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Elliott: Dodgers, Angels ought to cultivate young fans by starting games earlier this season

The Dodgers and Angels should start games earlier this season because fans don't need to rush to the ballpark after work. They just need to turn on the TV.


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What may come of the WHO's "honest evaluation" of its COVID response?
"This has been a bad experience, and we need to learn from it," former New Zealand leader says of a new, independent panel's mandate.
cbsnews.com
One Meat Plant, One Thousand Infections: Revisiting Achut Deng
After surviving civil war in Sudan, one of America’s most vulnerable workers faced the coronavirus. How has she been doing since?
nytimes.com
The Worst of Both Worlds
Failed businesses and lost loved ones, empty theme parks and socially distanced funerals, a struggling economy and an unmitigated public-health disaster: This is the worst-of-both-worlds equilibrium the United States finds itself in.Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, President Donald Trump has railed against shutdowns and shelter-in-place orders, tweeting in all caps that “we cannot let the cure be worse than the problem itself” and pushing for employees to get back to work and businesses to get back to business. But the country has failed to get the virus under control, through masks, contact tracing, mass testing, or any of the other strategies other countries have tried and found successful. That has kneecapped the nascent recovery, and raised the possibility that the unemployment rate, which eased in May and June after nearly reaching 15 percent in April, could spike again later this year.[Annie Lowrey: The second Great Depression]The economy seized in unprecedented terms this spring as states and cities mandated lockdowns. Hundreds of thousands of businesses closed, and millions of workers were furloughed or laid off. But instead of setting up a national viral-control strategy during this time, as other rich countries did, the United States did close to nothing. Congress underfunded disease research and contact-tracing efforts. No federal agency coordinated the procurement of personal protective equipment. Months into the pandemic, health professionals were still reusing masks for days at a time. The Trump administration punted responsibility for public-health management to the states, each tipping into a budgetary crisis. After a springtime peak, caseloads declined only modestly. Outbreaks seeded across the country. States reopened, and counts exploded again.Now the economy is traveling sideways, as business failures mount and the virus continues to maim and kill. New applications for unemployment insurance, for instance, are leveling off at more than 1 million a week—more than double the highest rate reached during the Great Recession, a sign that more job losses are becoming permanent. After rising when the government sent stimulus checks and expanded unemployment-insurance payments, consumer spending is falling again, down 10 percent from where it was a year ago. Homebase, a provider of human-resources software, says that the rebound has hit a “plateau,” in terms of hours worked, share of employees working, and number of businesses open.The next, terrifying phase of the coronavirus recession is here: a damaged economy, a virus spreading faster than it was in March. The disease itself continues to take a bloody, direct toll on workers, with more than 60,000 Americans testing positive a day and tens of thousands suffering from extended illness. The statistical value of American lives already lost to the disease is something like $675 billion. The current phase of the pandemic is also taking an enormous secondary toll. States with unmitigated outbreaks have been forced to go back into lockdown, or to pause their reopening, killing weakened businesses and roiling the labor market. Where the virus spreads, the economy stops.That is not just due to government edicts, either. Some consumers have rushed back to bars and restaurants, and resumed shopping and traveling. Young people, who tend to get less sick from the coronavirus than the elderly, appear to be driving today’s pandemic. But millions more are making it clear that they will not risk their life or the life of others in their community to go out. Avoidance of the virus, more so than shutdown orders, seems to be affecting consumer behavior. Places without official lockdowns have seen similar financial collapses to those with them, and a study by University of Chicago economists showed that decreases in economic activity are closely tied to “fears of infection” and are “highly influenced by the number of COVID deaths reported” in a given county. [Read: A devastating new stage of the pandemic]In other ways, the spread of COVID-19 is keeping Americans from going back to work. The