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L.A. school board cuts school police budget by $25 million after student protests

The Los Angeles School board voted to defund the school police budget by $25 million following weeks of protests by student activists involved in the Black Lives Matter movement.


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Tamera Mowry exits ‘The Real’ after 7 years
"However, all good things must come to an end, and it's with a bittersweet smile that I announce that I am moving on," Mowry wrote on Instagram.
nypost.com
See stunning San Francisco on this virtual tour
San Francisco might not be California's biggest city, but it makes a good case for being its most beautiful.        
usatoday.com
How Netflix made Breaking Bad a hit — and why that won’t happen again
Actor Bryan Cranston as Walter White in Breaking Bad. | AMC On this episode of Land of the Giants, we explore how Netflix boosted traditional TV shows — and undermined traditional TV at the same time. Breaking Bad was one of the biggest hits Netflix never made. After old episodes of the drama about high school science teacher and meth dealer Walter White began airing on Netflix, the show got more popular on AMC, its original network. Usually, audiences for TV shows dwindle over time. With Breaking Bad, the opposite happened: Its season four finale had less than 2 million viewers; but when the series finale aired two years later, its audience had grown to 10 million people. This is an example of what we call the Netflix Effect — that’s Netflix’s ability to find new and bigger audiences for shows that had languished on traditional networks. That’s why Netflix was traditional TV’s frenemy for a relatively brief time period. It could grow the popularity of shows that were still running on traditional TV — while simultaneously teaching TV viewers to stream shows on Netflix. AMC insists that Netflix was just one of the reasons Breaking Bad got so big — it says that audiences also found the show via video-on-demand and Breaking Bad “marathons” that the network would run. Most other people, including Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan, credit Netflix for the boost. Netflix’s platform made it easy for viewers to binge multiple episodes in one sitting. They could watch episodes whenever they wanted, rather than waiting for them to air on TV. And, crucially: When they watched Breaking Bad on Netflix, they didn’t see a single commercial. Netflix provided a superior way to watch the show, and audiences followed. Breaking Bad’s Netflix-powered ascent was good for AMC, and for Netflix, and for Netflix viewers. But this kind of win-win-win was a temporary phase for Netflix and the TV networks. Eventually, the TV guys realized that even though Netflix could boost them in the short-term, they were weakening their own business in the long-term by training viewers to watch their stuff on Netflix instead of TV. So they started to claw back their programming for their own, Netflix-style services that they began launching. But Netflix executives, who anticipated that move, had been busy creating their own shows. Even in 2020, it’s not always a direct competition. Netflix is spending billions a year on its own shows to pull more viewers away from traditional TV, but the streaming service can sometimes still work with traditional TV. Last year, Gilligan finally released a Breaking Bad sequel — El Camino, a movie focused on Walter White’s sidekick Jesse Pinkman. And this time, the TV/Netflix order was reversed: The movie debuted on Netflix last fall and then showed up on AMC a few months later. On this episode of Land of the Giants: The Netflix Effect, we look at Netflix’s relationship with the traditional media companies it eventually disrupted. It’s complicated! Which makes it perfect for our podcast. Subscribe to Land of the Giants on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
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Avlon: You should be outraged at the muzzling of Cohen
CNN's John Avlon questions Michael Cohen's return to prison, after a dispute between Cohen and the government over what lawyers say were restrictions in paperwork designed to prevent Cohen from finishing a book about President Trump.
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Daniel Silva finished Vatican thriller ‘The Order’ during pandemic with 'an extremely heavy heart,' he says
New York Times No. 1 bestselling author Daniel Silva is back with his 20th novel in the famed Gabriel Allon series.
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White House economic adviser Kudlow says 4th round of stimulus relief coming
White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said it’s “increasingly clear” there will be a fourth stimulus package as the country attempts to recover after the financial devastation caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Meanwhile, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he has been in discussion with Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin on the next phase and said...
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Arizona lake 'electrocution incident' kills 2 brothers, girlfriend left with 'burn marks' on feet, legs
Two brothers have died and a girlfriend of one was left with burn marks after a possible electrocution incident at a lake in Arizona, officials and family members revealed Monday.
