Need to use up air miles? Here's how you can spend them... on a trip to space! 

Every week our Holiday Hero Neil Simpson takes an in-depth look at a brilliant holiday topic, doing all the legwork so you don't have to. This week: spending unused air miles.
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BBC 100 Women: Jane Fonda and Sanna Marin named among trailblazing figures for 2020
List includes activists, teachers and politicians
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‘He’s made it look easy’ – Frank Lampard hails impact of Chelsea summer signing Edouard Mendy
'He’s made it look easy.'
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Olympic cyclist rescues lost dog using headphones for lead while on training ride
'I found him on the side of the road, shivering and looking a bit lost'
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Black Friday sales live: Updates on the best deals from Amazon, Currys and more
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What is Rishi Sunak expected to announce in the government’s spending review this week?
Chancellor has promised no return to austerity but has hunted he will freeze wages for millions of public sector workers
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Football clubs face race to be ready for fans return as leaders warn: ‘It’s just the first step to recovery’
Football on Tuesday welcomed the imminent return of supporters from next week but leaders insisted it was only the first step towards the game’s recovery.
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Best gaming Black Friday deals 2020: Early offers on PS4, Nintendo and Xbox consoles and products
Whether it’s an X Rocker chair or a new headset, pre-sale deals are hotting up, so now is the time to search for Christmas presents
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Don’t play political games with city, PM | Cheer for football fans
he Government should bear this in mind as it introduces the latest system of tiered restrictions in England. The public deserves to know the metrics by which entry into the new tiers will be underpinned. If their community is placed in Tier 3, the Government must be able to say why. 
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I’m a Celebrity: How much are this year’s contestants being paid?
There's a £250,000 difference between the highest and lowest paid star
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Food For London Now: Keep on trucking… the wheels that help our appeal roll in London
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Emergency children’s care rules that removed protections dating back decades declared unlawful
Emergency care rules that snatched away safeguards dating back decades have been declared unlawful, in what has been called “a huge victory for children’s rights”.
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Grant Shapps met with fury over pub closure comments on Sky News
The politician said people could 'go about their lives without visiting the pub' in Tier 2 and 3 areas and claimed hospitality would 'boom' under Tier 1 restrictions
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The Reader: Another day, another fiasco for Boris Johnson
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Taiwan launches production of new fleet of submarines to defend against Chinese invasion
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Jennifer Garner’s famous friends in stitches as she unveils questionable $8 haircut in throwback snap
Jen shared a gem of a throwback with fans.
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How I ended up camping in a stranger’s garden in the middle of a pandemic
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Keir Starmer accused of threatening free expression with ban on discussing Corbyn suspension as left-wingers stage NEC walk-out
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What The Oxford Vaccine Trial's 'Efficacy' And 'Effectiveness' Actually Mean
2020 was the year the UK became a nation of amateur epidemiologists. Under the dark cloud of the Covid-19 pandemic, we throw around terms like “asymptomatic” and “exponential growth” and talked about the “R-rate” like virology has always been a national pastime. But as the race for a jab to protect us from coronavirus heats up, we are entering the next stage of our education – vaccines. In recent weeks, biotech company Moderna and pharmaceutical giant Pfizer have both reported that their trial vaccines can offer around 95% protection from Covid-19, while Oxford University researchers revealed on Monday that their jab could have an efficacy of up to 90%. Or, administered a different way, 70%.But tens of thousands of people took part in the trial, and only 30 developed Covid after having the jab. So why isn’t the number higher?We asked some scientists to explain it to us.What do scientists really mean when they talk about ‘vaccine efficacy’? For those of us who aren’t part of the scientific community, “vaccine efficacy” probably isn’t a term we’ve come across much in the past. Vaccine efficacy is a measure of how much a trial participant’s risk of getting a disease drops if they have had the vaccine, compared with those given a placebo jab.