Jacinda Ardern faces Waitangi Day reckoning with Māori as progress stalls

Three years after the prime minister asked Māori to hold her to account, many are disillusioned with her government

In an oft-repeated story New Zealand’s prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, has recalled how growing up in the small, largely Māori town of Murupara, she would see children going to school hungry, and with no shoes on their feet.

It was these scenes of entrenched inequality and poverty, often along racial lines, that drove a teenage Ardern into the Labour party, where she has dedicated herself to combating child poverty.

Continue reading...
Read full article on: theguardian.com
Boris Johnson under pressure to sanction £190m Royal Yacht in memory of Prince Philip
BORIS JOHNSON is under pressure from Cabinet Ministers, MPs and businessmen to sanction the construction of a successor to HMY Royal Yacht Britannia in memory of the Duke of Edinburgh.
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
SNL tackles Derek Chauvin trial and America’s racial tension in cold open: ‘We’ve seen this movie before’
Alex Moffat, Kate McKinnon, Ego Nwodim, and Kenan Thompson starred as morning TV anchors in Minnesota
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Your new (tax) year resolution … give your finances a spring clean
The new financial year started last week and there’s no better time to take stock of all your investmentsHappy new tax year. While it is unlikely that many champagne corks were popped, 6 April was a landmark for anyone who wants to take a fresh look at their finances.“This is often a good time to take stock,” says Sarah Coles, a personal finance analyst at Hargreaves Lansdown. “Revisit things like savings, investments and pensions at least once a year to make sure they still reflect your needs.” Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the...
Chelsea transfer round up including Marina Granovskaia's Haaland strategy
The Blues are set to bring in reinforcements for Thomas Tuchel when the summer transfer window opens, with Erling Haaland and Sergio Aguero both linked with moves to Stamford Bridge
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
What happened to every player linked with Man Utd in summer transfer window
As the summer transfer window approaches, here is a look back at those linked with United last year and where they ended up
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Prince Philip statue: No10 backs plan to commemorate Duke of Edinburgh after death
A STATUE of Prince Philip has gained the support of MPs after the Duke of Edinburgh died on Friday aged 99.
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
Blue Peter star Katy Hill was 'scarred for life' after head-butting toilet
Former Blue Peter presenter Katy Hill has shown the horrific scar on her head which came after she had an accident in the bathroom with her young daughter
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Prince Philip’s death raises hopes royal rifts will heal – ‘somewhat sensationalised’
PRINCE Philip's death has led people to hope rumours of rifts within the Royal Family would be corrected.
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
SNL: Carey Mulligan’s husband Marcus Mumford crashes actor’s opening monologue
‘Promising Young Woman’ actor made her hosting debut
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Arsenal transfer round-up as Mavropanos's faces uncertain Gunners future
Arsenal and Mikel Arteta are still very much in the middle of a squad overhaul and this summer could see several faces come in and out as the north Londoners eye Brazilian youngster Matheus Martinelli
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
WWE WrestleMania 37 night one results, grades: Bianca Belair beats Sasha Banks in historic main event
The EST of WWE captured the gold.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
21 Chinese coal miners trapped by underground flood
A Chinese news agency says rescuers are trying to reach 21 coal miners who are trapped by an underground flood in the country's northwest
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Ecuador, Peru head to polls under strict virus measures
Ecuador and Peru are choosing new presidents under strict public health measures prompted by the coronavirus pandemic
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Movers And Shakers: How 'Stay Home' Finally Made Fitness Fun
