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Ashley Madison, P.I. and Dating Coach Reveal Signs Your Partner is Cheating

Worried your significant other is having an affair? A private investigator, relationship coach and Ashley Madison executive discuss the seven signs to look for.
Read full article on: newsweek.com
Should I Be Worried About Monkeypox? Top Professor Gives Reassuring Context
Vaccine expert Prof. Peter Hotez has said that monkeypox is "far, far less transmissible than COVID-19."
newsweek.com
Южные районы Башкирии занесло снегом
Южные районы Башкирии занесло снегом
http://rg.ru
Op-Ed: Mass shooters aren't mentally ill people who suddenly snap. They decide to kill
Don't make mental illness the bogeyman of mass shootings. It gets in the way of preventing attacks like the one at the Buffalo, N.Y., supermarket.
latimes.com
Biggie’s Life in Photos: Honoring the 50th Birthday of the Notorious B.I.G.
Biggie Smalls, Notorious B.I.G., is celebrated on his 50th birthday, as his legendary career is highlighted through photos capturing some his greatest moments.
nypost.com
The ‘margarita diplomacy’ of José Andrés
The National Geographic film focuses on Andrés’s emergency food relief organization and his canny understanding of the power levers in Washington.
washingtonpost.com
Opinion: Ho-hum, more angry letters after a mass shooting. These won't be the last
You've read this before, and only in America: Readers are outraged after mass shootings (in Buffalo and Laguna Woods) and want politicians to act.
latimes.com
Байден заявил о готовности встретиться с Ким Чен Ыном
Байден заявил о готовности встретиться с Ким Чен Ыном
http://rg.ru
Mercedes' First Electric AMG is Coming in 2025
The Vision AMG concept teases some handsome F1-inspired design cues and plenty of three-pointed stars.
newsweek.com
Chip ’n Dale: Rescue Rangers Is a Reboot That Requires Zero Nostalgia
Hollywood loves a good comeback story, and the new Disney+ film Chip ’n Dale: Rescue Rangers has a great one. No, not that of the titular chipmunk heroes, starring in their first project since the 1990 conclusion of their animated series. I’m talking about the return of “Ugly Sonic”—an unsettling version of Sonic the Hedgehog with human teeth, beady eyes, and a weirdly elongated body that you might remember from 2020 before a hasty redesign salvaged his live-action movie debut. To media-savvy fans, Ugly Sonic is an amusing pop-culture footnote. But in this Chip ’n Dale reboot, he’s just another actor who couldn’t quite crack success in Tinseltown.The return of Ugly Sonic is one of the biggest reasons to recommend Chip ’n Dale: Rescue Rangers, because it exemplifies the kind of humor on display in the rest of Akiva Schaffer’s film. Loyal viewers of the Disney Afternoon cartoon block expecting a faithful update might be disappointed; then again, I can’t imagine many people were really craving a straightforward adventure story about two chipmunks who run a detective agency. Instead, this movie is like a modernized Who Framed Roger Rabbit, set in a world where animated creatures are participating members of human society, and Chip and Dale are actors who have fallen on hard times since their show’s cancellation.[Read: Revisiting the best films of 2001]Roger Rabbit, which is maybe Robert Zemeckis’s greatest film and one of the most innovative movie satires ever produced, is a big act to follow. Chip ’n Dale isn’t quite at the same level. But it’s a cute and cheeky send-up of the film industry’s revival-hungriness, crammed with meta cameos and background in-jokes, and told with the zippy style of Schaffer’s previous showbiz satire, the underrated Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping. The director has reunited with his Lonely Island comrade Andy Samberg, who voices the happy-go-lucky doofus Dale, while John Mulaney lends mordant energy to his straight-arrow partner, Chip.Unlike most legacy sequels, Chip ’n Dale seems aware that the property it’s adapting hasn’t garnered much nostalgia. I was a devoted Disney Afternoon viewer as a child (DuckTales and TaleSpin were among the other syndicated offerings), and I can only vaguely recall whatever it is that Chip and Dale actually got up to week to week. The film’s script (by Dan Gregor and Doug Mand) is more interested in taking aim at the very idea of corporate nostalgia—the “only ’90s kids remember” retro aesthetic that clogs many Millennial meme pages.