Trump skips virtual G20 side-session on 'pandemic preparedness' to play golf

President Trump on Saturday skipped a side-conference at the virtual G20 summit to play golf Sterling, Virginia, as he continued to decry voter fraud and has refused to concede
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Liverpool vs Atalanta: Champions League prediction, team news, TV, live stream, h2h results, preview
Liverpool will qualify for the Champions League knockout stages with two games to spare by beating Atalanta on Wednesday.
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Best Christmas movies to watch on Amazon Prime UK in 2020
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I am sharing all of my experiences of racism online – here’s why
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TikTok adds new feature to allow people to skip videos that induce seizures
Users will receive a notification asking if they want to “Skip All” potentially triggering videos
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India bans 43 more mobile apps, including many from China
India is banning 43 mobile apps, including many from China, with which it is locked in a military standoff along their border in the Himalayas
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Man who says he ‘wasn’t living, just existing’ loses 20 stone naturally
Alejandro views his excess skin as a 'trophy'.
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Matt Hancock blames Greater Manchester row for lockdown tiers decision
Matt Hancock said the row between local leaders and government members in Greater Manchester influenced ministers' decision to take negotiations off the table
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Secretary of State nominee Antony Blinken is a guitarist with two singles on Spotify
Anthony Blinken, 58, is better-known to his 57 monthly Spotify fans as 'Ablinken' - the crooner and guitarist behind the original love songs Lip Service and Patience.
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Who’s who in Biden’s Cabinet?
A number of Mr Biden’s early picks for his national security and foreign policy teams are from the Obama era
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Moment drunk van man swerves across M25 while more than three times the limit near Clacket Lane
White van man James Mantel, 44, drove 'erratically' on the M25 and narrowly avoided crashing into a barrier after downing eight cans of beer while fishing, magistrates were told.
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Why are we so desperate for a 'normal' awful Christmas? | Joel Golby
British people have a bizarrely hysterical relationship with the festive season – and Boris Johnson is taking advantageOne thing I have noticed, peering at people’s lives on Instagram Stories, is that some of us are celebrating Christmas early this year. Nothing too major – a tree here, a dazzle of fairy lights there, a mince pie snuck into a mouth in the actual month of November – but you can feel it building: not an anticipation, exactly, and not the giddiness of Christmases past, but almost a festive sigh: well, there’s not much else to do, is there? Let’s just put up a tree. Normally I would find this behaviour so tacky it would verge on the morally reprehensible, but honestly, it’s 2020. Let people have their tinsel and listen to Wham!.The way I see it, there are three main reasons for this: boredom (lockdown is boring), a fundamental, bone-deep craving for joy (this year has – whichever way you spin it – been a miserable one), and the bizarrely hysterical relationship this country has with the concept of Christmas. I am a Christmas apologist – I love Christmas, sorry! It slaps! But it is supposed to come in waves, and this time in any normal year we would be deep into the eye-rolling phase of the festivities: the turkey–stuffing sandwiches announced with a fanfare in the various meal deals, the first jingle of Christmas music over the supermarket sound system, the faux snow on the windows, the stacked tubs of Celebrations, an annoyingly cheerful e-invite to an office party being held, inexplicably, on a Tuesday evening. The first phase of Christmas is a groan, but then, slowly, joyously, you warm to it: you hum some Shakin’ Stevens; you eat a small round chocolate wrapped in foil to look like a sprout; you come to, half-cut, at someone else’s dinner table, wearing a pair of reindeer antlers you don’t remember seeing before. Whether you want it to or not, Christmas catches up with you in the end. Continue reading...
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Eurotunnel dog travel clampdown sparks concerns from rescue charities
Organisations say dogs due to be rehomed could suffer after decision to cut number of animals allowed per vehicleDog rescue organisations are appealing for Eurotunnel to clarify new rules clamping down on the rising numbers of animals being brought into the UK.Rescue organisations said dogs due to be rehomed could suffer as a result of the decision to cut the number of animals allowed to travel in each vehicle from 20 to five, drastically increasing the costs for rescue operations. Continue reading...
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Home and Away star Johnny Ruffo reveals brain cancer has returned and determinedly vows to ‘beat it’ again
He's vowed to 'beat it' once again.
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Why we can’t wait to stay IN this festive season
Why we can’t wait to stay IN this festive season
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Chrissy Teigen admits John Legend was 'uncomfortable' taking miscarriage photos
Chrissy, 34, lost her baby boy on September 30, when she was 20 weeks into her pregnancy, after suffering a month of bleeding from a weak placenta.
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Interior designer reveals how she more than doubled the value of her home thanks to renovations
Interior designer from Bramhall, Chesire, Angela Bamforth bought her house for £275,000 in 2015. After renovations works, the property is estimated to be worth £590,000.
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Removal van arrives at empty Frogmore Cottage in Windsor after Prince Harry and Meghan Markle left
Harry and Meghan's possessions are said to have been secretly moved out of the property under the cover of darkness and sent to California where they are now living in a £11million home.
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When will the new tiers be announced for England?
New rules will be even stricter than before
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Enough was known about Covid-19 in January to act then, expert claims
Sir Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, said that while information about the virus was "uncertain" in January, action could have been taken
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Photo of celebrity with Israeli pop star causes outcry in Egypt
Mohamed Ramadan suspended from stage and film union over online imageAn Egyptian celebrity has sparked an uproar and been suspended from a stage and film professional’s union after a photo of him with an Israeli pop star was posted online.The outcry over actor-singer Mohamed Ramadan’s photograph with Israeli crooner Omer Adam highlights anti-Israel sentiment among most Egyptians who view any direct interaction with Israelis as taboo. Continue reading...
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Why ‘book exchange’ posts spreading on Facebook and Instagram might not be all they seem
An evergreen post about starting a “book exchange” is circulating on Instagram and Facebook.
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Woman ‘smuggled drugs, lighter and papers into jail stuffed inside her vagina’
Goldie Greene was allegedly caught with the contraband after prison staff told her to 'squat and cough'
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Alton Towers launches massive Black Friday 2020 deal on overnight stays
The attraction is offering a huge discount on stays in its themed hotels
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Barcelona can now save £100m on Mane transfer due to Coutinho clause
The Liverpool forward was heavily linked with a move to the Nou Camp and Barcelona can now capture him for a reduced fee based on previous years
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Taylor Swift’s Folklore: When is Disney+ special released and how can I watch?
Streaming-only special will feature live performances, behind-the-scenes secrets and special guests
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French shop owners pressure Macron to lighten virus lockdown
People in France may be able to go back to their favorite shops and attend religious services again next week, after a month of a partial virus lockdown
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Mark Clattenburg on having two hair transplants after wife's 'looking old' claim
During his career, Clattenburg refereed a number of notable matches including the 2016 Champions League final and the European Championship final in France the same year
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Andy Burnham Row Brought An End To Tier Negotiations, Suggests Matt Hancock
Matt Hancock has said Andy Burnham’s resistance to a Westminster imposed tier 3 lockdown in Greater Manchester influenced the governments decision not to negotiate with local leaders on future restrictions. England’s four-week national lockdown ends on December 2 and will be replaced by a three-tiered system similar to the one that was in place before.However the new system will involve tougher rules and local leaders will not be consulted.Speaking to MPs on Tuesday, the health secretary said the protracted talks between the government and Burnham, the mayor of Greater Manchester, had been “bad for public health”.Burnham had demanded better financial support for local people and businesses before agreeing to the tier 3 lockdown in his region.In the end Boris Johnson decided to put Greater Manchester into the highest tier without an agreement having been reached.Hancock said: “The reason we are doing it differently is whilst in most cases when we negotiated with most areas in the previous tiered arrangement, we had a high quality discussion which led to better outcomes – a case in point is Liverpool, where the case rate has fallen by over two-thirds in the last three weeks.“Unfortunately that wasn’t the case in all local areas.”Asked whether he was referring to Greater Manchester, Hancock said: “That would be one example but not the only one.“Sadly, in the case of Greater Manchester, cases carried on going up whilst we were trying to put in place the measures that were necessary.“So instead we’ve proposed a set of measures within the tiers which are fixed, also financial support which is agreed by formula rather than negotiation.“We will have engagement but what we won’t have is a two-week long negotiation while the cases still go up, that is bad for public health.”Hancock was speaking to a joint session of the Commons health and social care committee and the science and technology committee.The health secretary admitted the previous tier 3 was no “strong enough to get the R rate below one, and therefore cases falling” and the new levels were “better-calibrated”.“We need a slightly tougher third tier so we can have confidence that we can bring cases down under the tiered system,” he said.Related... Here Are The New Covid Rules For Pubs And The Science Behind Them This Is How The Government Will Decide What Lockdown Tier Your Area Will Be In Here's How The Four Key UK Vaccine Contenders Work Shops To Face 7-Day Shutdown Orders If They Breach Covid Safety Rules
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Andy Burnham Row Brought An End To Tier Negotiations, Suggests Matt Hancock
Matt Hancock has said Andy Burnham’s resistance to a Westminster imposed tier 3 lockdown in Greater Manchester influenced the governments decision not to negotiate with local leaders on future restrictions. England’s four-week national lockdown ends on December 2 and will be replaced by a three-tiered system similar to the one that was in place before.However the new system will involve tougher rules and local leaders will not be consulted.Speaking to MPs on Tuesday, the health secretary said the protracted talks between the government and Burnham, the mayor of Greater Manchester, had been “bad for public health”.Burnham had demanded better financial support for local people and businesses before agreeing to the tier 3 lockdown in his region.In the end Boris Johnson decided to put Greater Manchester into the highest tier without an agreement having been reached.Hancock said: “The reason we are doing it differently is whilst in most cases when we negotiated with most areas in the previous tiered arrangement, we had a high quality discussion which led to better outcomes – a case in point is Liverpool, where the case rate has fallen by over two-thirds in the last three weeks.“Unfortunately that wasn’t the case in all local areas.”Asked whether he was referring to Greater Manchester, Hancock said: “That would be one example but not the only one.“Sadly, in the case of Greater Manchester, cases carried on going up whilst we were trying to put in place the measures that were necessary.“So instead we’ve proposed a set of measures within the tiers which are fixed, also financial support which is agreed by formula rather than negotiation.“We will have engagement but what we won’t have is a two-week long negotiation while the cases still go up, that is bad for public health.”Hancock was speaking to a joint session of the Commons health and social care committee and the science and technology committee.The health secretary admitted the previous tier 3 was no “strong enough to get the R rate below one, and therefore cases falling” and the new levels were “better-calibrated”.“We need a slightly tougher third tier so we can have confidence that we can bring cases down under the tiered system,” he said.Related... Here Are The New Covid Rules For Pubs And The Science Behind Them This Is How The Government Will Decide What Lockdown Tier Your Area Will Be In Here's How The Four Key UK Vaccine Contenders Work Shops To Face 7-Day Shutdown Orders If They Breach Covid Safety Rules
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Lockdown is 'mental health catastrophe waiting to happen', menopausal women warn
A poll of 2,000 women over 40 found that half think the pandemic has made their menopause symptoms worse, with sleep heavily affected
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Does egg belong on pizza? Nigella Lawson divides fans with Holly Willoughby dubbing it ‘something out of the bin’
This is a thing, we must insist.
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Barcelona to offer Messi 'job for life' to keep him out of Man City's clutches
Messi is able to talk with other clubs from January with City plotting to make their move, but Barcelona are not prepared to give their captain up without a fight
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Johnny Ruffo: Former Home and Away star diagnosed with brain cancer for second time
Actor’s co-stars sent him messages of well wishes
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Burnley hotel renames itself in tribute to Jordan North on I'm A Celeb
I'm A Celebrity star Jordan North has inspired a hotel in Burnley to rename itself after the Radio 1 DJ following his impressive performance so far
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Princess Switch 2 fans have minds blown by Netflix's Christmas Prince Easter egg
Eagle-eyed viewers of the new Vanessa Hudgens movie, The Princess Switch 2, couldn't help but notice some very familiar faces from another festive film on Netflix
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Nicklas Bendtner, Martin Keown and the ubiquity of pink football boots
There was a time when pink boots were associated with the Premier League’s show ponies and fancy-dans. Not any moreBy Mark Sanderson for When Saturday ComesEvery now and then when I’m at a game, someone will say: “I remember when all 22 players on the field wore black boots.” The implication being those who still wear them are made of stronger stuff than today’s show ponies, who are obviously all far too concerned with what they’re wearing on their feet. I’ve always thought this was nonsense, as well as a little hypocritical. Well, apart from when Nicklas Bendtner first wore pink boots for Arsenal 12 years ago – that was a bit much. But it turns out Bendtner was just ahead of the curve.In my experience, many who champion the black boot above all others have their own particular footwear fetish, which tends to focus on the regard and upkeep of a certain pair of boots: Adidas World Cups, or their rubber-studded cousin, the Copa Mundial. Proper boots, nod those who wear them. Continue reading...
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Champagne and oyster habit hitting your pocket? Now you can blame science
The popular combination has an ‘umami synergy’ that we can’t resist, a Danish study has shownName: Champagne and oysters.Age: Prehistoric man was partial to an oyster. They haven’t always been seen as posh, either – everyone ate them in the 19th century. The invention of champagne is usually attributed to the 17th-century French monk Dom Pérignon, but in reality he built on the work of others. It became fashionable to combine the two in early-18th-century French salons. Continue reading...
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Anthony Joshua vs Kubrat Pulev to cost £24.95 despite Eddie Hearn’s pay-per-view promise
AJ’s rematch with Andy Ruiz Jr cost the same as the Briton’s upcoming title defence, a fee that Hearn previously called a ‘one-off’
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‘Cartel boss’ arrested over killing of Mormon family in Mexico
A suspected drug cartel boss has been arrested in connection with the killing of a Mormon family in Mexico last year.
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Le Creuset launches limited edition cookware range for a classy Christmas dinner
Deck your kitchen with chic dinnerware this festive season
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Grealish move would be a significant change to Man City transfer plans
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Britain's Got A Drinking Problem. Lockdown Has Proved It
Britain’s drinking culture has long been an accepted part of our cultural celebrations, from buying your first pint on your 18th birthday, to binge drinking through your first week of university.  And the great British pub is still seen as the stalwart of our communities, with approximately 47,600 in operation. Drinking is about as close to a definable British culture as you can get. Yet, since 2012, more than 760 youth centres have been shut in the UK. And since austerity began in 2010, 773 libraries and 428 day centres, most frequently used by the elderly, have closed. Our sober spaces are being quietly and methodically exterminated. I’m by no means the first to question our national alcohol dependence. Many have examined Britain’s relationship with alcohol. But the coronavirus pandemic has thrown our bad habits into sharp relief. More than a quarter of people admitted to drinking more during the first lockdown in spring of this year.Related... Here Are The New Covid Rules For Pubs And The Science Behind Them This Is How The Government Will Decide What Lockdown Tier Your Area Will Be In What’s more, as access to vital public services closed across the UK – including in-person mental health support – pubs remained open. As rules came in that dictated weddings with more than 30 guests could no longer go ahead, you could still technically gather in any one of our drinking establishments. As pregnant women had to attend maternity appointments alone, and, in some places, go through the first stages of labour without a birth partner, pubs were still seen as a priority. With the introduction of the second lockdown on 5 November, the government finally ceded and closed the pubs. But that it took so long for this decision to be taken speaks to the fear of a powerful public backlash. This fear seems warranted given the number of people who, anecdotally, decried the closures, emphasising there are many for whom a pub is their sole form of social interaction. While we must empathise with those facing isolation, we must also consider the wider implications that for many in the UK pubs are a main or only source of community. A look at the 2020 NHS national alcohol report shows that in 2018-2019 there were 358,000 admissions to hospital where the main issue involved alcohol, and in 2018 alone there were 5,698 alcohol-specific deaths.Related... Honestly, We've Never Felt This Tired, Despite Doing So Little We Need More Sleep, Less Screen Time. The Pandemic Is Messing With Both With numbers this high, the lack of sober spaces in the UK for people of all ages, as well as our culture’s penchant for boozy nights out should be considered a matter of public health. We should also consider those who make the brave decision to pursue recovery from alcohol addiction, and how terrifying it must be to find your local communal spaces a difficult place to be, if not entirely off-limits. The potential for alcohol abuse is not the only worrying feature of our pub-centred social lives either. In recent years, loneliness in the UK has become such a grave issue that it has been named an epidemic. Nearly half of us in England feel lonely “occasionally, sometimes or often”, according to figures that one can imagine must have worsened with the enforced the isolation of the coronavirus pandemic.  With researchers finding that loneliness can be as harmful as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, providing spaces where it’s easy to foster connections is vital, but do pubs promote the inclusion needed to fulfil a task of this size? The short answer is no. Besides those to whom pubs are already a complicated space because of their decision to remain sober, pubs also prove to be problematic for those of a certain age and gender. Along with the natural exclusion of those below the age of 18, a recent study shows that one in five women report feeling left out in pubs because of their gender, with a third of women stating that they feel pub environments are male-orientated. With the number of youth centres continuing to dwindle and safe spaces for women becoming increasingly important, these factors are a cause for concern.Related... Opinion: No, I Won't Be Baking Banana Bread This Lockdown – Or Doing Anything Else Another group that is too often overlooked in community planning is disabled people. Disability charity Euan’s Guide found that 36% of disabled people feel pubs and bars have typically poor or very poor accessibility, making the centralisation of pubs in the UK even more exclusionary. This lockdown, before we go back to “normal”, it’s vital that we reflect on the impact of so much of our culture being built around alcohol. With such high rates of alcohol-related illness and reported loneliness, it is a huge disservice to many people and puts public health at risk.If this government takes social wellbeing seriously, it needs to begin committing money and time to creating spaces that ensure the inclusion of a wider range of people, and help foster connection without encouraging potentially harmful behaviours. Jodie Hare is a freelance writer.More in Opinion... Opinion: Burnout Is Our Next Big Threat Opinion: Journalists' Mental Health Is In Crisis. And That Matters For All Of Us Opinion: No, I Won't Be Baking Banana Bread This Lockdown – Or Doing Anything Else Opinion: Veganism Is The Green Revolution. Boris Johnson Must Realise That
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Britain's Got A Drinking Problem. Lockdown Has Proved It
Britain’s drinking culture has long been an accepted part of our cultural celebrations, from buying your first pint on your 18th birthday, to binge drinking through your first week of university.  And the great British pub is still seen as the stalwart of our communities, with approximately 47,600 in operation. Drinking is about as close to a definable British culture as you can get. Yet, since 2012, more than 760 youth centres have been shut in the UK. And since austerity began in 2010, 773 libraries and 428 day centres, most frequently used by the elderly, have closed. Our sober spaces are being quietly and methodically exterminated. I’m by no means the first to question our national alcohol dependence. Many have examined Britain’s relationship with alcohol. But the coronavirus pandemic has thrown our bad habits into sharp relief. More than a quarter of people admitted to drinking more during the first lockdown in spring of this year.Related... Here Are The New Covid Rules For Pubs And The Science Behind Them This Is How The Government Will Decide What Lockdown Tier Your Area Will Be In What’s more, as access to vital public services closed across the UK – including in-person mental health support – pubs remained open. As rules came in that dictated weddings with more than 30 guests could no longer go