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Stormzy and Maya Jama ‘texting each other again’ after his heartfelt apology on new album
Sources hope there’s a second chance for the couple.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro
Second Jeffrey Epstein victim 'could go public with claims she slept with Prince Andrew next month'
The Prince (pictured in Windsor yesterday) faces claims he slept with a Virginia Roberts when she was 17. But now a second Epstein's victims is being probed by lawyers.
Home | Daily Mail Online
Madonna, 61, gets close to dancer 'boyfriend,' Ahlamalik Williams, 26, while with Lourdes, 23
Madonna got quite handsy with her back-up dancer 'boyfriend' on Friday, while spending time with her daughter Lourdes, 23, and her mystery man.
Home | Daily Mail Online
Jeremy Corbyn claims he ‘won the argument’ despite crushing election defeat
The Labour leader remains defiant despite Labour’s worst election performance since 1935.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro
Peter Handke: The Nobel prize-winning author accused of praising war criminals
Following Handke's controversial win, Alex Marshall and Christopher F Schuetze look back at the writer's life and times
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide News | Newspaper
Arrested man, 75, released after post-mortem shows partner died of natural causes
The man had been arrested on suspicion of murder after police were called to reports of a suspicious death at Wigan's Royal Albert Edward Infirmary
Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip
Colby Covington suffers suspected broken jaw as Kamaru Usman silences challenger to retain title at UFC 245
Kamaru Usman has retained his welterweight title after a stoppage victory over Colby Covington in a thrilling conclusion to UFC 245.
London News | London Evening Standard - London's newspaper
The long road to Jaden Moodie’s murder
The brutal killing of a 14-year-old boy highlights the difficulty of keeping vulnerable children safe from the lure of county lines gangsOnce again the inextricable links between drug dealing, poverty, troubled family lives and a disrupted education have been laid bare with the conviction last week of 19-year-old Ayoub Majdouline for the murder of Jaden Moodie, 14.Both Majdouline and Moodie had been involved in drug dealing, including “county lines”; both were members of rival London territorial drug-selling gangs; both their fathers had respectively been murdered and deported in the context of selling drugs. Majdouline had been repeatedly abused as a child and eventually went missing from foster care, while Moodie’s family had felt compelled to move from Nottingham to London in the face of threats from local gangs. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
The top 29 mistakes in films, from Captain Marvel to Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
From a mix-up over breakfast in 'Pretty Woman' to a modern car in the backgroud of a battle scene in 'Braveheart', Charlotte Cripps picks some of the most famous film mistakes ever made
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide News | Newspaper
How to help children go green … make their playgrounds edible
Trees for Cities, one of the four groups we are supporting in the 2019 charity appeal, helps schools in deprived areas create inspiring green spaces• Please donate to our appeal hereHeadteacher Clare Higgins was concerned when a 10-year-old student told her “something had gone wrong” during a recent lunch break. But she was quietly relieved to see the student was talking about the carrots the school had been growing in their allotment, which to everyone’s shock had turned out purple.There have been countless moments like this since the charity Trees for Cities transformed an unused concrete square at Holy Cross Catholic primary school in Birkenhead into a beautiful allotment where staff and students grow strawberries, rhubarb and pumpkins. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Police arrest man, 59, on suspicion of murder after a man was found with fatal stab wounds
A man in his 40s was found with fatal stab wounds at 10.10pm last night on Marlborough Road in Dagenham. The female victim, in her 50s, does not have life-threatening injuries.
Home | Daily Mail Online
The rise and fall of The X Factor: Why it's time to put Simon Cowell's 'televised karaoke' out to pasture
Smug, supercilious and with an ever descending v-neck, Simon Cowell was the self-appointed gatekeeper of pop, writes Alexandra Pollard. But his hold has loosened, and it's time he let go
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide News | Newspaper
We will now find out what a triumphant Boris Johnson really wants and believes | Andrew Rawnsley
To keep his promises, the Tories must pay a lot more heed to areas of Britain that have been strangers to the party for decadesPower always reveals. Robert Caro, the brilliant biographer of Lyndon Johnson, puts it extremely well: “When a man is climbing, trying to persuade others to give him power, concealment is necessary. But as a man obtains more power, camouflage becomes less necessary.”This insight came to mind when considering the prospects for our country now that another politician called Johnson has secured a great deal of power. His successful gamble on a snap election has just taken the Conservatives to their largest parliamentary majority since Margaret Thatcher was at her zenith in 1987. This will make him unchallengeable within his party for the foreseeable future. A lot of the fresh faces and many of the grizzled ones on the Tory benches in the new parliament will feel a deep personal debt to the man who delivered on his primary promise to his party, which was that he would win them an election. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Boris Johnson 'orders review of BBC licence fee'
Boris Johnson is considering a move to decriminalise non-payment of the BBC licence fee in a move likely to further worsen relations between Number 10 and the broadcaster.
Home | Daily Mail Online
Jeremy Corbyn says sorry as Boris Johnson plans 'revolution' – politics live
The prime minister is reportedly making plans to overhaul the cabinet and Whitehall while the Labour leader has taken a share of responsibility for the defeat 8.25am GMT Good morning, welcome to Politics Live. After criticism over his initial failure to do so, Jeremy Corbyn has said he takes his share of responsibility for the disastrous election result for Labour. He has written mea culpas of sort in both the Observer and the Mirror. Meanwhile, the Tory supporting papers are full of Boris Johnson’s plans for a “revolution”.The Observer: Corbyn: I take my share of responsibility for this defeat #TomorrowsPapersToday pic.twitter.com/p2fwsjQ4AGThe Sunday Times: Now for the Boris revolution-PM to wield axe on cabinet #TomorrowsPapersToday pic.twitter.com/nqa0NWSHo6The Sunday Telegraph: PM’s Whitehall revolution to guarantee ‘people’s Brexit’ #TomorrowsPapersToday pic.twitter.com/gNdw8nou3CFinal #Marr of 2019 in the morningScotland’s First Minister @NicolaSturgeonChief Secretary to the Treasury @RishiSunakShadow Chancellor @johnmcdonnellMP & Wigan MP @lisanandy Plus, actor Brian Cox on the success of SuccessionAnd #marrmusic from the Bach Choir9am @BBCOne Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Families get on board with fast, easy games for Christmas
Classics such as Trivial Pursuit and Monopoly make way for pick-up and go options such as Dobble and BananagramsTired of Trivial Pursuit? Weary of Cluedo? Board games are booming in the run-up to Christmas, but this year shoppers are stocking up with “quick, pick-up and go” options with idiot-proof rules learnable in minutes.Hardy perennial “big board” games such as Monopoly and Trivial Pursuit have dropped out of John Lewis’s Christmas top 10, elbowed aside by easy-to-learn, portable games such as Dobble and Bananagrams. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Jeremy Corbyn apologises for 'coming up short' after bruising Labour party election defeat
Jeremy Corbyn has apologised to Labour supporters over the party's worst general election result since the 1930s.