“The greater the percentage reduction of illness in the vaccinated group, the greater the vaccine efficacy,” the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains on its website. So, how is vaccine efficacy calculated? The CDC sets out one way of calculating vaccine efficacy on its website.First, scientists testing a vaccine will establish the number of trial participants who caught the disease even though they’d been given the jab. In the case of the Oxford trial, that was 30.They then subtract this figure from the number of unvaccinated trial participants (those who got a placebo) who were infected. On the Oxford trial, that was 101.Then, they divide the result – that’s 71 for the Oxford trial – by the number of unvaccinated participants who developed the disease, which as we just said was 101 in the Oxford vaccine example.Finally, to get a percentage, multiply that by 100.I don’t get itA less maths-y way of thinking about it is this.Imagine that both groups (those who got the vaccine, and those who got a placebo) were both equally exposed to the virus during the trial. On average, that’s probably a fair assumption if both groups did similar things: travelled, saw colleagues or friends, went shopping.The placebo group got 101 cases of Covid between them. That’s the base number of Covid cases a group of that size should be getting without vaccination.But the vaccinated group only got 30 cases instead of 101. In other words, the vaccine stopped 71 of those expected 101 cases.Which is just over 70%. So that’s the efficacy of the vaccine.Incidentally, if 131 cases in a group of 20,000, remember that UK-wide lockdown was taking place for much of the trial, which slowed everything down.What are the efficacy rates of the leading trial coronavirus vaccines? According to results from phase 3 trials, Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine – made in collaboration with BioNTech – has an efficacy rate of 95%, while the Moderna vaccine has a rate of 94.5%.In comparison, the vaccine developed by University of Oxford and AstraZeneca was shown to have an average efficacy rate of around 70%. However, Oxford researchers reached this figure by combining the efficacy rates of two different dosing systems (what scientists call “regimens”).The first regimen – which had an efficacy rate of 62% – gave volunteers two full doses of the vaccine, some weeks apart.The second regimen initially gave volunteers half a dose of the vaccine and then followed up with a standard dose later on. This method gave an efficacy rate of 90%. Why are coronavirus vaccine efficacy rates different? On Monday, director of the Oxford Vaccine Group Andrew Pollard said that the efficacy of Oxford’s vaccine would be higher if trials had only measured whether the jab prevented severe disease and hospitalisation.In the trial – which involved more than 24,000 volunteers – there were no hospitalised or severe cases in anyone who received the coronavirus vaccine, researchers said. In other words, it appears to have prevented everyone who received it from getting seriously ill.Pollard told reporters it was hard to explain the different efficacy rates between the AstraZeneca/Oxford shot and the other vaccines developed by Pfizer and BioNTech and one by Moderna.One reason may be that the companies are measuring for different things, Pollard said, with the Oxford trial tests its efficacy for all levels of disease from severe to mild. On the other hand, he said, there might also be real differences between all the vaccines.What about the bigger picture? Dr Jasmina Panovska-Griffiths, a senior mathematical modeller, said it was important to look beyond just the headline efficacy figures. “One thing that is really important – and we are starting to get data on this – is how effective these vaccines are at protecting specific groups, especially those at higher risk of Covid-19,” she said. “So certain ages – for example the elderly, people in care homes and people with co-morbidities and people of different ethnicities.“So it’s not just the overall number that matters, but the zoomed in number for different groups.” Are vaccine efficacy and effectiveness the same thing?You might assume that “efficacy” and “effectiveness” are interchangeable terms when speaking about how well a coronavirus vaccine works. But in the scientific community, these terms actually mean pretty different things. (Although one scientist we asked initially told us they meant the same thing, only to correct themselves later by e-mail.)Efficacy is how well a vaccine works under trial conditions, while vaccine effectiveness looks at how the jab performs in the real world. So even though a vaccine might have an extremely high efficacy rate during trials, it might not have the same level of effectiveness when it’s rolled out outside of lab conditions. 