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People With Severe COVID-19 Have Higher Risk Of Long-Term Effects, Study Finds
The study's author says he was shocked to find the toll of long COVID was so substantial and multifaceted: "When you put it all together ... it's actually quite jarring."
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Overdose Deaths Surged In Pandemic, As More Drugs Were Laced With Fentanyl
Researchers say cocaine, meth and other street drugs are increasingly contaminated with deadly synthetic opioids, contributing to a major spike in deaths.
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Oklahoma Law Grants Immunity To Drivers Who Unintentionally Harm Protesters
The new law also makes blocking public roadways a misdemeanor offense.
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Psychologist Examines What A 'Rapid Evolution' In Policing Might Look Like
Yale professor Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff co-founded the Center for Policing Equity, which collects data on police behavior from 18,000 law enforcement agencies across the country.
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Countering Biden, Senate Republicans Unveil Smaller $568 Billion Infrastructure Plan
The five-year spending outline is much more narrowly focused on traditional infrastructure than the president's sweeping proposal.
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How Israel Persuaded Reluctant Ultra-Orthodox Jews To Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19
As anti-vaccine sentiment spread among ultra-Orthodox Jews, officials waged an aggressive campaign against rumors and hesitancy. Today, 80% of ultra-Orthodox adults over age 30 are vaccinated.
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How India Went From A Ray Of Hope To A World Record For Most COVID Cases In A Day
India's COVID-19 caseload plummeted to record lows in February. Now a startling spike is causing health systems — and law and order — to break down. What went wrong?
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'He Was A Prince': Grief And Anger At Daunte Wright's Funeral In Minneapolis
Mourners gathered to pay their respects to Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black man shot dead by a police officer in Brooklyn Center, Minn., earlier this month.
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U.S. Issues More Than 115 'Do Not Travel' Advisories, Citing Risks From COVID-19
Just a week ago, only 33 countries were on the U.S. Do Not Travel list. New additions include Canada, Mexico, Germany, the U.K., and dozens of other countries.
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House Democrats Pass Bill To Make D.C. The 51st State
The effort to make Washington, D.C. the 51st star on the U.S. flag has never had more support. But the measure's fate in the Senate is uncertain.
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'It Didn't Change': North Carolina Town Demands Answers After Another Fatal Shooting
Residents of Elizabeth City, N.C., are pressing for answers after a Black man, Andrew Brown Jr., was shot dead by a sheriff's deputy carrying out a search warrant on Wednesday.
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What Does Vaccine Inequality Look Like? See Chart
Namibia's president says disparate global rates of vaccination represent "COVID apartheid." When you compare percent of people vaccinated in the most populous countries, you can understand his ire.
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State Foster Care Agencies Take Millions Of Dollars Owed To Children In Their Care
In at least 36 states and the District of Columbia, child welfare agencies use a child's benefit checks to offset the cost of foster care, often leaving them with a tattered safety net as adults.
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Biden Makes New Pledge For U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A 50% Cut
The president will begin a climate summit by announcing that the United States will aim to cut its greenhouse gas emissions in half, based on 2005 levels, by the end of the decade.
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Democrats Ask Justice Barrett To Recuse In Case Involving Nonprofit Donor Privacy
The case involves a conservative nonprofit with ties to a Koch brothers-founded group that gave at least $1 million to fund a campaign to win Senate confirmation of her Supreme Court nomination.
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Boulder Supermarket Shooting Suspect Faces Dozens Of New Charges
Prosecutors amended the criminal complaint against Ahmad Al Aliwi Alissa Wednesday to include more than 40 new charges.
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At Least 1,700 Protesters In Russia Arrested After Nationwide Anti-Putin Rallies
Demonstrators demanded the release from prison of Kremlin-critic Alexei Navalny, who has been on a hunger strike for three weeks. The marches swept across dozens of cities.
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Civil Rights Attorney Vanita Gupta Confirmed As Associate Attorney General
The 51-49 vote elevates Gupta to the No. 3 position inside the Justice Department, where she's expected to help shape the administration's efforts to reform policing.
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A 'Relic' And 'Burden': Manhattan District Attorney To Stop Prosecuting Prostitution
Cyrus Vance Jr. announced the new policy on Wednesday and appeared virtually in court to seek the dismissal of more than 5,000 prostitution-related cases dating back to the 1970s.
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FDA Inspection Finds Numerous Problems At Facility Intended To Make J&J Vaccine
The report on Emergent BioSolutions' Baltimore factory found an array of problems, from peeling paint to inadequate measures to prevent cross-contamination. Manufacturing at the facility is on hold.
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Activist: Convictions In George Floyd's Death Could Represent 'A Huge Paradigm Shift'
"It would have been unimaginable just even a month ago that something like that was possible," activist and civil rights lawyer Nekima Levy Armstrong says following Derek Chauvin's murder conviction.
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Masks Remain Extremely Effective Indoors, But Are They Necessary Outside?
Unless people are packed together, "there really just is not much spread happening outdoors," Ashish Jha of Brown University's School of Public Health says.
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On Climate, U.S. And China Pledge Cooperation, But Competition Will Also Be Prominent
Bilateral ties are at a low and while Washington and Beijing agreed on climate cooperation, details are unclear. Competition with China is key to the Biden administration's response to climate change.
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Where Efforts To Overhaul Policing Stand In Congress After Chauvin Verdict
The guilty verdict against Derek Chauvin has added new urgency around long-stalled talks on legislation to ban chokeholds and end qualified immunity for police. But the path remains far from clear.
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Germany Grapples With Racism After Threats Derail Refugee's Candidacy For Parliament
The first Syrian refugee has withdrawn his candidacy because of racist abuse and death threats. The news was announced the same week a German comedian did a TV sketch about the election in blackface.
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The Secret Mission To Unearth Part of A 142-Year-Old Experiment
Scientists in Michigan went out in the dead of night to dig up part of an unusual long-term experiment. It's a research study that started in 1879 and is handed from one generation to the next.
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What's Next In The Trials Of 4 Former Police Officers Over George Floyd's Murder
Derek Chauvin is scheduled to be sentenced in June. Later this summer, his three fellow former officers are slated to go on trial for aiding and abetting murder.
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Darnella Frazier, Teen Who Filmed Floyd's Murder, Praised For Making Verdict Possible
Frazier is being hailed for her bravery and quick thinking in recording the video that has been seen by millions and played a key role in former police officer Derek Chauvin's trial.
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Governors Urge Biden To Order 100% Zero-Emission Car Sales By 2035
In a letter to the president, 12 governors asked that the White House order a ban on greenhouse gas-emitting cars and light trucks within 14 years.
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DOJ To Investigate Minneapolis Police For Possible Patterns Of Excessive Force
Attorney General Merrick Garland announced the inquiry a day after a jury convicted former officer Dereck Chauvin on murder charges for the death of George Floyd.
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