EXPLAINER: Why it's hard to make vaccines and boost supplies
With demand for COVID-19 vaccines outpacing the world's supplies, a frustrated public and policymakers want to know: How can we get a lot more, fast
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Why You Need A 'Power Hour' Each Day – And How To Do It
You’re reading Here, Try This – our month-long plan encouraging you to try something new every day.You’re not alone if you feel that every day seems the same right now – but there are things you can do to start your mornings off right. Enter: the ‘Power Hour’. Adrienne Herbert came up with the idea back in January 2017, when she was in a desperate need of a fresh start. In her new book, Power Hour: How to Focus on Your Goals and Create a Life You Love, she writes how the previous year had been tough for her – her son Jude was five, and she’d been trying with her husband to get pregnant again, with little luck.After three years of trying, Herbert and her husband decided to try IVF. Despite falling pregnant, she miscarried after four weeks. Herbert wanted to do something for herself, so decided to train for a marathon. It was no easy feat, and being a working mum meant she struggled to fit training time in each day.Related... This 10-Minute Routine Is The Perfect Morning Pick-Me-Up Her solution? Her son woke at 6.30am, so she decided to get up even earlier, at 5.30am. “At that moment, I had no idea that winding the clock back an hour would change just about everything,” she writes. “I’ve [since] used that extra hour to read more, listen to podcasts, stretch, meditate, journal and even write this book”.So what actually is this Power Hour and how can you add it into your day? Speaking to HuffPost, Herbert says the hour is about reclaiming the most valuable thing we have – time! “The message is simple, start each day with one hour that is dedicated to creating a life that you love,” she says. “What is the one thing you really want to work on? One area of your life that you’d like to improve? One project that you need more time to dedicate to? It could be a fitness goal, a career ambition, or a passion project, whatever it is you want to achieve, use your Power Hour to make it happen.”Related... 17 Alternative Self-Care Tips To Help Keep You Zen Even if you’re not a morning person, give it a go. And if it still doesn’t stick after a few days, don’t jettison the idea completely. Perhaps your power hour is meant to be a little later in the day. Ultimately, it’s about what works for you.But here are Herbert’s three suggestions of how you can start your day with a Power Hour:1. Start your day with movement. “It doesn’t have to be a tough workout or a 10K run, but moving your body first thing in the morning can deliver a long list of benefits,” she says. “From boosting your mood and overall feeling of wellbeing, to regulating your appetite and improving the quality of your sleep.”2. Eliminate tech, social media and any other distractions. “It’s harder than ever to cultivate solitude and an environment that will enhance our ability to focus and be truly present, so avoid the temptation to reach for your phone before you’ve even got out of bed. Enjoy the first hour of your day alone.”3. Reframe any negative feelings when it comes to early mornings. “The Power Hour is not a punishment, it’s your choice to get up earlier and it’s up to you how you spend the extra time.”Power Hour: How to Focus on Your Goals and Create a Life You Love by Adrienne Herbert is out now (Hutchinson, £14.99).This new year, we focus on fun, not denial (because we’ve all had enough of that). Follow our month-long plan, with a new Here, Try This idea each day, spanning easy ways to engage your body and mind, inspiration for your food and home, and tips for boosting how you feel – inside and out.More Here, Try This Unable To Switch Jobs Right Now? How To Find Joy In The One You Have How Looking At The Sky Really Can Boost Your Mood Why You Should Buy Yourself Fresh Flowers This Week
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'I Lock Myself In The Loo' – The Claustrophobia Of Parenting Right Now
Yvadney Davis loves her children, but sometimes she locks herself in the toilet for 10 minutes – just to get away from them.As this national lockdown stretches on – with confirmation that schools will stay shut until at least March 8 – the mum of Lolo, five, and MG, eight, is feeling claustrophobic and craving space for herself.“This time round, the days are shorter, it’s bitter cold outside and often raining, which means we’re much more cooped up at home and tripping over each other,” says Davis, from London. “The sense of being stuck like this for the foreseeable future is so crushing at times.” Related... How To Homeschool Your Children If You're Still Drained From The First Time It’s a feeling other parents can relate to. Homeschooling fatigue has set in, as parents have spent months juggling school worksheets with their own work calls. The novelty of having kids at home all day every day has worn off, because as taboo as it may be to admit, no one signed up to 24/7 parenting. “At least during the warmer months the boys could play outside, albeit for about 10 minutes at a time before pestering me for a snack, a drink or to tell a tale,” says Jamie Beaglehole, who’s homeschooling Lyall, 12, and Rich, 11, alongside his husband, Tom. READ MORE: From PE with Joe To History: Your Virtual School Day For Kids, Sorted “The latest lockdown has been particularly claustrophobic with the bad weather outside and we’ve all struggled for our own space,” says Beaglehole.