10) Finally, vaccine efficacy vs. effectiveness? We like to reserve "efficacy" for estimates from randomized trials, where everyone receives the vaccine as intended (proper cold chain, no missed doses). We distinguish this idealized measure from real-world "effectiveness." END— Natalie E. Dean, PhD (@nataliexdean) September 28, 2020“Effectiveness relates to real world use of a vaccine and includes all the extraneous factors that may alter the ability of a vaccine to work,” explained UCL’s Dr Joe Grove.“The trials thus far have only addressed efficacy and will only judge the ability of a vaccine to reduce disease under idealised conditions. The true effectiveness will become apparent with time.“Nonetheless, these trials are very encouraging and there’s every reason to be optimistic.”So, what external factors could impact the vaccine in the real world? ”With the current trials there simply isn’t enough people to extract detailed findings for subgroups of individuals,” Grove, an infections expert, explained.“For example, some people may have some form of mild immunodeficiency.” This could be from malnutrition, he explained, which could be an important factor in the developing world. “In these individuals, the vaccines may not provide as much protection.“That said, the trials would suggest that most people are going to benefit from good protective immune responses.” How and when a vaccine is given could also impact its effectiveness in the real world. Related... Oxford Covid Vaccine: Here's What We Know So Far Boris Johnson To Announce 'Major' Covid-19 Community Testing Programme
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
What The Oxford Vaccine Trial's 'Efficacy' And 'Effectiveness' Actually Mean
2020 was the year the UK became a nation of amateur epidemiologists. Under the dark cloud of the Covid-19 pandemic, we throw around terms like “asymptomatic” and “exponential growth” and talked about the “R-rate” like virology has always been a national pastime. But as the race for a jab to protect us from coronavirus heats up, we are entering the next stage of our education – vaccines. In recent weeks, biotech company Moderna and pharmaceutical giant Pfizer have both reported that their trial vaccines can offer around 95% protection from Covid-19, while Oxford University researchers revealed on Monday that their jab could have an efficacy of up to 90%. Or, administered a different way, 70%.But tens of thousands of people took part in the trial, and only 30 developed Covid after having the jab. So why isn’t the number higher?We asked some scientists to explain it to us.What do scientists really mean when they talk about ‘vaccine efficacy’? For those of us who aren’t part of the scientific community, “vaccine efficacy” probably isn’t a term we’ve come across much in the past. Vaccine efficacy is a measure of how much a trial participant’s risk of getting a disease drops if they have had the vaccine, compared with those given a placebo jab.“The greater the percentage reduction of illness in the vaccinated group, the greater the vaccine efficacy,” the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains on its website. So, how is vaccine efficacy calculated? The CDC sets out one way of calculating vaccine efficacy on its website.First, scientists testing a vaccine will establish the number of trial participants who caught the disease even though they’d been given the jab. In the case of the Oxford trial, that was 30.They then subtract this figure from the number of unvaccinated trial participants (those who got a placebo) who were infected. On the Oxford trial, that was 101.Then, they divide the result – that’s 71 for the Oxford trial – by the number of unvaccinated participants who developed the disease, which as we just said was 101 in the Oxford vaccine example.Finally, to get a percentage, multiply that by 100.I don’t get itA less maths-y way of thinking about it is this.Imagine that both groups (those who got the vaccine, and those who got a placebo) were both equally exposed to the virus during the trial. On average, that’s probably a fair assumption if both groups did similar things: travelled, saw colleagues or friends, went shopping.The placebo group got 101 cases of Covid between them. That’s the base number of Covid cases a group of that size should be getting without vaccination.But the vaccinated group only got 30 cases instead of 101. In other words, the vaccine stopped 71 of those expected 101 cases.Which is just over 70%. So that’s the efficacy of the vaccine.Incidentally, if 131 cases in a group of 20,000, remember that UK-wide lockdown was taking place for much of the trial, which slowed everything down.What are the efficacy rates of the leading trial coronavirus vaccines? According to results from phase 3 trials, Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine – made in collaboration with BioNTech – has an efficacy rate of 95%, while the Moderna vaccine has a rate of 94.5%.In comparison, the vaccine developed by University of Oxford and AstraZeneca was shown to have an average efficacy rate of around 70%. However, Oxford researchers reached this figure by combining the efficacy rates of two different dosing systems (what scientists call “regimens”).The first regimen – which had an efficacy rate of 62% – gave volunteers two full doses of the vaccine, some weeks apart.The second regimen initially gave volunteers half a dose of the vaccine and then followed up with a standard dose later on. This method gave an efficacy rate of 90%. Why are coronavirus vaccine efficacy rates different? On Monday, director of the Oxford Vaccine Group Andrew Pollard said that the efficacy of Oxford’s vaccine would be higher if trials had only measured whether the jab prevented severe disease and hospitalisation.In the trial – which involved more than 24,000 volunteers – there were no hospitalised or severe cases in anyone who received the coronavirus vaccine, researchers said. In other words, it appears to have prevented everyone who received it from getting seriously ill.Pollard told reporters it was hard to explain the different efficacy rates between the AstraZeneca/Oxford shot and the other vaccines developed by Pfizer and BioNTech and one by Moderna.One reason may be that the companies are measuring for different things, Pollard said, with the Oxford trial tests its efficacy for all levels of disease from severe to mild. On the other hand, he said, there might also be real differences between all the vaccines.What about the bigger picture? Dr Jasmina Panovska-Griffiths, a senior mathematical modeller, said it was important to look beyond just the headline efficacy figures. “One thing that is really important – and we are starting to get data on this – is how effective these vaccines are at protecting specific groups, especially those at higher risk of Covid-19,” she said. “So certain ages – for example the elderly, people in care homes and people with co-morbidities and people of different ethnicities.“So it’s not just the overall number that matters, but the zoomed in number for different groups.” Are vaccine efficacy and effectiveness the same thing?You might assume that “efficacy” and “effectiveness” are interchangeable terms when speaking about how well a coronavirus vaccine works. But in the scientific community, these terms actually mean pretty different things. (Although one scientist we asked initially told us they meant the same thing, only to correct themselves later by e-mail.)Efficacy is how well a vaccine works under trial conditions, while vaccine effectiveness looks at how the jab performs in the real world. So even though a vaccine might have an extremely high efficacy rate during trials, it might not have the same level of effectiveness when it’s rolled out outside of lab conditions. 10) Finally, vaccine efficacy vs. effectiveness? We like to reserve "efficacy" for estimates from randomized trials, where everyone receives the vaccine as intended (proper cold chain, no missed doses). We distinguish this idealized measure from real-world "effectiveness." END— Natalie E. Dean, PhD (@nataliexdean) September 28, 2020“Effectiveness relates to real world use of a vaccine and includes all the extraneous factors that may alter the ability of a vaccine to work,” explained UCL’s Dr Joe Grove.“The trials thus far have only addressed efficacy and will only judge the ability of a vaccine to reduce disease under idealised conditions. The true effectiveness will become apparent with time.“Nonetheless, these trials are very encouraging and there’s every reason to be optimistic.”So, what external factors could impact the vaccine in the real world? ”With the current trials there simply isn’t enough people to extract detailed findings for subgroups of individuals,” Grove, an infections expert, explained.“For example, some people may have some form of mild immunodeficiency.” This could be from malnutrition, he explained, which could be an important factor in the developing world. “In these individuals, the vaccines may not provide as much protection.“That said, the trials would suggest that most people are going to benefit from good protective immune responses.” How and when a vaccine is given could also impact its effectiveness in the real world. Related... Oxford Covid Vaccine: Here's What We Know So Far Boris Johnson To Announce 'Major' Covid-19 Community Testing Programme
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Harry Kane the most ‘street-wise’ footballer in Premier League, says Jamie Carragher
Striker has been accused in recent weeks of employing dangerous tactics to draw fouls
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Group of women caught having ‘Come Dine With Me’ dinner party in Covid hotspot
Hull currently has the highest coronavirus infection rate in the country.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
Ellen DeGeneres mocked for Playstation tweet: ‘You should ask Twitter to add a laugh track function to mask the unfunny’
‘Pay your writers so you get better jokes than this,’ one user said
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Food For London Now: ‘Living with hunger can damage you mentally’
Living in hunger can cause psychological trauma, an expert said today in a stark warning illustrating the importance of our Food For London Now Christmas appeal.
London News | London Evening Standard -...
Coronavirus: Homes could be riskier than pubs for spreading virus, Sage scientist warns
People ‘let their guard down’ when mixing with others inside their own home
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Pregnant Kate Ferdinand won't put pressure on herself to lose baby weight
Former TOWIE star Kate Ferdinand is expecting her first baby with husband Rio Ferdinand, and says she won't be putting any pressure on herself to get back in her pre-pregnancy jeans
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Ranvir Singh Addresses Rumours Of Strictly Come Dancing Romance With Giovanni Pernice
Strictly Come Dancing star Ranvir Singh has downplayed the suggestion that she and professional Giovanni Pernice are anything more than dance partners.Throughout their time in the competition, Ranvir and Giovanni have been at the centre of speculation about the nature of their relationship.Over the weekend, their Argentine Tango routine did little to dispel the rumours, with head judge Shirley Ballas commenting: “Well [that routine] made me rather hot under the collar I have to say.“I felt like you were in your own room and we were all watching from the window, as your legs got entwined and your lips puckered… and you almost kissed each other – it was so hot! It was so sensational.”Ranvir – who protested at the time, joking “my mum’s watching!” – was asked about Giovanni by her Good Morning Britain colleagues on Tuesday morning, but insisted there was nothing going on between them.When Piers Morgan questioned if there’d been “hanky panky”, she shot back: “No, of course not. There hasn’t – there really hasn’t.”“We get on,” Ranvir said. “It’s just that we both ... I suppose what it is, is there’s a performance element to the dancing, which is all about telling the story about two people.“I mean, of course when you keep replaying that bit, it’s slightly awkward, thank you very much.” She added: “He’s very much about the energy of the performance. It’s so much more than just about learning the steps or learning the routine, or any of those things.” Ranvir and Giovanni aren’t the only ones who’ve had to contend with Strictly rumours this year, though, with fellow contestants HRVY and Maisie Smith having also been at the centre of headlines about a potential romance.While HRVY has maintained that they are just friends, he has said that he isn’t ruling out a romance in the future, when the Strictly stars are allowed to leave their respective support bubbles.Good Morning Britain airs every weekday from 6am on ITV.MORE STRICTLY: ‘They Slaughtered Her’: Former Strictly Pro Kevin Clifton Weighs In On Judges’ ‘Harsh’ Scoring Of Clara Amfo What The Hell Happens To This Year's Strictly If More Stars Are Exposed To Covid-19? Strictly’s Caroline Quentin Licked Partner Johannes During Cha Cha And Viewers Have Thoughts
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Ranvir Singh Addresses Rumours Of Strictly Come Dancing Romance With Giovanni Pernice
Strictly Come Dancing star Ranvir Singh has downplayed the suggestion that she and professional Giovanni Pernice are anything more than dance partners.Throughout their time in the competition, Ranvir and Giovanni have been at the centre of speculation about the nature of their relationship.Over the weekend, their Argentine Tango routine did little to dispel the rumours, with head judge Shirley Ballas commenting: “Well [that routine] made me rather hot under the collar I have to say.“I felt like you were in your own room and we were all watching from the window, as your legs got entwined and your lips puckered… and you almost kissed each other – it was so hot! It was so sensational.”Ranvir – who protested at the time, joking “my mum’s watching!” – was asked about Giovanni by her Good Morning Britain colleagues on Tuesday morning, but insisted there was nothing going on between them.When Piers Morgan questioned if there’d been “hanky panky”, she shot back: “No, of course not. There hasn’t – there really hasn’t.”“We get on,” Ranvir said. “It’s just that we both ... I suppose what it is, is there’s a performance element to the dancing, which is all about telling the story about two people.“I mean, of course when you keep replaying that bit, it’s slightly awkward, thank you very much.” She added: “He’s very much about the energy of the performance. It’s so much more than just about learning the steps or learning the routine, or any of those things.” Ranvir and Giovanni aren’t the only ones who’ve had to contend with Strictly rumours this year, though, with fellow contestants HRVY and Maisie Smith having also been at the centre of headlines about a potential romance.While HRVY has maintained that they are just friends, he has said that he isn’t ruling out a romance in the future, when the Strictly stars are allowed to leave their respective support bubbles.Good Morning Britain airs every weekday from 6am on ITV.MORE STRICTLY: ‘They Slaughtered Her’: Former Strictly Pro Kevin Clifton Weighs In On Judges’ ‘Harsh’ Scoring Of Clara Amfo What The Hell Happens To This Year's Strictly If More Stars Are Exposed To Covid-19? Strictly’s Caroline Quentin Licked Partner Johannes During Cha Cha And Viewers Have Thoughts
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Alex Telles can decide future of Jose Mourinho signing at Man United
The Brazilian arrived at Man Utd in the summer transfer window at Old Trafford and has impressed versus PSG and West Brom so far.