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Texas ER doctor says Houston hospitals stretched to their limits: 'It's been very terrifying'
Texas emergency rooms and intensive care units are "bulging at the seams," bombarded by a tsunami of new coronavirus cases, Dr. Natasha Kathuria reported Tuesday. 
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How Kelly Preston spent her final years while privately battling cancer
Kelly Preston died at age 57 from breast cancer on Sunday after a private two-year battle. 
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Bill Nye demonstrates why wearing masks protects people from COVID-19
Scientist Bill Nye is urging everyone to wear a mask in the fight to stop the coronavirus. He says it is "literally a matter of life and death." Nye joins "CBS This Morning" to give a live demonstration of why masks work.
cbsnews.com
Bizarre 'Captain Hook' dinosaur with long claws discovered in Montana Badlands
Researchers have discovered a new species of dinosaur, known as Trirarchuncus prairiensis, in the Montana Badlands with a unique hooked claw at the end of its arms.
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Zappos is now selling single shoes and mixed size pairs
You can now buy a single sandal or sneaker from Zappos, or even mixed size pairs of running shoes.
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Josh Hawley's message to ESPN: Don't apologize, ask NBA tough questions about China
Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., said on Monday that ESPN should ask tough questions to the NBA about China’s misdeeds, instead of apologizing about a reporter’s insult. 
foxnews.com
Cops arrest man who attacked Post reporter with wooden board
Daniel Mayo, 32, was hauled into custody Monday night, a day after he was caught on camera whacking the journalist, Kevin Sheehan.
nypost.com
Minka Kelly urging balding tiger at zoo Carole Baskin is after be placed in sanctuary
In a letter obtained exclusively by Page Six, Kelly asks Waccatee Zoo to release Lila.
nypost.com
HBO documentary 'Showbiz Kids' depicts dark side of childhood fame, from abuse to self-doubt
"People were like, 'Oh, my God, it's the kid from 'E.T.'!" Henry Thomas remembers in "Showbiz Kids." "I wasn't set up for that at 10 or 11."        
usatoday.com
‘X-Men’ Forced Superhero Movies to Evolve 20 Years Ago Today
We're still living in the shadow of X-Men.
nypost.com
This week in TikTok: Every influencer wants a reality show
Plus, Chinese street style fancams! Hello from The Goods’ twice-weekly newsletter! On Tuesdays, internet culture reporter Rebecca Jennings uses this space to update you all on what’s been going on in the world of TikTok. Is there something you want to see more of? Less of? Different of? Email rebecca.jennings@vox.com, and subscribe to The Goods’ newsletter here. Famous TikTok teens are always squabbling with each other — that’s part of the point! — but last week our nation’s top creators of negligible scandals were so angry with each other that the event was given its own nickname: the TikTokalypse. I won’t go into extreme detail because it’s all very byzantine and also I feel weird about speculating on high schooler’s personal lives; plus, plenty of other outlets have already published helpful rundowns. Basically, it revolves around two former couples — Chase “Lil Huddy” Hudson and Charli D’Amelio, and the Sway House’s Josh Richards and Nessa Barrett. Apparently, Lil Huddy kissed Nessa at one point, and then when a bunch of people started unfollowing him, he posted a Notes App accusing several other TikTokers of cheating on their respective girlfriends. There’s more, but you get it. If you’re thinking, “This sounds like Laguna Beach,” ding ding ding! You clearly have the mind of a TikTok talent manager, because every single one of them is currently shopping a reality show about their respective collab house. Pitching has been ongoing since pre-quarantine, but it’s actually a lot more difficult to get a TikTok reality show greenlit than you might think. According to Taylor Lorenz’s latest, management companies are trying to sell shows about the business deals that go on behind the camera (boring!), but producers are far more interested in the relationships between its stars (the reason people watch reality shows!). When the stars are still minors, though, it becomes a bit of an issue. Teenagers aren’t typically cast for reality shows because it can feel “sensational,” according to one production head, and the lack of an existing model for how a show about a content house might work is itself a hurdle when pitching to networks. The linear narrative TV drama is also pretty different from how followers currently track their favorite creators’ personal arcs, which is usually a collage of Instagram Lives, drama accounts, and