“I give the British people a very simple instruction: you must stay at home.”Those were the words of Boris Johnson, in March 2020, when lockdown was announced. Our ability to move freely, something most of us took totally for granted, was suddenly restricted – in every sense, not just for fitness.We couldn’t go to the gym, to a bootcamp class, or for a long, three-hour hike in the countryside. We couldn’t go for a run with a mate, to a swimming pool, or even to one of those outside gyms in the park. Instead, we had to stay home, leaving our houses only for essential reasons: for food, medicine, work (if we had no choice) and ‘daily exercise’ – initially limited to an hour a day. Our routines came to a standstill.We were told not to move, and suddenly we’d never wanted to move more.And so we did. Some virtually befriended Joe Wicks and sweated in front of their TVs each day. Others downloaded couch to 5K and kickstarted a new-found love of running. People skipped, turned their living rooms into gyms  or studios, did a 30-day yoga course with Adriene, or explored their local area like never before on daily walks.Celebs were in on it, too. Gordon Ramsay went on 100k bike rides in Cornwall. Ellie Goulding worked out most mornings, when there was “literally no excuse” not to. Ruth Langsford skipped and Oti Mabuse danced with our kids.Our exercise habits changed – there’s no doubt about it. But why was the pandemic such a driving force in getting us moving – and has it stuck? Natalie Trice, 46, from Devon, had a “hit and miss” approach to exercise pre-pandemic. She’d take her dogs on walks, but her gym membership was rarely used. When lockdown hit, she put on her trainers and walked – a lot. “It would either be by the sea or up the many hills in our village,” she says.Having lost her work, she was retraining to be a coach. She’d listen to books and podcasts to enhance her training and, as she started to get fitter, she’d walk further. “I’d make time for at least an hour of walking a day and stuck to it for the whole year, even on Christmas Day,” she says.Trice never renewed her gym membership – in fact, just 31% returned to their gym when first lockdown ended, a RunRepeat survey found, and 59% of more than 5,000 surveyed cancelled or considered cancelling their memberships.The stats are there: Sport England noticed a surge in appreciation for exercise during the first lockdown. People turned to cycling and walking to stay active outdoors, it found, with 63% across the first six weeks of lockdown saying exercise was important for their mental health. “New exercise habits have formed as a result of the restriction on movement,” it concluded. Even a study in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) found that, despite challenges to an active lifestyle, the Covid-19 lockdown “led to increases in population-level interest in and engagement with physical activity”. Researchers said the potential explanations for this included us having more time, all that messaging from health authorities about exercise, and, well, not having anything else to do.A survey of more than 7,600 UK adults published by Decathlon for its Decathlon Activity Index, revealed almost half (42%) of adults exercised more than they did before social distancing measures were introduced – with running, cycling and yoga all surging in popularity since the virus took hold. More than one in four (25%) said they found exercising more enjoyable, while one in three (31%) said working out has helped to improve their mental health.Wellbeing psychologist Wendy Shooter believes the motivation came from a growing awareness of our bodies’ need for physical movement to feel and be okay. There were other aspects at play as well, she says: we had time on our hands – and limited options as to how we could spend it. People were very conscious, sometimes terrified, about their health. Exercise classes were ‘de rigueur’ – and, in some cases, all anyone was doing and talking about.How we respond to being told to “stay home” will depend on our personalities, Shooter adds. “There is the power of suggestion,” she says. “If I ask you not to think about pink penguins – all you can think about is pink penguins. If I ask you not to leave your house, maybe all you can think about is leaving your house!”Even those who exercised regularly before lockdown had to rethink how to move when gyms switched off their machines and closed their doors. Jennifer Emele, 25, from Essex, took up cycling. Before Covid, she’d go to the gym with her sister, Miriam. When lockdown hit, she bought her first ever adult bike. She’d ride 40km at a weekend – with a cheeky picnic in between – and even started her own cycling club. “We met every fortnight to ride,” she says. “We challenged ourselves to cycle 50km, too.”Emele was in a car accident in the summer which meant she had to stop due to her injuries. “Now I aim to walk 10,000 steps or more six days a week,” she says. She’s been inspired by Lydia Dinga’s #DingaStepChallenge, which sees the travel and lifestyle influencer encourages people to reach a certain step count over a month, with one rest day a week. Walking became the nation’s favourite physical activity in the early weeks of lockdown, Sport England found, with more than 21 million adults walking at “moderate intensity” – running also proved popular. The report showed the number of people cycling for leisure or sport also increased from 6.1m to 7.2m from mid-March to mid-May, compared to the same period the year before.André Gwilliam’s step count went up, too. The 28-year-old who lives in Leeds, would reach an average of 2,000 steps a day before Covid. “The first lockdown was a make or break moment for me with my fitness and my mental health, both equally as important,” he says. “Like Forest Gump, I started running lots!”Initially, he’d go out two to three times a week, trying to build up to a 5k. That soon increased to 10k. “Across 2020 from March, I’d run a total distance of 338 miles,” he marvels. Lockdown specifically changed the amount he exercised, he says, because he needed to “escape the four walls of home and my mind”.Personal trainer and coach, Luke Goulden, believes people are exercising more because they’ve started to value that simply moving – whenever, wherever – impacts our state of mind.“How did lockdown make us feel? For the best part, it sucked,” he says. “What is the single most effective thing we can do to shift our mood? Move. Exercise. Lift weights. Run. Stretch and so on.”Goulden’s hope is that this mindset can stick now we recognise the positive impact of movement on our minds and bodies. “It’s so powerful,” he says. “Moving creates momentum in a feelgood direction.”Exercising at home saw a boom in lockdown, compared to the same two-month period in 2019, as people were encouraged to get active indoors. Between March and May 2020, there was an increase in home exercise of 2.1m. For Kirsty Mason, 26, who lives in London, keeping good fitness habits had always been hard – “it was more of an after-thought,” she says. But when we locked down, this shifted. “I’ve always felt like getting up before work to exercise is too tiring and I’m exhausted after work,” she says. “Without the commute, I had a lot more time on my hands.“All of a sudden I found myself getting up before work or doing a HIIT after work – something I would never have dreamed of before the pandemic. I was wrong when I thought I’d have less energy, it’s the opposite!” Mason did (and continues to do) HIIT classes with Joe Wicks or on Centr, as well as running. No longer having a commute was the main driving force in creating that exercise routine, she adds. “It’s given me a chance to reflect on what’s important in life and looking after my mental health. I don’t try and think about weight or muscles, that’s just an added benefit. It’s about how good you feel.”Rachel Bradley, 48, from Wokingham, also had a sporadic exercise routine before Covid. “I was always too busy, tied to my desk and would generally put it off,” she says. “Obviously I did have the time but I just found excuses!” With fewer meetings and less time spent commuting to clients, she found time. Bradley knew she could go one of two ways: “I could do nothing, put weight on and just relax into lockdown life, or I could get my act together. I’m 50 next year, so I thought it was a great chance to make daily exercise part of my life.”The balmy weather in April 2020 hooked her in, and she “rode the wave of jumping online with free workouts”. She also started running. “Now I can’t get through a day without a run through the trees,” says Bradley. “I was rubbish at first, but I downloaded the free Nike Run Club app, and I’ve been taking part in monthly challenges. This month I’m running 88 miles for the Brain Tumour Charity.”For some, it hasn’t been so easy. Jodie Rose, 26, from Lancashire, has  fibromyalgia and joint hypermobility syndrome, which affects her joints. Before lockdown, she’d go to the gym two to three times a week when she felt well.“The gym is a lot easier for me because I can sit down on the resistance machines to do exercise,” she explains. “I struggle to stand for long periods as I get lightheaded but my doctors said to me it’s really important to exercise otherwise I’ll become de-conditioned. Especially for the joint hypermobility, stronger muscles reduce the chance of sprains or dislocations.”Rose can’t exercise at home, she says, because she doesn’t have the equipment and her two dogs will jump all over her.“The gym was one of the only times I got to get out of the house,” she adds – she can’t wait to get back in and start moving when they reopen on April 12.To stay motivated with exercise, in lockdown and beyond, Goulden suggests we link movement to what matters most to us in life. “For example,” he says, “if your career is one of your highest values, link how moving or going for a walk will have a positive impact on your day from a professional standpoint. Will it provide you with more energy and focus? This means it has more purpose.“If your family is your highest value: are you a better parent or partner if you have moved? I know personally that if I haven’t moved much, I can feel lethargic and tired and that isn’t me at my best. Think about how moving supports you and your life. It can help when you’re struggling with motivation.”Ultimately, Trice says integrating exercise in her life has kept her moving – physically and mentally – through the pandemic.“I know that even on the coldest days, when it’s raining or when I just want to snuggle up on the sofa with the kids, getting out and walking will make me feel great and give me time to process my thoughts,” she says. “Lockdown showed me I didn’t need the luxury gym and spa to exercise, I needed self-motivation and headspace – and that is what walking has done for me.”Related...11 Home Workouts To Jazz Up Your Exercise Routine, From HIIT To YogaWill People Actually Go Back To The Gym?You Weren't Exercising In 2020 If You Didn't Do These 10 ThingsThe Best Fitness Apps For Home Workouts. Yes, We've Tried ThemHere's How To Get Up And Exercise Outdoors, Even If It's Cold And WetLow-Impact Exercise Isn't Lazy – Adriene And Others Tell Us Why11 Brilliant Ways To Jazz Up Your Outdoor Space For April