ahead, you could still technically gather in any one of our drinking establishments. As pregnant women had to attend maternity appointments alone, and, in some places, go through the first stages of labour without a birth partner, pubs were still seen as a priority. With the introduction of the second lockdown on 5 November, the government finally ceded and closed the pubs. But that it took so long for this decision to be taken speaks to the fear of a powerful public backlash. This fear seems warranted given the number of people who, anecdotally, decried the closures, emphasising there are many for whom a pub is their sole form of social interaction. While we must empathise with those facing isolation, we must also consider the wider implications that for many in the UK pubs are a main or only source of community. A look at the 2020 NHS national alcohol report shows that in 2018-2019 there were 358,000 admissions to hospital where the main issue involved alcohol, and in 2018 alone there were 5,698 alcohol-specific deaths.Related... Honestly, We've Never Felt This Tired, Despite Doing So Little We Need More Sleep, Less Screen Time. The Pandemic Is Messing With Both With numbers this high, the lack of sober spaces in the UK for people of all ages, as well as our culture’s penchant for boozy nights out should be considered a matter of public health. We should also consider those who make the brave decision to pursue recovery from alcohol addiction, and how terrifying it must be to find your local communal spaces a difficult place to be, if not entirely off-limits. The potential for alcohol abuse is not the only worrying feature of our pub-centred social lives either. In recent years, loneliness in the UK has become such a grave issue that it has been named an epidemic. Nearly half of us in England feel lonely “occasionally, sometimes or often”, according to figures that one can imagine must have worsened with the enforced the isolation of the coronavirus pandemic.  With researchers finding that loneliness can be as harmful as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, providing spaces where it’s easy to foster connections is vital, but do pubs promote the inclusion needed to fulfil a task of this size? The short answer is no. Besides those to whom pubs are already a complicated space because of their decision to remain sober, pubs also prove to be problematic for those of a certain age and gender. Along with the natural exclusion of those below the age of 18, a recent study shows that one in five women report feeling left out in pubs because of their gender, with a third of women stating that they feel pub environments are male-orientated. With the number of youth centres continuing to dwindle and safe spaces for women becoming increasingly important, these factors are a cause for concern.Related... Opinion: No, I Won't Be Baking Banana Bread This Lockdown – Or Doing Anything Else Another group that is too often overlooked in community planning is disabled people. Disability charity Euan’s Guide found that 36% of disabled people feel pubs and bars have typically poor or very poor accessibility, making the centralisation of pubs in the UK even more exclusionary. This lockdown, before we go back to “normal”, it’s vital that we reflect on the impact of so much of our culture being built around alcohol. With such high rates of alcohol-related illness and reported loneliness, it is a huge disservice to many people and puts public health at risk.If this government takes social wellbeing seriously, it needs to begin committing money and time to creating spaces that ensure the inclusion of a wider range of people, and help foster connection without encouraging potentially harmful behaviours. Jodie Hare is a freelance writer.More in Opinion... Opinion: Burnout Is Our Next Big Threat Opinion: Journalists' Mental Health Is In Crisis. And That Matters For All Of Us Opinion: No, I Won't Be Baking Banana Bread This Lockdown – Or Doing Anything Else Opinion: Veganism Is The Green Revolution. Boris Johnson Must Realise That
UK News and Opinion - The Huffington Post...
Shirtless groom accidentally kicks bride in face during wedding lap dance
A bride has posted a video on TikTok of the moment her new husband "ruined our wedding" by heel-kicking her in the side of the head during a shirtless dance to the Magic Mike soundtrack
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Body found in search for missing fishermen after boat sinks in Channel
He was found in his bunk inside the wreck of the Joanna C fishing boat which sunk after being hit by a wave.
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Freddie Mercury had heartbreaking logic for not disclosing AIDS status publicly
Freddie Mercury told the world about his diagnosis just 24 hours before his tragic death age just 45 on November 24, 1991
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EastEnders spoilers: Killer Gray Atkins exposes violent true colours to Whitney Dean
The mask slips.
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Michael Owen makes Manchester United Champions League prediction
Manchester United are looking for revenge after defeat to Istanbul Basaksehir in the reverse fixture.
Manchester Evening News: Number one for...