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Great British Bake Off 2020: Official account pokes fun at Prue Leith previously leaking winner
Will she ever live it down?
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
Europe hopes for reset, end to 'damage control' under Biden
Germany’s foreign minister says he hopes a reset of U_S_-European relations under the Biden administration can end years in which Europe was mainly concerned with “damage control.”
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
The chancellor should raise taxes so Britons finally pay their way instead of piling up debt
Please send your letters to letters@independent.co.uk
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Farmer fatally blasts family's beloved cockapoo Benji in the face with a shotgun
Kerri Malley, 40, from Winterley, Cheshire, was walking Benji, three, near a sheep field when he bolted away from her. She said the dog ran off when it got a shock after it touched an electric fence.
Home | Daily Mail Online
Iceland launch Greggs Festive Bakes back into stores - ready for Christmas
The limited edition Festive Bakes from Greggs offer great value at just £2 for a pack of two and, available from Iceland now
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Katie Price turns new rental home upside down as mess echoes Mucky Mansion
Katie, 42, gave fans a glimpse of her £4k a month rental pad on her Instagram Story, but its mess seems to echo that of the troubled Mucky Mansion
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
How long will tier system last and how often will it be reviewed?
Boris Johnson outlined changes to the original tier system on Monday
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Comedian sends Twitter in hysterics with a spoof recap of The Crown series 4
Kieran Hodgson, from Yorkshire, wowed fans of the Netflix drama with his impeccable imitations of the main cast, from Olivia Colman's Queen Elizabeth II to Gillian Anderson's Margaret Thatcher.
Home | Daily Mail Online
Bolton boss Evatt on learning from Guardiola, Mourinho, Klopp and Bielsa
The Trotters head coach feels the best coaches in the game all ply their trade in the Premier League
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...
Swiss pilots could retrain as train drivers
‘In our eyes, this is a win-win situation,’ says union
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Mobo Awards return with nominations for Nines, Lianne La Havas, Mahalia and more
Ceremony will be broadcast live on YouTube and air on BBC One
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...
Deck the halls: how to create a crowd-pleasing Christmas tree
Craving Christmas cheer early this year? Here are some top tips for decorating that will keep partners, children, pets and even the environment happy – however long your festive seasonChristmas has come early, or at least many of us would like to think so. Trees have gone up earlier than usual this year, which is hardly surprising – they reinvent a living room you’ve spent far too much time in over the past few months. Plus, getting on with Christmas gives us something to enjoy, as well as making the end of this wretched year feel closer.Still, it can bring out the humbug. How do you deck the halls while keeping everyone happy? Here is some expert advice. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the...
Khloe Kardashian 'not moving to Boston' with Tristan Thompson
Reality TV star Khloe Kardashian is reportedly planning to stay in Los Angeles despite her rumoured boyfriend signing a big money deal to play for the Boston Celtics
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Marcus, Monica and Nigella are getting me and my sofa through the last week of lockdown
 My resilience primer is very simple. Montdog  (my spaniel) and I have become one
London News | London Evening Standard -...
British billionaire gave £21m gift to staff - and his secretary retired at 36
The Hut Group founder has landed a massive £830million after his firm was launched on the stock market in September - it is one of the biggest in British history
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Oxford coronavirus vaccine volunteer explains minimal side effect
Lorraine Kelly had asked Oxford trial volunteer Jack Sommers about taking part in the Oxford Covid-19 vaccine trial
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid....
Eight officers investigated after black woman restrained and punched during arrest
Two of the officers have been placed on restricted duties while the probe by the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) continues.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz,...
Trump’s billionaire friend and donor backs Biden transition team and calls him president-elect
Ronald S Lauder joins growing list of pro-Republican figures to accept presidential election result
The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide...