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Buffalo protester knocked to ground by police is out of the hospital weeks later, lawyer says

Buffalo protester Martin Gugino was released from the hospital Tuesday after spending nearly a month there for injuries he sustained when two police officers pushed him to the ground.
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Pup takes on allergy season with adorable ‘turbo sneeze’ 
Achoo! Meet Pooh the Pomeranian, a very good girl from Be’er Sheva, Israel. Her hilarious sneezing fits are just one of the many “too-cute-to-handle” traits about her. They’ve been dubbed “turbo sneezes” by her owners. Watch as Pooh sneezes and shimmies her way to social media fame.    Subscribe to our YouTube! 
nypost.com
Where's the beef? Lebanon's currency crash puts desperation on the menu
The Lebanese are used to eating plenty of meat, but the country's economic woes have made it a luxury as rampant inflation takes its toll.
latimes.com
WNBA star speaks of her 'relief' after helping man overturn conviction
WNBA star Maya Moore has spoken of her "relief" after successfully helping a man overturn his conviction when he he served 22 years in prison.
edition.cnn.com
2 cops charged with murder for alleged over-use of stun guns on man
The Oklahoma officers allegedly used the devices more than 50 times. The 28-year-old man later died.
cbsnews.com
WNBA star Maya Moore speaks of her 'relief' after helping a man overturn his prison sentence
WNBA star Maya Moore has spoken of her "relief" after successfully helping a man overturn his conviction when he he served 22 years in prison.
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First On-Screen Kiss: Sam Heughan & Caitriona Balfe
It takes a while for "Outlander" stars Sam Heughan and Caitriona Balfe to remember their first on-screen kiss. (July 3)       
usatoday.com
Saroj Khan, choreographer behind hundreds of Bollywood hits, dies aged 71
Saroj Khan, a celebrated Indian choreographer behind some of Bollywood's biggest productions, has died aged 71, her doctor has told CNN.
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Hong Kong official: National security law will be 'clean break'
CNN's Ivan Watson interviews Hong Kong Justice Secretary Teresa Cheng, who says that the controversial national security law enacted July 1 and drafted by China's National People's Congress will be a "clean break" for Hong Kongers as it will not apply retroactively.
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China and India are sparring but neither can afford a full-on trade war
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Coronavirus updates: US surpasses 52K daily cases; Jersey Shore open, California beaches closed for July 4th; Texas mask mandate begins
India is expected to become the third worst-hit country. Face masks are now required in Texas as crowds flock to the Jersey Shore. Latest coronavirus news.       
usatoday.com
Secret Service agents assigned to Pence's detail tested positive for coronavirus ahead of his Arizona trip
Eight Secret Service agents assigned to Vice President Mike Pence's detail ahead of his trip to Arizona tested positive for the coronavirus right before Pence was scheduled to travel there, a law enforcement source told CNN.
edition.cnn.com
105 University of Washington frat members have coronavirus
Experts say the outbreak is a troubling sign of what may be in store if colleges reopen in the fall.
cbsnews.com
Activist urging an Fourth of July boycott says black experience in US has not improved
A debate broke out Thursday night on "The Ingraham Angle" about the Fourth of July holiday and whether or not the black experience in the country improved over the last few centuries.
foxnews.com
What restaurants in the Hamptons are doing for 4th of July 2020
Foodies in the Hamptons are not letting coronavirus get them down this summer. Pandemic dining is finally in full swing and revelers are having a socially distanced blast — just in time for the Fourth of July. From Southampton’s Main Street to the beaches of Montauk, Hamptons restaurateurs are finding creative ways to serve their...
nypost.com
Our Complacent Commander in Chief
When I served in Afghanistan, we had to walk single file through Taliban-controlled territory laden with mines, hoping to stay on the thin, invisible path that the point man had cleared with the squad’s lone metal detector. None of us had any illusions about the danger we were in; we knew we had to remain vigilant. “Complacency kills” was a common mantra. America is in one of the most vulnerable phases of the war in Afghanistan—with a resurgent Taliban, few combat forces on the ground, and mostly Afghan allies for protection. And we have a complacent commander in chief.I served under Barack Obama and George W. Bush, and I trusted that each one would uphold their end of the bargain with the military: We go into harm’s way, and they wage the war honorably and responsibly. This president is different. This past week I learned that Donald Trump potentially ignored—or simply did not read—intelligence that Russia had allegedly placed bounties on American soldiers in Afghanistan.According to The New York Times, three marines were murdered last year possibly by Taliban fighters seeking Russian bounties. Yet Trump did nothing, then or now. Failing to act on this new information declares to our enemies that it’s open season on those still deployed and sends a message to U.S. soldiers and our Afghan allies that nobody has their back.[Elizabeth Warren: We can end our endless wars]The refusal to protect American soldiers from Russian attempts to murder them is only Trump’s latest dismissal of the dangers facing troops abroad. After Iranian missile strikes against U.S. bases in Iraq earlier this year, he claimed that “we suffered no casualties.” Later, after 100 soldiers were diagnosed with traumatic brain injuries, he said, “I heard that they had headaches and a couple of other things, but I would say, and I can report, it is not very serious.”This same injury rightly warranted a Purple Heart when I was in Afghanistan. After a rocket-propelled grenade exploded near one of my sergeants, he was left concussed and unable to form coherent sentences for days. Concussions plague many soldiers for years, causing cognitive and emotional impairments. Just as some injuries require amputation, a traumatic brain injury also takes a part of the person it wounds.When the president downplays the risks to our soldiers or fails to act on new information—or simply doesn’t read the briefings and take our lives seriously—he neglects his crucial duty to counter threats far above the paygrade of the average service member, who is only trying to safely accomplish the mission to which he’s assigned.Russian bounties are especially dangerous because they drive a wedge between our military and the Afghan people by encouraging treachery in an already-impoverished country. When I was there, almost a decade ago, one of the most challenging threats we faced was attacks by Afghan soldiers and police on coalition forces, known as green-on-blue attacks. Yet because we needed to build trust with our allies, we had no way to mitigate this vulnerability, which the Taliban—now aided by Russia—have long sought to exploit.The Afghan War is an intimate conflict, built on trust with the Afghan people. My company’s mission was to partner with an Afghan National Army unit on a small patrol base in the northern Helmand River Valley. Then as now, American troops were outnumbered in the deserts and valleys of Afghanistan, in close quarters with an unfamiliar culture. The marines were nervous at first, but we lived and patrolled together with the Afghans. Our goal was to train the Afghan soldiers so that they could take over the fight that both groups knew would eventually be theirs alone.[Read: The U.S. once wanted peace in Afghanistan]Many of us developed close relationships while we were there. On Eid-al-Fitr, the holiday marking the end of Ramadan, American and Afghan soldiers slaughtered sheep, as is customary, and broke bread together. I found myself up late with the Afghan commander smoking cheap Pine cigarettes and eating melon-size pomegranates cross-legged on his rug-covered dirt floor. He showed me old videos of mujahideen fighting the Soviets during their occupation in the 1980s.When I later had to tell him that one of his men had been killed, I saw this perpetually stoic man’s eyes redden and water, just as my lieutenant’s had a few moments before when I told him the same news about one of his marines. Our men fought and died together, building partnerships over decades across battalion after battalion.In the village I sat at shuras, or meetings, debating the problems facing the Afghan people. We learned one another’s names and faces. On patrols, we’d visit compounds to follow up on a well we’d helped build, only to be invited in for chai. I looked at children, the young boys rowdy and smiling, the girls with curious eyes not yet covered by a burka, and I wondered what kind of life they dreamt about and whether our work would someday help them realize it.In 2015, a few years after my tour of duty, the Taliban overran the district where I’d served. I have no way of knowing what happened to the army commander or the children who’d followed us on patrol begging for pencils. But I’m certain that the American troops still deployed are our last hope of leaving the rest of the country with a fighting chance to hold out against Taliban rule, which remains as oppressive today as it was in 2001. We owe the Afghan soldiers and people and the U.S. troops still deployed the support and respect needed to finally end this war.Every single man and woman who fought in the Afghan campaign would sleep easier, or tell their story to their children with more pride, or stand before the graves of long-dead friends with less heartbreak, if the war were to end in victory—but I know that’s not possible. We can still, however, end this war with honor.[Jim Golby and Peter Feaver: It matters if Americans call Afghanistan a defeat]As we reduce our footprint, the risk grows greater to the few troops who remain. Our retreat must be done thoughtfully and systematically to minimize bloodshed in a war we no longer intend to win. And yet the president is managing it with careless disregard for the 12,000 service members currently deployed, by eroding the trust developed with our Afghan allies over decades, and by betraying the sacrifices that so many of us made during this costly American tragedy. Instead he should note the standard of care that the soldiers he leads devote to their fallen comrades.In Afghanistan, when an improvised explosive device killed marines in my company, the blast often tore apart their body. After a Navy corpsman made a heroic but futile attempt to save their life, a medic on a casualty-evacuation helicopter took custody of the body, the next in a long line of soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines who solemnly delivered the remains home to their family. But our job on the ground still wasn’t over.Despite the danger from Taliban fighters and other IEDs, a squad would search the scene to try to collect additional body parts. We didn’t always succeed. One man’s ring finger with his wedding band was never found and returned to his widow. But honoring their sacrifice demanded follow-through and every possible effort to the end.When the president treats the conclusion of this war as unimportant, his behavior squanders whatever honor the men and women currently deployed may yet salvage from this terrible ordeal. They’re risking their life for the same cause as all of us who served: peace. More than 2,300 Americans have been killed in action; in these final moments of the war, we cannot let their sacrifices be in vain.
theatlantic.com
China and India are sparring but neither can afford a full-on trade war
Last month's deadly border battle between India and China has already begun to affect business and technology. But the world's two most populous countries have a lot to lose should the dispute escalate into a full-on trade war.
edition.cnn.com
New crew will launch to the International Space Station in October
This October, NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov will launch to the International Space Station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in southern Kazakhstan.
edition.cnn.com
New crew will launch to the International Space Station in October
This October, NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov will launch to the International Space Station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in southern Kazakhstan.
edition.cnn.com
Liverpool title-winning celebrations dampened after thrashing from Manchester City
Liverpool's title-winning celebrations were given a rude awakening as Jurgen Klopp's team was thrashed 4-0 by last year's champion Manchester City in the Premier League.
edition.cnn.com
Liverpool title-winning celebrations dampened after thrashing from Manchester City
Liverpool's title-winning celebrations were given a rude awakening as Jurgen Klopp's team was thrashed 4-0 by last year's champion Manchester City in the Premier League.
edition.cnn.com
Three dark horse teams for Major League Baseball's shortened 2020 season
Baseball's condensed schedule will surely produce some unexpected outcomes, namely in the chase for the postseason.       
usatoday.com
Gyms in England to Open in Two Weeks, Prime Minister Says
This announcement comes one day before "Super Saturday," when pubs, restaurants and cinemas are set to open in England for the first time since lockdown began.
newsweek.com
Coronavirus updates: Bar allowed workers with COVID-19 to continue working: Officials
For the fifth day in a row, Arizona has surpassed its record number of hospitalizations on Thursday, with 2,938 patients currently hospitalized.
abcnews.go.com
Twitter is removing 'master,' 'slave' and 'blacklist' from its code
The language of computing is changing in the wake of the death of George Floyd.
edition.cnn.com
Priest suspended after likening protestors to 'maggots'
A Catholic priest in Indiana has been suspended from public ministry following an incendiary church bulletin that likened protesters to "maggots and parasites."
edition.cnn.com
How to celebrate a fun Fourth of July at home
A combination of factors could make the Fourth of July a "perfect storm" of coronavirus infections, warned one doctor -- but only for those who don't choose to safely navigate the holiday weekend.
edition.cnn.com
New York’s Problems Are America’s Problems Now
Here’s what happens next in the American city.
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slate.com
Trump set for another massive event during national pandemic
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump head to Mount Rushmore National Memorial on Friday to celebrate an early Fourth of July at a gathering of an estimated 7,500 people during a global pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Trump set for another massive event during a pandemic
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump head to Mount Rushmore National Memorial on Friday to celebrate an early Fourth of July at a gathering of an estimated 7,500 people during a global pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
North Korea's Covid-19 response has been a 'shining success,' Kim Jong Un claims
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has praised what he described as his country's "shining success" in curbing the novel coronavirus pandemic, but warned his subordinates that lifting precautionary measures too early could be devastating.
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edition.cnn.com
Twitter is removing 'master,' 'slave' and 'blacklist' from its code
The language of computing is changing in the wake of the death of George Floyd.
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edition.cnn.com
5 things to know for July 3: Coronavirus, economy, China, Khashoggi, Epstein
Here's what else you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day.
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edition.cnn.com
These moms wore masks while giving birth. Doing everyday things while wearing one shouldn't be hard, they say
Health officials say facial coverings are one of the most effective ways to stop the spread of coronavirus. And yet, many people refuse to wear them.
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edition.cnn.com
These moms wore masks while giving birth. Doing everyday things while wearing one shouldn't be hard, they say
When Valeri Hedges was delivering her daughter, Adrienne, she didn't really notice the face mask she had to wear to protect herself and the medical staff from coronavirus.
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edition.cnn.com
'The Tax Collector': Shia LaBeouf Tattooed His Entire Chest for New Movie
"The Tax Collector" is the new movie starring Shia LaBeouf—who was fully committed to his role, going where no method actor has gone before.
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newsweek.com
California man expresses regret over attending party day before he died of coronavirus
A Southern California man reportedly expressed his regret late last month over attending a party where he likely contracted the coronavirus in a Facebook post just one day before he died.
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foxnews.com
City Hall ‘demoralized’ by de Blasio as staffers jump ship
City Hall employees have been “demoralized” by Mayor Bill de Blasio’s refusal to listen to his staff, leading to bungled administration responses to what are arguably the biggest issues of our time — the coronavirus pandemic and the George Floyd protests, sources told The Post. “A lot of the office is pretty demoralized,” a source...
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nypost.com
Op-Ed: What do you really know about the Fourth of July? A quiz
Annual July 4 parties are suspended this year, so stay safe and take our quiz instead.
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latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: Karen Bass is caring, competent and progressive. She would make an excellent VP
A former L.A. city controller who worked with Karen Bass for two decades believes putting her on Joe Biden's ticket could win over progressives.
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latimes.com
Op-Ed: Could the racist past of Mt. Rushmore's creator bring down the monument?
What should be done with an accomplishment that features problematic men carved in a problematic location by a problematic sculptor?
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latimes.com
Sen. Tim Scott: Fourth of July challenges – as in times past we will unite, progress and hope, always
America was founded on the principles of liberty and justice for all, yet for too many, these have seemed like lofty ideals rather than daily realities.
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foxnews.com
Tammy Duckworth is a war hero and the best vice president for Joe Biden in 2020
This combat pilot gave America the highest form of service and nearly the highest form of sacrifice. We need her grit to steer us safely through crisis.       
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usatoday.com
Boris Johnson’s ‘Global Britain’: Inspired Vision or Wishful Thinking?
Post-Brexit Britain is going it alone at a time when globalization in retreat. But a clash with China over Hong Kong has shown the limits of what it can do.
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nytimes.com
Column: It's inevitable: Donald Trump's enablers will get rolled by history
Even the fiercest of the White House collaborators — Sen. Mitch McConnell, Vice President Mike Pence, Atty. Gen. William Barr — will have to let the inevitable happen: The president is indefensible.
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latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: If white America wants racial progress, it must stop supporting politicians like Trump
Every time there is progress on race in America, there is a major backlash from white people. That has to stop.
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latimes.com
Editorial: When will we live up to our Declaration of Independence?
For too many people, and for too many generations, the "self-evident" truth of equality has just been empty words scrawled on parchment.
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latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: The Russian bounty scandal raises a terrible question: Is Trump a traitor?
With the Russian bounty scheme, the United States faces a crisis worse than anything in Watergate.
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latimes.com
Op-Ed: Why abortion rights are still at risk
If Chief Justice John Roberts can find a way to maintain the court's reputation and eliminate Roe, he will.
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latimes.com