Donald Trump’s impeachment lawyers quit days before Senate trial

Donald Trump has abruptly parted ways with his lawyers with little over a week until his Senate impeachment trial, according to an inside source.
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Serena Williams slams ‘pain and cruelty’ suffered by friend Meghan Markle while in the royal family
‘I know firsthand the sexism and racism institutions and the media use to vilify women and people of color to minimise us, to break us down and demonise us,’ the tennis star wrote on social media
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TUC and Heathrow call on Sunak for 'survival support' for UK aviation
Move follows accusations chancellor is failing to understand sector’s role and provide promised helpCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe Trades Union Congress and Heathrow have called on the government to cover UK airports’ operating costs while travel bans are in place, and to extend the furlough scheme for as long as public health measures affect aviation, in a joint call for “survival support”.They said the demand for financial help and other measures were a matter of survival for businesses in the sector, after a budget in which Heathrow accused the chancellor of ignoring aviation and failing to understand the sector’s role. Continue reading...
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Footballers, fossil hunters and warrior queens: the women history forgot
Kate Mosse, founder of the Women’s prize and #WomanInHistory campaign, explains how a new generation of writers is putting female contributions on record The last words of “Diving into the Wreck”, the title poem in the 1973 collection by the great American feminist thinker, poet and essayist Adrienne Rich, are these: “a book of myths / in which / our names do not appear.” I can’t remember when I first read the poem – certainly not when it was written, I’d have been only 10 or 11. More likely in the early 80s, when living away from home for the first time, in those heady days of “discovering” feminism, of Reclaim the Night marches, of consciousness-raising groups. That’s when I learned – rather late in the day – to look at the world through a wider lens, to read more widely and to seek out books not on the syllabus. To listen to different voices, learn from other times. To attempt to stand in other people’s shoes.At the heart of Rich’s poem – and, indeed, the whole fierce, beautiful, collection about women’s liberation and the silencing of women’s voices – is a question. What is history? Who decides which stories are told and which are peripheral? Who judges what matters, whose views should be heard? Who is it that chooses the names to be written in the “book of myths”? When Diving into the Wreck won the National Book Award for poetry in 1974, Rich shared it with her fellow nominees Audre Lorde and Alice Walker (they had made the decision to do this, whoever won) and accepted it on behalf of “all the women whose voices have gone and still go unheard …” Continue reading...
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Hopes, dreams and fears: the world of teenage girls through their diaries
To mark International Women’s Day, explore beyond the stereotypes with Masuma Ahuja’s book Girlhood, a collection of diary entries from girls around the worldMasuma Ahuja was tired of seeing the same stories told about teenage girls. They were either victimised or sexualised, even if an “exceptional girl” such as Greta Thunberg or Malala Yousafzai was occasionally held up as a role model for fighting back.“We have very little understanding of the day-to-day life of girls and what life looks like for them,” says Ahuja. “I wanted to create a small portrait of what girlhood looks like in different places, and something that girls can pick up and feel seen by … and seen by girls elsewhere who share their own experiences.” Continue reading...
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Slade guitarist Dave Hill: ‘I’d come out of work, put on my costume and suddenly I’d be Superman!’
Half a century after his first hit single, Hill has survived a stroke, depression and the departure of all three of his former bandmates. The glam rock ‘yob’ relives the days of glittering faces, mighty stacks and timeless anthemsIt’s half a century since glam rock first dazzled Britain, and Slade had their first hit, Get Down and Get With It. All four members of the original lineup are alive and kicking, but Dave Hill is now the only one who trades under the name Slade. As is the way of rock bands, there have been sulks, tiffs and the odd tempestuous row. But today Hill is the very picture of Zen calm.While singer Noddy Holder is remembered as the one with the rasping voice, bassist Jimmy Lee as the creative one (he was classically trained and wrote the songs with Holder), drummer Don Powell as the one who had the terrible car crash that killed his girlfriend and left him in a coma, lead guitarist Hill was always the crazy one. He was famous for his pudding-basin fringe, glittering face, gold capes, mighty stacks (disguising his diddy, 5ft 4in stature) and ray-gun-shaped guitar called Super Yob. In his heyday, he drove a silver Jensen Interceptor and a gold Rolls-Royce with the number plate Yob 1. Hill was marketed as the yob’s yob. Continue reading...
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The Great British Art Tour: Manchester celebrates 'Our Emmeline', who changed history
With public art collections closed we are bringing the art to you, exploring highlights from across the country in partnership with Art UK. Today’s pick: Manchester’s Rise Up, WomenThis powerful and evocative work was created by the sculptor Hazel Reeves. Titled Rise Up, Women, it is colloquially referred to as “Our Emmeline”, and was unveiled in St Peter’s Square, Manchester, on 14 December 2018, marking 100 years since some women were granted the right to vote.Its unusual design depicts Emmeline Pankhurst surmounting a chair, addressing a mass demonstration. Oriented towards the former Free Trade Hall, where the first women’s suffrage meetings took place, it is set at the centre of a “meeting circle”, also designed by Reeves. Continue reading...
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Her Dior: fashion photography celebrates female gaze – in pictures
Fashion photography more often celebrates the female body than the female gaze. To celebrate International Women’s Day, a new book challenges this tradition with a collection of work by 33 female fashion photographers including Sarah Moon, Bettina Rheims and Nan Goldin. Her Dior is published by Rizzoli on the day Christian Dior’s autumn/winter 2021 collection designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri will be shown at an all-digital Paris fashion week. Chiuri has said that when she accepted the Dior role in 2016 her view of the house was that ‘this is a stereotyped vision of femininity; femininity today has many more facets to it’ Continue reading...