“Tensions are high – Tom and I have no private time or space for any kind of intimate relationship. I’m sure we’re not the only parents to be feeling this – it’s almost as though our own relationship is on lockdown, too.”After nearly a year in each other’s pockets, the family – who live in Leicester – have made the decision to move to a larger home, despite the additional stress of moving house in a pandemic. They hope to be in their new abode by March, with a little extra breathing space. As well as feeling like physical space is closing in, Jenna Rigby, a mum of five children under nine years old, feels like her social circle is getting smaller, which adds to the feeling of claustrophobia. “One of my biggest support mechanisms with being such a busy mum is my social life,” says Rigby, from Lancashire. “I take time out to catch up with friends weekly and this has ceased to exist since November – possibly because of their own anxiety and overwhelm.“We don’t reach out over the phone as much and ultimately, this is a sacrifice many mums have had to make in order to keep their house running and be on top of school work.” The children’s patience is also diminishing, and their behaviour worsening. “This has been my biggest challenge.” she says. “More so in me blaming myself for not knowing the best way to juggle home-learning and being the parent.” To make matters harder, some non-parents simply don’t get it. Rigby posted about claustrophobic parenting online and was hurt when someone responded to tell her she should be enjoying spending time with her children. “People need to understand that what’s going on right now is not a normal circumstance, and therefore feeling fed up of the same daily routine within four walls is bound to drive emotions you’ve never previously felt,” she says. READ MORE: Here's How To Explain Covid-19 Developments To Your Kids Ben Westwood, a single parent from East Sussex, thinks it’s harder for parents with young children in many ways, but there are different challenges that come with having two teenagers: Jake, 15 and Isabella, 13. “My children are very sociable so it’s hard on their wellbeing,” he says. “Seeing them unhappy impacts me. My son can’t see his girlfriend and my daughter had reached that age where she was having her own social life. It’s hard to keep their spirits up when goalposts keep shifting.”Westwood is quick to acknowledge that other parents have it worse; he’s able to complete his university job from home, the kids can largely manage their school work online and the family has a garden. “But it’s harder as a single parent,” he says. “I can’t divide myself.”To cope with the ongoing situation, many parents have lowered expectations on themselves (and their kids) since the first lockdown. Beaglehole, who runs the blog Daddy and Dad, is trying to step back and give his children more autonomy. “At the beginning of the first lockdown, our expectations of our sons were very high,” he says.“We assumed lockdown would only last a few weeks, so we provided the boys with a routine of school and homework – we were very hands-on, but positive.“As the lockdown went on (and on), Tom and I stepped back because we needed to focus on our own work, giving the boys responsibility for their school work and freedom to play in the garden pretty much whenever they liked.”  READ MORE: I’m A Single Mum Of Six. Parenting In A Pandemic Is The Most Difficult Thing I’ve Ever Done Westwood combats cabin fever by getting out to walk or run daily. “I sometimes bring my daughter,” he says. “Yesterday I persuaded them both to go for a walk, which felt like an achievement because my son hadn’t been out for days.”Davis, who’s self-employed and also runs the blog Mums That Slay, felt a huge sense of guilt for not ticking off all the school boxes during spring, but now she’s giving herself a break. “Trying to work to deadlines while my daughter is sounding out her phonics or googling the best ways to explain long division was so hard,” she says.“I learned to be more realistic, take the pressure off of perfection and realise the priority was keeping everyone sane. For my kids that meant more arts, Lego and playing. And for me, recognising that most people got what lockdown parenting is like.” READ MORE: Why Nursery-Age Kids Are Struggling – And How To Help Them Davis also started carving out time for self-care. She wakes an hour before everyone else – to meditate or write in her journal – and tries to exercise daily. “I’ve also scheduled notifications that ping throughout the day on my phone and remind me to take some long breaths,” she says. “I’m much gentler on myself, there’s so much pressure to be all things to all people right now and it’s not possible. Accepting that has been the biggest breakthrough.”But, as Rigby says, parents need more support if this is going to continue. “We sacrifice so much for our children, and our wellbeing needs to be maintained in order for us to care for them in the best possible way,” she says.“The main thing to keep reminding yourself is there is no such thing as a ‘bad parent’ right now.”READ MORE: 5 Women Who Gave Birth In Lockdown Share Advice For New Mums-To-Be I’ve Decided To Stop Taking Pictures Of My Kids. Here’s Why Covid Has Thrown Off Bedtime Routines. Here's How To Get Back On Track
