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ABC's 'Stumptown' canceled after Season 2 renewal due to scheduling issues in COVID-19-upended year

ABC canceled 'Stumptown' after renewing it, citing timing issues in a production season upset by COVID-19. Its studio is seeking a new home for it.       
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Lawmakers mourn the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday at the age of 87.
cbsnews.com
‘I Think Our Goal Is Worthy for Everyone in Thailand.’ Meet the Lawyer Trying to Reform the Thai Monarchy
“I want my daughter to grow up in a society where she can enjoy her freedom," says 36-year-old Arnon Nampa
time.com
RBG's death means Republican senators will face the ultimate test of their loyalty to Trump
The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday -- followed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's statement that "Trump's nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate" -- creates a stark choice for the 52 GOP senators that boils down to this: Just how loyal are you to President Donald Trump?
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William Barr commemorates Ginsburg, says she 'leaves a towering legacy'
Attorney General William Barr offered his condolences Friday after Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death, praising her as leading "one of the great lives in the history of American law."
foxnews.com
Biden: 'The voters should pick the president, and the president should pick the justice'
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Ginsburg’s death jolts chaotic presidential race as both sides prepare for Supreme Court battle
Top Republicans signal push to vote on new justice nominated by Trump, while Biden and other Democrats say the decision should be delayed until after Inauguration Day.
washingtonpost.com
'She never failed': Reaction to the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Even as they mourn Ginsburg's death, officials at the White House and on Capitol Hill began thinking about the process of filling her seat.        
usatoday.com
Joe Biden mourns Ruth Bader Ginsburg and says she shouldn't be replaced until after the election
Democratic presidential nominee and former Vice President Joe Biden mourned the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday and demanded that voters dictate the next president before her replacement is chosen.
edition.cnn.com
Trump: Biden will make Minnesota ‘refugee camp’ of Ilhan Omars
President Trump on Friday said that Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden would turn Minnesota into a “refugee camp” full of people like Rep. Ilhan Omar. “Sleepy Joe will turn Minnesota into a refugee camp,” Trump told a large rally in Bemidji, northern Minnesota. Trump, who narrowly lost Minnesota in 2016, called the scandal-plagued Minneapolis Democrat...
nypost.com
Joe Biden urges holding off on Ruth Bader Ginsburg replacement until after election
Democratic presidential contender Joe Biden is urging that Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat not be filled until after voters choose the next president. Ginsburg’s death at age 87 was announced Friday night by the Supreme Court. “Just so there is no doubt, let me be clear: The voters should pick a president and that president should...
nypost.com
Joe Biden thinks whoever is sworn in this January should pick Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s replacement
Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks to reporters about the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg upon arrival at New Castle County Airport after a trip to Duluth, Minnesota, on September 18, 2020, in New Castle, Delaware. | Drew Angerer/Getty Images “The voters should pick the president, and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider.” Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden told reporters Friday night that he thinks a new Supreme Court justice should not be confirmed to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg until after the November presidential election is held and the president inaugurated. “There is no doubt — let me be clear: The voters should pick the president, and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider,” Biden told reporters following news of Ginsburg’s death. “This was the position the Republican Senate took in 2016 when there were almost 10 months to go before the election. That’s the position the United States Senate must take today, and the election is only 46 days off.” .@JoeBiden: "She practiced the highest American ideals as a Justice. Equality and justice under the law. Ruth Bader Ginsburg stood for all of us."On #SCOTUS process: "The voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider." pic.twitter.com/fg4czmmObE— CSPAN (@cspan) September 19, 2020 Biden, the former chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee who oversaw numerous confirmation hearings for US Supreme Court justices — including Ginsburg’s — said that the average confirmation process for a justice takes around 70 days. With the November election fast approaching, Biden said he thinks the Senate must take a pause. “They should do this with full consideration, and that is my hope and expectation of what will happen,” Biden said. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has already made it clear he does not plan to pause, and that whoever President Trump picks to replace Ginsburg will get a Senate floor vote. “President Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate,” he said in a statement, though he did not specify when this potential vote is expected to take place. Given how close the election currently is, it’s possible Republicans could attempt to confirm a new justice before November or conduct the vote during the lame-duck session that Congress will hold later in the year. Even if Trump loses the election in November, or Republicans lose their Senate majority, Biden and a new Congress wouldn’t take over until January, leaving the GOP a window of time when they could act on the vacancy. McConnell’s position in 2020 is opposite from his stance when President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court in March 2016. During Garland’s confirmation process, McConnell took the position that a Supreme Court justice should not be confirmed during a presidential election year. Biden added he learned of Justice Ginsburg’s death aboard a flight from a campaign event in Minnesota. “It was my honor to preside over her confirmation hearings, and to strongly support her accession to the Supreme Court,” Biden said. “In the decades since, she was consistently and reliably the voice that pierced to the heart of every issue, protected the constitutional rights of every American, and never failed in the fierce and unflinching defense of liberty and freedom. Her opinions, and her dissents, will continue to shape the basis of our law for future generations.” Help keep Vox free for all Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.
