Jesy Nelson and Sean Sagar ‘back together after brief split’

Singer Jesy Nelson and boyfriend Sean Sagar are reportedly back together.


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Three families, one sperm donor: the day we met our daughter’s sisters
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Covid job losses show structural racism of UK labour market, says TUC
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7 Things You Should Do In The Morning If You Want More Energy
Many of us generally feel pretty tired and rundown. And the stress of the Covid-19 pandemic, which has upended our daily routines for nearly a year now, certainly has not helped.But developing morning habits that leave you feeling energised and ready to take on the day is possible, even amid an ongoing global health crisis. (Provided, of course, that you’re able to get sufficient restorative sleep. Alas, no amount of habit-rejiggering can help if you’re not regularly getting enough ZZZs.)But if you are getting enough rest, and you’re still feeling kind of sluggish, here are seven simple steps that can help boost your morning energy levels:1. Take 10 breaths.Stress has many effects on the body, one of which is decreased energy. So experts recommend starting the day with an easy, evidence-backed intervention: taking a few deep breaths.“I try to take a few minutes of deep breathing and silence to centre myself before the work day begins,” said Gregory Katz, a cardiologist at Nuvance Health in Connecticut. He recommends a “brief period of focused deep breathing” to pretty much anyone.Although there are many in-depth breathing exercises and routines available through apps and on the internet, it really doesn’t take much. The researchers behind a recent study that mapped out the “how” of well-being suggest, for example, that simply closing your eyes and focusing on the act of taking 10 breaths can be an effective way to slow down and to start to cultivate a sense of awareness.2. Hydrate. (Coffee counts!)Drinking water, even if you’re not thirsty, can be an energy booster, which is why so many nutritionists recommend downing a glass of water first thing in the morning.“Staying hydrated helps your energy level because water helps oxygen move through the body. The more efficiently you can deliver oxygen to your muscles and organs, the more energy you’ll have,” said Stephanie Nelson, a registered dietitian and in-house nutrition expert for MyFitnessPal. By contrast, people who are significantly dehydrated can often feel extremely tired and lethargic.Plus, it’s simple — and free. “I tend to think that hydration is one of the easiest things you can do for yourself, because all you have to do is drink water,” Nelson said. (Eight cups isn’t a hard-and-fast rule; instead, consider urine colour if you’re really looking for a good barometer.)Also caffeine fans, rejoice: “Tea and coffee are not dehydrating,” said Michele Smallidge, director of the B.S. Exercise Science Program at the University of New Haven in Connecticut. Though she recommends getting plenty of water as well, Smallidge said our typical caffeinated beverages “are a source of hydration.”3. Get moving.Physical exercise has all kinds of energy-boosting benefits, from pumping up your endorphins (which can make you feel both relaxed and excited) to improving concentration so you’re ready to tackle your morning to-do list. Research also suggests that people who move their bodies in the morning tend to be more active throughout the day.It doesn’t need to be an intense cardio session, either. Do whatever type of movement feels good to you; even just a stroll around the block can help.“Get some physical activity. Whether it’s yoga, stretching or something a bit more strenuous, anything that gets your blood flowing starts the day off right,” Katz said. “The benefits of exercise aren’t just physical; a morning workout sets a tone of self-care and the importance of wellness.”4. Make sure you’re actually eating enough.In general, it’s a good idea to “follow your body’s natural cadence” when it comes to food in order to boost energy in the morning, Smallidge said.While intermittent fasting continues to be extremely trendy, for energy you really want to be “listening to your body, and its natural rise and fall in blood sugar,” Smallidge said. She recommended eating a breakfast that is “higher in protein and healthy fats,” which may help maintain energy levels throughout the morning.People tend to get hungry every three to four hours. To keep up energy levels, it’s important to give your body plenty of fuel — so if you’re an early riser, you might eat a few times in the morning, not just once.5. ... and be mindful of your sugar intake.Sugar isn’t the enemy by any means, but it can have an effect on your energy levels.