London News | London Evening Standard - London's newspaper
Festive plants you can bring out every year | James Wong
Three living Christmas decorations that, with minimal care, will last you for many new years to comeIn the run-up to Christmas, it seems even people who would never normally be tempted by indoor greenery get temporarily bitten by the houseplant bug. Lush poinsettias, powerfully fragrant hyacinths and tiny flocked conifers put on a dazzling indoor show for a few short weeks, before almost certainly being consigned to the bin along with the tinsel come January.If you’re not a horticulturist, you might think the lack of a green thumb is at fault, but I promise you that this is almost certainly not the case. Most seasonal houseplants are either cold-climate species entirely unsuited to the extreme warmth and dark of living room conditions – or they’ve been forced by a cocktail of growth regulators to flower at an unnaturally small size and they soon exhaust themselves. There is a reason you never see a poinsettia in anyone’s house in August. But things really don’t have to be this way. Here are three living Christmas decorations that, with minimal care, will last you for many new years to come. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Hunt for the Cocktail Crook: 'Professional burglar' hits dozens of city centre bars and pubs
Landlords believe the same thief - often wearing a head torch and with a cigarette hanging from his mouth - is behind a string of brazen break-ins
Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip
Mum dying from ovarian cancer is forced to take ice cold showers for 14 months
Linne Smith was forced to take cold showers and wrap up in blanket around her Birmingham home for over a year after her boiler broke down - she says: "Give me a bit of dignity and heat what could be my final months"
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Essex church hides 1,000 baby Jesus rocks 'to bring joy'
Earls Hall Baptist Church in Essex are encouraging those that find them to post on social media.
UK - BBC News
YouTuber Tana Mongeau sets record straight on Noah Cyrus dating rumours
Well there you have it - no tea.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro
Philippines earthquake: Powerful 6.9-magnitude quake strikes near Davao city
A powerful earthquake measuring 6.9-magnitude has struck the Philippines near the city of Davao, sending people fleeing in panic from homes and shops and raising fears of extensive damage.
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide News | Newspaper
Thirty years on, will the guilty pay for horror of Ceauşescu orphanages?
By 1989, when the dictator was killed, up to 20,000 had died in Romania’s children’s homes. Now criminal cases may finally be broughtThey were the pictures that, for many across the world, were the defining image of the aftermath of Romania’s 1989 revolution: emaciated children clothed in rags, looking into the camera with desperate eyes amid the squalid decay of the country’s orphanages.Christmas Day will mark 30 years since Nicolae Ceaușescu, Romania’s megalomaniac, isolationist dictator, was convicted in an impromptu trial and shot dead together with his wife. His execution ended more than two decades of rule that brought poverty and misery to the majority of the country’s population. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Call for pill tests as more than 50% of music festivalgoers say they take drugs
Better on-site testing will reduce harm – especially to older ‘festival-only’ drug users, charities sayMore than half of UK festivalgoers are taking illegal drugs at the annual music events, according to the first research of its kind.The findings, which come amid fears that 2019 will prove a record year for drug-related deaths at such events, have triggered calls for festivals and nightclubs to provide more onsite testing as a matter of urgency. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Jumanji: The Next Level review – an upbeat, frenetic adventure
In this latest lively instalment of the video game adventure, two old curmudgeons join the kids in a battle against tyrannyNo one was more surprised than I when Jake Kasdan’s 2017 romp Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle managed to squeeze smart new thrills from the premise of Chris Van Allsburg’s 1981 children’s book, first filmed in 1995. While Joe Johnston’s Jumanji (starring Robin Williams) had featured fantastical creatures escaping from the titular board-game to run wild in Brantford, New Hampshire, Kasdan’s “continuation of the story” sent four young players into a video game, where they battled a series of challenges in order to earn a safe passage home. The result was a crowd-pleasing romp that combined the school detention premise of The Breakfast Club with boisterous CG action in sprightly fashion.With a worldwide box-office gross just this side of a billion dollars, a sequel became an industrial necessity – never an inspiring situation. It’s a relief, therefore, to report that Jumanji: The Next Level keeps things upbeat and lively, thanks in no small part to the introduction of two counterintuitively revivifying characters – curmudgeonly old codgers whose gripes and aches provide a jolly counterpoint to the teen angst that fired Kasdan’s previous instalment. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Debate so white: candidates of color miss out as Democratic field narrows
Despite an increasingly diverse party, Andrew Yang will be the only non-white face on the stage in Los AngelesWhen the Democratic presidential candidates gather in Los Angeles next Thursday to debate for the sixth time, the stage will look rather different than it did when the contenders first faced off back in June.A field that was initially celebrated for its diversity has been whittled down to seven debate participants: the former vice-president Joe Biden, Senator Bernie Sanders, Senator Elizabeth Warren, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Senator Amy Klobuchar, billionaire activist Tom Steyer and entrepreneur Andrew Yang. Five of them are men, and all but one of them are white. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Unions colluded in the fiction that Corbyn’s plan was going to win power | Will Hutton
If the party is going to survive it must pursue a broad coalition, not a socialist utopiaSo, although more than 17 million people voted for parties that wanted a second referendum compared with fewer than 15 million who did not, on 31 January Britain will leave the EU on Boris Johnson’s terrible deal. What he presents as an irrefutable, unarguable validation of Brexit is in truth a democratic travesty. When Brexit goes wrong, as it will, there will be a reckoning – if a sufficiently viable opposition exists to force it.Tactical voting had some successes, but so precipitate was the drop in the Labour vote and so resilient the Tory one that it was overwhelmed. Looking back, it is obvious that the Labour party should have joined the Remain alliance to avoid splitting the Remain vote, and its point-blank refusal to do so should not have been accepted so tamely. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
‘The spotlight can scare the shit out of me’: Stormzy speaks out
As he releases his second album, the all-conquering grime star talks about living in the public eye, a new politics of hope – and why it nearly all went wrong at Glastonbury this summerLadies and gentlemen please make way for the man of 2019, barrelling into his lovely kitchen-lounge in a blue dressing gown and tracky bottoms. “Sorry, sorry!” says Stormzy, enveloping me in a hug. “Sorry.” His apologies are because he’s a bit late – he had a headache, “even though I went bed early” – and also because I’ve just heard him bawl out a man who came to his front door. Stormzy had thought it was a food delivery and so buzzed the gate to let him in. But the man wasn’t delivering food. “He was looking for money,” says Stormzy. “So send me an email, you get me? I get it’s a charity, but this is my home. I’m Michael here, not Stormzy!”We’re sitting on an L-shaped sofa, opposite an enormous TV. Michael Omari Jr, aka Stormzy, who is jolly despite his buzzing head, goes to feed his dog, a huge Rottweiler lounging by the front door. Time for me to have a nosey around. Stormzy’s house is open plan, bright and modern, with what at first glance looks like an awful lot of ornaments but turns out to be awards: 29 of them, on various living-room shelves, including several Mobos. There’s also his 2019 Time cover, framed and waiting to be hung up, and in his downstairs loo a double platinum disc for his first album, Gang Signs & Prayers. The place is neat, but not a show home. There are clothes on the ironing board, bottles of Coke on the surfaces.Floor-to-ceiling glass doors look out over a grey sky, a small square of grass, a free-standing boxing bag and what looks like a glass-fronted studio. It’s actually a glamma-kennel, for the dog. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
The day Stormzy came to work | Eva Wiseman
The music superstar and guest editor caused a sensation when he arrived for his shift at the Observer offices – and he still had time to squeeze in fish and chipsThe Observer offices are tucked securely behind the earlobe of the Guardian building. It’s a comfortable collection of tea cups and computers, with books piled precariously next to the odd well-intentioned plant. It’s not unusual for famous people to come into the office, whether to be photographed or interviewed, but it is unusual for staff to bother looking up from their screens. I mean, I don’t want to boast, but I have taken the lift with models. Politicians stalk the corridors. There was a memorable afternoon when someone’s neighbour wanted to learn about sub-editing, and after many hours of her studiously practising InDesign behind us, we realised it was PJ Harvey. Celebrity guest editors have come and gone, sometimes shyly, sometimes with an entourage the size of Europe, but in my many years sitting in this chair I’ve never seen the air change the way it did when Stormzy visited.We picked him up from reception, 100ft tall in his black Ugg slippers, and his first request was to see the canteen (“I love school dinners!”) where, as he waited for his fish, chips, beans and chicken slice to be plated up, the room filled with people, all suddenly excited for lunch at quarter to 12. Somebody gasped as they passed him on the stairs and someone else stifled a scream. He brought his fish and chips up to the editor’s desk, where it quickly became clear we were going to have to keep the door closed to prevent strangers fainting. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Try a traditional Sunday roast with a twist this winter - and it's still got all the trimmings
Turkish restaurant House of Kai pays homage to ancient flavours with the chef's secret speciality gravy and marinade
Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip
Andreas Pereira explains why he rejected offers to leave Manchester United
Man Utd player Andreas Pereira has spoken about Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's impact on his career ahead of the Everton fixture in the Premier League.
Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip
Favourable run of games which could shape Man Utd's season - starting with Everton
Man Utd have come into form at the right time after impressive wins over Tottenham and Man City have set them up for a potentially fruitful run of matches over the Christmas period
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Arsenal vs Manchester City odds: Best bets for all Sunday's Premier League games
Expert betting tips for Emirates showdown plus Manchester United vs Everton and Tottenham at Wolves
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Britain’s new political landscape
Politics professor Rob Ford crunched the numbers with a team of experts to produce the devastatingly accurate exit poll. Here, he details how the 10pm figures foretold a night of horror for LabourThe exit poll stunned us all again. In 2017 it raised the curtain on a night of humiliation for Theresa May and the Conservatives and triumph for Labour and Jeremy Corbyn. This time the roles were reversed. Boris Johnson succeeded where May failed, mobilising Leave voters’ frustration at Brexit deadlock to secure the largest Conservative majority since Margaret Thatcher’s third victory in 1987, and the largest share of the vote (44%) won by any party since Thatcher’s first win in 1979. Corbyn secured a “glorious defeat” in the summer of 2017, when a surge in Labour support saw the party advance in defiance of expectations of disaster.The defeat this time was not glorious. Labour fell everywhere, but the party collapsed in its northern and Midlands heartlands where voters have returned Labour MPs for generations. The “red wall” collapsed, and Corbyn’s party was left to pick through the rubble of its worst defeat in more than 80 years. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Simon Cowell’s ex-girlfriend Sinitta on being ‘friend-zoned’ by mogul as she admits jealousy
She said there is nothing to fight about once you’re in the friend-zone.
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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro
Peter Pan’s dark side emerges with release of original manuscript
JM Barrie’s first draft of the classic story paints the hero as a far less pleasant boyHe’s the boy who never grows up, a lovable rogue who has convinced generations of children that “dreams do come true, if only we wish hard enough”. But now a darker side to Peter Pan has been revealed with the publication last week of JM Barrie’s original manuscript, Peter Pan and Wendy.Fans will be able to read the previously unpublished version of the story in Barrie’s own handwriting and see the amendments he made to his manuscript as he was writing it. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Dagenham stabbing: Man knifed to death in east London home
A 59-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after a man was stabbed to death in east London.
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London News | London Evening Standard - London's newspaper
Pep Guardiola explains why he's not "really concerned" about Man City form
Manchester City have won just two of their last five Premier League fixtures but Pep Guardiola isn't too worried about their performances.
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Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip
Lebanon protests: 40 injured as violence flares again in Beirut
Security forces fire tear gas and rubber bullets after Hezbollah supporters target camps of anti-government movement Lebanese security forces have fired rubber bullets, tear gas and used water cannons to disperse anti-government protesters from the centre of Beirut. The violence, which started on Saturday and lasted in the early hours of Sunday, was some of the worst since the demonstrations began two months ago. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Don’t look to Labour to defend the institutions Johnson seeks to destroy | Nick Cohen
In its current state the party shares too many of the Tories’ worst instinctsA defeat as crushing as the centre-left suffered on Thursday night leaves it at the mercy of its opponents. Of all the necessary mental adjustments, this will be the hardest to make. Related: Johnson ascendant: your general election recap Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Juice WRLD: despair and death for another young rapper | Rebecca Nicholson
Jarad Anthony Higgins joins the club of musicians whose lives ended too soonWhen Jarad Anthony Higgins, better known as the rapper Juice WRLD, died last weekend, he had just turned 21.Every thoughtful piece I read about his life and work expressed despair at the wasted potential of an entire generation of rappers, particularly Soundcloud rappers, who are overdosing or being incarcerated at a rate that suggests far more needs to be done by those profiting from their music. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
How do you bleed a radiator and when should you do it?
