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Woody Williams, the last surviving WWII Medal of Honor recipient dies at 98
As a young Marine corporal, Williams went ahead of his unit during the Battle of Iwo Jima in the Pacific Ocean in February 1945 and eliminated a series of Japanese machine gun positions.
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Giuliani associate Lev Parnas is sentenced to 20 months in prison
Lev Parnas, an associate of Rudy Giuliani who was a figure in President Donald Trump's first impeachment investigation, was sentenced Wednesday for fraud and campaign finance crimes.
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Many Pakistanis dig the cultural nods on 'Ms. Marvel' but are mixed on casting
Pakistanis weigh in on the new Disney+ show, which features the story of Kamala Khan, a Pakistani American teen who discovers her superpowers in her grandmother's bangle.
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The abortion ruling has forced progressives to confront past missteps in strategy
Conservatives long understood that the courts were key to reversing Roe v. Wade. By contrast, progressives found defending abortion rights an increasingly difficult challenge.
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Marlin Briscoe, the 1st Black starting quarterback in the AFL, dies at 76
The Nebraska native was a star quarterback for Omaha University before the Denver Broncos drafted him as a cornerback in the 14th round in 1968. He wasn't allowed to compete for the QB job in 1969.
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Pelosi receives Communion in the Vatican, despite her home archbishop refusing it
The head of the church in San Francisco has said the House Speaker can't receive the sacrament there because of her abortion rights support, but Pope Francis has avoided politicizing the Eucharist.
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We asked 5 students: What inspired you to become a gun control activist?
NPR spoke with high school and college students who have been impacted by gun violence, and are now working to make sure others won't be.
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A journalist says the Philippines is shutting down her critical news site
Maria Ressa, the first Filipino recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize,
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Job cuts are rolling in. Here's who is feeling the most pain so far
Tesla, JPMorgan, Netflix, Redfin and Coinbase are among companies that are cutting jobs. While layoffs are contained to the hottest parts of the economy, there's fear they could spread elsewhere.
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The end of Roe has implications for abortion rights around the globe
International rights groups have long warned that overturning Roe v. Wade could weaken abortion rights in other countries, potentially leading some nations to adopt new restrictive laws.
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Who's to blame for inflation? We fact check some common claims
As many Americans continue to struggle financially because of inflation, we set out to clear the air on some common claims about what's going on.
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Dogs are sniffing out disease in animals vital to traditions of the Blackfeet tribe
Montana's Blackfeet Nation is experimenting with a new way to detect chronic wasting disease in animals and toxic substances in plants used by tribal members for food and cultural practices.
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War in Ukraine is driving demand for Africa's natural gas. That's controversial
The African natural gas industry is booming as Europe looks to replace Russian supplies. But some worry new African gas projects don't make financial sense in a warming world.
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On Martha's Vineyard, tribal elders work to restore land to its pre-colonial state
On the island of Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts, members of the Aquinnah Wampanoag tribe are trying to restore land to the way it looked, smelled and sounded pre-colonialism.
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With Roe overturned, state constitutions are now at the center of the abortion fight
In a sense, what was one battleground has become 50, as advocates on both sides of the abortion issue race to put the issue before state constitutions. Half a dozen lawsuits are already in court.
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Americans are deeply divided on transgender rights, a poll shows
An NPR/Ipsos poll shows a stark partisan split on laws that prevent transgender youth from accessing medical care for gender transition.
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Whale entanglements may be dropping but the threat remains, feds say
Entanglement in fishing gear is one of the two biggest threats to declining species of whales, along with collisions with ships.
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Airbnb officially bans parties at its listings in a new policy
The company temporarily banned parties in August 2020 to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus.
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The school at the center of the Uvalde, Texas, shooting will be rebuilt
The school will be demolished so "students and staff will not have to return to the building at the site of the tragedy," the district said.
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The first woman speaker of France's parliament defends the right to abortion
The National Assembly elects Yael Braun-Pivet as speaker as it prepares to tackle proposals on fighting inflation and enshrining abortion rights in the French Constitution.
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The U.S. will offer nearly 300,000 doses of monkeypox vaccine in the coming weeks
The Department of Health and Human Services will make 296,000 doses available in the coming weeks, and expects a total of 1.6 million doses to be available in the U.S. by the end of the year.
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Trump's legal exposure may be growing – and 4 other takeaways from the Jan. 6 hearing
Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson testified under oath about a volatile and angry president who was prone to throwing dishes, knew that supporters were armed and didn't want the riot to stop.
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A passenger recounts the moment the Amtrak train derailed: 'It was hell on Earth'
A passenger on board the Amtrak train that crashed into a truck and derailed in Missouri on Monday, killing four people, has described the harrowing moment when his carriage rolled.
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FDA advisers recommend updating COVID booster shots for the fall
The Food and Drug Administration will have to decide the exact recipe, but a combination shot is expected that adds protection against a version of the omicron variant to the original vaccine.
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Despite heavy criticism, Gov. Stitt is the favorite to win the Oklahoma GOP primary
In Oklahoma, state Superintendent Joy Hofmeister switched parties to run against Gov. Kevin Stitt who fiercely opposes abortion rights, defends gun rights and is endorsed by former President Trump.
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The Supreme Court has delayed creating a majority Black voting district in Louisiana
After a lower court found Louisiana's new congressional maps diluted the votes of Black voters, the Supreme Court put on hold an order for a second majority Black congressional district to be created.
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With 50 people dead in Texas, here's what you should know about migrant smuggling
The trapped people were found after a worker heard someone crying for help. Two experts — one a former Homeland Security Investigations agent — tell NPR how it happened.
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Trump didn't want to stop Capitol attack, former White House aide testifies
Former Mark Meadows aide Cassidy Hutchinson recalls exchange between her boss and White House Counsel Pat Cipollone, who warned "Somebody is going to die and this is going to be on your effing hands."
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Ghislaine Maxwell is sentenced to 20 years in prison
"Today's sentence holds Ghislaine Maxwell accountable for perpetrating heinous crimes against children," U.S. Attorney Damian Williams said in a tweeted statement.
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Witness recalls Trump lunging for the wheel when told he couldn't go to the Capitol
Former President Donald Trump lunged for the steering wheel and grabbed his driver after being told that he would not be going to the Capitol with his supporters after his rally on Jan. 6
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