“When you eat a lot of sugar, your body produces high amounts of insulin to pull the sugar out of your blood and into your cells,” Nelson explained. “The overproduction of insulin leads to a sugar crash, making you feel tired, hungry and craving more sugar to bring your blood sugar levels back up.”Experts don’t believe the goal should necessarily be to avoid sugar altogether. (Who doesn’t love a morning pastry?) Instead, consider ways in which you can cut down on added sugar in the morning — because breakfast does tend to be a pretty big culprit.6. Ignore your phone.When you reach for your phone first thing in the morning, you’re essentially letting someone — or something — else dictate the first thoughts and feelings you have, whether because you’re scrolling through social media or you’re checking the latest headlines. You’re certainly not alone. Two-thirds of Americans say they feel “worn out” by news fatigue.You don’t necessarily have to go cold turkey, but do think about setting some boundaries that make sense for you.“A calm start to the morning ― away from scrolling through social media or responding to work emails ― can give your mind a chance to hone focus,” Katz said.7. Spend some time really getting to know your own preferences.What works for one person in the morning won’t work for another, which is why all three experts interviewed for this piece emphasised that some deliberate trial and error is a very good thing. Change up your routine a bit, starting with one habit at a time. (Pick whatever one seems easiest to you, Nelson said.) Then see what happens.Here’s one really simple example. “My favourite quick and easy meal in the morning is fruit and yogurt,” said Nelson, who said she opts for 2% Greek yogurt, which offers a bit of protein and fat. But she also acknowledged that yogurt doesn’t sit well with everybody. Others might want to try toast with some peanut butter, or eggs or something else entirely.The overall idea is to get a sense of your baseline, and then spend some time making basic tweaks and just seeing what feels good — and what doesn’t.“Play around with it,” Nelson urged, adding that people will likely notice that they feel different (or not) pretty soon after making changes to what they eat and drink and how they structure their mornings. “Don’t be afraid to make mistakes.”Related...The Best Time To Eat Lunch While Working From HomeDeflated, Excited, Numb? 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How To 'Dream Big' Right Now, Even When It Feels Impossible
Amanda Kusek recently inspired me all they way from her garden in New York to my own grotty London lockdown setup, when she conveyed a thought I’d been nursing privately for a while.“This year my theme is DREAM BIGGER,” Kusek posted under a photo of herself in a jumper with FUCK OFF written right across it. “I noticed over the past couple of years my goals have become too reasonable,” the 33-year-old account manager wrote. “So, for 2021, I’m done being reasonable.”Now, I’d love to write an article that didn’t mention the pandemic, but let’s face it, if ever big dreams were having a rough ride, it’s right now. Unsure what’s happening tomorrow, next week or next month, we are living in a state of infinite present. And this low-level stress means most of us are struggling to make plans for dinner, let alone our lives. View this post on InstagramA post shared by Poet | Storyteller | NYC (@cheapcourage)“Dreaming big may seem distant and unrealistic given our environment,” says psychologist Dr Jill Bond. But for Kusek, the pandemic had the opposite effect.“I was forced to slow down and reflect in a way that I have typically avoided,” she tells me. “This experience shifted my thinking heading into the new year and I wanted to try setting a theme.” It also made her realise how much much her perspective had changed since childhood. “I recalled memories of great big, beautiful dreams I had as a child and I missed that feeling. Realistic dreams aren’t dreams – they’re a to-do list!”Pandemic or no pandemic (let it soon be the latter!), losing the ability to “dream big” is a feeling I can relate to. As more of my friends settle down into families and develop stronger personal ties, I’ve been left wondering what my version of life looks like if it’s different to theirs and I’m not the only one having a rethink.When Thuva Amuthan’s final medical exams were halted by the pandemic last year, the stress gave him pause for thought and the 29-year-old doctor from Birmingham began pondering if his big dreams were even the right ones. “Do I really want to neglect my health in my best years working crazy hours relentlessly, only to play catch-up later, if that is even possible?” he asked.Looking more closely at the cost – financial and emotional – of his current commitments and how they affected his work-life balance, Amuthan realised the setback was a chance to “really unpick my priorities and what I want from life”. Given the right headspace, could this pandemic actually be a good time not only to think about, but potentially action, our biggest hopes and dreams? Jessica Chivers is a coaching psychologist and founder of Comeback Community, a digital resource for people returning from any sort of leave – parental, sickness, bereavement. She agrees that going through a stressful period can sometimes help people work out what really matters to them. While differences in our individual make-up mean this isn’t going to work for everyone, some people find themselves fuelled by uncertainty, she says. “Putting one person in a state of distress, not able to attain the things that they usually have, can generate huge feelings of, ‘Right, I’ve got to solve this, let’s get creative and think big,’” Chivers explains. “We hear many entrepreneurial stories coming from really difficult situations.”Amuthan, who arrived in the UK as a refugee in childhood, believes that encountering difficult situations in the past has only spurred him along.“Growing up in a council house and leading a single parent household at a young age, adversity has never fazed me,” he says. “I have particularly enjoyed proving wrong those who say, ‘Ooh that’s impossible/mad!’ – from getting into medical school to many of the other things I have achieved.” Perhaps it’s no surprise how he’s responded to these latest obstacles, then, no matter whether he ends up doubling down on his medical dreams – or finding new ones.Some shifts are smaller, but no less significant. For Amber Leach, 39, a wedding photographer based in Devon, the past year has triggered a fight or flight response that’s reset her priorities while also focusing her ambitions.“I was in a rut, hoping things would get better within the wedding industry and then I realised I couldn’t keep hoping and waiting,” says Leach. With weddings off, Leach started “dreaming in a different direction”. The pandemic showed her she had been overworking. “I realised my family is the most important thing to me in the world! Nothing comes in the way of my time with them,” she says.Now, while weddings still aren’t possible, she’s still developing her career by working on elements of growth that are within her control. “I have spent my extra time rebranding my business, building a new website and working on my marketing strategy. The current climate has given me courage to try completely new ideas that I would never have had the time to do,” she says.For me, the big dreams aren’t professional so much as personal and a matter of geography. I can’t stop thinking how I’d like to move abroad, but I’d also get into a relationship. The weirdness of lockdown ennui has definitely spurred both trains of thought on. I count myself lucky as someone predisposed to thinking beyond the end of the day, but that’s not to say I find those days any less hard.There are people, of course, for whom dreaming big is blocked by the very real struggles of getting food on the table, caring for children or other dependents, and stabilising their own mental health in hugely challenging times like these. And even for those of us with the relative freedom to daydream, the flights of fancy can be irregular and unpredictable. Pandemic preoccupations easily take over. As Leach says of her current headspace: “It is pretty tough. I am usually a goal setter and planner but I am finding it hard to plan long term.” So, how can we get our “big dream” juice flowing? If nothing else, the pandemic has offered us time for introspection, good or bad. “This is not quick fix territory; this is thinking about things over the longer term,” warns Chivers, who suggests setting some time aside to work out, in the truest sense, what you really want.“Sometimes big questions need to sit and marinade at the back of our minds,” she expands. “And when I say the back of our minds, we’ve kind of put them there. That thought won’t rise up unless we’ve said, ‘I want to consider this question, I want to think about this.’” Positive external stimuli can be a good way to arouse your intrigue if you aren’t in natural dreaming/planning mode during lockdown. “Listen to stories of how other people have achieved something, how other people have overcome difficulties,” says Chivers, who recommends the podcasts How I Built This and Conversations of Inspiration. Time away from Zoom, phone calls and other day-to-day stresses, whether that’s paid work or emotional labour, is key, she adds – “not carrying a cognitive workload so your mind has the ability to be free.”Remember there is light at the end of a vaccine vial. “We can see the global pandemic will have an end at some point in the future so it will be possible to gain more control back over your life and your destiny,” reflects Dr Bond of dreaming big. “For people who have lost a lot at this time, these ideas may help them to rethink things and some may even re-evaluate their failures.” Dreaming big can mean “failing time after time”, she adds. “It is a cliché, but often, as a result, people come back stronger and more able to see their real dreams.”Ultimately, whichever camp