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We can stop to take pride on International Women's Day – but only for a moment | Polly Toynbee
The fight for equality has come a long way since I started work in 1968. But the pandemic has shown how far there is to goOn the long climb, stop and catch your breath on International Women’s Day. Look back in anger – but with pride, too. Dear granddaughters, let me recount women’s lives when I started work in 1968. To you, it’s the same ancient history the suffragettes were to me.With my first paycheck from the Observer, I tried to buy a washing machine on hire purchase, but was refused without a signature from a husband or a father. That felt symbolic, since washing machines were such liberators. The 1975 Sex Discrimination Act gave women the right to goods, credit, loans and services, but they were still often refused, just as the law is ignored now, with women still sacked for pregnancy. Continue reading...
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Half of women in UK fear equality is going back to 1970s – survey
Exclusive: impact of pandemic has fallen unequally on women, leading to calls for strategy to restore balanceWomen across the UK have issued a “desperate cry for help”, with more than half believing that women’s equality is in danger of going back to the 1970s at work, at home and in society, according to an exclusive survey.After a year that has seen women more likely to be furloughed, lose their jobs, carry the burden of home schooling and domestic drudgery, women are increasingly fearful about their futures, with almost half of those surveyed in a Mumsnet poll for International Women’s Day expecting gender equality to go into reverse over the next few years. Continue reading...
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It’s the final lockdown. But is it really?
The Channel 4 News Factcheck team ask: how safe are schools? Does the latest data show that the vaccines are working?
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We Don’t Know How Many Black Women Face Domestic Abuse. That’s About To Change
In 2014, Valerie Forde approached the police for help after her ex-partner threatened to burn her down her house – with Valerie and their 23-month-old daughter, RJ, inside. Police recorded the call as a “threat to property”, and no safeguarding procedures were put in place.Weeks later, Valerie and RJ were murdered.A review that followed outlined a number of flaws in the reporting. Changes were recommended but on International Women’s Day – and as we approach the seventh anniversary of Valerie and RJ’s death this month –  we must wonder what changes have actually been made.The number of African heritage women, like Valerie and RJ, who have complained of inadequate support by police and the violence against women and girls sector has always been worryingly high. Ever since we were founded a year after Valerie and RJ’s deaths, Sistah Space has been instrumental in revealing and bringing to public attention the core issues faced by Black women seeking domestic abuse support from mainstream services: institutional racism, classism, ageism, sexism and much more.We have witnessed first hand how the lack of knowledge around African heritage women’s needs can lead to further trauma for victims of abuse. In our experience, culturally specific training for mainstream providers is essential to ensure that Black women are supported adequately. Our specialist programmes offer that bespoke culturally significant training to individual organisations, charities, police, housing – all institutions in need of understanding that they don’t understand. There is no data on domestic abuse perpetrated against Britain’s women of African heritage specifically. Currently, all data is grouped under "BAME" Crucially, there is no data on domestic abuse perpetrated against Britain’s women of African heritage specifically. Currently, all data is grouped under “BAME” – but to talk about “BAME” women is talk about a multitude of different people, each with a distinct and relevant history. It is a discriminatory title that serves no purpose but to degrade and erase mostnon-white experiences, history and cultures. But that might be about to change. We have recently been granted £10,000 funding by Black Lives Matter UK, and with that money we will begin to collect the data ourselves. The data will be gathered both by Black women – who know the right questions to ask and how to ask them – and from Black women, will be more comfortable telling their truth without apology and without fear of reprisal, contempt or ridicule when relaying their truth.We plan to use that information that will come in the form of questionnaires, personal stories, video and audio recordings to effect changes  at policy level as well as inform our specialist training programmes. This grant will help us achieve two additional vital goals. First, In Valerie Ford’s memory we will be relaunching our campaign for Valerie’s Law, which would compel police, housing, NHS and local authority services to give specialised care to Black women and  ensure that never again will Black women be failed to the point it costs them their lives. We aim to ensure that every organisation dealing with violence against women and girls must have minimum training around the specific needs of African heritage women and girls.  Those women will have endured domestic violence and much more, and suffered in silence through fear of deportation if they speak out. Second, we’ll be purchasing a canal boat from where we plan to invite survivors of domestic violence to learn about abuse and staying safe. Why a boat? Well, this is in memory of those of us denied, by our economic status, access to the water which we African women enjoyed in our African and Caribbean homelands.Marcus Garvey vision of the Black Starliner, bringing independence and self-reliancefor Black people, will be given life once again in the shape of what we will call our Black-SisStah-liner. Priority will be given to those who have, for too long, been denied what others have taken for granted, such as those who came over from Africa and the Caribbean in the 50s and 60s but have never again had access to the sea. Those women will have endured domestic violence and much more, and suffered in silence through fear of deportation if they speak out. The Windrush scandal has shown that this has happened time and time again to those who have worked their whole lives in Britain, only to be threatened with, and even face, deportation.   Our campaigns, and most vitally the data we gather, will finally give a voice to the Black womenwho have gone through domestic violence, but whose stories have never been heard.Ngozi Fulani is CEO of Sistah Space If you, or someone you know, is in immediate danger, call 999 and ask for the police. If you are not in immediate danger, you can contact:The Freephone 24 hour National Domestic Violence Helpline, run by Refuge: 0808 2000 247In Scotland, contact Scotland’s 24 hour Domestic Abuse and Forced Marriage Helpline: 0800 027 1234In Northern Ireland, contact the 24 hour Domestic & Sexual Violence Helpline: 0808 802 1414In Wales, contact the 24 hour Life Fear Free Helpline on 0808 80 10 800.National LGBT+ Domestic Abuse Helpline: 0800 999 5428Men’s Advice Line: 0808 801 0327Respect helpline (for anyone worried about their own behaviour): 0808 802 0321
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I Came Here As An Unaccompanied Child Refugee. Now Britain Has Abandoned Others Like Me
When I was 12 years old, I had to flee my home country in East Africa because of civil war and the threat of ISIS. To escape danger, I had to go on a difficult journey to safety. I travelled through the desert in Libya. I didn’t have enough food and was very thin. I still carry the scars from being shot and beaten. I just kept going, trying to get somewhere safe. Everywhere I went, there were threats from terrorist groups. I had to get far away from danger and make sure I wasn’t caught and sent back or killed.After crossing many countries, I ended up in France, but wanted to get to the UK, where my aunt was. In France, I didn’t know the language, had no friends or family. It was a hard life, almost like being in jail. Every day, I saw people sleeping on the street, with no life and no support. I had spent two years crossing North Africa and I did not want to spend another two years in France in limbo, sleeping rough. But that’s what I did.While in Calais, I was among many children trying to get to the UK. I tried getting on lorries to the UK, which was nearly impossible. Imagine it: police, security, dogs that always find you. The dogs smell you, they bark, the police find you, beat you up and use tear gas. And then they send you back.After many months, thanks to a Calais volunteer, I heard about a process to reunite with my aunt through the EU’s Dublin Regulation. When one woman found out I was 15 and my aunt was in the UK, she said she could take me to a shelter and start the process of reuniting us. I was interviewed, age assessed, had my DNA taken and interviewed again. But many months after this process began, my aunt had to unexpectedly travel to Turkey temporarily. When the Home Office found out she had left London, they said I was not allowed to come to the UK.  I was extremely fortunate to access the Dubs scheme to travel safely to the UK – the very same scheme the government has said they will not continue. I spent the whole next week in my room feeling hopeless. I had waited seven months and after all that time I couldn’t go. Resigned to staying in France, I stopped eating, stopped washing. I remember crying at the photos my friends who had reached Glasgow, Manchester and other places would send me.I heard about another route: the Dubs scheme, which was set up in 2016 for unaccompanied children seeking asylum to travel to the UK. I knew people who had taken this route, but I thought it was for younger children. I thought that because I was nearly 16, I wouldn’t stand a chance, but after two weeks it was confirmed that I could. It was such a relief, like a big weight off my shoulders. The process still took ages, with interviews and travel arrangements, but I was on my way.Finally, I got a plane to Heathrow. My new foster parents met me and took me home to Dorset. I remember how green the countryside was, and falling asleep in the car, exhausted. When we pulled into the driveway, I saw two girls – as I wondered who they were, my foster parents told me they were their daughters. Now they are my sisters and always will be. I don’t live with my foster family now, but they will always be my family. I still talk to them most days, and I am also able to see my aunt regularly, as we live in the same city. Since I arrived in the UK, I have studied hard. Now I am at college doing sports and I want to become a fitness trainer, a lifeguard or a referee. I also campaign for refugees’ rights with the charity Safe Passage International. A lot of children that I met on my journey are in that situation, still on the streets, still waiting. I was extremely fortunate to access the Dubs scheme to travel safely to the UK – the very same scheme the government has said they will not continue. With Brexit, the UK has left the EU’s Dublin Regulation, which also makes it much harder for children like me to reunite with their families. This makes me feel sad, to think of all those children, homeless with no other option. I think of a friend who I met in Calais; we were there together for seven month and both started the process under the Dubs scheme, but he wasn’t successful. His life is very different to mine. He lives on the street and sometimes doesn’t have food to eat. Now he, and so many like him, may never be able to come here. If I hadn’t been successful in reaching the UK, I would have ended up going camp to camp, with no documents and no hope. I could have ended up on the streets without support. A lot of children that I met on my journey are in that situation, still on the streets, still waiting. With the challenges I went through and all the things I experienced, sometimes I can’t believe I’m alive. When I remember the people I saw who died, remember being shot in Libya, it all feels so surreal. I have friends who haven’t been as lucky as me. So when I look at people here and reflect on my life – leaving my country, my journey through Libya, my time in Calais – I think it is important that people know what others have been through just to be here. I want people to hear my story and realise how lucky they are. I am proud of how far I have come, and of where I am today. I didn’t choose these experiences, they happened to me, but everything I have been through has made me stronger. I had no choice, no option but now here I am. I want to get on with my life. Every child fleeing war or persecution should have the same opportunities that I have, and the same right to safety.Muste is a former unaccompanied child refugee, and a campaigner with Safe Passage InternationalHave a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on ukpersonal@huffpost.comMore from HuffPost UK PersonalI Tracked Down The Girls Who Bullied Me As A Kid. Here's What They Had To SayPeople Like Me Rely On The Universal Credit Uplift. Don’t Take It Away From UsI’m A Paramedic. I’ve Seen The Mental Health Toll This Pandemic Is Taking On Us All
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5 Ways Women Are Losing Out During Covid – And How To Fight Back
Women have been hardest hit by the socioeconomic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, forced out of the workforce at four times the rate of men.  Over two thirds of the additional responsibilities generated by Covid, such as homeschooling, have been absorbed by women, according to a report by the London School of Economics, and there are growing concerns that women are being targeted for furlough or redundancy for this reason.In other cases, women are leaving the workforce voluntarily – on paper, at least – but in reality, many have no other choice. “I think it’s very clear that Covid has entrenched already enormous inequalities,” says Sophie Walker, founding leader of the Women’s Equality Party, who’s  recently joined law firm McAllister Olivarius as chief strategy officer.  “It has been really painful to watch the progression of the pandemic, not just because there has been such immediate pain and illness and loss of life, but because there has been so little understanding of how to respond to an event that has exposed our social infrastructure as being severely lacking.”Walker says governments have consistently overlooked the unpaid work disproportionately completed by women – such as childcare and care of elderly relatives – and this has only been exacerbated by the pandemic. Though schools are returning this week, this won’t end the problem if students are sent home and told to self-isolate in the rates we saw in autumn. “It’s astonishing to me that a government response to a pandemic can be to go out in a hard hat and start talking about construction, when the NHS is on its knees, schools are closing, nurseries are closing and women in their thousands are being pushed into poverty and financial despair,” she says.We can’t change societal views about the roles of women overnight. But we can fight back against those societal views, if we think they’re contributing to discrimination in the workplace. Here are five things to look out for:Women’s wages have been cut Almost three quarters (72%) of mothers have had to work fewer hours because of childcare issues, according to a survey by Pregnant then Screwed.This will have had a direct impact of women’s wages, says Walker, as women are “more likely to be on precarious work contracts and zero hours contracts”, where they get paid for the hours they complete.  All employees have the right to request flexible working, says gender discrimination lawyer Kelsey Murrell, so remember this if you’re unable to fit your usual tasks into set hours.“Your employer isn’t obliged to grant that request, but they are legally obliged to deal with your request reasonably,” she says. “There might be circumstances where it doesn’t make sense  – a job in manufacturing, for example, where you really do need to be working certain hours – but if there isn’t a good reason why there can’t be that flexibility, it could well be unreasonable for them to deny it.”Nor should the mental health impact of shifting your day and combining it with unpaid work should be underestimated. “I’m hearing from women who are working 16 to 18 hour days to do all the childcare first, then try to do all of the work at the end of the day and into the middle of the night,” says Walker. “That just can’t compare to men, husbands and partners, who are going into another room, shutting the door and working as normal.”Women are being targeted for redundancy Among working mothers, 15% have been made redundant or believe they will be made redundant in the next six months. Almost half (46%) of those who’ve faced redundancy believe a lack of childcare may have contributed to them being selected. “One thing we’ve seen in both the US and the UK is employers using redundancies and Covid as their cover to clean house,” says Murrell.“There’s no question that a lot of businesses absolutely do have to make some employees redundant – but the furlough scheme is still going, so there is a query around whether they really have to right now.”Look for patterns, she suggests. Who is being made redundant? Is it mostly women? Is it mostly women who are also mothers? Is one protected class being targeted more than others?“It’s not really enough for a discrimination claim that you are a woman and someone else isn’t and you were selected for redundancy and they weren’t,” adds Murrell. “You do need some other evidence.”Keeping a log of potential discrimination, ranging from offensive comments to being overlooked for opportunities, will strengthen your case.“It can be a combination of a lot of little things,” says Murrell. “And I don’t want to call them little, because they’re obviously enormously hurtful and cumulative.”As uncomfortable as it may feel, your first step if you suspect discrimination is to file an internal grievance. This is the case for any claim that may potentially end up at an employment tribunal.“You can be penalised and your damages can be reduced [if you don’t raise internally], because the idea is that the courts want to keep as many claims out of court that don’t need to be in court as possible,” explains Murrell. After filing an internal grievance, you’ll need to file a claim with Acas, the administrative body that deals with work-based claims, within three months. Ascas will then process this, before your claim is brought to an employment tribunal. The system is designed to be used without a lawyer, says Murrell, but seeking legal advice might help you feel more at ease. Women are being targeted for furlough  There are two big problems with the furlough scheme: being unfairly targeted for furlough by employers, and asking to be furloughed but being denied it. Over half (65%) of mothers who have been furloughed say a lack of childcare was the reason, yet separate research shows 70% of working mothers who asked to be furloughed for childcare reasons have been refused. Both show a lack of understanding of the complexities of being a working parent.“Unfortunately there’s not a lot that you can do if you’ve been denied furlough, because you have a right to request furlough, but you don’t have an absolute right to demand it,” says Murrell. “But on the flip-side we’ve seen companies make assumptions about women and what their performance is going to be like before even asking them. That is a discriminatory issue.”Again, she advises looking for patterns among the furloughed staff: are they  disproportionately women, mothers or both? Also note down any seemingly off-the-cuff comments that might suggest women were targeted.“A lot of women experience gaslighting in the workplace, but they also downplay their own experiences, they don’t want to be seen as hysterical or overreacting to things,” says Murrell. “Because we’re often tone-policed in the workplace, I think we’re hyper-vigilant about not overreacting.”Shake off that internalised patriarchy, don’t worry about being a “drama queen” and raise a grievance (as instructed above) if something doesn’t feel right. Another thing to remember, is that employers shouldn’t be shifting you on to the furlough scheme just because you’re due to go on maternity leave. “HMRC has been very clear they will be carrying out audits and if a company was required to pay someone for their maternity leave, then they’re not allowed to put them on furlough to save money,” says Murrell. “It would be an abuse of not only that woman’s rights, but the government furlough scheme.”Women are missing out on meetings We might joke that we’re all in too many meetings, but if women are taking on disproportionate childcare and home responsibilities, they risk losing their voice at the table. Companies should make reasonable adjustments to working conditions, such as the times of meetings, if there’s a particular time of day that’s harder for the parents or carers. “One of the implied duties that every employer owes an employee is a mutual duty of trust and confidence,” says Murrell.  “If we’re talking about things like asking for flexibility around when meetings take place... if an employer is reacting unreasonably, it may be that they’ve breached that duty and it could be that you’ve got a legal claim there.”Problems such being excluded from meetings might be a form of “indirect discrimination”. “If a company has a policy that on the face of it is not discriminatory and it applies to everybody, but it disproportionately affects a protected class, then you may have an indirect discrimination claim,” she adds. “You can raise that with your employer, because an employer may not even be recognising it.” Women are still being harassed Women are still experiencing workplace sexual harassment during the pandemic. A survey from Rights Of Women found 42% of women experiencing sexual harassment at work have experienced some to all of the harassment online. Almost a quarter (23%) of women who have experienced sexual harassment reported an increase or escalation whilst working from home.The pandemic has caused the nature of sexual harassment to change, says Murrell, and some workers may be less inclined to report it.“One thing I see a lot is harassers trying to send harassing messages over personal numbers or emails instead of work channels, thinking that  will protect them, but it doesn’t,” she says.“The thing that makes me worry, is that in the current economic climate women don’t feel as empowered to assert those rights, they don’t want to rock the boat, because they want to hold onto that job.” Murrell urges women to continue to report harassment and to do so immediately, rather than wait until the “pandemic is over”. Again, there’s a three-month time limit – so waiting may mean perpetrators go unchallenged. READ MORE:Chinese Divorce Court Awards Wife £5,000 For HouseworkCharity Loses Case Arguing Covid Scheme Discriminated Against Working MothersBAME Women Hardest Hit By Financial Impact Of CoronavirusGovernment Withdraws Sexist Covid 'Stay Home' Advert After CriticismOpinion: Women Have Been Hit Harder By Covid. Now This Budget Forgets Them Altogether'I'm Not Here For The Warm and Fuzzies': The UK Stars Of Disability TikTokWe Are Single Parents In A Pandemic. We're Coping But Don't Forget Us
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‘We Are Survivors’: A Year On The Covid Front Line For 6 British Women
“I’ve never worked in those kind of conditions. It was like fire fighting. You had young people, as well as elderly people, who were just fighting for their lives.”As a respiratory specialist, Dr Shumonta Quaderi’s life was turned upside down when Covid-19 tore through the UK last spring. The 37-year-old, from London, was worried about the virus “right from the beginning”. Beds in ICU were filling up, while ventilators were running critically low. “We were totally inundated with numbers, but this was a completely new thing for us,” she says. “We had no idea what we were dealing with. Yes, the virus attacked the lungs, but it was attacking other parts of the body as well. We were all learning together, the best way to manage and treat it.”To make matters more complicated, Dr Quaderi was also four months pregnant, with her first child. Pregnant women had been advised not to do frontline work, yet despite support from her hospital, Dr Quaderi decided to go against the advice. She had adequate PPE – though reports of “extreme shortages” elsewhere in the country were rife – and felt it was her duty to continue. “I felt really strongly and passionately about wanting to work,” she says. “It was my particular specialty, and my profession, so it would feel weird to sit back.”  Women like Dr Quaderi have been working throughout the pandemic in the very jobs that have kept the nation functioning. Many are doing so while shouldering society’s unpaid work, too – childcare, looking after elderly relatives, and housework – which still disproportionately falls to women. As the UN has said: "Women stand at the front lines of the Covid-19 crisis, as health care workers, caregivers, innovators, community organisers and as some of the most exemplary and effective national leaders in combating the pandemic. The crisis has highlighted both the centrality of their contributions and the disproportionate burdens that women carry.”An exclusive Savanta ComRes poll* for HuffPost UK reveals women are doing more childcare, cooking and household work than before the pandemic. For those working from home, any time they may have saved from physically travelling to and from work has been filled with unpaid, domestic labour.And this shift in lifestyle is negatively impacting women’s mental health.Nearly half (47%) of the women surveyed say their mental health has declined. Two-thirds (63%) feel more anxious, while 55% feel more challenged and 53% feel more limited. Yet these experiences are seldom acknowledged. Worryingly, almost a third (32%) of women now feel less heard than they were previously. As the UK’s death toll surpasses 124,000 – the highest per capita of any country in the world – many are dealing with these life-altering challenges amid grief.  Professor Shani Orgad, a sociologist at the London School of Economics, says that while she’s not surprised by the findings, she is “deeply disappointed and alarmed by them”.  When people say the pandemic has set back the cause of gender equality ‘to the 1950s’ we should all take this very, very seriously.Professor Shani Orgad, LSE“Crises like the pandemic reveal and exacerbate existing social and economic inequalities. So the pandemic has deepened a crisis of care and gender and racial inequalities that existed before,” Professor Orgad tells HuffPost UK.“There has been mounting evidence – already before the pandemic – showing that women (more than men), especially those aged 35 to 49 with caring responsibilities for both children and elderly parents, suffer from stress and mental health problems as a result of the current crisis in social care.“Women were therefore the obvious ‘shock absorbers’ of the pandemic.”For Amahra Spence, a 29-year-old business owner from Birmingham, it’s felt “impossible” to work from home while homeschooling a four-year-old and raising a newborn. “I’ll have a meeting at 8am while I’m feeding one. Then the other one’s setting up his laptop for a class at 9am. Then I’ll go into another meeting, and all the while I’ve got my baby on my lap,” she says.“I am so tired. I am exhausted. It’s really hard.”Spence doesn’t think women have been valued enough for this juggling act and was saddened to hear of companies targeting working mothers for redundancy or furlough.According to research by the campaign group Pregnant then Screwed, almost half (46%) of working mothers made redundant believe a lack of childcare provision played a role in their redundancy. Meanwhile, 65% of mothers who have been furloughed say a lack of childcare was the reason. “There is mounting evidence showing that women have suffered huge financial penalties largely because of caring responsibilities,” says Professor Orgad.“Women are losing their jobs at four times the rate of men; women especially in the lowest socioeconomic groups were more likely to be furloughed, women have been forced to cut their working hours and scale back their careers,” she says. “So, when people say the pandemic has set back the cause of gender equality ‘to the 1950s’ we should all take this very, very seriously.” They say it takes a village to raise a child and I’ve realised with the absence of my village, how true that is.Amahra Spence, 29, BirminghamSpence is relieved that schools are finally reopening. In her view, homeschooling is something that’s become worryingly “trivialised” over the past year.“People are joking and laughing [but] I’m speaking with other parents, friends of mine, and everybody is so stretched and emotionally broken,” she says.She gave birth to her second child in June 2020 – “slap bang in the middle of the pandemic”. Being heavily pregnant during the first wave was “just really nerve-wracking and anxiety-inducing”, she says, not least because she had to attend appointments alone while hospitals limited visitor numbers due to Covid.Spence was terrified of giving birth alone, too, after seeing heartbreaking “lines of fathers outside” on her visits.In the end, she entered active labour five minutes after arriving at the hospital, so her partner was allowed in for the remainder of her fast, one-hour birth. However, the challenges continued for the couple. Their son was born with complex health needs, meaning they had to navigate a series of hospital appointments amid ongoing Covid restrictions. It’s made the lack of contact time with friends and family all the more difficult. “They say it takes a village to raise a child, and I’ve really realised with the absence of my village, how true that is,” says Spence. “I’ve found it terrifying. I’ve found it really, really scary and I’ve found it really, really sad.” Others have struggled, too. More than half of the women we surveyed (51%) said they are “less happy” than they were before the pandemic. This increases to 54% among parents. Money worries factor into this. While 24% of women said the pandemic has had a positive impact on their household finances, 32% reported a negative effect. The rest remain unchanged.Spence, who runs a social justice arts organisation, says her “finances have been stretched to the brink” this year. “I thought that we might have to close the business last year,” she adds. “Thankfully we got some emergency grants that kept us afloat.”  You just get on with it, protect yourself as best you can.Monica Sullery, 58, NottinghamFor Monica Sulley, a 58-year-old bus driver from Nottingham, finances have also been tricky. When bus drivers test positive for Covid or are told to self-isolate via Test and Trace, they receive statutory sick pay, which is set at £95.85 per week. “You don’t get paid for the first three days, so the first week off you’ve lost about £40,” she says. “And you can’t live on that.” Sulley worked as a Tesco delivery driver during the summer, but returned to bus driving – a job she’d previously done for 15 years – in October. She had missed bus work and wanted to get back, despite the risks – she’d read of bus drivers dying from Covid and personally knew a driver who’d died in Nottingham.“If I’m honest, I didn’t really think about it,” she says of the danger. “You know, it’s one of those things, if you do think about it you’re gonna go mad. You’re not gonna be able to work. So you just get on with it, protect yourself as best you can.”The hardest part of the job has been dealing with non-compliant passengers, who refuse to wear face masks or follow social distancing measures on the bus. But the overwhelming majority of the public have been grateful for the continued service, she says.One regular passenger, an elderly man, seemed confused by the new rules, so Sulley bought him a pack of face masks. “You just help people where you can,” she says. “We’re in a strange situation.”During her toughest week on shift, around 30 staff members were off work self-isolating. Sulley says the government has supported bus companies financially, but this help has not extended down to drivers. Four in 10 women (40%) surveyed by HuffPost said they didn’t feel government support for women had changed during the pandemic, despite the challenges  faced. Almost a third (29%) said they felt less supported by the government than they had previously, while 20% felt less supported by their employer. While passenger numbers are down on the bus network, work was busier than ever when Sulley was driving for Tesco in June, when there was an unprecedented number of bookings. “It was hard work. I mean, you could be moving three tons of groceries by hand a day quite easily. Great for your figure!” she laughs. “But it was busy. People weren’t wanting to go out and we had a lot of people who were shielding. It wasn’t unusual to be doing 30 deliveries a day.” I was going to work with all these people and in my mind there was a good chance I could catch Covid and bring it home.Deborah Stevens, 59, HertfordshireMany others continued shopping in-person, coming into close contact with supermarket staff like Deborah Stevens, who has worked on the check-outs and shop floor in Tesco for 30 years. The 59-year-old, from Hertfordshire, has three grown-up children, including a daughter, 20, who is living at home with Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes (EDS) and Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), meaning she needs to shield. The government’s policy dictates that people living with shielders must still go to work if they can’t work from home. It leaves Stevens constantly worrying about catching Covid at work, then infecting her vulnerable daughter. “I knew I had to cope with it though, because I had to work financially,” she says. Work was particularly tough early in the pandemic, when some customers still acted as though the virus was “like flu” and lunged forwards to grab products off the shelf.“It was like every person coming towards you was going to hurt you,” Stevens recalls. “I worried, extremely – it was all on my shoulders. I was going to work in this place with all these people and in my mind there was a good chance I could catch it and bring it home. It was very, very hard. I was constantly jumping out of people’s way. I was having heart palpitations a lot of the time.” She made the decision to wear a face mask at work long before they were made mandatory by the government. She says this made her a “target” in some respects, with customers who thought she was being a “drama queen”. “I felt torn, I wanted to take it off because of the response, but I had to keep it on because of my family,” she says. Things got easier as face masks rules were introduced and the public started to take the virus seriously. Thankfully, Stevens’ family has avoided falling ill.Dr Nisreen Alwan, who has juggled roles as an associate professor in public health at the University of Southampton and working as a hospital consultant, while single-handedly caring for three children, has not been so fortunate.The 46-year-old caught coronavirus early on in March 2020 and says she has never fully recovered. Her personal experience, coupled with her research into public health, has led to her becoming a leading voice on long Covid, raising awareness around the globe.Dr Alwan is also known for her research on the health and wellbeing of women and children, and speaks out about the importance of a safe return to school. 
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This Is The Risk Of Catching Covid-19 In A Busy Park
Every Monday, we’ll answer your questions on Covid-19 and health in a feature published online. You can submit a question here.  HuffPost UK reader Pete asked: “Can you catch Covid in a busy park?As the weather warms up, parks are going to get busier again – especially since Boris Johnson’s roadmap states people will be able to sit with one other person from March 8 – and five other people from March 29. So as we, once again, have picnics with our pals on the grass, are we putting ourselves at risk? “We know this virus transmits during close contact with people,” says Dr Julian Tang, clinical virologist at the University of Leicester. If a park is very crowded, with less than two metre spacing between groups, where no masks are worn, “the virus can still potentially transmit”, he says. “If most people have been vaccinated, and there is a strong breeze and strong sunlight, this risk will be less.”Submit a coronavirus health question to HuffPost UK.Paul Hunter, professor in Medicine, at the Norwich School of Medicine, University of East Anglia, adds that the evidence is that transmission of Covid outside is much lower – about 19-fold less – than transmission indoors.“There was also no obvious outbreak associated with the very crowded beaches that we saw last spring and summer,” he adds. “That does not mean that such transmission is impossible but it will be unlikely to play an important role in the spread of the epidemic.”The highest risk of transmission is during face-to-face conversation between unmasked people, less than one metre apart, if there is less wind and less sunlight, says Dr Tang. In these conditions, the virus can pass quickly between individuals at this distance through the air.“Standing close to someone not from your household or support bubble face to face whilst talking still should be avoided,” says Prof Hunter. “But sitting near other people, especially if more than two metres apart whilst not socialising with them, would be a very low risk.”Prof Keith Neal, professor of the Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases, University of Nottingham, says the benefits of exercise and vitamin D are much greater than the risks of not going outside at all. When lying down especially, the sunbathing droplets you breathe out will “go virtually nowhere”, he says. Closing parks isn’t an option for local and national government, adds Prof Neal, as “forcing people into places where distancing is less practical”.  So, while going to a busy park may not be super risky, you should still abide by distancing measures. Professor Jonathan Reid, director of Bristol Aerosol Research Centre, says there have been “very few recognised cases” of transmission outside and only when people were “not observing the guidance on physical distancing”. “It is also important people still recognise the risks of any indoor spaces they might use when visiting an outdoor venue, such as toilets, changing rooms and cafes,” he adds. If a park looks, or becomes, too crowded, you can go somewhere else. “The important thing to remember is that no one who gets vaccinated at the moment is routinely tested for an antibody response, so you don’t actually know if you might be one of the few that has not responded to the vaccine,” sats Dr Tang. “This non-response rate is typically around 5-10% across all vaccines.“Despite the rapid vaccine rollout, people still need to be aware of potential transmission risks – particularly with the circulation of multiple potentially more transmissible, partial vaccine escape virus variants – which includes crowded outdoor situations also.”Experts are still learning about Covid-19. The information in this story is what was known or available at the time of publication, but guidance could change as scientists discover more about the virus. To keep up to date with health advice and cases in your area, visit gov.uk/coronavirus and nhs.uk.Related...The Risk Of Catching Covid From A Runner's BreathYes, Covid Affects People Differently, Even In The Same HouseholdThe Unrivalled Joy Of Lazing In Parks Is A Positive Lockdown TakeawayYou've Had The Vaccine, So Can You Hug Your Grandkids Now?
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The pandemic of inequality: How coronavirus is setting women’s rights back decades
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Prince Harry's rift with Charles: Duke of Sussex feels 'really let down' by his father
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Meghan compares her life to The Little Mermaid during Oprah interview
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EXPLAINER: What's happened so far at China's annual congress
Midway through its annual session, China’s ceremonial parliament is focusing on boosting the economy, building self-reliance in technology and further squeezing room for political opposition in Hong Kong
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How pandemic may finally sink Kashmir's famous houseboats
Building and repair ban had turned Dal Lake into graveyard for sinking boats even before coronavirus and Delhi crackdownGhulam Nabi Butt may be 90 years old, but he has never forgotten the three days that George Harrison came to stay on his houseboat in October 1966.It was here, on one of Butt’s first historic Clermont houseboats moored on the northern bank of Dal Lake in Srinagar, Kashmir, that the Beatles lead guitarist met the Indian musician and composer Ravi Shankar and was taught to play the sitar – marking the beginning of an musical collaboration that would last decades. Continue reading...
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7 bombshells from Meghan's Oprah interview - racism claims and suicidal thoughts
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's interview with Oprah Winfrey will filled with shocking claims about the royal family, and the Duchess of Sussex finally gave her side of the story on that infamous bridesmaid dress row with sister-in-law Kate Middleton
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Jill Biden sees teachable moment in the depths of a pandemic
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Harry and Meghan reveal role Hollywood mogul Tyler Perry played in move to LA
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Meghan Markle and Harry blasted by Twitter users over Oprah interview – ‘Kind of stupid’
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Prince Harry Says Prince Charles ‘Stopped Taking His Calls’ Following Discussions About Royal Family Exit
Prince Harry has revealed Prince Charles “stopped taking his calls” following discussions about his exit from the royal family.The Duke of Sussex made the revelation during his and Meghan Markle’s interview with Oprah Winfrey, which aired in the US on Sunday night.Harry revealed that his father had asked him to put his and Meghan Markle’s plans to leave “in writing,” which he did, but the future king was still unhappy with Harry’s decision.“I took matters into my own hands,” Harry told Oprah. “It was like, ‘I need to do this for my family. This is not a surprise to anybody. It’s really sad that it’s got to this point, but I’ve got to do something for my own mental health, my wife’s and for Archie’s as well,’ because I could see where this was headed.”Later in the interview, Harry admitted he felt “let down” by his father, who went through a similar situation with Harry and Prince William’s mother, Princess Diana of Wales.“He knows what pain feels like, and Archie’s his grandson,” Harry said. “But at the same time, of course I will always love him. But there’s a lot of hurt that’s happened and I will continue to make it one of my priorities to try and heal that relationship.”Harry also addressed rumours of a rift with his brother, Prince William, after he and Meghan officially stepped back from the royal family for a life of service in Los Angeles. William reportedly felt that Harry was abandoning his sense of duty and birthright, but Harry shot down rumours that he and his older sibling were still feuding.“I love William to bits,” Harry said. “He’s my brother, we’ve been through hell together... but we were on different paths.“The relationship is space, at the moment. And, you know, time heals all things, hopefully.”Harry previously spoke about the reported rift in the 2019 documentary Harry & Meghan: An African Journey.He insisted that while he and William have good days and bad days, most of the reports are “created out of nothing.”“Part of this role and part of this job and this family being under the pressure it’s under, inevitably stuff happens. But look, we’re brothers, we’ll always be brothers,” Harry said at the time. “We’re certainly on different paths at the moment. But I’ll always be there for him and, as I know, he’ll always be there for me. We don’t see each other as much as we used to because we’re so busy, but I love him dearly.”In the Oprah interview, Harry once again accused the media of creating false narratives, saying, “I’ve never blindsided my grandmother. I have too much respect for her.”Harry said he spoke with the Queen on multiple occasions about the idea of him and Meghan stepping back from the royal family.“When we were in Canada, I had three conversations with my grandmother and two conversations with my father before he stopped taking my calls,” he said.Later in the interview, Harry confirmed that he and his father were back on speaking terms but that he felt like his family was stuck in the monarchy.“I was trapped, but I didn’t know I was trapped,” he said. “My father and my brother, they are trapped. They don’t get to leave.”CBS Presents Oprah with Meghan and Harry airs on ITV at 9pm tonight and on ITV HubMEGHAN AND HARRY:Meghan Markle Says She Contemplated Suicide: ‘I Just Didn’t See A Solution’Meghan Markle Reveals Royal Family Member Expressed Racist Concerns Over Son’s Skin ColourA Timeline Of The Royal Family's Most Famous (And Infamous) TV Interviews To Date
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How might the palace respond to Harry and Meghan’s explosive interview with Oprah? I have some ideas
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Furious backlash as critics call for Harry and Meghan to be stripped of titles
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex made a string of serious allegations about the royal family, alleging that one unnamed member had voiced concern about son Archie's skin colour, and said they had no mental health support
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School for female shepherds aims to restore balance in Spain's countryside
As more women leave rural areas for cities, course forms part of drive to revive villagesThe rugged pathways crisscross Spain, sprawling across an estimated 1% of its territory. Etched into the land over centuries, the country’s livestock roads have long been the domain of solitary men leading their flocks to lush pastures.Now a new initiative is looking to change this with the launch of the country’s first shepherding school for women. The aim of the School for Shepherdesses of the 21st Century is twofold: offering women a foothold in a trade long dominated by men, while also throwing a lifeline to the thousands of Spanish towns that are slowly fading from the map. Continue reading...
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