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Brian Michael Smith: 'Being Black And Trans Is A Story That Needs Telling'
In What Works For Me – a series of articles considering how we can find balance in our lives – we talk to celebrities about wellbeing and self-care.Brian Michael Smith made headlines in 2017 when he came out as trans after years working in TV where he’d made a name largely playing cisgender roles.But it was two years later that he landed the role that made him a household name in the US – in Ryan Murphy’s spinoff procedural drama 9-1-1: Lone Star, opposite 1980s heart-throb Rob Lowe. The series wrapped its first season before the pandemic hit, but speaking to HuffPost UK, Smith says he feared the show that propelled him into the mainstream might never return.The 37-year-old’s role as firefighter Paul, also a trans man, was a step forward for representation, he says, but the thought this progress might become a casualty of the pandemic, along with his job, left him with anxiety.“We started to think, maybe what if we don’t come back? I don’t want to jinx it, but that’s starting to happen, things are getting pushed back, things are getting cancelled, things are closed and they’re going to be for a while,” says Smith.“I had some anxiety: what if we don’t get the chance to go back to work? I love it so much, I love working on the show, I love who I work with. It was really sad to imagine – and then we got the news we are renewed, we’re coming back for a second season. It gave me something to press forward for, do you know what I mean?”“Playing a Black trans character on a TV show is a story that needs to be told,” Smith says of 9-1-1: Lone Star. The second series arrives in the UK later in 2021 on Sky Witness, where the first season is already available. “I just want to make sure I’m honouring this opportunity that has been given to me and I feel like I’ve been able to do that, even though this year has thrown so much as us.”Playing Paul is a cathartic experience, explains Smith, who finds elements of the story “overlap” with his own experiences, while leaving plenty of room to get creative with character. “There’s things that are inherently different,” he adds. “This is why I feel like I was brought in for the role because I can really pull from some authentic experiences, or even if I haven’t had the experience myself, just a deeper understanding perhaps of what the character might be going through and then filtering it through the lens of his story. That’s what’s exciting for me, that’s been what the work is.”Smith has been promoting the trans cause ever since he came out, both inside and outside of work – “wherever I’m useful I try to be relevant”, he says.“I like to use my art and the platforms I get from my art to do that. I also like to amplify the voices of other activists and organisations that are doing work to either reverse legislation or raise information about anti-trans legislation, or anti-black legislation, anti-racism legislation,” he says. A quick scroll through his Instagram reveals those passion points: campaigns for universal healthcare, posts honouring trans people murdered by name, and a poem in memory of Breonna Taylor, the Black medical worker shot and killed by US police. Role models such as Smith have never felt more crucial. While in the UK, the trans backlash from a small faction of cisgendered, largely white women, often centres public and “safe” space, Smith says it’s a mistake to think that America is necessarily more open-minded about transness. “They may not be as concerned about the bathrooms, but they’re concerned about trans people in sports, and ‘we can’t have parents forcing their kids to transition, kids don’t know what they want’,” he says. “It’s kind of shifted a little bit here.”And while 9-1-1 Lone Star has been well received, with a ‘Certified Fresh’ rating on Rotten Tomatoes, Smith is aware it’s only one show – and there are people whose stories urgently need told to increase understanding of trans issues. “Not everybody watches everything, so as long as I feel like there is an area of misunderstanding in the world then I wanna do something about it, especially if I feel I am particularly qualified to tell a kind of story,” he says.Which characters would he most like to play? Right now, he has his eyes on science fiction and historical non-fiction, “something I haven’t done before.”Until recently, most of his characters were cisgender. “I enjoy playing cis roles and and feel like the last two years I’ve been able to do something I’ve wanted to do: bring very different trans characters into existence and in front of audiences. Now I feel like I’ve explored what I wanted to explore in that realm.“Hopefully with Paul, we can go for more seasons where I can continue to explore that, and develop his character, but I’m also interested in some of the things I’ve wanted to do since I was a kid: action movies, I would love to play a character in a war film, superhero movies are great...”Is there a block to getting those roles?