you’re in – forced into new ways of living by the pandemic or crying out for change, somehow, without knowing how to get at it – finding ways to think truthfully through what we want will help us escape our current confinement. So, there you have it: don’t beat yourself up if you want to think further than the end of the day right now, but aren’t able to. The first step to being able to dream big might just be overcoming ourselves.Covid-19 is more than a news story – it has changed every aspect of life in the UK. We are following how Britain is experiencing this crisis, the different stages of collective emotion, reaction and resilience. You can tell us how you are feeling and find further advice and resources here.Related...Lockdown May Last Months. Here's Why We Still Need Life PlansHow To Get Your 'Spark' Back If You've Completely Lost Your MojoHow Setting Goals In 2021 Can Help Deal With UncertaintyTry This New Approach To Your Daily Walk. You'll Love Or Hate ItWhy We Feel Constantly Distracted Right Now
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Gogglebox: 50 Secrets You Didn't Know About The Channel 4 Show
Now in its 17th series, Gogglebox has never been more popular.With the pubs shut and restrictions on seeing our family and friends, in these isolated times it’s been appointment telly for many of us as we hang out with a bunch of familiar faces – even though we’ve never actually met any of them IRL.So as we get reacquainted with Jenny and Lee, The Malones, Pete and Sophie, The Siddiquis, Giles and Mary et al, we’ve also taken a peak behind their curtains to find out just what’s involved in bringing Channel 4′s much-loved fly-on-the-wall show to our screens, and uncovered plenty of secrets in the process...1. The London riots were the original inspiration for the show (yes, really)Tim Harcourt, the creative director for Studio Lambert who produce the show, had the original idea for the programme while watching the London riots of 2011. He wondered what people were talking about while watching people taking to the capital’s streets on the nightly news and came up with the idea of cutting between people watching the same TV programmes.2. The style of the show was inspired by a certain classic British comedyGogglebox producer Stephen Lambert said his inspiration for the reality show was the BBC comedy, The Royle Family. It’s why the late Caroline Aherne (who played Denise Royle) was chosen to narrate the show alongside her co-star, Craig Cash, who still provides the voiceover. 3. And a certain British comedian... Former producer Tania Alexander was a huge fan of Harry Hill’s TV Burp and wanted the same style of humour to come across in the show.She told Vice: “I thought if you combined the look of The Royle Family with the tone of TV Burp and threw in real people – with their own lines, cast because they are naturally very funny and ideally without even realising it – we’d be onto a winner.” She wasn’t wrong.4. When it comes to casting, fame-hungry reality stars are a no-no Complete unknowns were cast for the show when it launched in 2013, and the same approach has been used ever since. “Everybody on Gogglebox has been found and persuaded to be on the show,” says Stephen Lambert. “I think that’s the key to why they are likeable and why the show works, because we get to know these people. We’ve never advertised for people on Gogglebox.”5. However, some of the show’s former stars had already been on the tellyBefore her stint on Gogglebox, Scarlett Moffatt had appeared on MTV’s Beauty School Cop Outs, while Steph and Dom competed on Four In A Bed.6. There are no traditional ‘auditions’ for the showInstead, producers do a lot of “street casting”. Original Goggleboxer, Stephen Webb was discovered at the East Sussex hairdressers he owns, when a member of the show’s crew walked in and asked if anyone wanted to be on television.7. But there are strange ‘silent auditions’In order to test if people would be able to perform on the show, potential new recruits would be filmed commenting on images held up in front of them - anything from Simon Cowell to the Queen. This would allow the producers to see how quickly they could formulate an opinion and how insightful that opinion was. Plus, it gave them a good idea about how much fun they would be.8. Giles and Mary were recommended to producers by a friend of a friend“[Producer] Lucy Whelan came off the phone and said Giles is quite keen, Mary’s not a pushover – we’ve got a bit of a battle on our hands there,” Tania Alexander told Radio Times.9. The Malones originally turned the show downMum Julie explains: “Tom Senior said no. We explained about the rottweilers and the staffie but they still wanted us. They came over and had a chat, and took a video of us chatting. Three weeks later someone rang and said we like you, and Tom changed his mind.”10. Jenny and Lee were cast after a day at the races View this post on InstagramA post shared by Jenny And Lee (@jennyandlee_gogglebox)Hull-based Jenny and Lee joined the show when Jenny and a friend met two of the show’s researchers at Beverley Races Ladies’ Day and they all got talking. Lee was reluctant to join at first, but we’re very grateful he (and *that* eyebrow) was talked round.11. New cast members don’t have long to make an impressionAs the original Goggleboxers are so established and seasoned it can be difficult for new cast members to win over viewers at home.Tania Alexander explained to Vice: “It’s like when they introduce a new family into EastEnders or Corrie. You hate them for ages, then they get a good storyline and you stop noticing they’re new. It has a lot to do with familiarity.  