perception of public transit as unsafe, for example, makes it expensive and tough for commuters to get to their jobs. Schools and day-care centers are struggling to figure out how to reopen safely, meaning millions of parents are facing a fall juggling work and child care. This is a disaster. “The lingering uncertainty about whether in-person education will resume isn’t the result of malfeasance, but utter nonfeasance,” the former Department of Homeland Security official Juliette Kayyem has argued in The Atlantic. “Four months of stay-at-home orders have proved that, if schools are unavailable, a city cannot work, a community cannot function, a nation cannot safeguard itself.”International comparisons are enlightening. Countries that successfully countered the virus seem to have enjoyed better financial recoveries; countries that did not shut down saw major hits to their economy anyway. In Sweden, authorities declined to enact strict public-health measures as the virus took hold. It has seen significantly higher case counts and more deaths than its neighbors, such as Norway, and its economy tanked. Or consider South Korea. With aggressive contact tracing and mass testing, it kept many of its commercial and educational facilities open as it quashed the pandemic. (The country has tallied just 288 deaths from COVID-19, compared with roughly 135,000 in the United States.) The unemployment rate there is 4.2 percent, and the economy is expected to contract just a small amount this year, due in part to falling exports.In New Zealand, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern did a “little dance” to celebrate the country’s reopening one full month ago. In Taiwan, thousands of fans cheered from the stands at a baseball game last week, unafraid of disease. In France, one of the hardest-hit countries in Europe, families are back to going on vacation, eating in cafés, and visiting loved ones in hospitals. In the United States, outbreaks are shutting everything down yet again.[Read: New Zealand’s prime minister may be the most effective leader on the planet]The United States can still contain the spread of COVID-19 and save lives, epidemiologists argue. The country can still flatten the curve and lower the death toll. Simple, low-cost measures like requiring masks in public would preserve as much as 5 percent of GDP, economists have estimated, as well as preventing thousands from getting sick. The supposed trade-off between public health and the economy doesn’t exist. And right now, the country is choosing not to save either.
theatlantic.com
Power Up: Trump’s spaghetti on the wall campaign is still seeking its special sauce
The president’s rambling Rose Garden speech hit Biden, China, and the Green New Deal.
washingtonpost.com
Were Will and Jada holding back during their ‘Red Table Talk’?
A body language expert took a look at the couple’s “Red Table Talk” conversation about their momentary breakup and Jada’s “entanglement” with August Alsina.
nypost.com
Gregg Jarrett: Armed couple who defended St. Louis home when threatened shouldn’t be prosecuted
The St. Louis couple displaying guns when threatened by a mob acted lawfully. They should not be prosecuted.
foxnews.com
Rival EPL managers criticize Man City's overturned ban
There's been fallout from the Court of Arbitration for Sport's decision to overturn Manchester City's two-year ban from the Champions League. Safe to say that rival Premier League managers were not too happy with it.
edition.cnn.com
Trump heads to Georgia, one of the new 2020 battleground states
The latest CBS News Battleground Tracker poll rates Georgia as a toss-up for the presidential election; currently, Biden leads Trump by two points.
cbsnews.com
Election Day could turn into "Election Week" with rise in mail ballots
Election officials say the public should prepare now for the possibility of delayed election results in November.
cbsnews.com
David Duke’s War Against Two Louisiana Governors
In the 1991 race to lead the state, the ex-Klansman found a new way to expand his appeal.
slate.com
Ali Noorani: Trump should let DACA recipients become citizens — it will benefit US and his election chances
What will President Trump do about the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program, created by President Obama to allow children brought to the U.S. without authorization to remain here?
foxnews.com
SBA grant program attracting the wrong kind of attention
Scam artists drawn by the lure of “free money” are drawing scrutiny from the agency’s inspector general
washingtonpost.com
Column: California's aid-in-dying law is working. Let's expand it to Alzheimer's patients
It will raise a fraught and contentious ethical debate. But dementia sufferers should be able to choose assisted suicide.
latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: Read COVID-19 horror stories, then answer: Why aren't you wearing a mask?
Forcing mask refusers to read a hospice chaplain's harrowing op-ed article should change a few minds, hopefully.
latimes.com
Op-Ed: Civil rights lawsuits alone won't give us the America we want
To dismantle systemic racism, we have to do more than look to the Supreme Court or other judges to save us.
latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: I was laid off in March, and I'm still waiting for an answer on my unemployment
A reader says he's familiar with the routine of calling 100 times to speak to a live person about his unanswered California unemployment claim.
latimes.com
Garry Trudeau is spoofing the Trump presidency by treating it as ‘a hostile takeover’
The "Doonesbury" creator says his new book "Lewser!" aims to show how Trump is "privatizing the gain while socializing the pain."
washingtonpost.com
A 7-year-old raises $23,000 to buy skin-colored crayons and multicultural books for her California school
Madison Wilson, 7, said she hopes other children of color feel respected when they draw pictures with their new crayons and read the books she plans to donate.
washingtonpost.com
Letters to the Editor: It's not 'cancel culture.' It's finally holding privileged people accountable
Instead of worrying about the people "canceled" for actions taken long ago, worry about the people who have long suffered because of those actions.
latimes.com
Diversity job openings fell nearly 60% after the coronavirus. Then came the Black Lives Matter protests.
Companies slashed hiring for diversity and inclusion jobs in March, with openings for those roles falling twice as fast as for other listings. Then came the protests after George Floyd was killed, and hiring rebounded.
washingtonpost.com
Letters to the Editor: Why a 'CAREN' bill on false police reports would make people of color safer
People of color cannot rely on prosecutors to punish people who wrongly call the police.
latimes.com
'Trump is a singular danger': The president faces unprecedented opposition — from his own party
Republican anti-Trump groups aim to convince just enough GOP voters that it's OK to support a Democrat to oust this president.
latimes.com
Maryland sees jump in use of program that pays jobless benefits for those brought back part-time
About 25 states and the District have versions of the program, which keep benefits flowing to employees brought back at reduced hours.
washingtonpost.com
The 1991 Louisiana Governor’s Race Was Already Fraught. David Duke Made It the “Race From Hell.”
Edwin Edwards vs. Buddy Roemer vs. David Duke in a fight to control Louisiana.
slate.com
Editorial: Let's do this second shutdown right, California
We know how to get the coronavirus under control again. Californians just have to be willing to do it.
latimes.com
White Fragility Talks Down to Black People
I must admit that I had not gotten around to actually reading Robin DiAngelo’s White Fragility until recently. But it was time to jump in. DiAngelo is an education professor and—most prominently today—a diversity consultant who argues that whites in America must face the racist bias implanted in them by a racist society. Their resistance to acknowledging this, she maintains, constitutes a “white fragility” that they must overcome in order for meaningful progress on both interpersonal and societal racism to happen.White Fragility was published in 2018 but jumped to the top of the New York Times best-seller list amid the protests following the death of George Floyd and the ensuing national reckoning about racism. DiAngelo has convinced university administrators, corporate human-resources offices, and no small part of the reading public that white Americans must embark on a self-critical project of looking inward to examine and work against racist biases that many have barely known they had.I am not convinced. Rather, I have learned that one of America’s favorite advice books of the moment is actually a racist tract. Despite the sincere intentions of its author, the book diminishes Black people in the name of dignifying us. This is unintentional, of course, like the racism DiAngelo sees in all whites. Still, the book is pernicious because of the authority that its author has been granted over the way innocent readers think.[Lawrence Glickman: How white backlash controls American progress]Reading White Fragility is rather like attending a diversity seminar. DiAngelo patiently lays out a rationale for white readers to engage in a self-examination that, she notes, will be awkward and painful. Her chapters are shortish, as if each were a 45-minute session. DiAngelo seeks to instruct.She operates from the now-familiar concern with white privilege, aware of the unintentional racism ever lurking inside of her that was inculcated from birth by the white supremacy on which America was founded. To atone for this original sin, she is devoted to endlessly exploring, acknowledging, and seeking to undo whites’ “complicity with and investment in” racism. To DiAngelo, any failure to do this “work,” as adherents of this paradigm often put it, renders one racist.As such, a major bugbear for DiAngelo is the white American, often of modest education, who makes statements like I don’t see color or asks questions like How dare you call me “racist”? Her assumption that all people have a racist bias is reasonable—science has demonstrated it. The problem is what DiAngelo thinks must follow as the result of it.[Ibram X. Kendi: The American nightmare]DiAngelo has spent a very long time conducting diversity seminars in which whites, exposed to her catechism, regularly tell her—many while crying, yelling, or storming toward the exit—that she’s insulting them and being reductionist. Yet none of this seems to have led her to look inward. Rather, she sees herself as the bearer of an exalted wisdom that these objectors fail to perceive, blinded by their inner racism. DiAngelo is less a coach than a proselytizer.When writers who are this sure of their convictions turn out to make a compelling case, it is genuinely exciting. This is sadly not one of those times, even though white guilt and politesse have apparently distracted many readers from the book’s numerous obvious flaws.For one, DiAngelo’s book is replete with claims that are either plain wrong or bizarrely disconnected from reality. Exactly who comes away from the saga of Jackie Robinson thinking he was the first Black baseball player good enough to compete with whites? “Imagine if instead the story,” DiAngelo writes, “went something like this: ‘Jackie Robinson, the first black man whites allowed to play major-league baseball.’” But no one need imagine this scenario, as others have pointed out, because it is something every baseball fan already knows. Later in the book, DiAngelo insinuates that, when white women cry upon being called racists, Black people are reminded of white women crying as they lied about being raped by Black men eons ago. But how would she know? Where is the evidence for this presumptuous claim?An especially weird passage is where DiAngelo breezily decries the American higher-education system, in which, she says, no one ever talks about racism. “I can get through graduate school without ever discussing racism,” she writes. “I can graduate from law school without ever discussing racism. I can get through a teacher-education program without ever discussing racism.” I am mystified that DiAngelo thinks this laughably antique depiction reflects any period after roughly 1985. For example, an education-school curriculum neglecting racism in our times would be about as common as a home unwired for electricity.[John McWhorter: The dictionary definition of racism has to change]DiAngelo’s depiction of white psychology shape-shifts according to what her dogma requires. On the one hand, she argues in Chapter 1 that white people do not see themselves in racial terms; therefore, they must be taught by experts like her of their whiteness. But for individuals who harbor so little sense of themselves as a group, the white people whom DiAngelo describes are oddly tribalist when it suits her narrative. “White solidarity,” she writes in Chapter 4, “requires both silence about anything that exposes the advantages of the white population and tacit agreement to remain racially united in the protection of white supremacy.” But if these people don’t even know whiteness is a category, just what are they now suddenly defending?DiAngelo also writes as if certain shibboleths of the Black left—for instance, that all disparities between white and Black people are due to racism of some kind—represent the incontestable truth. This ideological bias is hardly unique to DiAngelo, and a reader could look past it, along with the other lapses in argumentation I have noted, if she offered some kind of higher wisdom. The problem is that White Fragility is the prayer book for what can only be described as a cult.We must consider what is required to pass muster as a non-fragile white person. Refer to a “bad neighborhood,” and you’re using code for Black; call it a “Black neighborhood,” and you’re a racist; by DiAngelo’s logic, you are not to describe such neighborhoods at all, even in your own head. You must not ask Black people about their experiences and feelings, because it isn’t their responsibility to educate you. Instead, you must consult books and websites. Never mind that upon doing this you will be accused of holding actual Black people at a remove, reading the wrong sources, or drawing the wrong lessons from them. You must never cry in Black people’s presence as you explore racism, not even in sympathy, because then all the attention goes to you instead of Black people. If you object to any of the “feedback” that DiAngelo offers you about your racism, you are engaging in a type of bullying “whose function is to obscure racism, protect white dominance, and regain white equilibrium.”That is a pretty strong charge to make against people who, according to DiAngelo, don’t even conceive of their own whiteness. But if you are white, make no mistake: You will never succeed in the “work” she demands of you. It is lifelong, and you will die a racist just as you will die a sinner.Remember also that you are not to express yourself except to say Amen. Namely, thou shalt