“Sometimes it’s just limited imagination,” he says of the ways that trans people can be viewed by the industry. “People assume that trans people will only be accepted as trans characters, or that there aren’t enough trans writers, or that there aren’t any trans producers or directors, there’s that attitude.”Of course, says Smith, such an attitude can be toxic. “If people want to see more representation of trans people you just have to look around, because with the explosion of digital creation, lots of trans actors and film makers have been creating their own content and it’s readily available.” In the meantime, Smith and his wife, who works in a New York school, have other pressing matters – a new dog, which the actor has been potty training at the time of our call. “It’s been a healing experience to have him around in such a fractured year,” he says of his super cute chug (a mix of chihuahua and pug).The pandemic months have halted many hopes and dreams, but what started out as anxiety is slowly turning into clarity for Smith. “At first there was this sense of fear, not knowing what exactly to do, try to make the best of a situation that is out of my control,” he says. “I started to think, all right, what’s the most important thing to us? I had all these plans for what 2020 was gonna be.”But after the travesties of Covid-19, his priorities fell into place. “What’s really important is people I care I about,” he concludes. “My wife and my family and being together, and finding what works for us. There’s so much in the world that’s out of our control, so I want to focus on things that are in control.”The lesson: “We’ve gotta figure out ways to stay as connected as we can.”9-1-1: Lone Star’s first season is on Sky Witness, where the second season will broadcast later in 2021.Related...Meet Moxie Star Josie Totah –The Actor, Writer And Producer Redefining Trans RepresentationTravis Alabanza: 'I'm Chain Smoking My Way Through All This'Stacey Solomon: ‘My Whole Life, I’ve Had To Prove I’m Not An Idiot’Rachel Khoo: 'The Pandemic Has Left Me Without Work'
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Marcus Rashford to punish inconsistent Spurs defence
Jose Mourinho returns to Old Trafford looking to do the league double over his former employers
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Man United could vary their line-up vs Tottenham
The predicted line ups and early team news as Man Utd travel to face Tottenham in the Premier League fixture on Sunday afternoon.
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Man Utd transfer round-up as Kane 'considers exit', Cavani 'closes on' Boca
Man Utd will be among a host of clubs eyeing Harry Kane this summer as doubt continues to swirl over his Tottenham future with Champions League football high on his list of priorities
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Brits without ‘vaccine passports’ could pay more in travel insurance
BRITS without vaccine passports could face higher travel insurance premiums when going on holiday.
1 h
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
Kim warns North Korea faces famine horror similar to 90s crisis that left 'millions' dead
North Korean tyrant Kim Jong un has warned that his country is facing a famine on a scale comparable to the one in the 1990s that reportedly left millions dead.
1 h
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
Vaccine passports 'only short-term' before UK reaches 'herd immunity by October'
New passes could allow big events to resume but are not set to be required in the first phase of opening pubs and restaurants - they reportedly may only be a short-term measure before the vaccine programme achieves herd immunity
1 h
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Pubs reopen: Two-thirds of pubs can’t welcome drinkers on Monday due to no outdoor space
A staggering amount of pubs in England cannot reopen on Monday as they do not have the outdoor space needed to welcome customers.
1 h
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
Bad Bunny gets physical at WrestleMania 37 and amazes WWE fans with mind-blowing match
What an incredible debut!
2 h
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
Nikki Grahame told Vanessa Feltz 'I love living' in emotional Big Brother clip
Nikki Grahame opened up to Vanessa Feltz during a chat while they were together in Ultimate Big Brother in 2010 and it soon turned tearful as Nikki described her troubles
2 h
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
AP source: Electric vehicle battery firms settle trade spat
Two South Korean electric vehicle battery makers have settled a long-running trade dispute that will allow one of them to move ahead with plans to make batteries in Georgia
2 h
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Snow and bone-chilling -4C temperatures one day before beer gardens reopen
Met Office weather warnings are in place today for parts of northern England as snow and icy conditions hit - it comes ahead of lockdown being eased on Monday including the return of outdoor hospitality
2 h
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Home and Away spoilers: Is Ryder about to get a new love interest?