[Read: 26 brilliant movies that critics were wrong about]In Chip ’n Dale, Dale is trying to ride that trend to a comeback. Hoping to spruce up his look after his show’s cancellation, Dale has gotten experimental CGI surgery so that he resembles the 3-D-animated creatures that populate children’s movies today, complete with realistic fur and bulging eyes. Chip remains the traditionally two-dimensional, cel-shaded creation of yesteryear, and has switched to a more mundane career selling insurance. But when Dale reconnects with him, they get sucked into trying to solve the case of their missing pal Monterey Jack (voiced by Eric Bana), a former cast member of theirs.As with Roger Rabbit, the central mystery has links to the Hollywood underworld; this time, however, that setting is updated to the industry as audiences now know it. The film digs into the cheap animated knockoffs that pervade streaming services today. That space is where characters such as Ugly Sonic are languishing, alongside Sweet Pete (Will Arnett), a middle-aged, beer-bellied version of Disney’s Peter Pan; and (most amusingly) a glassy-eyed CGI Viking warrior played by Seth Rogen, who resembles the eerie mannequins of 2000s films such as The Polar Express and Beowulf. In Chip ’n Dale, all of these forgotten figures continue to toil in obscurity, fighting for even a scrap of relevance amid so many flashy, new brands.If this plot sounds a little too serious and on-the-nose, rest assured, it isn’t. Schaffer and company get goofy while illustrating their point, by, for example, inserting a poster for a movie called Batman vs. E.T. and another advertising Meryl Streep as Mr. Doubtfire. And a solid emotional bedrock grounds Chip, who has given up on fame, and Dale, who needs it to feel validated, as they work to rebuild their friendship. (Samberg and Mulaney’s easy chemistry also helps.) The movie works mostly because, through its weird tricks of animation and self-referentiality, it somehow finds a fresh satirical angle. Other films have skewered an industry that’s intent on bludgeoning audiences with their own fading memories, but only Chip ’n Dale actually gives those memories a new life.
theatlantic.com
A Better Way to Prosecute War Crimes
Stockholm—As the Russian army leaves a trail of atrocity in Ukraine, a trial held here this month offers a powerful template for prosecuting war crimes. The Swedish case—involving a former Iranian official accused of participation in the mass murder of political prisoners in the late 1980s—is based on the principle of universal jurisdiction. According to this doctrine, the national courts of any state that has adopted this principle may prosecute someone suspected of grave crimes, no matter where they occurred and irrespective of the nationality of the suspect.The defendant, Hamid Nouri, also known as Hamid Abbasi, worked in Iran’s prison system for much of the rule of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and allegedly oversaw the executions of thousands of regime opponents in his name. The trial began in August 2021, and at its conclusion, on May 4, the court had held 93 sessions and heard 35 plaintiffs, 26 witnesses, and 12 expert testimonies. If convicted of the charges of war crimes and murder, Nouri faces a possible sentence of life in prison. The verdict is expected on July 14.Supposedly a mining executive at the time of his arrest, Nouri began his career—as most lucrative careers begin in Iran—in the Revolutionary Guard Corps. He entered the corps after Khomeini, Iran’s first supreme leader, rose to power in 1979. He then fought in the Iran-Iraq War for two years until he joined the judiciary’s prison division in 1984. Four years later, Nouri had risen to the top tier of prison officialdom when the ayatollah issued a nationwide fatwa ordering the mass killing of political prisoners.[Andrew Exum: The Russian military has descended into inhumanity]The ayatollah delivered this edict in 1988, the year of his most humiliating defeat: The war that he’d hoped would end with Iran’s army conquering first Baghdad and then Jerusalem had concluded instead in a no-win truce so unacceptable to him that he likened it to drinking “a cup of poison.” Khomeini was reeling from this reverse when his most formidable domestic opponent, the People’s Mujahedin Organization (MEK), conducted a series of offensives in southern Iran from its base in Iraq. Although the group’s military campaign was unsuccessful, Khomeini’s fatwa was retaliation that aimed to annihilate any possible threat against his rule at that vulnerable hour.The prison killings began in July. To carry out the fatwa, the ayatollah appointed an ad hoc board made up of a Sharia judge, an intelligence-ministry official, a prosecutor, and his deputy. That deputy was Ebrahim Raisi; today, he is the president of the Islamic Republic of Iran. These clerics reviewed each prisoner’s files and decided their fate, usually within minutes.Nouri was the functionary who allegedly assisted the board, which the prisoners called the “death panel.” One of his duties, according to his accusers, was to usher the prisoners down “the corridor of death” to the chamber where the panel convened. The verdict rendered, Nouri reportedly then walked them to their hanging.By mid-September 1988, some 3,000 political prisoners had been hanged. Most were members of the MEK who refused to renounce the group. Several hundred Communists, some of whom had served their sentences and were waiting to be released, were also hanged, because they refused to pray or say they believed in God or Islam.The killing spree was so gruesome that it led to a permanent rupture between Ayatollah Khomeini and the cleric whom he had named his successor, Ayatollah Hussein-Ali Montazeri. When Montazeri discovered what was happening in prisons, he wrote two scathing letters to Khomeini, describing the acts as “malicious” and “vengeful”; a third letter addressed to the members of the death panel themselves called their work “mass murder.” When Montazeri summoned them to warn them that they’d “go down in history as criminals,” Khomeini dismissed him as his successor. Montazeri refused to stay silent, and in 1997, after he criticized the next supreme leader, he was placed under house arrest. He remained in detention until his death in 2009.Today, human-rights organizations have called for an investigation into President Raisi’s role as the prosecutor in the 1988 prison massacre, but it was Nouri, the functionary, who inadvertently placed himself in legal jeopardy when he traveled to Sweden. For the victims of human-rights violations in Iran, his arrest was the culmination of years of effort and represented the most significant victory they’d ever known.Several former political prisoners who had for years been writing and recording their recollections of that era were doggedly identifying and pursuing their former torturers. Finally, one ex-prisoner, Iraj Mesdaghi, a naturalized Swedish citizen who has become a leading plaintiff in the case, helped devise a scheme to lure the former jailer to Sweden with the promise of a lavish cruise. When Nouri took the bait, a network of human-rights attorneys and Iranian exiles in the United Kingdom and Sweden went into action to lobby the authorities to issue an arrest warrant.As soon as Nouri’s plane touched down in Stockholm in November 2019, Swedish police officers detained him. During later testimony, a deflated Nouri said that his “cruise ship turned into a solitary cell.”[Karim Sadjadpour: Iran stops pretending]When I attended the final week of the trial, the Nouri I saw appeared neither feeble nor dejected. Rather, he behaved seemingly with the same sadistic arrogance that former prisoners had described. In the courtroom, he often turned his back on the judges and his own attorneys to face his accusers and mouth obscenities at them. Several witnesses avoided using a water fountain in the courtroom because it brought them near enough to Nouri that he could whisper curses at them.Members of his family attending the trial paraded before TV cameras inside the courthouse, smiling as one pressed to his chest an image of the current supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and the late Quds Force commander General Qasem Soleimani, who was killed by a U.S. drone strike in 2020. Their theatrics were for Iran’s leadership only: to show that they had not forsaken their patrons, or cooperated with the Swedish police or prosecutors, and that they hoped their loyalty would be rewarded.The Nouris had not miscalculated. As the trial concluded, Tehran reached for its trademark tool for diplomacy—to arrest and imprison foreign nationals and dual citizens, accuse them of espionage, and later use them as leverage in negotiations with foreign powers. The judiciary announced a date for the execution of an Iranian-Swedish physician, Ahmadreza Djalali, then arrested a Swedish tourist, along with two other European visitors, to put pressure on Sweden to intervene in the Nouri trial.Rumors of a possible prisoner exchange ran through the court as survivors and witnesses huddled during court recesses. And yet, no fear about what the eventual outcome of Iran’s machinations might be could prevent their rejoicing over what had already occurred with the trial itself. On the final day, MEK members, Iranian royalists, and Communists—fierce political rivals usually loath to engage with one another—danced together outside the courthouse. One former prisoner told me he felt that he, too, had died that summer together with his comrades but he had carried on all these years to see this day. Another attendee, Laleh Bazargan, wearing on a necklace a picture of her brother, who was killed in the massacre, said, “I’ve lived in Sweden for 20 years, but I never felt I belonged here until this trial.”Whatever verdict the Stockholm court delivers, to those like Bazargan