Unai Emery delivers update on Mesut Ozil’s availability ahead of Arsenal’s clash against Burnley

He missed last weekend's match.
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China condemns US backing for pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong
You Wenze called the lawmakers' comments 'a gross violation of the spirit of the rule of law, a blatant double standard and a gross interference in China's internal affairs'.
Home | Daily Mail Online
Didcot cooling towers demolished in a controlled explosion
Thousands of homes lost power shortly after the three remaining cooling towers of Didcot power station near Oxford came down in a controlled explosion.
UK - BBC News
Katie Price reveals shocking surgery wounds after facelift ‘left kids in tears’
Katie previously admitted Princess and Junior have also struggled with the aftermath of surgery.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro
Netflix orders animated Elvis Presley spy series with Priscilla Presley serving as producer
This sounds pretty epic.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro
The cosy canalside family pub that exceeds expectations with cookie dough pies and two kids' courses for £5.95
It's what we'd expect to pay for a pub meal, but Astley's Old Boat House exceeds our expectations on everything else
Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip
Chelsea vs Leicester: Best bets for Sunday and Monday's Premier League games
Expert betting tips for Stamford Bridge showdown, plus Crystal Palace at Sheffield United and Monday night’s clash between Manchester United and Wolves
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Marcus Rashford and Anthony Martial must come of age and deliver 15 goals this season
Both must hit the goal trail this season after struggling for consistency for the last few campaigns
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Lucas Dobson missing: Desperate dad jumped into River Stour in effort to rescue son, 6,
The schoolboy has not been seen since 1.20pm on Saturday, when he plunged into the water in Kent
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Bury FC: Part of our family for four generations
Losing the League One club, which is in financial crisis, would be "pure grief" for the Turner family.
UK - BBC News
What Wilfried Zaha does next shapes his football career - and the rest of his life
What Crystal Palace star Zaha can either buckle down and have season of his life - or fade into oblivion
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Bangladesh fire leaves 10,000 homeless after blaze razes slum
Fire broke out in Dhaka’s Mirpur district on Friday, destroying almost 2,000 tin shacks, officials sayAt least 10,000 people are homeless after a massive fire swept through a crowded slum in the Bangladesh capital and destroyed thousands of shanties, officials said on Sunday.The fire broke out at in Dhaka’s Mirpur neighbourhood late on Friday and razed around 2,000 mostly tin shacks, fire services official Ershad Hossain said. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Suicide bomber kills 63 people at wedding in Afghanistan
A witness said the attacker set off the explosives near the stage where children had gathered to dance.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro
Romelu Lukaku hits back at fat jibes after Gary Neville dig
'Not bad for a fat boy'.
Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro
JT LeRoy review – a less surprising hoax the second time around
The fake author who fooled the publishing world is brought back to life in a diverting tale that treads familiar ground“Sometimes, a lie’s more truth than the truth,” drawls author JT Leroy, speaking down a crackling telephone line. This straightforward dramatisation of Savannah Knoop’s 2008 memoir Girl Boy Girl: How I Became JT LeRoy details the scandalous, six-year-long ruse created by Knoop (Kristen Stewart) and author Laura Albert (Laura Dern) in the early noughties. Jeremiah Terminator LeRoy wasn’t just Albert’s pseudonym; he was a full-blown literary persona with a salacious backstory of poverty and child abuse that made the teenager’s acclaimed semi-autobiographical novels appear more authentic.When Albert meets her boyfriend’s shy, androgynous sister Savannah, she sees an opportunity to realise the reclusive LeRoy (the hunched, shuffling Stewart is perfect casting) and turn him into a celebrity phenomenon. Albert styles herself as LeRoy’s mad British manager Speedie; magazine covers and multimillion dollar film adaptations follow. For those familiar with the story, this version of LeRoy’s rise and fall won’t offer new revelations. Still, Dern brings a hungry, manic energy to Albert, a sad and troubled woman who used LeRoy as a vehicle to process her own childhood trauma, while Stewart’s performance is typically interiorised and exacting. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Matthew Bourne’s Romeo and Juliet review – the thrilling shock of the new
Sadler’s Wells, LondonBourne and his superb dancers inject visceral new life into Shakespeare’s overworked tragedyYou’ve got to hand it to Matthew Bourne, choreographer extraordinaire. When most people sit down and think of Romeo and Juliet, images of warring families spring to mind. They might be in Shakespeare’s traditional version, or Kenneth MacMillan’s ballet, or Baz Luhrmann and Franco Zeffirelli’s films. Even if they’re living in a dystopia such as Mats Ek’s Romeo & Juliet or in the tougher boroughs of New York in West Side Story, the essential lineaments of the story of young lovers kept apart by the forces of society around them will remain the same.The wrenching shock of Bourne’s new version, set in the white-tiled Verona Institute, where groups of young people are drilled and drugged into conformist submission, is how huge a leap of imagination he has made. Just as Terry Davies’s reconfiguring of Prokofiev’s score makes the familiar sound strange and edgy, Bourne’s approach lets an overworked story take on a different life. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Jada Pinkett Smith: 'the word "wife": it's a golden cage, swallow the key'
She put her film career on hold and let husband Will Smith become a megastar. Now Jada Pinkett Smith’s candid chat show is opening up truthful conversations around kitchen tables everywhereImagine the scene. You’re a middle-aged woman, sitting around the table with your husband, your mother and your teenage daughter. Your husband is saying how hard he tried to give you the best 40th birthday party ever, and you didn’t even appreciate it. Then you announce that you never wanted to get married in the first place because marriage is a trap, but your mother forced you into it because you were pregnant. Grandma responds that this is news to her, but agrees that your wedding was horrible. Your daughter is just staring at all of you and saying wow a lot.Well, you don’t actually have to imagine it, because this is a real conversation that Hollywood stars Jada Pinkett Smith and her husband Will Smith had at home in Calabasas, California, with their daughter Willow and Jada’s mother Adrienne. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Meet the people trying to save enough to retire by 40
Followers of the Fire – Financial Independence, Retire Early – movement say it’s possible to amass enough cash to quit work and follow your dreams in mid-lifeFor many, it is an idea of heaven – shutting down the computer one last time and leaving the office in the full knowledge that you are financially stable enough never to have to return. And all at an age that most people would consider to be barely midway through their working life.But a growing movement is focused on just that: encouraging people towards a mixture of extreme saving, frugal living and smart investment that will allow them to stop working and put their feet up decades before their peers – in some cases, when they are still in their 30s. And the Financial Independence, Retire Early (Fire) doctrine claims that people do not need a six-figure salary to get there. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Edinburgh fringe roundup: the sound of fighting talk
Personal stories – of exile, homelessness, illness and existential terror – jostle for hearts and minds with farts and live bread-bakingIt will come as no great shock that much of the Edinburgh fringe is taken up with people talking about themselves, whether in standup or theatre, musicals, cabaret or even magic shows, a surprising conduit for narcissism. Occasionally this can feel like being trapped in a small corner of the pub with the resident barfly, which, let’s face it, is not so far from what it actually is. But there is plenty of raw truth-telling too, that swerves self-indulgence in favour of finding humanity and common ground.Nicola McCartney and Dritan Kastrati’s haunting How Not to Drown (Traverse) dramatises Kastrati’s own perilous journey to the UK from Albania when he was just 11 years old. While much of the early action focuses on the dangers of the route itself, the darkness of silent vans and the overstuffed boats, it is what happens next that lingers long after the play is over. Staged sparsely, with five performers – including Kastrati himself – deftly taking on around 50 roles, manoeuvring their bodies around a shifting wooden platform, its true power is in pulling apart the care system, and what care actually means when it comes without love. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Facial recognition is now rampant. The implications for our freedom are chilling | Stephanie Hare
This new technology is being secretly used on streets and in shopping centres across Britain, making potential suspects of us allLast week, all of us who live in the UK, and all who visit us, discovered that our faces were being scanned secretly by private companies and have been for some time. We don’t know what these companies are doing with our faces or how long they’ve been doing it because they refused to share this with the Financial Times, which reported on Monday that facial recognition technology is being used in King’s Cross and may be deployed in Canary Wharf, two areas that cover more than 160 acres of London.We are just as ignorant about what has been happening to our faces when they’re scanned by the property developers, shopping centres, museums, conference centres and casinos that have also been secretly using facial recognition technology on us, according to the civil liberties group Big Brother Watch. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Five simple ways to give your old smartphone a speed boost - revealed
Mobiles.co.uk has revealed five simple ways to boost your smartphone - including managing your apps and clearing cached data
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Inside Alexis Sanchez's disastrous 18 months at Manchester United
The Chilean has suffered a drastic decline since swapping Arsenal for United last year
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
My Manchester - with chef Gary Usher
Kala chef, Gary Usher, tells us his favourite foodie parts of Manchester
Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip
Anthony Martial praises Manchester United tactical change under Solskjaer
Man Utd forward Anthony Martial is enjoying playing as part of a new fluid attacking line under Ole Gunnar Solskjaer.
Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip
The 30 best films about music, chosen by musicians
Anna Calvi, Neil Tennant, Nadine Shah, Wayne Coyne, Nitin Sawhney and Anna Meredith pick their top five music moviesMovies about musicians, whether biopics, fictions or documentaries, are a fixture in cinema, but judging by the flurry of activity over the past 12 months – with acclaimed films about Aretha Franklin, Freddie Mercury and Elton John among others – we are in an uncommonly busy period, if not a flat-out golden age.Good news for music fans, but even better news for the music industry, where these films represent an increasingly vital revenue stream in an era of slumped record sales, bumping a band’s back catalogue and getting a new generation hooked on their work. Continue reading...
News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Nate Diaz's message to Conor McGregor after UFC 241 win over Anthony Pettis
Diaz dominated Pettis over three rounds before calling out Jorge Masvidal - and not McGregor
Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Novak Djokovic reacts to Cincinnati Masters defeat as Daniil Medvedev closes in on top-five debut
The Serb let a one-set lead slip.
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Metro.co.uk: News, Sport, Showbiz, Celebrities from Metro
The longest serving player at every Premier League club
There has been a lot of change at Premier League clubs over the summer - and some long-term servants have left their clubs
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Man City's summer transfer strategy might have given Kyle Walker a surprise boost
Manchester City added Joao Cancelo to the squad this summer which could give Kyle Walker a boost.
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Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip
Didcot power station: Last cooling towers demolished
The last three cooling towers at the Didcot A plant have been brought down in a controlled explosion.
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UK - BBC News
Kabul bombing: At least 63 killed and 182 injured after suicide bomb attack at wedding in Afghan capital
A suicide bombing at a crowded wedding party has killed at least 63 people and injured 182 more in the Afghan capital Kabul.
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London News | London Evening Standard - London's newspaper
How much money Lewis Hamilton earns for every Instagram post
The five-time F1 world champion is raking in a whopping wage via the social media platform
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Nate Diaz's surprise call-out after UFC 241 win over Anthony Pettis
Diaz cruised to victory over Pettis despite fighting for the first time in three years on Saturday night
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
'It was just weird and excruciating': Revisiting Quentin Tarantino's doomed, violent and quickly forgotten Broadway debut
Twenty-one years ago, Quentin Tarantino took the starring role in a Broadway play, and was promptly annihilated for it. Now, as Tarantino plots his retirement from filmmaking, Adam White revisits a long-forgotten pop culture mystery
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The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide News | Newspaper
Sex, lies, and videotape at 30: How Steven Soderbergh's erotic drama changed independent cinema forever
The button-pushing 1989 movie remains impossible to define, while laying the template for Soderbergh's wildly divergent directorial career in the aftermath, writes Kambole Campbell
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The Independent | News | UK and Worldwide News | Newspaper
Liam Hemsworth’s management ‘annoyed’ after split with Miley overshadows new film
The 29-year-old actor has allegedly refused to attend promotional events for 'The Killerman' in Los Angeles as he wants to remain in Australia to heal from a broken heart
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Corsica’s cape of good campsites
With cliffs and crags, views and sandy beaches, Cap Corse, which juts out from the top of the island, offers a perfect mobile home stay‘It’s like being in a car advert!” The corniche road along the western side of Cap Corse, the spiny promontory pointing north from the body of Corsica towards Genoa, must be one of Europe’s most dramatic drives. Cliff-hugging hairpin bends hurtle around rocky outcrops and across densely forested hillsides, with the sea seeming both unnervingly close and dizzyingly far below. The kids leaned with glee one way and I leaned the other; taxis casually overtook us; at one point a wild boar (or possibly tame pig) wandered into view round a bend, and at another metal struts and wooden planks carried the road over a landslide. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Behind the Screen review – inside the social media sweatshops
Sarah T Roberts’s vital new study demonstrates how online content moderation is a global industry that operates on the back of human exploitation“All human life is there” used to be the proudest boast of the (mercifully) defunct News of the World. Like everything else in that organ, it wasn’t true: the NoW specialised in randy vicars, chorus girls, Tory spankers, pools winners, C-list celebrities and other minority sports. But there is a medium to which the slogan definitely applies – it’s called the internet.The best metaphor for the net is to think of it as a mirror held up to human nature. All human life really is there. There’s no ideology, fetish, behaviour, obsession, perversion, eccentricity or fad that doesn’t find expression somewhere online. And while much of what we see reflected back to us is uplifting, banal, intriguing, harmless or fascinating, some of it is truly awful, for the simple reason that human nature is not only infinitely diverse but also sometimes unspeakably cruel. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
The week in TV: Succession; Deep Water; Kathy Burke’s All Woman and more – review
Brian Cox bosses the screen, and his family, as Succession returns, while ITV’s new Lake District drama intriguesSuccession | Sky AtlanticDeep Water (ITV) | ITV HubKathy Burke’s All Woman (Channel 4) | All 4The Chefs’ Brigade (BBC Two) | iPlayerRemarkable Places to Eat (BBC Two) | iPlayerSuccession burst back on to our screens with a vengeance: chiefly, of course, Logan Roy’s. The billionaire media mogul, the part Dundee’s own Brian Cox was perhaps born to play, is, if not exactly relishing the comeuppance of his squirrelly, treasonous son Kendall – who had something of a Chappaquiddick moment at the close of the first series – not shedding hot salt tears at the turn of events either. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Spinning conspiracy theories won’t help us prevent another Chernobyl | Serhii Plokhy
Despite the TV show and the author’s landmark book, the truth about Chernobyl is still contestedDid it really happen? Was it really so bad? Is it true that they were so unprepared? These are the questions I have heard the past few months in connection with the stunning success of the miniseries Chernobyl. It brought to life the tragedy of people who lived through, were affected by and, yes, caused the world’s worst nuclear disaster.My book Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy, published in May 2018, one year before the broadcast of the miniseries, tells the story of the disaster on the basis of recently released archival documents, which I checked against people’s diaries, memoirs and interviews. Thus, on the factual level, I can provide some answers to the accuracy of the miniseries. But inquiries I’ve received in the past few months also made me think about the bigger question of what is true in our current understanding of the Chernobyl disaster, its causes, development and consequences. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
Reader, I downloaded him: boom times for the literary long listen
Whether on Radio 4 or Amazon Audible, the appetite for classic works in audio form has never been greaterFour hours of Beatrix Potter, 10 hours of Marcel Proust, or 72 hours of Sherlock Holmes. How about every single word of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and George Eliot’s Silas Marner? Sound overwhelming? Radio bosses clearly think not – so much so they have commissioned a plethora of literary adaptations to delight growing numbers of fans of “the long listen”.“There is an appetite for the epic that has simply surpassed our expectations,” says Celia De Wolff, who has produced and directed a marathon adaptation of Marcel Proust’s In Search of Lost Time, to be broadcast over three days this bank holiday weekend on Radio 4. A seven-volume epic published between 1913 and 1927 may not seem an obvious choice for contemporary audiences short on time but rich in entertainment options, but a fast-growing audience is transforming the industry. Continue reading...
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News, sport and opinion from the Guardian's UK edition | The Guardian
What Sir Alex Ferguson said to Man Utd dressing room after Sergio Aguero goal robbed them of title
Manchester United were on the wrong end of one of the most dramatic endings to a Premier League season back in 2012
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Ruby Wax believes her kids think she's "creepy friend who f**ks up all the time"
Comic and TV star Ruby Wax, 66, on her ‘odd’ upbringing, giving her family nightmares, and the realities of getting older...
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
Mum who binged after son was born drops 3 dress sizes after swallowing a balloon
Elipse, the first swallowable gastric balloon, promises to be an easier alternative to traditional weightloss surgery - and Valeria Rebeque de Brityo, 42, from Surrey, tried it out
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Mirror Online: The intelligent tabloid. #madeuthink
The 70-year love story dementia won't destroy
"They are just such a lovely, caring couple who taught us so many things and grounded us so well"
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Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip
How Fred's Manchester United chances improved over the summer
Man Utd midfielder Fred has struggled for game time but he has been given the perfect opportunity to shine this season.
2 h
Manchester Evening News: Number one for news, opinion, sport & celebrity gossip