I would say, it takes a good two seasons for a new household to settle in.”12. The stars of Gogglebox stars are paid to appear on the show...but how much they get is one of the show’s best-kept secrets. Reports have varied wildly from £15 towards weekly expenses to a not-to-be-sniffed-at £1500 monthly pay cheque.13. As well as getting paid for watching telly, the Goggleboxers also get free foodDuring a fan Q&A on TikTok, Tom Malone said getting free takeaways was the “best perk” of being on the show. “Every time we film, which is twice a week, the crew get us a takeaway of our choosing,” he revealed. “It’s literally one of the most amazing things about the show. Honest to god, it’s the best.”14. The Malones do actually eat that dizzying array of treats you see every week on their pouffe“We do [eat them], but they don’t often show it,” Tom says. “We had a big plate of toast in front of us filming The Andrew Marr Show and Twitter went nuts. It was like ToastGate - everyone was getting on at us like: ‘Why do you have toast? Where’s the cake?’ It’s literally because we were filming a show that’s on early in the morning.”15. They are also sometimes placed in very errm, specific arrangementsTom admitted to often placing the cakes and biscuits into NSFW shapes, explaining: “We have, me and my dad before, put the cakes in different positions and different shapes to see if any eagle-eyed viewers would actually notice… sometimes quite rude shapes (see above).”16. The Malones’ have four dogs, which can play havoc...Gogglebox always has the best dog moments... pic.twitter.com/jGS6W12409— Gogglebox (@GoggleboxQuotes) October 5, 2019Dave, Lucy, Izzie and Joe are all regulars on the show. 17. Giles and Mary also have a dog that makes the odd appearanceMerlin, the Tibetan Spaniel, is notoriously camera-shy.18. Gogglebox is filmed by two remote cameras known as ‘hot heads’Oi! Oi! Gogglers another #Gogglebox
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Newsboy's ITV Racing tips include Al Dancer in Kempton feature
Mirror Racing tipster Newsboy has made his selections for Saturday's ITV Racing cards – and he expects Al Dancer to win the Close Brothers Handicap Chase
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Judge approves $650M Facebook privacy lawsuit settlement
A federal judge in San Francisco has approved a $650 million settlement of a privacy lawsuit against Facebook for allegedly using photo face-tagging without the permission of its users
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The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Lady Gaga's bulldogs returned unharmed after kidnapping
Dogs were dropped off at a police station in Los Angeles, while dog walker shot in the attack is recoveringTwo French bulldogs belonging to Lady Gaga that were stolen at gunpoint earlier this week have been recovered unharmed, police in Los Angeles have said.A woman brought the dogs to the LAPD’s Olympic community police station on Friday evening, said Jonathan Tippett, commanding officer of the robbery-homicide division. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the...
Queen’s ‘rare intervention’ on anti-Covid vaxxers ‘packs an almighty punch’ says expert
THE QUEEN's "rare" and "personal" intervention urging the public to receive their coronavirus vaccine "packs an almighty punch", a royal commentator has said.
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Predicted Man City line up vs West Ham United
Manchester City return to Premier League action on Saturday afternoon when they face high-flying West Ham United.
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Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Lady Gaga's stolen dogs dropped off at police station 'safe and unharmed'
Singer Lady Gaga's two French bulldogs dogs were stolen in a raid that saw her dogwalker Ryan Fischer shot - the distraught star had offered a $500,000 reward
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Royal fans spot curious similarity between Princess Charlotte and Kate Middleton's outfits
KATE, Duchess of Cambridge and her three children were enthusiastic participants of the "Clap for Carers" event, along with Prince William.
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