what matters is the message the court has already sent to war criminals: There is no statute of limitations on the atrocities they’ve committed and no international guarantee of haven. Although the International Criminal Court at The Hague is investigating Russia’s actions in Ukraine, neither of those countries is a party to the ICC. Struggling to establish itself as an effective forum for international justice, the court has won only four convictions in the two decades of its existence.The proceedings against Nouri under universal jurisdiction offer a way out of the ICC impasse. Sweden’s action demonstrates that a different kind of liberal and humanitarian interventionism is possible, one conducted not by military operations but through the criminal-justice systems of democratic societies. That can be a new source of hope to the victims of cruel autocratic regimes—if other Western democracies follow Sweden’s lead in refusing to harbor the tormentors and denying them impunity.
theatlantic.com
What Alito Doesn’t Understand About Pregnancy
When I train medical students, I emphasize that almost nobody is more acutely aware of time than an obstetrician is. Whenever doctors in my field are briefed about a new patient, the first question we ask is: “How many weeks?” The answer affects everything. A pregnant patient diagnosed with high blood pressure at 12 weeks is usually suffering from chronic hypertension, a condition not immediately dangerous to her. At 37 weeks, a similar blood-pressure reading signals preeclampsia, a direct risk to the patient and her fetus. A patient whose water breaks the week before her due date, at 39 weeks, is probably going to have a healthy baby; someone in the same situation at 20 weeks faces a terrifying ordeal that will probably end in infection and pregnancy loss. The dangers that a patient faces, the treatment options we can consider, the risks she may be willing to take—all of these evolve over the nine months of a pregnancy. The only people who understand this better than obstetricians do are our pregnant patients themselves, who count every passing moment in their bodies. In contrast, the Supreme Court appears poised to rule that those time sensitivities don’t matter at all, at least not in the context of reproductive rights. In a leaked draft that may foretell the Court’s opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, Justice Samuel Alito not only reverses Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 decision protecting the right to obtain an abortion, but also heaps scorn upon the Court’s past attempts to align American law with the reality of pregnancy.[Mary Ziegler: ​​The conservatives aren’t just ending Roe—they’re delighting in it]The Roe Court, which presumed that the law should take fetal development into account, established different standards for abortion access by trimester. States could not prohibit abortions in the first trimester, could regulate them somewhat in the second trimester, and could prohibit them altogether in the third trimester. In Casey v. Planned Parenthood, the 1992 decision that upheld Roe, the Court replaced the trimester system with a framework centered on viability—the gestational age when a fetus can survive outside the uterus. Casey declared that before the point of viability, which at the time was considered to be about 24 weeks, states could not place an undue burden on a woman’s fundamental right to abortion; after viability, the state could pursue its interest in the “potentiality of human life” by regulating or even outlawing abortion.In the leaked draft, Alito jettisons both approaches. He describes Roe as an “elaborate scheme” devised “without any grounding in the constitutional text, history, or precedent” and dismisses the Casey viability standard as similarly contrived. His draft concludes that at no point in gestation should a person’s ability to end her pregnancy be beyond the control of her state’s legislature. Alito’s line of reasoning treats pregnancy as a binary matter: Either a uterus is occupied by a fetus or it is not. The owner and operator of that uterus doesn’t appear to deserve much of his consideration.As a physician who specializes in high-risk pregnancies, I have cared for patients with a wide variety of complex medical troubles: metastatic cancer, kidney disease serious enough to require dialysis, heart conditions that make walking down the hallway an exhausting workout. For many of my patients, pregnancy hinders or simply prevents them from getting the right treatment for their chronic underlying illness. For others, pregnancy is what is making them sick, putting their heart or their brain at risk of permanent damage. Recently, I discussed termination with a patient who came to my hospital at 21 weeks’ gestation with multiple organs in failure. Her pregnancy was killing her; ending it would save her life.[Adrienne LaFrance: Liberty no more]In the United States, more than 90 percent of pregnancy terminations occur in the first trimester. This pattern is consistent not only with the logic of Roe and Casey, but also with something obstetricians know: Ending a pregnancy is medically simpler the earlier the procedure occurs.Early abortions—accomplished either by medication or by dilation and curretage, a technique that ob-gyns typically learn in their first year of training—are some of the safest procedures in medicine, and are far safer than carrying a pregnancy to term. (The United States continues to have a shameful maternal-mortality crisis. Carrying a pregnancy to term is one of the most dangerous experiences someone can undergo in America. The overall death rate is unmatched in any other rich country, and the rate for Black women is particularly high.) Many of these early abortions can be performed in an office, rather than an operating room; if the timing is early enough for a medication abortion, it can even be accomplished at home, safely. Later abortions get progressively more complex, and require more time, and often a higher level of physician expertise, though they are still safer than continuing a pregnancy. Accordingly, later abortions are rare; only 1.3 percent of abortions in the United States occur after 21 weeks. These patients are more likely to be medically vulnerable, and to be under the care of a high-risk-pregnancy specialist, than those who seek an abortion early on. In many such cases, an abortion is the tragic outcome of a desired pregnancy gone horribly wrong. In some of those cases, saving a patient’s life requires all of my team’s expertise.In New York, where I practice, abortion access has been encoded into state law; the forthcoming Supreme Court ruling likely will not affect my ability to offer terminations of pregnancy. But more than a dozen states have passed laws outlawing abortion as soon as Roe falls, and other states have bills in the works. Many of the laws allow for exceptions: Some permit termination of pregnancy for the general health of the mother; others require “substantial and irreversible impairment” or “imminent peril” of a “major bodily function” before termination becomes legal. In my view, these laws show minimal consideration for the pregnant patient, and instead seem designed to make a doctor pause. Is this enough of an emergency? Is she sick enough to make this acceptable, or will I get fired? Is she close enough to death, or will I go to jail?For people who believe that every abortion is equivalent to killing a child, any discussion of it may be disconcerting. Yet I can promise that I and other high-risk-pregnancy doctors deeply understand the value of a pregnancy. Our life’s work is to help patients achieve a happy outcome: a healthy mom, a healthy baby. We are the care providers who stay up all night to watch fetal heart tracings, and study ultrasound results endlessly, and weep with our patients when a pregnancy is lost. We understand that would-be parents sometimes face terrible choices, and we do not counsel patients with a desired pregnancy about termination lightly—at any gestational stage.[Michele Goodwin: The new Jane Crow]Every day, though, we see more evidence of medical realities that are enshrined in Roe and Casey but are absent from Alito’s argument. Namely: The early phases of pregnancy are not the same as the later phases; early abortions are different from late abortions. For half a century, the United States has had an abortion structure that reflected these truths—and therefore worked most of the time, for most women. Even under Roe and Casey, some of my patients have been left without the option of termination when lethal fetal anomalies were diagnosed very late in their pregnancy. These patients endured excruciating emotional and physical pain. But the issue with Alito’s draft judgment is that he is essentially decreeing that a first-trimester pregnancy is no different from a third-trimester one, and allowing states to ban all of these abortions with the same level of restriction.I will grieve the loss of Roe. Most Americans do not realize what we are about to lose. All consideration for medical complexity is gone in the Alito draft, which cares very much for the “unborn human” and very little for the live human it grows in. The idea of pregnancy it proposes is abrupt and binary: The moment she becomes pregnant, a woman has no constitutional guarantee of autonomy over her body. This is what it looks like when so many of the people making laws for pregnancy show no understanding of what going through one is like. I am here to tell you it will not end well.