not utter:I know people of color.I marched in the sixties.You are judging me.You don’t know me.You are generalizing.I disagree.The real oppression is class.I just said one little innocent thing.Some people find offense where there is none.You hurt my feelings.I can’t say anything right.This is an abridgment of a list DiAngelo offers in Chapter 9; its result is to silence people. Whites aren’t even allowed to say, “I don’t feel safe.” Only Black people can say that. If you are white, you are solely to listen as DiAngelo tars you as morally stained. “Now breathe,” she counsels to keep you relaxed as you undergo this. She does stress that she is not dealing with a good/bad dichotomy and that your inner racist does not make you a bad person. But with racism limned as such a gruesome spiritual pollution, harbored by individuals moreover entrapped in a society within which they exert racism merely by getting out of bed, the issue of gray zones seems beside the point. By the end, DiAngelo has white Americans muzzled, straitjacketed, tied down, and chloroformed for good measure—but for what?And herein is the real problem with White Fragility. DiAngelo does not see fit to address why all of this agonizing soul-searching is necessary to forging change in society. One might ask just how a people can be poised for making change when they have been taught that pretty much anything they say or think is racist and thus antithetical to the good. What end does all this self-mortification serve? Impatient with such questions, DiAngelo insists that “wanting to jump over the hard, personal work and get to ‘solutions’” is a “foundation of white fragility.” In other words, for DiAngelo, the whole point is the suffering. And note the scare quotes around solutions, as if wanting such a thing were somehow ridiculous.A corollary question is why Black people need to be treated the way DiAngelo assumes we do. The very assumption is deeply condescending to all proud Black people. In my life, racism has affected me now and then at the margins, in very occasional social ways, but has had no effect on my access to societal resources; if anything, it has made them more available to me than they would have been otherwise. Nor should anyone dismiss me as a rara avis. Being middle class, upwardly mobile, and Black has been quite common during my existence since the mid-1960s, and to deny this is to assert that affirmative action for Black people did not work.In 2020—as opposed to 1920—I neither need nor want anyone to muse on how whiteness privileges them over me. Nor do I need wider society to undergo teachings in how to be exquisitely sensitive about my feelings. I see no connection between DiAngelo’s brand of reeducation and vigorous, constructive activism in the real world on issues of import to the Black community. And I cannot imagine that any Black readers could willingly submit themselves to DiAngelo’s ideas while considering themselves adults of ordinary self-regard and strength. Few books about race have more openly infantilized Black people than this supposedly authoritative tome.[Adam Serwer: ‘Protest is the highest form of patriotism’]Or simply dehumanized us. DiAngelo preaches that Black History Month errs in that it “takes whites out of the equation”—which means that it doesn’t focus enough on racism. Claims like this get a rise out of a certain kind of room, but apparently DiAngelo wants Black History Month to consist of glum recitations of white perfidy. This would surely help assuage DiAngelo’s sense of complicity in our problems, but does she consider what a slog this gloomy, knit-browed Festivus of a holiday would be for actual Black people? Too much of White Fragility has the problem of elevating rhetorical texture over common sense.White Fragility is, in the end, a book about how to make certain educated white readers feel better about themselves. DiAngelo’s outlook rests upon a depiction of Black people as endlessly delicate poster children within this self-gratifying fantasy about how white America needs to think—or, better, stop thinking. Her answer to white fragility, in other words, entails an elaborate and pitilessly dehumanizing condescension toward Black people. The sad truth is that anyone falling under the sway of this blinkered, self-satisfied, punitive stunt of a primer has been taught, by a well-intentioned but tragically misguided pastor, how to be racist in a whole new way.
theatlantic.com
US coronavirus deaths could reach more than 220K by November: study
U.S. coronavirus deaths are projected to reach more than 220,000 by the beginning of November as many states continue to report a surge in new cases and hospitalizations.
foxnews.com
Apple Scores Legal Victory Against $14.9 Billion E.U. Tax Demand
The decision is a setback for European efforts to clamp down on what the authorities there believe is anti-competitive behavior.
nytimes.com
Record heat continues for the US
The first half of July has brought hundreds of heat records to the US as well as thousands globally. CNN meteorologist Pedram Javaheri has the record details and who will feel that heat today.