YouTube apology videos. Said one talent manager, “In many ways, fans are already watching the TV show, just not on TV.” So do we need a TikTok reality show? On one hand, no, because the people who care about them are already following their every move. On the other, as The Cut points out, social media allows kids to be the executive producers of their own lives. With stars this savvy about what plays and what doesn’t, what might a seasoned reality TV producer be able to craft out of fame-hungry teens with millions of fans? My actual thought, though, is that a reality show about TikTokers will either be very dark and totally mesmerizing or so surface-level that nobody will even bother watching. I’m not sure the world needs either one. TikTok in the news “What are you going to write about when TikTok gets banned?” is the question I was asked most this weekend, and the answer is that I do not think the US will actually ban TikTok. The Verge has a great explainer on why it would be very, very difficult for the Trump administration to do so. (The answer to the original question is probably meandering blog posts about sexy fruits.) Amazon sent out, then retracted, an email demanding that its employees delete TikTok due to “security risks.” These supposed risks, which virtually all TikTok bans are ostensibly about, have stemmed from TikTok’s parent company ByteDance’s relationship with the Chinese government. Over the past year, TikTok has distanced itself from ByteDance and China in general, opening headquarters in the US and London and insisting that it does not and will not share any user data with the Chinese government. To prove it, TikTok removed itself from Hong Kong app stores after a Beijing law went into effect stating that the Chinese government would no longer require a warrant to request user data from internet companies. A temporary glitch last week dropped every TikTok user’s follower and view counts down to zero, and everyone reacted very calmly. Just kidding, people freaked out and thought the end was nigh. Jason Derulo makes $75,000 per TikTok. Do with that information what you will. Meme watch Last week I tweeted an example of a video genre that’s been all over my For You page, which is this: paparazzi-style videos, sometimes in slow motion, of impossibly attractive and stylish people in China. There is no “deeper meaning” to them; they only exist to make viewers feel ugly and jealous and I love every second of it. every time I think I look cute I think about chinese streetstyle fancams and realize that actually im a goblin pic.twitter.com/lelJkXlgzU— Rebecca Jennings (@rebexxxxa) July 9, 2020 While they’ve been around for years — you can easily find examples on YouTube and Instagram — on TikTok they’re more visible than ever, and many users are posting about their love of scrolling through Douyin, the TikTok app in China, to find more of them. The million-dollar question, though, is whether these videos are staged or just some guy with a camera filming random beautiful people, which would feel sort of creepy. When I asked on Twitter, multiple people told me that they’re typically plandids, or mock-candid films shot with friends. If so, this needs to become a thing in the US too. Normalize dressing amazingly and making your friend film you like a celebrity!!! One Last Thing Imagine if TikTok existed in 2003 and you and your friends made a dorky music video for “Heaven” by DJ Sammy. That’s what this video is. @lindseystirling #aheadofitstime ♬ original sound - lindseystirling Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
vox.com
ER doctors and nurses describe fear on the front lines during COVID-19 uptick
Front-line workers in ERs across the South and the West are seeing upticks in coronavirus cases in their hospitals and communities. They spoke with senior medical correspondent Dr. Tara Narula about their concerns watching the growing number of people getting sick.
cbsnews.com
Prices rose in June as gas got more expensive
Consumer prices rose in June after three straight months of declines, as the cost of gas and food increased.
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House Democrats restarting effort to obtain Trump’s tax returns
Douglas Letter, the top lawyer for the House of Representatives, urged the court in a filing Monday to immediately put its July 9 ruling into effect so lawmakers could bring the issue back to the original US District Court judge who oversaw the case for renewed consideration.
nypost.com
Dior partners with Ghanaian artist Amoako Boafo for a stunning new collection
As creative director for Dior Men, Kim Jones has shown a flare for art world collaborations, teaming up with the likes of Raymond Pettibon, KAWS, Hajime Sorayama and Daniel Arsham to enrich his streetwear-meets-Savile Row collections and shows.