vox.com
'She never failed.' Biden and Trump react to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death
President Trump and Joe Biden react to Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death, calling the Supreme Court justice 'amazing' and 'a voice for freedom.'
latimes.com
Murkowski, prior to Ginsburg passing, said she 'would not vote' to confirm a nominee to Supreme Court before election
Before Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away on Friday, Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski said in an interview this week that she “would not vote” to confirm a nominee to the High Court ahead of the 2020 presidential election.
foxnews.com
Pac-12 plans to make decision on football season next week
Pac-12 presidents and chancellors intend to meet Thursday to determine whether the football season will begin before Jan. 1.
latimes.com
Biden says voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice
The Democratic presidential nominee said the focus for the next few days should be Ruth Bader Ginsburg's legacy.
cbsnews.com
Biden pays tribute to late Supreme Court Justice
Former US Vice President Joe Biden has paid to tribute to the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her enduring legacy. (Sept. 18)       
usatoday.com
Ruth Bader Ginsburg's operatic western escape: Santa Fe
RBG loved Santa Fe for its opera and skies.
latimes.com
Brit Hume warns of 'brutal and divisive' confirmation battle over Ruth Bader Ginsburg replacement
Senate Republicans should think long and hard about moving forward with confirming a replacement for late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg with the country deeply divided ahead of the November election, Fox News senior political analyst Brit Hume said Friday.
foxnews.com
What Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death means for the Supreme Court’s Obamacare case
Mourners gather at the Supreme Court after news of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death. Her passing has serious implications for the upcoming case on Obamacare. | Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images Is Obamacare doomed without Ruth Bader Ginsburg? Not quite. The Affordable Care Act is coming before the Supreme Court in November — and this time, with no Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg there to protect the law. Ginsburg, who was appointed to the Court by President Bill Clinton in 1993 and served until her death on Friday, voted to uphold the law in 2012. Along with the three other liberal justices and Chief Justice John Roberts, she saved Obamacare then from a legal challenge that would have invalidated the law entirely. But now another challenge, a sequel of sorts to that 2012 case, will be heard by a Court without Ginsburg on it. A consortium of Republican-led states have sued again to overturn the ACA completely. In 2012, Roberts sided with the liberal justices including Ginsburg and ruled that the law’s individual mandate penalty could stand because it was a legitimate use of Congress’s taxing power. Now, because a GOP-controlled Congress repealed the penalty in their 2017 tax law, the Republican states argue Roberts’s rationale from 2012 no longer applies and the ACA must fall. It was assumed in Washington, up until Friday, that Obamacare would probably be safe because the same five votes that preserved it in 2012 were still on the bench. But now, with Ginsburg’s death, that is no longer true. There is a lot of uncertainty about what happens next, but the bottom line is this: The ACA is much more at risk of being overturned today than it was the day before. “It’s a much more significant possibility than it was,” Nicholas Bagley, a University of Michigan law professor who worked in the Obama administration, told me. “I’m much more worried about the ACA than I was two hours ago.” The consequences of the Court overturning Obamacare would be severe: The Medicaid expansion and the insurance marketplaces that cover 25 million people would be nullified, the protections for people with preexisting conditions would be voided. Overnight, the US health care system would be thrown into chaos. However, that worst-case scenario is not a given even after Ginsburg’s passing. There are matters of court procedure and the substance of the case that could still save the ACA. First, the procedure: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is promising to hold a vote on President Donald Trump’s nominee to replace Ginsburg, but he hasn’t set a timeline for that vote. Bagley told me that convention dictates justices should not rule on cases they did not hear the oral arguments for. The Senate holding its hearings and voting on a Court nominee before November 10, the scheduled date for the ACA arguments, seems unlikely if not impossible. If a new justice won’t be confirmed before oral arguments, the current Court has two choices. One, they could choose to postpone oral arguments. But that would require five votes, and such a consensus could be difficult to come by on a closely divided Court, with nobody certain how the incoming justice will rule. The other option is to hear the case as scheduled and have eight justices decide the outcome. If there was a 4-4 tie, the decision of the lower courts would hold. In this case, that means a federal district court judge would be asked to decide what other parts of the law must also fall if the mandate is overturned. Those could include the law’s rules banning insurers from denying people coverage or charging them higher premiums because of their medical history. So the litigation would, in a certain sense, start over, and the same case would likely end up back before the Supreme Court in another year or two. However, some of the legal experts I spoke with believe the lawsuit will still be heard in November and Obamacare ultimately upheld even without Ginsburg on the bench. Why? As Bagley put it: “This lawsuit is profoundly dumb, and that matters a lot.” That is not a partisan position either. Jonathan Adler, a libertarian law professor at Case Western Reserve University, told me in 2018 he thought the Republican states’ argument was “absurd.” The case turns on the complicated legal concept of “severability”: If one provision in a law is invalidated by a court, can the rest of it stand without it? Texas is arguing that the individual mandate is so central to Obamacare that if it is unconstitutional, then the rest of the law is too. Courts usually decide that question by looking at Congress’s intent — and that’s where the conservative case falls apart. It is actually quite simple, legal scholars say: Congress passed a law, the tax legislation, repealing the individual mandate and leaving the insurance protections in place. So, clearly, Congress intendedin the tax bill to eliminate the mandate penalty while keeping the ACA’s insurance reforms. That is exactly what the tax law they just passed does. Adler told me Friday night that he thought there were still five or six votes on the Supreme Court who would rule that even if the mandate is now unconstitutional, the rest of the law is severable from it and should therefore be upheld. Justice Brett Kavanaugh is believed to be sympathetic to that argument, based on some recent decisions, though that remains to be seen. Nevertheless, Adler said, a new vacancy on the Supreme Court “shouldn’t affect the outcome” of the ACA case. That could very well end up being true. Legal experts have long been dubious about the merits of the lawsuit. But right now, in the hours after the world learned Ginsburg had died, the future looks a little less certain. Help keep Vox free for all Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.
vox.com
Trump isn’t likely to shrink from Supreme Court fight in election year: Goodwin
If you thought the presidential election was already too hot and too nasty, brace yourself. You ain’t seen nothing yet. The mourning for Ruth Bader Ginsburg had barely started when the first political shots were fired. At 7:51 pm, about 15 minutes after news broke of her death, Sen. Chuck Schumer tweeted his demand that...
nypost.com
Politicians and Pundits Offer Their Final Farewells to Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Former President Bill Clinton said of Ginsburg, "[She] exceeded even my highest expectations when I appointed her."
newsweek.com
Former UFC heavyweight champion Frank Mir signs with Bare Knuckle FC
Frank Mir's MMA days might be over, but his combat sports career isn't.        Related StoriesFormer UFC heavyweight champion Frank Mir signs with Bare Knuckle FC - EnclosureSee the UFC 253 poster that features a championship doubleheaderCage Warriors 114's Jake Hadley says he's ready to 'run through' UFC's best at 125 pounds 
usatoday.com
Ruth Bader Ginsburg's last wish: 'I will not be replaced until a new president is installed'
Ruth Bader Ginsburg gave uttered her wish to her granddaughter, Clara Spera, days before she died, according to NPR.       
usatoday.com
Trump has been eager to nominate Ginsburg's replacement, source says
President Donald Trump has been "salivating" to nominate a replacement for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg even before her death on Friday, a source close to the President told CNN.
edition.cnn.com
The Reasons Conservatives Say They Need to Replace RBG Before the Election
Tucker Carlson said he would "choose not to believe" reporting about RBG’s final wish.
slate.com
Here’s who might succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death on Friday at 87 is sure to spark a battle over who will fill her seat. Here are some of the judges who could be in line to succeed her on the high court, should President Trump choose to nominate someone: Amy Coney Barrett A judge on the...
nypost.com
Man asks to see diamond rings, grabs them, runs 
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Several cars hit by gunfire at Waffle House
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This affordable Yamaha soundbar delivers warm audio—and it's on sale
Soundbar deals hunters will want to check out this discount on a great Yamaha soundbar with a built-in subwoofer—get the details.       
usatoday.com
Americans Mourn the Passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg at 87
"Ruthie was my friend and I will miss her terribly."
slate.com
What does an Emmy drive-through festival look like? Scroll to see our photos
Debbie Durkin organized a drive-through event where nominees and invitees can celebrate the 2020 Emmy Awards in the driveway of the Beverly Hilton Hotel.
latimes.com
Top Judiciary Dem Feinstein: RBG successor should 'under no circumstances' be confirmed before inauguration
Senate Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein said that "under no circumstances" should the Senate confirm late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's successor before the January presidential inauguration.
foxnews.com
Trump Reacts To Justice Ginsburg's 'Amazing Life' On Tarmac After Rally
"She led an amazing life, what else can you say?" Trump told reporters after they told him Ruth Bader Ginsburg had died. "Whether you agreed or not — she was an amazing woman who led an amazing life."
npr.org
David Ortiz admits he had Covid-19, but was asymptomatic
The baseball legend says he was asymptomatic, but his brother "had it really bad."
edition.cnn.com
Trump: Justice Ginsburg was "an amazing woman"
President Donald Trump says the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was "an amazing woman" who led an "amazing life." (Sept. 18)       
usatoday.com
What we know about a possible Senate vote to replace Justice Ginsburg
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell promised that he would hold a vote on President Trump’s nominee to replace Justice Ginsburg. | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Here’s what key Republican senators have said, and how the timeline could play out. The question of whether President Donald Trump will get to fill the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat this year — either before the election or even after it, if he should lose — is entirely up to Senate Republicans. There are 53 Republican senators. Confirmation of a nominee would take 50 Senate votes, plus a tiebreaker vote from Vice President Mike Pence. Democrats are likely to remain united in opposition to any Trump effort to fill the seat, but they can’t stop the GOP by themselves. They’d need to convince at least four Republican senators join them — to agree to let the winner of the next election fill Ginsburg’s seat. Justice Ginsburg said days before her death that her “most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,” according to NPR. But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Friday that President Trump’s nominee to replace Ginsburg “will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.” There are two main possibilities for when he’d hold such a vote — before the election or in the lame-duck period after it stretching from November to January. Either option would be controversial, but the latter would be particularly so if Biden wins and if Republicans lose their Senate majority; Republicans would effectively be thumbing their noses at the election results. As it so happens, a few GOP senators are on the record saying they would oppose filling a Supreme Court vacancy this year. (The question has often been posed given McConnell’s refusal to hold a vote to replace Justice Antonin Scalia after he died in 2016, while Barack Obama was still president.) But, of course, those assurances were given when the question was hypothetical, and it’s far from clear whether these senators will stick to them in the face of what’s certain to be intense pressure from the right. The Senate math Most recently, earlier Friday (before the news broke), Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) reportedly told Alaska Public Media that she wouldn’t vote to confirm any new justice until after Americans decide who the next president will be. Last month, Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) told the New York Times’s Jonathan Martin that she would not vote to confirm a new justice in October because that would be “too close” to November’s election. She added that, should Trump lose, she wouldn’t vote to confirm a new justice in the lame-duck session, either. Both Murkowski and Collins are known for defecting from their party on certain key votes (though not others, like on impeachment) — for instance, together with the late Sen. John McCain, they derailed President Trump’s effort to repeal Obamacare in 2017. Next on the list of possible GOP defections would likely be Sen. Mitt Romney (R-UT), who has clashed with President Trump and expressed concern about political norms. But Romney does not appear to have said what he’ll do in this situation. His office told CNN he wouldn’t comment on the timing of a vote Friday. Even if Collins, Murkowski, and Romney did all commit to let the winner of the election pick the nominee (a scenario that is far from a sure thing), that wouldn’t be enough — Democrats need a fourth vote, and finding one could be very difficult indeed. In 2018, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) said, “If an opening comes in the last year of president Trump’s term and the primary process has started, we’ll wait to the next election.” But this May, Graham changed his tune, suggesting that a hypothetical vacancy this year would be “a different situation” from the Scalia vacancy. Graham is the chair of the Judiciary Committee and will have a major role in determining how this plays out. Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) has said that, if he was still Judiciary Committee chair, he wouldn’t hold a hearing on a nominee this year. But that statement is meaningless, because Graham has succeeded him as the committee chair. Grassley has not committed to vote against any nominee. Another possibility would be the retiring Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN), but he is a close McConnell ally. For another high-profile vote this year — whether to call witnesses at President Trump’s impeachment trial — he ended up siding with McConnell. The possible timeline of a vote to fill Justice Ginsburg’s seat There are also a few wrinkles with the timeline for when such a vote would be held. The simplest possibility would be for McConnell to hold a vote before the November 3 election. However, in his statement promising a floor vote on Trump’s nominee, he did not commit to that timeline. There’s much speculation that McConnell might prefer to keep the seat open to boost Republican turnout in key Senate races, or to avoid putting his endangered senators on the spot. If Trump wins the election and Republicans hold on to their Senate majority, then, they would be able to vote on Ginsburg’s replacement whenever they like. But if Biden wins, or if Democrats take the Senate, that means the clock would be ticking for Republicans to ram through a nomination in the lame-duck period before those changes take place, amid what’s sure to be enormous public outcry. The new Senate will be sworn in on January 3, and the president’s inauguration day is on January 20. So if Democrats win the Senate, McConnell would have until January 3 to hold his vote. If the GOP holds on to the Senate but Biden wins, they’d have till the 20th. There are some further complications, though. One wrinkle is the Arizona Senate contest, which is a special election. Republican Sen. Martha McSally currently holds the seat. But if the Democratic nominee, Mark Kelly, defeats her, he will likely be seated before the other new senators — once the results of the election are certified, which could be in late November or December. That means Republicans would lose a vote. However, if McConnell is hell-bent on getting a nominee confirmed anyway, this probably wouldn’t be an obstacle — he can just make sure to hold the vote before Kelly is sworn in. Another complication is a possible runoff for the Georgia Senate contest pitting Sen. David Perdue (R) against Jon Ossoff (D). If no candidate tops 50 percent of the vote on election day, the runoff would be on January 5, meaning that seat would become vacant at the start of the new Senate on January 3. Of course, it’s also possible that one or more very close Senate race could be contested — recall that the 2008 Minnesota Senate election wasn’t decided until the summer of 2009, after a recount and court decisions. So the safest bet for McConnell, if he doesn’t hold a vote before the election, would be to hold the vote in November or December. Many would be outraged if Republicans are seen as defying the election results, particularly after Republicans stressed the importance of abiding by those results in 2016. Some Democratic pundits are already musing about threatening to abolish the legislative filibuster or pack the courts in response, if Republicans push a nominee through. But practically, even an outgoing Senate Republican majority would be able to do what it wants in the lame-duck period — if they want to burn down institutional norms on their way out, no one can stop them. Help keep Vox free for all Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.
vox.com
'She was living history': A somber crowd of citizens cries and remembers Ginsburg outside the Supreme Court
WASHINGTON — Lawyer Stephanie Schlatter looked up at the Supreme Court building and wiped away tears, some of them trickling down on her pink face mask.       
usatoday.com
MSNBC commentator appears to drink wine on camera while discussing Ruth Bader Ginsburg
"We are all @rtraister chugging wine on @MSNBC with @chrislhayes tonight," wrote Matt Wilstein of the Daily Beast.
nypost.com
Man heads home after 6 month battle with COVID-19
edition.cnn.com
Shots fired at the home of two police officers
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Judge frees woman serving 21 years for murder
edition.cnn.com
Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s legacy celebrated in the films ‘RBG’ and ‘On the Basis of Sex’
Ginsburg became a pop-culture phenomenon throughout the years.
foxnews.com
After Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death, what's next for the Supreme Court?
What will happen to the Supreme Court vacancy the judicial titan leaves behind?
foxnews.com
Opinion: With Justice Ginsburg's death, Mitch McConnell's nauseating hypocrisy comes into full focus
Four years ago, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell didn't believe a president in the final year of his term should appoint a new Supreme Court justice. How about now?
latimes.com
Ruth Bader Ginsburg tributes: 'There will never be another like her'
Hillary Clinton, Janet Mock, Mindy Kaling and Stacey Abrams are among those who honor Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday.
1 h
latimes.com
Boston Red Sox legend David Ortiz says he's cleared after testing positive for COVID-19
Longtime Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz says he's been cleared after testing positive for COVID-19.       
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usatoday.com
Judge allows DNA testing in case of Tennessee man on death row for 32 years
Evidence in the case of a Tennessee man who was sentenced to death three decades ago can be tested for the first time for DNA, a judge ruled this week.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
Watch Joe Biden react to RBG's death
Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden reacts to the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
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