The last person he expects makes a move.
2 h
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
Sir Richard Sutton death: Man charged over multi-millionaire hotelier's murder on country estate
2 h
The Telegraph - Telegraph Online, Daily...
20 Apple Cider vinegar hacks and tips – from cleaning to skin care
It's easy as A-C-V.
2 h
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
US-Philippines officials discuss concerns over China's ships
Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin has discussed with his Philippine counterpart China’s recent positioning of “militia vessels” near the Philippines in the South China Sea
2 h
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Princess Beatrice spoke of Prince Philip’s ‘inspiration’ behind important life lesson
PRINCESS BEATRICE spoke about how her grandfather gave her an important life lesson to not be "obsessed with solutions".
2 h
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
Prince Philip statue: Thousands sign petition calling for commemorative display
A PETITION calling for the creation of a commemorative statue to Prince Philip has already been signed by thousands of people.
2 h
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
Prince Philip and Queen ‘didn’t need words’ as ’no one knew her so well’
PRINCE Philip and the Queen shared a special relationship, meaning they were able to understand each other without speaking, it is claimed.
2 h
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
How tall is Omos? WWE giant and AJ Styles win tag team titles at WrestleMania 37
The towering star won gold in his debut match.
3 h
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
£200m fire sale at Debenhams as chain prepares to shut last 97 stores
Bust department store giant Debenhams will kickstart a £200million fire sale of stock tomorrow in the biggest closing down sale since the demise of Woolworths.
3 h
Home | Daily Mail Online
Bunga Bunga owners in £3m court fight over Covid claim
The owners of Bunga Bunga - the London nightclub once frequented by Prince Harry - are preparing a legal battle to recover millions of pounds in an insurance dispute.
3 h
Home | Daily Mail Online
David Cameron, financier and Hancock discussed NHS scheme over 'private drink'
The former Prime Minister David Cameron is said to have described the decision to exclude his employer's firm, Greensill Capital, from a coronavirus emergency loan as 'nuts'
3 h
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Man charged with murder of millionaire hotelier Sir Richard Sutton
Thomas Schreiber, 34, has been charged by Dorset police with murder, attempted murder and dangerous drivingA 34-year-old man has been charged with the murder of millionaire hotelier Sir Richard Sutton.Dorset police said Sutton, 83, who owned a string of top hotels in London, died on Wednesday during an incident at a property near Gillingham. Continue reading...
3 h
News, sport and opinion from the...
Covid restrictions: what is changing in England this week?
Consumers are looking forward to returning to shops, beer gardens, gyms and hairdressers as restrictions ease into step two.
3 h
London News | London Evening Standard -...
Hairdressers preparing to work 12-hour days to cope with onslaught
Many salons are reporting they are fully booked for up to six weeks despite ‘everybody wanting an appointment on April 12’.
3 h
London News | London Evening Standard -...
Huge demand for attractions and accommodation reopening on Monday
Chester Zoo said the majority of its tickets are sold out for the coming days.
3 h
London News | London Evening Standard -...
Midnight haircuts and tanning sessions booked as restrictions set to ease
Shops, hairdressers and pub beer gardens can all reopen their doors on Monday.
3 h
London News | London Evening Standard -...
Gyms reopening underlines role in health of millions – industry
As of April 12, people can use indoor fitness facilities, including indoor pools, alone or within a household group.
3 h
London News | London Evening Standard -...
Pubs light up their gardens as they reopen to floods of bookings
Half of Britons plan to make a dash for the pub or a restaurant when the rules ease, a recent poll by investment bank Jefferies found.
3 h
London News | London Evening Standard -...
Comment on David Cameron texted senior Boris Johnson aide hours after Treasury rejected bid for emergency Covid loan by FIONA NIMONI
3 h
The Sun
Prince Charles last bedside message from his father shared by royal source
PRINCE CHARLES' last message from his father Prince Philip has been shared by a royal source.
3 h
UK News | World News | Breaking News and...
What the papers say – April 11
Further tributes to Philip feature in Sunday’s papers.
3 h
London News | London Evening Standard -...