theatlantic.com
The Brief Life and Watery Death of a ’70s Libertarian Micronation
A wealthy American wanted to build an island republic. The king of Tonga had other ideas.
slate.com
Fire Erupts at Russia Aviation Institute Near Moscow as Ukraine War Rages
Emergency responders put out the fire at the Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute on Saturday, May 21.
newsweek.com
The Republican Party’s Extremist Wing Has a New Face
Doug Mastriano could either help Democrats in November—or provoke a 2024 constitutional crisis.
slate.com
Biden suggests there is little chance of meeting with North Korea's Kim amid rising tensions
Biden on Saturday said that any meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un would "depend on whether he was sincere and whether he was serious."
latimes.com
A year after her sudden withdrawal, Naomi Osaka partakes in French Open media session
Four-time tennis grand slam champion Naomi Osaka returned to the French Open to meet the media on Friday -- a year after her sudden withdrawal from the major tournament.
edition.cnn.com
Is Garlic Getting Easier to Peel? A Slate Investigation.
Was it the cloves that had changed, or was it me? (It wasn’t me.)
slate.com
Tree-trimmer found guilty of 3 throat slashing murders in California
A California tree-trimmer has been found guilty of murdering three people.
foxnews.com
Vacation Reading, Unpacked
What do we want from the books we take with us when we travel? They can be a destination, a guide — or the tether that restores us to ourselves.
1 h
nytimes.com
Первые ракеты "Сармат" будут поставлены на боевое дежурство в конце осени
Первые серийные межконтинентальные баллистические ракеты "Сармат" будут поставлены на боевое дежурство в конце осени этого года. Об этом сообщил гендиректор Роскосмоса Дмитрий Рогозин. Они имеют колоссальную мощь и высокие технические параметры
1 h
http://rg.ru
Study could be 'missing link' to better care for thousands of Gulf War veterans battling a mysterious illness
As Gulf War veterans continue to search for answers to their mystery symptoms, a new genetic study may help.       
1 h
usatoday.com
Zelenskyy wants Russia to be held financially responsible for war; Russia claims victory in Mariupol: Live updates
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy called for Russia to pay for the destruction it has caused. Russia declared victory in Mariupol. Live updates.      
1 h
usatoday.com
Eva, the hero dog, beats back a mountain lion that attacked her owner on a hike
Erin Wilson recounts how her dog saved her from a mountain lion attack while she hiked along a river in remote Northern California. Eva the Belgian Malinois is recovering.
1 h
npr.org
She joined DHS to fight disinformation. She says she was halted by... disinformation
Nina Jankowicz looks back at how exaggerations and falsehoods stoked so many doubts about the Disinformation Governance Board that DHS paused it after just three weeks.
1 h
npr.org
Trump's MAGA is marching down a trail blazed by the Tea Party
The populist energy within the Republican Party goes by the name the former president gave it: MAGA. And its influence on the 2022 midterms seems destined to track that of the Tea Party surge in 2010.
1 h
npr.org
Kourtney Kardashian: What to know about the eldest Kardashian sibling
After various speculation whether Kourtney Kardashian and Travis Barker have officially tied the knot, the lovebirds and their close friends and family arrived in Italy where they will exchange nuptials at the famed Castello Brown castle. Ahead of her big wedding weekend, here's a look at what to know about the oldest Kardashian sibling.
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foxnews.com
From family-friendly to downtown beaches: The ultimate New Jersey beach guide for the summer
Summer will be here before you know it, and that means the return of beach days. Our guide will help you plan the perfect trip.      
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usatoday.com
Решетников рассказал, как избежать продовольственный кризис
Решетников рассказал, как избежать продовольственный кризис
1 h
http://rg.ru
Baz Luhrmann Talks ‘Elvis’ With Maureen Dowd
In other words, yes, the director has made a movie about Elvis.
1 h
nytimes.com
Bush Dynasty, Its Influence Fading, Pins Hopes on One Last Stand in Texas
George P. Bush is running to unseat the incumbent attorney general. His family, once powerful in Texas, has become an albatross as well as an asset.
1 h
nytimes.com
How goods made with forced labor end up in your local American store
A new report from a non-profit group finds that goods imported from the Xinjiang region in China could be the result of policies that coerce ethnic minority into factory jobs.
1 h
npr.org
Should 18-year-olds be allowed to buy semi-automatic rifles? State and courts debate
Efforts by states to to raise the minimum age for buying a long rifle have been challenged in court by gun rights activists.
1 h
npr.org
Summer Reading BSuggestions
A book for “White Lotus” fans, a coming-of-age story in the Canary Islands, Werner Herzog’s debut novel (yes, it’s grim) and more.
1 h
nytimes.com
Writers to Watch This Summer
Three authors discuss their new novels and what brought them to write about a young woman in trouble, three brothers from Staten Island and an anxious parrot.
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nytimes.com
Long Covid Symptoms and Treatment: What We Know So Far
There is no universal definition of the complex condition, but clues about causes and potential treatments are beginning to emerge.
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nytimes.com
D.C.-area forecast: Flirting with record highs today as heat intensifies
Washington needs to get to 95 to tie a record from 1934. We should be in that neighborhood.
1 h
washingtonpost.com
The Trial That Ruined TikTok
If your “For You” page is only Depp v. Heard, Lizzo, and a weird “Jiggle Jiggle” rap, you’re not alone.
1 h
slate.com
That’s Not ESG
Slate Money talks Tesla, Grubhub, and TikTok.
1 h
slate.com
МО РФ: В Одесской области уничтожен лагерь подготовки сил специальных операций Украины
МО РФ: В Одесской области уничтожен лагерь подготовки сил специальных операций Украины
1 h
http://rg.ru
МО РФ: В ходе воздушного боя в ДНР сбит украинский штурмовик Су-25
Истребительная авиация ВКС РФ в ходе воздушного боя в районе поселка Белицкое Донецкой Народной Республики сбила украинский штурмовик Су-25, заявили в Минобороны РФ. Также были уничтожены 14 украинских беспилотников в ДНР и ЛНР, Херсонской и Харьковской областях
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http://rg.ru
Northeast heat wave to break dozens of records this weekend
Over 30 million people are under a heat advisory this weekend across the Northeast as record temperatures stretch from Virginia to New Hampshire.
2 h
edition.cnn.com
Слуцкий назвал грабежом идею Минюста Латвии конфисковать активы РФ
Слуцкий назвал грабежом идею Минюста Латвии конфисковать активы РФ
2 h
http://rg.ru
Angels to Anaheim: You're on the clock to approve stadium sale
Facing pressure to delay or cancel the Angel Stadium sale amid a corruption probe, the Angels gave the city council 25 days to grant final approval.
2 h
latimes.com
Ракетами "Калибр" на станции Малино уничтожена партия оружия из США и Европы
Вооруженные Силы РФ высокоточными ракетами большой дальности морского базирования "Калибр" уничтожили крупную партию вооружений и военной техники из США и европейских стран. Удар был нанесен по железнодорожной станции Малин Житомирской области
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http://rg.ru
Gaylord Tornado Videos Show Total Devastation: 'I Can't Find Anything'
One person has died and more than 40 more people have been injured by the tornado in northern Michigan.
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newsweek.com
В Забайкалье продлили масочный режим
В Забайкалье продлили масочный режим
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http://rg.ru
В Подмосковье произошел пожар в ЦАГИ
В Подмосковье произошел пожар в ЦАГИ
2 h
http://rg.ru
PGA Championship: Tee times, featured groups, TV and streaming info for Saturday's third round
Will Zalatoris enters Saturday's third round at the 104th PGA Championship with a one-stroke lead and history on his side.       
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usatoday.com