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What To Know About Schizophrenia And Covid-19 Risk
People with schizophrenia are almost three times more likely to die from Covid than those without the psychiatric illness in America, a study has found. The higher risk cannot be explained by factors that often accompany serious mental health disorders, such as higher rates of heart disease, diabetes and smoking, according to researchers at New York University’s (NYU) Grossman School of Medicine. This particular investigation found schizophrenia is the “biggest risk factor for death from Covid-19 after age”. Being male, heart disease, and race ranked next after schizophrenia in order. This finding has not been replicated in the UK.In the UK, adults with pre-existing mental health conditions are at greater risk of death and hospitalisation from Covid-19, according to a government analysis, but are considered at lower risk than other high-risk groups.In light of the new findings from America, mental health charities have urged the government to do more to protect people with schizophrenia in the UK. “We call on the government to urgently review these findings, and include people with schizophrenia in those vulnerable groups for early vaccination,” said Marjorie Wallace, chief executive of the mental health charity SANE. Related... How To Get Through A Lockdown With No End Date In Sight What did the US study find?For the study, published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, the research team analysed 7,348 patient records of men and women treated for Covid-19 at the height of the pandemic in NYU Langone hospitals in New York City and Long Island between March 3 and May 31, 2020.Of these cases, they identified 14% who were diagnosed with schizophrenia, mood disorders, or anxiety. The researchers then calculated patient death rates within 45 days of testing positive for the virus.Being 75 or older increased the odds of dying by 35.7 times, the researchers found. Those aged 65-74 were 16.6 times more likely to be killed by Covid, while those aged 55-64 were almost eight times more likely to die, and those aged 45-54 were 3.9 times more likely to die.Schizophrenia was the second biggest risk factor after age – the odds of dying were increased 2.7 times – and this was after adjustment for age, sex, race, and other medical issues.Initially, researchers believed issues such as heart disease, depression and barriers in care were behind the low life expectancy seen in schizophrenia patients. However the results suggest the biology of schizophrenia itself could be making people more vulnerable to Covid-19. One explanation is an immune system disturbance, possibly tied to the genetics of the disorder, said Nemani.The researchers noted that this large sample of patients who all were infected with the same virus provided a “unique opportunity” to study the underlying effects of schizophrenia on the body. They plan to explore whether medications used to treat schizophrenia may play a role as well.However, study senior author Donald Goff cautioned that they could only determine the risk for patients with schizophrenia who had access to testing and medical care. Further research is needed, he said, to clarify how dangerous the virus may be for those who lack these resources.Related... How To Get Through A Lockdown With No End Date In Sight What does this mean for the UK?Wallace, of mental health charity SANE, said the study reveals the need for more research into the “still unexplained biochemistry of schizophrenia and the wider risks for patients” in the UK. Lucy Schonegevel, deputy campaigns and policy associate director at Rethink Mental Illness, called the findings “very concerning” and said the study needs to be fully evaluated. “We need to develop a better understanding of why people diagnosed with a severe mental illness like schizophrenia are potentially at greater risk of dying from Covid-19,” she told HuffPost UK.“It reinforces the importance of people living with severe mental illness being included as a priority group to receive the vaccine. To support this, we’re undertaking research to understand any potential barriers to vaccination so that they can be urgently addressed.”While many people severely affected by mental illness will live long and happy lives with the right care and support, there are concerns that Covid-19 stands to exacerbate pre-existing health inequalities.“Prior to the pandemic, we knew that people living with severe mental illness are more likely to experience poor physical health and are 4.5 times more likely to die before the age of 75 than the general population,” said Schonegevel.“Physical health checks are routine health appointments for people severely affected by mental illness which can save lives and efforts to increase the number of people receiving these checks need to be redoubled.“It’s essential to look beyond a diagnosis of mental illness and treat and care for people’s physical health to give them the best possible quality of life.”In response to the study, a Department for Health and Social Care spokesperson said: “The list of conditions used to identify individuals who may be clinically extremely vulnerable is agreed by the four UK Chief Medical Officers and reflects the latest available evidence.“Clinicians in the NHS are able to add any patient to the shielded patient list, based on their own clinical judgement and an impartial assessment of their needs.”Related... Schools To Stay Shut Until March 8, Boris Johnson Confirms Vaccinate Teachers And Other Key Workers Alongside Over-50s, Says Labour Will Boris Johnson Come To Regret His ‘Sorry, Not Sorry’ Apology For 100,000 Deaths?
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Hot property: Jamie Demetriou on the rise of Stath Lets Flats
In the first of a series exploring the stage origins of hit comedies, the actor remembers creating the delusional letting agent at Bristol University“For a lot of series one, I don’t like Stath as a character,” says Jamie Demetriou, the comedian, actor and writer behind triple Bafta-winning sitcom Stath Lets Flats. “His behaviour is terrible. Even with a character you dislike, you should sympathise. I had to remember what I’d learned on stage – when characters exuded hope or delusional self-belief, the audience were endeared to them.”When we speak, Demetriou is in LA filming The Afterparty, a new show with Tiffany Haddish. It all sounds far from the basements and pubs of UK live comedy, but that’s where Demetriou started out and where the character of chaotic Greek-Cypriot letting agent Stath, who is set to return in a third series for Channel 4, first began to take shape. Continue reading...
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The Great British Art Tour: time at last to pay Anna Bilinska proper attention
With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Bath’s Anna Bilinska by Emmeline DeaneThis enigmatic portrait of Anna Bilinska in mourning is one of the best-loved exhibits at Bath’s Victoria Art Gallery, despite its sombre subject matter and monochrome palette. It is an arresting painting that quietly demands attention; the sitter’s aura of profound melancholy is both moving and intriguing.Bilinska was a talented Polish artist whose father had recently died when the portrait was painted in 1886. Dressed in deep mourning, she holds what might be a black feather on her lap. She met the British artist Emmeline Deane in Paris when they were both training at the celebrated Académie Julian. This was one of the few art schools in Europe that was open to female students in the 19th century. We don’t know anything about their relationship, but given the compassion evident in this painting, it’s fair to assume that artist and sitter were close. Bilinska studied and taught at the forward-thinking and innovative Parisian art school. She had ambitions to open a similar school for women in Poland, but died tragically young in 1893 from a heart condition, aged 36. Continue reading...
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Cash injection: could we cure all disease with a trillion dollars?
Could such a large amount of money end the Covid pandemic? Eradicate disease? Provide universal healthcare and fund vaccine research?You know that daydream where you suddenly come into a vast fortune? You could buy a castle or a tropical island hideaway, help out all your friends, do a bit of good in the world. But what if it was a truly incredible sum? What if you had $1tn to spend, and a year to do it? And what if the rules of the game were that you had to do it for the world – make some real difference to people’s lives, or to the health of the planet, or to the advancement of science.A trillion dollars – that’s one thousand billion dollars – is at once an absurdly huge amount of money, and not that much in the scheme of things. It is, give or take, 1% of world GDP. It’s what the US spends every year and a half on the military. It is an amount that can be quite easily rustled up through the smoke and mirrors of quantitative easing, which is officially the mass purchase of government bonds, but which looks suspiciously like the spontaneous creation of money. After the 2008 financial crash, more than $4.5tn was quantitatively eased in the US alone. All the other major economies made their own money in this ghostly way. Continue reading...
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Beverley Bryan: the British Black Panther who inspired a generation of women
After her friend Olive Morris was assaulted by police in 1969, Bryan joined her in the civil rights group. Then she decolonised her classroom – and contributed to a groundbreaking bookIn the mid-60s, Beverley Bryan was a prefect at Lavender Hill secondary modern in south London. One of her responsibilities was to stand at the school gates and scribble down the name of any student who was late. One such girl was Olive Morris, who would become one of the country’s leading anti-racism activists. Bryan, meanwhile, would follow in the younger girl’s footsteps, becoming a British Black Panther, a founder member of the Brixton Black Women’s Group and, in 1985, the co-author of the seminal book The Heart of the Race: Black Women’s Lives in Britain – which helped educate generations of women about the struggles and triumphs of Black women in Britain.“She was always very fierce,” Bryan says, over a video call from her home in Jamaica, of her friend Morris, who died in 1979. “She was always a strong person, a strong personality.” Bryan and Morris had much in common – both were born in Jamaica before emigrating to London as young children – and they quickly became friends who reminisced with a laugh about their early dispute. Continue reading...
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How Captain Cook described the weather on Antarctica voyage
Journal tells of ‘an unusual Snow white brightness’ as explorer’s ship made its way through icy islandsJames Cook is already within the Antarctic Circle on 28 January 1774, in “a gentle breeze of Wind, attended by a thick Fogg and snow and then Showers of Snow and Sleet. Continued our course to the South till 11 o’Clock PM, when falling in with Some Ice Islands, and the fog being very thick we hauled the wind to the Eastward.”Within an hour, say the Journals of Captain Cook, edited for the Hakluyt Society by JC Beaglehole, HMS Resolution is heading south again. At 4am on 30 January he perceives “the Clowds to the south near the horizon to be of an unusual Snow white brightness which denounced our approach to field ice, soon after it was seen from the Mast-head and at eight o’Clock we were close to the edge of it which extended East and West in a streight line far beyond our sight”. Continue reading...
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Forget Ratatouille, here's Ratatoing! The rise and rise of the 'mockbuster'
If there’s a big animated film coming out, a studio somewhere will be rushing to release a cheap imitation. But who makes them? Are they proud of their work? And how did they become an internet hit?It is hard to describe what happens 24 minutes into Ratatoing, an animated children’s movie from 2007. Four unnerving rats – one with a handlebar moustache, another in pearls – begin to jump up and down and grunt in a restaurant, in order to alarm the human clientele. “La, la, la, la, la,” they sort of sing while sort of dancing. They then do the can-can and shout “HA, HA, HA!” before making ghostly noises. Ratatoing is not, it is safe to say, a good movie. It is barely even an acceptable movie. It was created in just four months by Brazilian animation studio Vídeo Brinquedo, to be released in the same month as Ratatouille, the restaurant-and-rat-themed film that went on to win Pixar the Oscar for best animated feature.“I don’t have regrets but I’m not proud of it,” says Ale McHaddo, one of Ratatoing’s producers. He says Vídeo Brinquedo had a budget of just £75,000 to script, cast, animate and score each movie he worked on. These included The Little Cars (released the same year as Pixar’s Cars) and Little Bee (released two years after DreamWorks’ Bee Movie). Ratatouille’s budget, by comparison, was £112m. “I was young and needed to produce some films,” says the 37-year-old from São Paulo. “I thought, ‘I have plenty of ideas – but OK, I need to pay my bills.’” Continue reading...
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Exclusive interview: Helen Glover, double Olympic champion and mother of three, on trying for Tokyo 2020 
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How to control your negative inner voice
There’s no escape from the voice in our head, but we can use tools to get it working for us.