Listen to Leona Lewis this winter and keep bleeding, keep keep bleeding.
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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro
London’s Victorian churches deserve a second gothic revival
Many of the fine monuments to London’s golden age lie undervalued and underused. It’s time these brick and stone glories were brought back to lifeThey are London’s lost cathedrals. A few people still worship in them, a few more know of them, but few visit them. Whenever I have dropped by, they have been locked and seem deserted. Yet inside, these are masterpiece monuments of London’s age of confidence and flair, that of high Victorian gothic. They must be revived. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
A victory won by Brexit lies does not make those lies true
How can we believe that a party wedded to deregulation and flirting with Trump’s America will ever govern for ‘one nation’?The Chinese proverb is “be careful what you wish for”. My own adapted version is “be careful what you vote for”. I make no apology for having devoted so many columns to what on Thursday became the lost cause of Remain. The pro-European cause in this country has, alas, suffered from a colossal failure of leadership. The failure to make the case for our EU membership goes back a long way, as does the drip-drip of the vile anti-European campaign in the Murdoch press, and the obvious suspects in other sections of the media.The sequence of events was well brought out in Denis MacShane’s prophetic book Brexit – How Britain Will Leave Europe in 2015. (What lies in store is outlined both in MacShane’s latest volume, Brexiternity, and Sir Ivan Rogers’s recent magisterial lecture at Glasgow University.) As MacShane wrote in 2015: “The referendum on Europe is not on the benefits or cost of EU membership, but a wider protest about economic and social change which appears inside Britain to produce as many losers as winners.” Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Liz Hyder: ‘I feel like I’m in a weird cheese dream’
The author of acclaimed YA book Bearmouth on striking gold in a slate mine – and what you can’t learn from other writers• The Observer critics’ pick of the best children’s and young adult books of 2019Liz Hyder, 42, was born in London and studied drama at Bristol University. While working as a publicist at the BBC, and later as a freelance PR consultant, she wrote six novels, none of which were published. Her seventh, Bearmouth, about a child called Newt who lives and works deep inside a Victorian coalmine, came out in September to glowing reviews and was named “children’s book of the year” by the Times, which described it as “A Christmas Carol for 2019”. Hyder lives with her husband in Ludlow and is completing another novel.What have the past few months been like for you, since the publication of Bearmouth?I feel like I’m in a weird cheese dream – this is Camembert-at-3am-on-New-Year’s-Day levels of weirdness. I pinch myself every day. It’s not often I’m speechless, but I really am dumbfounded, flabbergasted, all those things, by the response. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Citizen K review – from filthy rich to Kremlin foe
Alex Gibney’s documentary about a Russian oligarch turned Putin critic struggles to penetrate the man’s slick exteriorMore than two hours long, Alex Gibney’s lively documentary is packed with information, context and archive footage of zany, bad-taste TV advertisements that use oligarch Mikhail Khodorkovsky’s story to frame Vladimir Putin’s ascent.In Citizen Kane, publishing mogul Charles Foster Kane’s idealism is corrupted by an unquenchable thirst for power. In Citizen K, Russian plutocrat Khodorkovsky’s career trajectory veers in the opposite direction. One of seven oligarchs whose role in the state privatisations of the 1990s helped transform the country’s communism into “gangster capitalism”, as Gibney’s voiceover puts it, Khodorkovsky was complicit in Putin’s rise. Now living in London in exile (he is wanted for murder), he is one of the president’s fiercest and most vocal critics. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian