with sideburns. I soon realised I was fooling myself when my best friend Cindy began making snide remarks about my weird sister “who thought she was a man.” I was embarrassed and ashamed but had no way to defend myself. If I told Cindy the truth, she would tell her mom and her mom would tell everybody. It was safer to just stop being Cindy’s friend. Our conservative, Catholic relatives already thought my mom had sinned when she attended the touring production of Hair with its infamous nude scene. But “allowing her daughter to do that to her body and be okay with it” was absolutely unforgivable. If I wanted to play with my cousins, I had to be dropped off and picked up in our driveway like a kid shuttled between divorced parents. Many, like my grandmother, refused to speak to my new brother. I could feel something new emanating from every single person who knew or suspected what was happening in my family. It wasn’t just judgment ― there was emotion behind it. It was disgust. My brother left home a few months later. He told me those operations he needed were done on the West Coast, but I wondered if he was also aching to get far away. He never wavered in his conviction that this was the right thing to do, but he’d been completely ostracised by everyone except a very few of us. As he drove off, even I felt a wave of guilty relief. Now maybe everything could go back to normal.  My mom moved us to a new school district before the year was out.* * *Five years after his surgeries, my brother came home. I felt jealous when he first stepped out of his pick-up in his trucker’s hat and t-shirt. Even though I’d hit puberty, I was not nearly as masculine as the man standing before me.He restarted his life and eventually met a conservative, religious widow who he married.“That’s great,” I said to my mom on the phone when she told me. By then I had moved to New York City and surprised no one when I came out as gay. “Is his wife cool about his past?”My mom sounded offended by my question. “Why would she need to know about that? It would only cause problems.”I was used to my family’s skill at hiding the truth, but this took it to a new level. When my brother’s new wife asked my mom to see pictures of him as a child, she told her they had all burned in a fire. Over the next seven years, I often wondered what mix of naiveté and denial kept their marriage going, but I wasn’t going to ask my brother. Although we shared the bond of being outsiders, we never talked about him being transgender ― even with each other.It was a much different time and a much different world then. As difficult and dangerous as it can still be for transgender people to come out, it was virtually unheard of ― and unthinkable ― at that time. So many trans people were not able to live the lives they wanted to live, and those who did often found themselves dealing with secrecy or shame or both. His marriage inevitably ended in disaster. His wife was furious their relationship was founded on a massive lie. And my brother’s shame and guilt eventually led to a suicide attempt.Twenty-five years have passed since then. My brother got needed support from groups and therapists that became increasingly available to trans people, and he happily remarried a woman who knew his story from their first date. Now he lives a peaceful small-town life under the radar while I live out loud and openly as a married gay man.But whenever I wanted to tell the truth about my family, I felt I was betraying the sacred rule passed down from our mom: accept but don’t talk about it. Although we scattered her ashes in 2009, speaking about this part of our past still felt disloyal. The last thing I wanted was to reopen old wounds. But wasn’t this my story, too? Didn’t I have the right to speak about it?***“It’s a good story,” my brother said when I called him recently to let him know I was writing about our lives.“It’s not easy to tell,” I replied.“It wasn’t easy to live.”I was relieved and grateful he didn’t try to stop me. I knew this wasn’t exactly fun for him. My brother was never a trailblazer by choice. He became a pioneer out of necessity. Transitioning saved his life. And my life was forever changed because of it.He was never able to teach me to be the handyman he is, although he impatiently tried, rolling his eyes when I handed him pliers after he asked for a socket wrench. But our relationship taught me something more important — how to not get hung up on the external and to be able to recognise the humanity in others. When I see how much time the world wastes demonising the “other” and causing unnecessary strife and pain, I know now is not the time to be timid. I need the same courage to take the kind of action that he and my mom showed me all those years ago.When my brother remarried, my husband and I danced at his backyard reception with him and his wife. It was a bright spring day and we were surrounded by supportive relatives. My grandmother died without ever speaking to my brother again. Others in the family took a few decades, but finally came around and now adore the man they’ve come to know. Their kids and grandkids weaved through us as we danced, playing a game of tag, unaware that the groom had once been thought of as perverse and disgusting by many of the people around them. I marvelled at this wholesome family scene. This was all my brother had ever wanted.This article first appeared on HuffPost PersonalHave a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on ukpersonal@huffpost.comUseful websites and helplines:The Gender Trust supports anyone affected by gender identity | 01527 894 838Mermaids offers information, support, friendship and shared experiences for young people with gender identity issues | 0208 1234819LGBT Youth Scotland is the largest youth and community-based organisation for LGBT people in Scotland. Text 07786 202 370Gires provides information for trans people, their families and professionals who care for them | 01372 801554Depend provides support, advice and information for anyone who knows, or is related to, a transsexual person in the UKMore from HuffPost UK PersonalThis Is What It's Like When Your Twin Comes Out As TransMeet Moxie Star Josie Totah –The Actor, Writer And Producer Redefining Trans RepresentationExclusive: Black LGBT+ Young People Hit Hardest By Covid Mental Health Crisis
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Labour Must Unite In Liverpool, Or Risk Losing The City Entirely
“It couldn’t happen.” “Not here.”“You’re having a laugh, aren’t you?”In recent years these have been stock responses I’ve heard to the suggestion Liverpool might vote any other way than Labour. And they were right – the socialist republic of Liverpool appears to be an unassailable red fortress.But I’m afraid this isn’t true. Labour’s success has been built on trust, not blind tribalism. It wasn’t all that long ago when the Liberal Democrats were in charge. They ran our city for 12 years, and it was a seriously hard slog to slowly win back trust seat by seat. My party colleagues would do well to think back to this period in the early 2000s as we reflect on the chaos of recent months, which has been like watching a slow motion car crash. The eyes of the country are on Liverpool right now and, after the farcical way in which the national party has handled the selection process, many will simply shake their heads and turn away.We’ve spent a decade building an unshakeable bond of trust with the electorate, and you can feel some of that hard earned trust beginning to slip away. It’s no exaggeration to say that Labour could lose the mayor’s seat in May. For Labour to prevent this happening, we need to pull back from the brink, end party factionalism and unite around a common vision of hope for our city. Then roll our sleeves up and start regaining trust with humility and hard work.  I want to be telling my constituents of Croxteth about Labour’s plans to help our city recover from the pandemic, not answering questions about shameful headlines. It shouldn’t fall on a young councillor like me to say this. But as someone who’s not part of any faction, I feel I can deliver home truths.  And right now, I want to be telling my constituents of Croxteth about Labour’s plans to help our city recover from the pandemic, not answering questions about shameful headlines. As the youngest candidate in the country to be contesting a major city mayoral role, I’m very alive to the challenges facing young people in Liverpool. I’m enormously proud of the work we’ve done, particularly in the face of Tory cuts, but know we need to work harder than ever to prevent a lost generation from falling through the cracks. Social mobility has gone into reverse during the pandemic. I’ve lost count of the number of stories I’ve heard of highly skilled people in our city being forced to take menial jobs. In many ways, young people have borne the brunt of the pandemic. They’ve missed out on education and lost job opportunities, and their lives have been put on hold. Youth unemployment is soaring and many feel their futures have been snatched away from them. We all know furlough is hiding the true level of unemployment and thousands of small businesses have been forced to close.  Whether it’s me or my great colleague Joanne Anderson, we desperately need a new style of leadership to rise to the challenges our city faces. When you take this into account and recognise the breadline struggle, uncertainty and anguish many residents are facing on a daily basis, it ought to concentrate politicians minds.There’s no time for infighting or disunity. Covid-19 is the biggest crisis we’ve faced in a generation and we should be straining every sinew to hardwire hope in our communities.    My generation is the post-9/11 generation and has known nothing but wars, terrorism, the banking crash and a divided world. What’s important to us is inclusion, social justice, trust and embracing change. Having grown up in a world of disruption, we’ve learned to expect change and realise that it drives improvements. For me, this is a Labour value too – and one that’s more relevant than ever. After all, Harold Wilson said, “he who rejects change is the architect of decay.” He would know that now is not the time for business as usual – and whether it’s me or my great colleague Joanne Anderson that’s selected to contest the mayoral election, we desperately need a new style of leadership to rise to the challenges our city faces. Anthony Lavelle is a Labour councillor and candidate for Liverpool mayor. Follow him on Twitter at @anthonylavelle1Related...Liverpool Mayor Job 'May Be Scrapped' Amid Row Over Labour Selection RaceWhat Are The Covid Variants In The UK? Here’s How They’re SpreadingRishi Sunak's Budget Explained In Two Minutes
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It's A Sin: 15 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Channel 4's Hit Drama
It’s A Sin has proved to be one of the biggest talking points of the year so far, and while it may have finished airing last month, exciting details about the show we’ve all been obsessed are still coming to light. Hearing all the stories and reading new interviews about the Channel 4 series has certainly helped us deal with our emotions after that ending, so with that in mind, we’ve rounded up everything we’ve learned to spread a bit of joy – just like the Pink Palace pals would have wanted. La!1. Three major networks originally turned the show downA number of major players turned down the chance to commission It’s A Sin when writer and creator Russell T Davies first started pitching his show to them in 2015. Speaking to Pink News, he revealed that even Channel 4 initially passed on it. He said: “It always started at Channel 4. They said no. And then it went to BBC One and they said no.“It even went to ITV at one point, and they just said: ‘Not yet. We’re not quite that sort of channel yet’.”He continued: “It was a hard sell, you know... Genuinely, because it’s about people dying. It’s a tough piece of work.”Channel 4 later reversed their decision thanks to their commissioning editor of drama, Lee Mason, who Russell says waited for “all the staff to change and all the heads of department to move on and then got the script out again” to try and get it made.2. There were many flash-forward plots that were scrappedThe show was meant to feature a number of storylines that eventually had to be scrapped. In an interview with Damian Barr’s Literary Salon, Russell revealed that It’s A Sin would ideally have run for eight episodes, and that there would have been an extra housemate living in the Pink Palace. There was also supposed to be an episode that revisited the characters in the present day, which would have seen Roscoe discover he had HIV later in life and Jill confronting Ritchie’s mother about her behaviour as she visited her in her old age.It also would have explored “sexual abuse at the heart of the Tozer household” and uncovered more about how Keeley Hawes’ character “ended up like she did”.“It was never written, so it doesn’t exist, but it was kind of budgeted for,” Russell lamented. 3. Russell T Davies refused to write one proposed sceneRussell has detailed how he refused to bow to a suggestion put to him by one of the networks during the commissioning process because he thought it was “unbelievably crass”.He told The Hollywood Reporter’s TV’s Top 5 podcast: “I was told at one channel, ’What if its start is on an AIDS ward in say, 1990 or 1992, with the machines and people dying, and then went, 10 years earlier....’.“I thought that was unbelievably crass and literally refused to do it.” “My producer said, ‘I know you don’t like that scene. If you just type it out, if you just type one page of that, it might get made’. I’d rather die than type that page. It’s the wrong way to tell it. There was a lot of nonsense like that.”4. There was also one AIDS symptom he didn’t want to feature on screenSpeaking to HuffPost UK, Russell revealed that he chose not to portray one of the devastating symptoms of the virus as he feared it may inspire young adults to harm their own bodies.“It’s also a wasting disease and a lot of patients get very very thin,” Russell said of the disease. “I didn’t want a lead actor with a lot of young fans [Olly Alexander] undergoing starvation because I think that’s asking them to follow, to copy.“That’s the one thing I drew a line at, saying, ‘let’s not do thinness as a symptom because I don’t want it to look in any way glamorised or admirable,’ which things do simply by being on television.”5. Ritchie’s involvement in Doctor Who was actually a tribute to a former sci-fi starIn episode four, we saw Ritchie make an appearance in a fictional 1988 episode of Doctor Who.Not only was this a nod to It’s A Sin writer Russell T Davies’ role as an executive producer on the 2005 reboot of the sci-fi series, but it also served to pay tribute to late actor Dursley McLinden, who died from AIDS in 1995 at the age of 29. In Episode 4 of #ItsASin we see Ritchie take a part in Doctor who! He plays the Character of Trooper Linden, Russel T Davies named this part after Dursley McLinden, who played Mike Smith in remembrance of the Daleks, he sadly passed away due to AIDS in 1995! @alexander_ollypic.twitter.com/LcZVoNqAmy— The Doctor Who Pages (@DWpages) January 25, 2021As if #ItsASin wasn't already a masterpiece the Daleks show up! pic.twitter.com/DVcjMzstEH— Sean Campbell
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How To Know If You're An Interrupter Or A 'Cooperative Overlapper'
In conversation, do you have a tendency to jump in before the other person is done speaking? You might be an interrupter — or you could be what linguists call a “cooperative overlapper.” Like interrupting, cooperative overlapping can be perceived as rude or dismissive in certain settings or among certain people, but the intent behind the behaviour is anything but. According to Georgetown University professor of linguistics and author Deborah Tannen, who first introduced the term, cooperative overlapping occurs when the listener starts talking along with the speaker, not to cut them off but rather to validate or show they’re engaged in what the other person is saying. “I coined the term to distinguish this type of talking-along, which encourages a speaker to keep going, from interruption, where a listener starts to speak while another is speaking in order to take the floor,” she told HuffPost. (She also uses terms like “enthusiastic listenership” and “participatory listenership” to illustrate this concept.)A recent viral TikTok from @gaydhdgoddess — a Jewish ADHD writer and educator, according to her bio — has sparked a discussion online about cooperative overlapping and how communication styles vary across groups and cultures. In the video, she calls herself an “interrupt-y person,” but says this never posed much of an issue until she left the East Coast. After doing some research, she discovered that her tendency to interject before the other person is done speaking was actually part of a culturally Jewish style of conversation, common in the Northeast.“You’re overlapping just at the end of what somebody is saying — you’re not trying to cut them off because you don’t care what they have to say,” @gaydhdgoddess explained in the video. “You already got the gist and you’re building up on it. To us, in good conversation, there aren’t any pauses. If there’s a pause, I think somebody doesn’t want to be speaking to me anymore, unless they’re very visibly thinking or chewing or something. But to other people, other cultures, that is not the case.”Sarah Bunin Benor, professor of contemporary Jewish studies and linguistics at Hebrew Union College, said that cooperative overlapping is often associated with, but not limited to, New York Jews.“Non-Jewish New Yorkers and Jews outside of New York also do it,” she said.In a 2008 survey Benor conducted about American Jewish speech patterns, she asked participants, “Have you ever been told that you interrupt too much or that your speech style is too aggressive?” Jews were more likely than non-Jews to answer “many times or “sometimes” (47% versus 36%).Though Tannen hasn’t done formal research to find out which cultures engage in cooperative overlapping, people from various backgrounds have told her they recognise it from their own upbringing, including those of Eastern European, Mediterranean, Indian, South American, African and Arab cultures, to name a few. “Within each country, of course, there are many cultures, and not all have the same style,” she noted.Among people who share the same communication style, cooperative overlapping often has the positive effect of “greasing rather than gumming up the conversational wheels,” Tannen previously wrote. However, among those who do not, it tends to have the opposite effect. It can fluster the speaker, disrupt the flow of the conversation and may be viewed as a sign of disrespect.“They often assume that anyone who begins to talk while they are speaking is trying to take the floor,” Tannen said. “Often they will stop and feel interrupted.”Once you’re aware that you are a cooperative overlapper, how can you better communicate with someone who isn’t? If you notice that the speaker isn’t responding well to your chiming in — e.g., they stop talking or seem uncomfortable — try expressing your engagement in non-verbal ways instead, like nodding, Tannen suggested.If you do jump in, acknowledge it. Then encourage the other person to continue talking.“For example, if someone stops, [you] might say, ‘Please go on. I wasn’t trying to interrupt,’” Tannen said. “If it is someone you have an ongoing relationship with, you could discuss it another time, perhaps referring to the TikTok or Twitter comment that went viral ― or to an article of mine.”If you’re not a cooperative overlapper but you are conversing with someone who is, you may want to ask them to hold off on jumping in so you don’t lose your train of thought. It will take some practice, but try to push yourself to keep talking if you have more to say, even when your instinct is to stop, Tannen said. (Note that this might be challenging for some neuro-diverse individuals, people with less assertive personality types or in situations where there’s a power imbalance between the speaker and the listener.)Context matters, too, of course. It’s easier to talk honestly about and work through these differences in communication styles with a close friend than with a boss, professor or mother-in-law, for example. And what might seem like an overlap in one scenario can be interpreted as an interruption in another.Regardless of the situation, learning to recognise and understand differences in conversational style due to ethnicity, culture, class, gender or other factors can be beneficial, Tannen said.“[It] gives you more control over how you are coming across to others, makes it more likely you’ll accurately judge others, and makes it possible to have better relations with those whose styles differ from yours,” she said.Related...How Women Should Say No To Thankless Office TasksThere's A Reason Some People Are Struggling To Self-Isolate For CovidMy Ex Blamed His Cheating On Me Not Being ‘Special’ In BedStudents Can Now Claim Covid Compensation. Here’s How
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
All The Things Standing In The Way Of Festivals This Summer
Festivals are back this summer, if Boris Johnson’s roadmap is anything to go by. On June 21, he hopes to scrap all legal limits on social contact and reopen the final closed sectors of the economy that have been shut since March 2020.“LET’S GO,” blurted a spokesperson from the Reading and Leeds Twitter account soon after the government announcement, revealing the two festivals would go ahead in summer 2021. Other festival organisers were a little more cautious. Boomtown, a living theatre festival, tweeted: “Of course there are still bumps in the road ahead but rest assured we’re doing absolutely everything we can to make sure our incredible community can dance together again this August.”There are around 975 festivals in the UK, and last summer, almost all were cancelled due to the pandemic. A handful of smaller events managed to take place, like the Gisburne Park Pop Up, which HuffPost UK attended.Still, many have released tickets for people to buy ahead of summer 2021 – even though other festivals have already announced they’ve cancelled. But it’s one thing to put tickets on sale – and another to actually put on a festival.We really hope *fingers crossed* festivals can go ahead as planned – but here are some unfortunate realities that may keep you knee deep in box sets rather than sticky British mud this summer.1. Festival owners often don’t get paid until after festivals take place. This could be a problem. Most festival owners don’t get the cash from ticket sales by ticketing companies until after the festival has happened, explains Paul Reed from the Association of Independent Festivals (AIF). Otherwise, ticketing companies would be in the red if they paid festivals in the lead-up, then something stopped the festival from happening.So, festival owners need to have a fair amount of trust that the festival is actually going to go ahead in order to start paying to build the festival site, and paying artists their wages ahead of time. They basically need assurance they won’t lose a tonne of money if they do need to cancel.But of course, if new variants crop up, or outbreaks occur, the government’s plans to end social distancing could be delayed – meaning there’s a chance festivals won’t go ahead. “I can’t give that guarantee, of course not,” Boris Johnson told a Downing Street press conference when asked if he’d rule out another lockdown. “Because we’re battling with nature, with a disease that is capable of mutating and changing.”2. Government-backed insurance is crucial, but yet to be confirmed. “The average cut off point for festivals in making decisions and financial commitments for this year is end of March,” says Reed – this date is based on a member survey, responding to concerns about the festival planning cycle and advanced costs. “This is why we need government-backed insurance to plan.”March may seem early, but festivals take months of planning, so payments need to be made upfront to enable workers to actually build the festivals.Government-backed insurance for festivals and large-scale events is crucial, in the case of forced cancellations. But it isn’t included as part of the financial support packages announced, including the additional £300 million pledged by Rishi Sunak to support culture. In a statement following the budget, Reed said: “We welcome the extension to the furlough scheme and continued support for the self-employed. However, independent festival organisers would much rather mobilise their staff to plan a full and successful festival season this summer.“As we have repeatedly stressed, the only way they can do this is with a government-backed insurance scheme that covers Covid-19 related cancellation. The chancellor confirmed the extension of the government-backed restart scheme for film and TV productions – a similar safety net needs to be put in place before the end of March to avoid mass cancellations throughout the UK’s festival market.”Before the budget was announced, the AIF said in its member survey, 92.5% of respondents said they can’t stage events without this insurance. “Analysis suggests that, for a festival taking place in early July, an estimated 40% of total costs will need to be paid before June 14 – the date when the government will make a decision on Step 4 of the roadmap,” said the AIF. “20% of these costs are payable in April and include not only artist, production and infrastructure deposits, but costs that are essential to events being allowed to go ahead, such as policing, medical provision and licensing.”3. Results of research taking place between now and then could throw up roadblocks. The Department for Digital, Media, Culture & Sport (DMCS) will be running an Events Research Programme in April to look at how events with large crowd sizes might be able to run without social distancing.In a document published by the government, the department say the pilots will “examine how such events can take place without the need for social distancing using other mitigations such as testing”. The trials could predict new spreading patterns and behaviours of the virus which could, at worst case, rule out the potential for festivals to take place.“A lot is riding on that programme, as it will hopefully determine how larger events can operate this summer without social distancing and what systems will need to be in place based on evidence, research and pilots,” says Reed. “Nothing is guaranteed, but it’s positive the government has committed to determining what the enabling factors are, including exploring testing and Covid certification.”4. The vaccine rollout could affect things. As it stands, all adults in the UK are supposed to receive their first vaccine by the end of July. If the rollout runs to schedule, most young adults will have had one vaccine dose by that point.Even though events could take place from June 21, many may not be able to attend if rules were in place that requested people to be vaccinated before attending. If this were the case, booking events in August may make more sense to give punters a higher chance of having had the first vaccine. All of this detail is yet to confirmed, though – and might not become an issue. “I personally don’t think the vaccine rollout will be where any of this falls down,” adds Reed. “The NHS is doing an extraordinary job in rolling the vaccine out and, in fairness, it’s an area in which the government had foresight in terms of procurement.” However...5. ‘Covid certification’ is likely to be a sticky area.The vaccine rollout may go swimmingly, but so-called “vaccine passports” could be an issue. What will constitute as a “Covid-safe” or “Covid-certified” festival-goer? “There are going to be mixed views on Covid certification across the sector and in wider society,” says Reed. “It could throw up a myriad of issues around discrimination.”There are issues around privacy, what a vaccine passports would look like, and how they can roll out a code across all festivals. Research into this is ongoing right now. The Covid-19 group at the Royal Society of the Oxford University has set out 12 criteria, says Reed – “and these are a step in the right direction”.The criteria that need to be satisfied in order to deliver a vaccine passport could potentially include: meeting a benchmark for Covid-19 immunity, be secure for personal data, and meet certain ethical standards, the research states. 6. Mass testing may not work at larger-scale festivals.Reed says on-the-gate testing would be “logistically challenging” for many to do, even with additional space onsite. “I imagine the focus is going to be on pre testing and certification of a test and / or vaccination,” he adds. Even though many festivals, like Reading and Leeds, have given their go-ahead, logistical details around testing are yet to be confirmed.Related...What Glastonbury's Cancellation Means For The Future Of Other Music Festivals This SummerYou Could Go To A Football Match Or Club In The Name Of ScienceReading And Leeds Organisers Have Exciting News For Festival-Goers After Latest Government Update5 Things You Might Have Missed In The Small Print Of Boris Johnson's RoadmapWhat Glastonbury's Cancellation Means For The Future Of Other Music Festivals This Summer
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Worth The Faff Or Too Much Hassle? We Reviewed 5 Craft Kits
HuffPost may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Prices and availability subject to change.The word craft gives some people the ick. Maybe they don’t have the patience, don’t see themselves as creative, or simply can’t be arsed. It’s can be a lot of effort sometimes, sure – but not all the time.Either way, craft kit searches are up – and it’s no wonder given we’re stuck indoors all the time with little to do. Spotting a trend for “mindful craft”, John Lewis found sales of embroidery kits were up 1527% (!) compared to last year, cross stitch kits were up 261%, and craft kits sales, in general, are up 206%. We decided to get in on the crafting – how hard can it be? Some of us on the HuffPost UK Life team enjoy craft, others are quite craft-adverse. Either way, we put these kits to the test to review – honestly – what they were like.Are they confusing and complicated? Is the process more stressful than the result? Are the instructions long-winded? Does the product end up looking anything like it’s meant to? Or is it plain-sailing and easy? Here are our reviews, with a rating out of five of how easy they are to complete. The Rainbow Banner KitRating: 3.5/5The Make Arcade Rainbow Banner Craft Kit, John Lewis, £16“Embarrassingly, I still take clothes home to my mum for her to sew on buttons. At 33, I haven’t cracked sewing (as you’ll tell if you zoom in on my abhorrent stitching below). I have a couple of sewing kits, gifted by my mum, but I clearly haven’t taken the hint.“The main picture of this kit on the website shows pretty pins and stylish sewing scissors – but you’ll need to get your own. I can’t find any pins in my flat, so I try making the banner without them. As I start, I enjoy the chance to be mindful and creative and can see why people turn to these projects in lockdown. I live alone, and I’m always looking for new ways to stay occupied.“It’s challenging enough, yet achievable as a sewing novice. I’d say the hardest thing is cutting the felt into the rainbow shapes. If you mess that up (which I do) the rainbow isn’t even. But hey, we’re going for a unique wonkiness here, right? The instructions say to use any stitch you like, but I don’t know any stitches. That doesn’t seem to matter, though, and – as a novice – I still manage to complete it. It feels really satisfying to make something. “For £16, it’s quite a pricey kit, but it keeps me occupied for three or four hours. It’s achievable and I now have something to keep, albeit uniquely wonky. Oh, and with my new-found skills, I’d say I could probably sew on a button now!” Becky Barnes, Audience editorThe Candle KitRating: 4/5Eco-Friendly Soy Candle Making Kit, Hazel & Blue, £28“I love how this kit comes packaged – it’s eco-friendly and covered in inspiring quotes. I’m pleased to see there are only a few ‘components’ to the kit, as too many ‘bits’ stress me out. When I read the card, my heart sinks at the first point: ‘Pour your soy wax into a double boiler’. I don’t have a double boiler (what is that?) As I read further, I see ‘what happens if you don’t have a double boiler’ – put a smaller pot inside a larger pot with boiling water (like when you melt chocolate). I use a smaller saucepan inside a larger one. Hey presto, it’s sorted. “10 minutes later I have two soy candles inside two glass jars, waiting to set. It’s so simple: melt the soy wax, mix in the the essential oil to make it smell nice, pour into the two glass jars, and stabilise the wick with a peg. Wait 24 hours for it to set completely and voilà: you have two homemade soy candles. “After I’ve proudly made them, I see they have a short YouTube tutorial to help if you don’t fancy reading instructions, as well as tips on the back of the card. The end result is brilliant if you always buy candles (like me) and will definitely be used. One for yourself, and one for a gift. It might be a little on the pricier side, but I’d say this is down to its eco-credentials.” Amy Packham, Life editorThe Pottery KitRating: 4.5/5Sculpd Pottery Kit, £39 “I’ve always wanted to have a go at making my own fancy ceramics and attend a pottery class, so this at-home kit is the perfect solution! The box comes with all the tools, easy-to-follow instructions and two bags of air-dry clay, which is more than enough material to shape some wonderful handmade creations.“My partner and I manage to make one large plant pot and two smaller pinch pots. My advice would be to sketch out what you want to make beforehand, or take a look at Sculpd’s Instagram, rather than dive in blindly. It’ll save a lot of mindlessly moulding and confused shaping. (I had to start again several times out of frustration – due to my bad planning and over sculpting). Once you get the hang of it, it’s so much fun and takes your mind off things.“It’s something you can keep fiddling around with and tweaking until you’re happy. One piece of advice: don’t expect to be done in one night. It’s a long process of waiting for the clay to dry completely then painting, another paint coat, more waiting and sealing everything in. But I’d definitely buy this again for myself or gift this to a friend. It’s the perfect lockdown activity to keep hands busy and beat the boredom blues.” Angela Hui, Life reporterThe Scrunchie KitRating: 5/5Sewn In The Bay via Etsy, £6.75“I have a lot of hair right now. Like, a lot. But thankfully, I have some new scrunchies to tame it with until salons reopen. There are a ton of ‘make your own scrunchie’ kits available on Etsy right now. I opt for one of the cheaper options, offering a choice of fabrics for a bargain price of £6.75. “The set comes with three pre-cut fabrics, coordinating thread, elastic, a needle, pins, paperclips and step-by-step instructions that are ridiculously easy to follow. The first scrunchie takes me 45 minutes to make. By scrunchie number two, I’m sewing while watching TV and have it down to a sweet half hour.“I’m usually too impatient for crafting, but to my surprise I enjoy the process – probably because it’s fast, and I’m genuinely excited to get my hands on the end product. I’ve recommended this kit to several bored friends and now have fun 90s hair in every other Zoom call. If you can’t try out new styles in lockdown, when can you?” Rachel Moss, Life reporterThe Kintsugi KitRating: easy, 5/5Kintsugi Repair Kit, Sandy Leaf Farm, £14.99“I break a lot of stuff. A combination of my frenetic energy and lack of fine motor skills has, in my life, led to far too many fractured mugs and chipped plates. In normal times, I chuck the things out – usually wrapped in newspaper to avoid my wife seeing – and replace them. But now we can’t go anywhere, I resolved to repair my lockdown victims (a cute little catch-all bowl from a San Diego ceramic stall and a cute whale mug gifted to me by my niece) as best I could.“Enter the Sandy Leaf Farms Kintsugi kit. Sometimes labelled as the Japanese art of putting broken things back together, the idea of kintsugi is to faithfully repair pottery and the like with a visible, bright gold glue as a means of embracing life’s imperfections and accepting mistakes as part of life.“At a pretty reasonable price of £15, I get a healthy-sized capsule of beautiful gold pigment and enough tubes of potent-smelling glue to keep me going. There are also two ‘practice’ bowls to smash and practice on – an unexpectedly cathartic treat. The process is quick, easy to get right, and, crucially, works. “I know what you’re thinking, though: what about the terrible clumsiness? Well, yes, to someone like me, with reception-grade crafting skills, kintsugi proved to be the art of making a shiny mess and gluing your hands together. But it does the job. More importantly, it’s a genuinely relaxing escape and an opportunity for even the least crafty person to create.” Charlie Lindlar, Opinion commissioning editorRelated...Woman Renovates Childhood Doll's House To Make A Tiny Version Of Her Actual HomeThis Craft Blogger Has Ideas For All Those Jeans We're Not WearingScared Of Painting Your Own Walls? Here's How To Get Started23 Mother's Day Cards You'd Only Send in 2021
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
No Filter: Inside The Black Online Talk Shows That Have Created A Safe Space During Covid
The Covid-19 pandemic has seen an increase in Black online talk shows led by prominent figures within entertainment, media and business. In addition to amplifying perspectives from within minority ethnic communities for all audiences to enjoy, these platforms have helped to create digital safe spaces for people of colour.This has been particularly poignant as the coronavirus outbreak and lockdowns have disproportionately impacted the lives of non-white groups – from an increased likelihood of contracting the illness to being twice as likely to face unemployment.   Eddie Nestor, who has presented a drive-time show on BBC Radio London for over ten years, launched his own online talk-show entitled #NoJoke in June 2020 – shortly after the first lockdown was rolled out. Presented alongside his wife Lisa ‘Boss Lady’ Nestor and comedian Curtis Walker, the show typically broadcasts via Youtube, Facebook and Instagram Live every Sunday afternoon and just concluded its second series. Nestor, 56, had been talking about doing a podcast for about ten years and being at home a lot more, along with the rest of the nation, presented an ideal opportunity to finally bring the idea to fruition. It’s truly a collaborative effort and the team mainly consists of young producers, the broadcaster explained.“Right now we have Fiona who we call the “media mafia”; she logs, posts, assesses and scrutinises. Steph – also known as Sushi – answers her phone to me at odd times with odd requests for e-flyers and clips of the show.“Then there’s Naiya, who is pretending to study at university, and makes up the weekly opening titles and Sharon, who sorts out all promotion and finance; Curtis Walker who is just trying to eat and Boss Lady Lisa who is trying to stop me from eating.”Nestor, who’s also an acclaimed actor and comedian who starred in iconic Black series The Real McCoy, added: ″The difference with this show is I am the real me and the show tells stories from an unapologetically Black perspective. “It is clear that the way people seek information or entertainment has changed. The pandemic has just sped the process up. Young people have long since given up the terrestrial channels.”Through the rise in online Black talk-shows like #NoJoke, underserved audiences are accessing the type of content that is being omitted from television and Black creatives are by-passing the middleman. Nestor attests to this.“The significance of the increase in Black-led online talk shows during the pandemic is that they are organic, born from a situation outside of our control,” he said.“We have found a way to bypass the middleman and communicate with the people – with no edit and no filter. The “gatekeeper” is there to interpret what they think middle England wants. The number of times I’ve had that as the reason given for my pitch not going forward...”.#NoJoke will return in the coming weeks following a successful crowdfund campaign for more episodes. “The funny thing is, many of our donations came from white people, who also appreciate a different perspective,” Nestor said.Sherry Dixon, former editor of Pride Magazine – one of the UK’s longest running Black lifestyle magazines, launched her online chat-show Lets Talk at the end of April 2020. The make-up guru had just returned to the UK from Guyana, where she was born and spends a lot of time.“People in England seemed miserable at the time and shortly after when I got back, the UK went into lockdown. I was asking a lot of questions on my social media pages and many were engaged in discussing and debating the topics I posed,” she told HuffPost UK.“I realised that people wanted to talk and have conversations, not just about Covid or lockdown, but about life issues. I knew many professionals in various fields, many of whom I have interviewed [over the years], so I invited them on each week to discuss and dispel myths especially in the areas of relationships and health.”The aim of Let’s Talk is to motivate and educate audiences about matters that are not usually discussed on mainstream platforms, Dixon said. “I want this current generation to be educated about issues where our parents did not feel at east to talk about – such as menopause and relationship dilemmas, making of wills and fibroids. I don’t want the ‘hide it under the table’ mentality any more,” the award-winning motivational speaker added.“Men cry too – and men and mental health has been one of my most successful shows because I brought the subject to the people. We heard the pain of grown men who were suffering and who are now doing workshops to help others. We discuss issues of race hate and how it is affecting young men and women. There is no area that cannot be discussed.”What’s more, Dixon is full of optimism for the upsurge in Black-led online discussions – many of which she actually watches herself.“All of these shows are great and educational and I find them all interesting because some things I did not know,” she says.“We are learning more and the texts and messages sent to me after my shows make me want to give my time, for free, to help another person be better. I will keep sending the elevator back down.”“We literally decided to create Black Woman’s Hour three weeks ago after seeing racist white women constantly platformed and Black women constantly policed in mainstream spaces,” Ava Vidal, creator of new programme Black Woman’s Hour (BWH), told HuffPost UK.“We were absolutely intentional about creating a safe space for Black people through BWH. We have done this by respecting all of our guests and potential guests, whatever their point of view is. We had John Barnes on the second episode and we were pleasantly surprised at the outcome.“We have seen John a lot on our screens over the past couple of years but we only ever get soundbites from him. We also make a point of not making derogatory comments about any of our guests after they have been on the show. We are not shy about making our feelings known that this is done in a very constructive way.”Vidal, who’s a lauded comedian, presents the show alongside Ayisha Vigneswaren. She said there are numerous benefits to staging shows from the comfort of home – not least because most people are available to be interviewed because they are also indoors. But there are hurdles too.“The most challenging thing is there is so much going on with homeschooling,” Vidal explains. “We are both mothers with primary school age children and so it’s hard. Aside from that, for me there is the stress of being in an industry that is going tits up. We are seeing loads of live gigs and festivals just cancelled.”The first show was broadcast on the 23 January 2021.“We don’t ambush our guests,” Vidal says. “We create a completely comfortable environment and we have challenging but respectful conversations. Respect is the most important value that the show has. “The significance of these platforms is that mainstream media has veered more and more to the right over the past five and six years. You wouldn’t be able to hear these voices by turning on the TV or radio.”In April 2020, businessman and activist Paul Lawrence launched an online talk show called People Talk, which explored topics from relationships and entrepreneurship to sexual abuse and current affairs – all from a Black perspective.He used the platform to challenge disinformation around Covid-19 and host important conversation about the pandemic’s impact on ethnic minority communities.The show attracted hundreds of listeners each week during its Zoom, Youtube and Facebook broadcasts. In December 2020, communities across the UK were shocked to learn of the Lawrence’s sudden death.Lockdown has also birthed a new appreciation for digital one-off special pogrammes from figures across the entertainment industry. One example of this is Verzuz – an American webcast series created by US music producers Timbaland and Swizz Beatz, which typically sees two popular, Black artists showcase the best of their musical catalogue in a battle format.As Covid has naturally led to the decline of live events, creatives around the world have found that having events indoors is the most effective and safest way to stay connected with fans.Angie Le Mar, widely hailed as the UK’s first lady of Black comedy, hosted her very own An Audience With event just before Christmas, which treated Zoom attendees to a night of laughter, special guests and funny stories.“Before lockdown I had done many live shows, evenings with an audience with Angie. With lockdown, once I worked out how to shift the new way of working, it was all go,” Le Mar told HuffPost UK.“It felt amazing – like a continuation of my live work. The audience hasn’t changed, they are just seated somewhere else, and this was really encouraging, knowing that the audience are just waiting for you to deliver the goods. My confidence was boosted. There is more to come.”She continues: “The biggest challenge was not having audience participation, making an audience laugh without hearing the laughter is like, pretending to eat, wondering why would you do that. But it was such a fantastic thing to pull off.”The arrival of more Black shows is deeply welcomed, as far as Le Mar is concerned.“For years, we sat in meetings [with television executives], saying we need this, we need that, now, we are saying, ‘let us show you’. We don’t want to Blacksplain anymore.“I have been in the entertainment business for over three decades. I have tried to explain my Blackness, I have been in the rushed together diversity meetings, I have been in many debates about how we can move forward as a multi-culture society, I have been at the so-called table, only to find out it is pure lip service.“George Floyd and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement showed Black people that TV commissioners did understand the importance of diversity.“I saw Black History Month where Black programming went through the roof.  So, not having diverse content throughout the year is a choice. That’s why we say we are tired; we will just make it another way.”Data released by the Creative Diversity Network (CDN) in October revealed the stark ethnic disparity in the UK television industry.People from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups are still underrepresented – and there’s particular concerns about representation in decision making roles.Just 1.6% of writers working in UK TV identify as Black and only 2.4% of Production Executives, 4.4% of Series Producers, 8.3% of Heads of Production and 9.3% Production Managers are non-white.The data is based on 30,000 survey responses from workers in the UK television industry, making it one of the most comprehensive surveys of diversity in any British industry.It also highlighted a serious shortfall in representation in background “craft” roles. Fewer than 5% of roles in Costume and Wardrobe, Hair and Make-Up and Set Design are filled by those from a BAME group, and fewer than 10% of programme contributions in Sound and Post Production. Deborah Williams, chief executive of the Creative Diversity Network, says there’s still a long way to go.“In spite of advances, it’s clear from the Diamond data that the UK TV industry has a long way to go before it is genuinely representative of its viewers,” she says. “And particularly in the off-screen and senior working opportunities it offers to people from different ethnic backgrounds. “While we applaud the efforts broadcasters and producers have made to improve on-screen representation, the industry must match this by taking meaningful and sustainable action to increase off-screen diversity.”  Clubhouse is a social networking app based on audio-chat – think ‘extended voice notes’ – where users can listen in to conversations, interviews and discussions, and be invited to participate At the moment, it’s invite-only and solely available on Apple phones. The platform, worth over $100m (£73m), was launched by tech entrepreneurs Paul Davidson and Rohan Seth in March 2020 but soared in popularity in the UK at the end of last year.Lately, a number of Black public figures, influencers and thinkers have been using Clubhouse to have important discussions about the topic of the day and create opportunities for individuals to nurture a sense of togetherness during these isolating times.This includes collectives such as the #ThreeOh club and 9AM in London.Despite its boom in popularity, Clubhouse has a number of security issues relating to how users’ data is shared. Though the app is in beta stage and currently under development, this has raised concern among privacy advocatesJournalists Luela Hassan and Nikki Onafuye, both 25 years old, host The Journo Room every other Tuesday at 6.30pm on the app.It is a space for journalists to congregate, elevate, advise and learn from one another. Moreover, it is a safe space for Black journalists to be themselves and share their experiences in the industry. Black journalists account for just 0.2% of working UK journalists, according to the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.“Originally we did it as a safe space for journalists. On doing our first room, we realised nope, this needs to be a safe space for Black journalists. By the end of our first room it was apparent to us that Black women journalists are our target audience and we want this room to be for them, by them,” Onafuye, founder of entertainment platform The Nikki Diaries, told HuffPost UK.“Hosting the rooms centred around Black women journalists’ experience in the industry allowed us to hone in on our topics and how we can create this room to be a humble and safe environment for them to share. This is our aim.”READ MORE:'It Gave Us A Sense Of Identity': Lovers Rock Stars On The Soft Reggae Soundtrack Of Small AxeThe Real McCoy Makes A Welcome Return To The BBC, But Why Has It Taken 24 Years?
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UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Liverpool keen on Kalidou Koulibaly transfer to aid Virgil van Dijk comeback
Liverpool have had major problems in defence this season with injuries to Virgil van Dijk and Joe Gomez and Jurgen Klopp has big plans in the summer transfer window
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Protests, tear gas in Myanmar after UN envoy urges action
Security forces in Myanmar have again used force to disperse anti-coup protesters, a day after the U.N. special envoy urged the Security Council to take action to quell junta violence that this week left about 50 demonstrators dead and scores injured
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The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Gavin Williamson: Monday’s return to school is start of road back to normality
Those returning to secondary schools will find safety measures including face coverings in classrooms while rapid Covid-19 tests have been introduced.
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London News | London Evening Standard -...
Mum-of-two placed in coma after headache turned out to be brain tumour
Rachae Carter, 46, from Newport, Wales had surgery to debulk the tumour before suffering two devastating family tragedies
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Archbishop of Canterbury 'asked what Oprah does for living' at Meghan and Harry wedding
THE ARCHBISHOP of Canterbury had a hilarious moment at the wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry when he inquired about what Oprah did for a living, it is claimed.
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Meghan Markle’s best pal applauds her for being ‘kind' amid bullying claims
Jessica Mulroney has applauded her best friend Meghan Markle for being 'kind' as dozens of pals come out in support of the Duchess of Sussex ahead of the Oprah Winfrey interview
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
South China Sea: Royal Navy ship faces ‘severe threat’ in disputed waters – ‘Risk is high’
A ROYAL NAVY aircraft carrier could come under cyberattack when it enters waters near China on its grand voyage later this year, experts have warned.
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Covid breakthrough: Variants ‘VERY unlikely’ to delay end to lockdown in boost to Britain
CORONAVIRUS variants are "very unlikely" to derail the UK's exit plan from lockdown due to the adaptability of Britain's vaccines, according to a top scientist.
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UK News | World News | Breaking News and...