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Channel 4 to follow undercover detectives catching paedophiles online in new ‘hard-hitting’ documentar
'What the child sexual abuse officers are witness to on a daily basis is truly horrific.'
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Chinese app TikTok cuts jobs in India following ban
Popular short-video Chinese app TikTok is cutting its workforce in India after hundreds of millions of its users dropped it to comply with a government ban on dozens of Chinese apps amid a military standoff between the two countries
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Coronavirus latest news: EU complains of 'lack of clarity' as AstraZeneca meeting fails to break vaccine deadlock
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Up to 7inches of snow and heavy flooding to trigger cold air 'battleground'
Severe weather warnings are in place for many parts of the country until tomorrow, with the Met Office warning of travel chaos and more flooding yet to come
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Man prises crocodile jaws from his head while swimming in suburban Cairns
The man escaped with minor injuries after feeling the ‘sudden impact’ of the crocodile bite to the top of his head during a swim in Lake Placid A man has escaped with minor injuries after reportedly prising the jaws of a crocodile off his head during an attack in far north Queensland.Paramedics say the 44-year-old man was bitten by a crocodile near Lake Placid Road, in the Cairns suburb of Caravonica, about 12.45pm on Thursday. Continue reading...
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Manhunt for 70-year-old accused of killing two duck hunters
Tennessee authorities warn public that David Vowell is armed and dangerous
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Tony Blair urges Boris Johnson to lead international coronavirus ‘passport’ push
TONY BLAIR has urged Boris Johnson to lead the push for an international coronavirus ‘passport' that could allow people to travel more freely.
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Biden pauses Trump policies as Blinken takes diplomatic helm
The Biden administration has paused or put under review a wide swath of Trump-era foreign policies as America's new top diplomat takes the helm of the State Department
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Biden: 'We can't wait any longer' to address climate crisis
President Joe Biden says "we can’t wait any longer″ to address the climate crisis, and that's driving his ambitious effort to stave off the worst effects of global warming
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Scott Disick 'furious and jealous' of Kourtney's romance with Travis Barker
Scott Disick is reportedly "freaking out" over ex Kourtney Kardashian's budding romance with Travis Barker as he is worried that it will affect their close relationship
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Virus aid package tests whether Biden, Congress can deliver
President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package is more than a sweeping rescue plan
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Biden seen likely to keep Space Force, a Trump favorite
President Joe Biden has been working quickly to undo many initiatives by his predecessor
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In Wyoming, Cheney faces blowback for vote to impeach Trump
A nationwide fight for the GOP’s future is getting fierce in Wyoming
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Mum-of-seven died with her newborn baby just three days after giving birth
Emerald Tai's heartbroken partner was said to have 'lost his soulmate' after the tragic death, which saw the baby die after his mum slumped on top of him
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GOP tested anew by Georgia congresswoman's Facebook activity
Republicans have a Marjorie Taylor Greene problem — again
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Oregon puts debate over race in vaccine rollout to test
The role that race should play in deciding who gets priority for the COVID-19 vaccine in the next phase of the rollout is being put to the test in Oregon
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EXPLAINER: Executive orders can be swift but fleeting
President Joe Biden arrived at the White House ready to wield his pen to dismantle Donald Trump’s legacy and begin pushing his own priorities
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Kate Middleton said to have direct line with Queen Elizabeth II - 'Fantastic relationship'
KATE, the Duchess of Cambridge, is said to have a direct line of contact to Queen Elizabeth II, highlighting the royal's strong bond.
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Thor: Love and Thunder's impressive set takes shape in Sydney's Centennial Park
Filming officially got underway for Thor: Love and Thunder on Tuesday at Sydney's Fox Studios. And with Chris Hemsworth in town, the film crew are hard at work building a sci-fi set in Centennial Park.
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Lockdown beginning to slow spread of coronavirus, study shows
Cases are decreasing in London, the South West and South East, but increasing in the East Midlands
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Zuckerberg says Apple is now Facebook's biggest competitor as Facebook profits surge 53 per cent
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (pictured) said on Wednesday his company had 'a strong end to the year as people and businesses continued to use our services during these challenging times.'