edition.cnn.com
Many Americans might not get another stimulus check. Here's where things stand on another COVID-19 bill
Congress is set to begin negotiations as early as next week on another coronavirus emergency bill, just weeks before bolstered unemployment benefits are set to run out.        
usatoday.com
Decapitated body of tech CEO found in NYC apartment, sources say
The body of a decapitated, dismembered tech CEO was found inside a Lower East Side apartment on Tuesday afternoon — sorted in plastic bags right next to a power saw, sources told The Post.
foxnews.com
A Bizarre 1970 Arctic Killing Offers a Road Map for How Not to Deal With Murder in Space
Murder will happen in outer space. This 50-year-old death on a now-melted chunk of ice shows how complicated it will get.
slate.com
Coronavirus updates: California updates testing guidelines; Tennessee governor won't consider closing state; vaccine candidate shows promise
California updated its testing guidelines. Best Buy and some Starbucks will require face masks. France plans to reopen school. Here's the latest news.       
usatoday.com
Tesla workers say company ignoring virus concerns at Calif. plant
Voices getting louder after industry blog report that 100 workers at company's Fremont plant have tested positive for COVID-19 and more than 1,000 have been exposed.
cbsnews.com
On This Day: 15 July 2016
The first season of Netflix's smash sci-fi series "Stranger Things" was released. (July 15)       
usatoday.com
The Wave of Gun Violence in N.Y.C.
Fifty-three people were shot from Friday through Monday. Officials have suggested reasons, but it’s difficult to pinpoint one root cause.
1 h
nytimes.com
Ivanka Trump posts photo of herself presenting can of Goya black beans, critics explode
1 h
foxnews.com
The Return of Jane Elliott
Before anti-racist reading lists and Instagram allyship, white people were presented with the “Blue Eyes, Brown Eyes” exercise. Its 86-year-old creator can’t believe she’s still being asked about it.
1 h
nytimes.com
Coronavirus Live Updates: Virus Resurgence Threatens U.S. Economy
The economic pain was evident in gloomy forecasts from companies. The Trump administration ordered hospitals to bypass the C.D.C. with key virus data.
1 h
nytimes.com
Mongolian teen infected by marmot dies of bubonic plague
In an unrelated case in neighboring China, a patient who was infected with plague in the northern region of Inner Mongolia is improving, Chinese state media say.
1 h
cbsnews.com
Congress Is Investigating Contracts Tied To Mask And PPE Shortages
Seven multi-million-dollar contracts are at the center of a House subcommittee probe. Investigators say the companies lacked experience and some had political connections to the Trump administration.
1 h
npr.org
In Supreme Court Term, Liberals Stuck Together While Conservatives Appeared Fractured
The court's conservative justices wrote separately a lot, often just for themselves. Meanwhile, the court's liberals let their victories speak for themselves and dissented as a bloc.
1 h
npr.org
Britons toppled a slaver’s statue. A guerrilla artist replaced it with a Black Lives Matter protester.
“Being up there, with my fist raised – it was an amazing moment, and this captures it. It gives me goose pimples,” Jen Reid told the Guardian.
1 h
washingtonpost.com
Chef creates 'world's healthiest' cookie with all 5 daily servings of fruits and vegetables
Don’t forget to eat your cookies.
2 h
foxnews.com
D.C.-area forecast: Record 90-degree streak still in play; super hot this weekend
If D.C. gets to 90 degrees today, tomorrow and Friday, we’ll set a new record with 22 consecutive 90-degree days.
2 h
washingtonpost.com
The universe's clock might have bigger ticks than we imagine
The smallest conceivable length of time might be no larger than a millionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a second. That's according to a new theory describing the implications of the universe having a fundamental clock-like property whose ticks would interact with our best atomic timepieces. 
2 h
foxnews.com
‘Coming Out of the Woodwork’: Black Lives Matter in Small-Town America
A multiracial future has appeared, along with unprecedented conversations about race.
2 h
nytimes.com
She Was Stopped by the Police Multiple Times. Her Bosses Decided to Help.
A restaurant with Black employees is prioritizing its workers’ mental health as they navigate the coronavirus and the protests against racial injustice.
2 h
nytimes.com