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Apple to crack down on tracking iPhone users in early spring
Apple says it will roll out a new privacy control in the spring to prevent iPhone apps from secretly shadowing people
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At Sundance, pandemic dramas unfold on screen and off
The pandemic has transformed the annual Sundance Film Festival into a largely virtual event, but it has also reshaped many of the films that will unspool there
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Meghan Markle and Prince Harry 'can't bear’ criticism as social media ‘death trap’ looms
MEGHAN MARKLE and Prince Harry have been accused of being afraid to hear what people have to say about them, by a top brand expert.
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Witness claims seeing Giulio Regeni in Cairo police station before death
Man also alleges hearing Egyptian security officials discuss tampering with Italian student’s mobile phoneA man who claims to have witnessed the arrest of Giulio Regeni has told the Guardian how he heard and saw the Cambridge PhD student inside a police station in Cairo before he was found dead by a roadside.The witness, who is regarded as credible by investigators in Rome, said the security officials alleged to have detained the Italian behaved as if they were above the law. “Those people that took Giulio were different,” he said. “Everyone is afraid of [Egypt’s] National Security Agency.” Continue reading...
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Anthony Martial backed by Man United manager Solskjaer amid criticism
Edinson Cavani has not played in front of Man United fans at a stadium but has struck up a bond with them whereas Anthony Martial's popularity is waning.
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Arsenal transfer round-up as Gunners plot Garcia swoop while Odegaard arrives
Arsenal have already made two new signings in January, along with three departures, and could do further business before the window slams shut next week
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Coronavirus live news: WHO says Covid 'war' can be won; White House predicts 90,000 more deaths by March
US CDC chief says 90,000 could die in next four weeks; Madrid health authorities pause vaccinations amid supply issues; ‘We are in the fight of our lives,’ says WHOBritain and EU clash over claims to UK-produced Covid vaccineCanada: backlash after millionaire got jab meant for Indigenous peopleGermany expected to tighten borders to control spread of variantsChina to use anal swabs to test for Covid in high infection areas 4.58am GMT The Philippines’ Food and Drug Administration has approved the emergency use of AstraZeneca PLC’s Covid vaccine, the second to be approved in the Southeast Asian nation, Reuters reports. The known and potential benefits of AstraZeneca’s Covid vaccine outweighed the risks to date, FDA chief Rolando Enrique Domingo told a news conference. 4.40am GMT Vietnam has reported its first cases of community transmission in months, after two infections were detected in the northern provinces of Hai Duong and Quang Ninh, just weeks before the Lunar New Year holiday.While the new case numbers are very small, they have caused concern in Vietnam, which had gone 55 days without any local infections. The country has been praised for its strict quarantine and contact tracing efforts, which have allowed it to successfully limit the spread of the virus over the past year. Since the start of the pandemic, it has recorded 1,551 cases and 35 related deaths. Continue reading...
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EU vaccine CHAOS: AstraZeneca loyal to UK and Brussels HUMILIATED as jab row turns ugly
LOYALTY between pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca and the UK is a key reason for Britain's effective vaccination rollout campaign, it is claimed.
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US takes aim at China territorial claims as Biden vows to back Japan
US president smooths over Trump-era complaints to deepen Japan security alliance as new secretary of state rejects Beijing’s South China Sea claimsJoe Biden has vowed to strengthen the US’s alliance with Japan to counter growing Chinese military activity in the volatile Asia-Pacific region, including a commitment to defend the Senkakus, a group of islands in the East China sea administered by Tokyo but claimed by Beijing.The US president and Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga agreed during a phone call that their countries’ security alliance was “the cornerstone of peace and prosperity in a free and open Indo-Pacific”. Continue reading...
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Asia Today: China's big holiday travel season light so far
Efforts to dissuade Chinese from traveling for Lunar New Year appeared to be working
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Regulator says Australia must address Google ad dominance
Australia’s competition watchdog says a lack of competition for Google and a lack of transparency in the digital advertising supply chain need to be addressed because they are impacting publishers, advertisers and consumers
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