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Dior partners with Ghanaian artist Amoako Boafo for a stunning new collection
Dior Men's creative director Kim Jones collaborated with Ghanian painter Amoako Boafo to create one of the most talked-about collections of the Spring-Summer 2021 menswear season.
edition.cnn.com
Tougher rules, new lockdowns around the world as COVID spreads
Australia threatens to jail quarantine violators for months, Hong Kong shutters Disneyland, and one Indian state is back on lockdown.
cbsnews.com
UK orders Chinese telecom giant Huawei to be removed from its 5G network
LONDON – Prime Minister Boris Johnson ordered Huawei equipment to be purged completely from Britain’s 5G network by 2027, risking the ire of China by signaling that the world’s biggest telecoms equipment maker is no longer welcome in the West. The seven-year lag will please British telecoms operators such as BT, Vodafone and Three, which...
nypost.com
Daniel Lewis Lee's execution part of first wave of federal executions since 2003
A former white supremacist convicted of murdering a family of three was executed Tuesday morning -- the first federal execution since 2003 and part of a new wave of such executions by the Department of Justice.
foxnews.com
Delta CEO says zero layoffs a possibility, promises empty middle seats beyond September
Delta said more than 17,000 of its 90,000 employees are taking early retirement, thousands more unpaid leave as the airline shrinks due to pandemic.       
usatoday.com
New Jersey elementary school unveils plan to have students safely return to the classroom
As the coronavirus pandemic continues to worsen, school districts across the country are grappling with how best to safely have children return to class. Some districts are choosing to have smaller class sizes, limit movement within the school and restrict visitors. Meg Oliver gets an inside look at how one New Jersey elementary school is facing this challenge.
cbsnews.com
Joe Biden Quotes Mao Zedong; Senior Adviser Called Mao 'Favorite Political Philosopher'
Former Vice President Joe Biden used a quote made famous by the late Chinese Communist leader Mao Zedong in an online fundraiser.
breitbart.com
Grant Imahara, ‘Mythbusters’ Host, Dies at 49
The electrical engineer and roboticist passed away suddenly following a brain aneurysm.
nypost.com
Official UFC 252 poster revealed as Stipe Miocic and Daniel Cormier feature, 'Face/Off' style
The official poster for UFC 252 features the trilogy bout between heavyweight champion Stipe Miocic and Daniel Cormier.       Related StoriesSportsbook gives 'bad beat refunds' to anyone who bet on Max Holloway winning at UFC 251UFC 251 reactions: Winning and losing fighters on social mediaUFC on ESPN 13: Cody Stamann thinks 'one-dimensional' Jimmie Rivera hasn't evolved 
usatoday.com
Ghislaine Maxwell should be denied bail after alleged attempt to flee from FBI agents: Prosecutors
Jeffrey Epstein's former girlfriend -- a purported associate in his alleged sex trafficking ring -- will appear in front of a judge via video feed Tuesday after prosecutors revealed startling new details about her arrest earlier in July. The arraignment will determine whether or not Ghislaine Maxwell is released on bail pending a trial. Jericka Duncan reports.
cbsnews.com
California shutters businesses, makes some schools remote due to COVID-19 spike
A spike in COVID-19 cases in California is forcing the governor to shut down businesses once again. The skyrocketing rates there and around the country are forcing governors to rethink their strategies for reopening, especially as students are set to return to school. Jonathan Vigliotti reports.
cbsnews.com
COVID has made living with Parkinson's more difficult, increased symptoms, survey finds
For those with Parkinson's and COVID, "Everything worsened," a study conducted by the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research found.       
usatoday.com
Lori Loughlin asks judge to reduce $1 million bond, arguing there's 'no indication' she'll flee
Lori Loughlin and Mossimo Giannulli are asking a federal judge to reduce their bond in the college admissions scandal case from $1 million to $100,000, arguing that they are not flight risks. 
foxnews.com
Maryland rapper IDK yields 'Colbert' spotlight to Black Lives Matter
For young artists, their debut on late-night television is a time to show off their catchiest song and draw more fans to their catalog. Not IDK.
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Delta lost $5.7 billion in last quarter as recovery stalls
CEO Ed Bastian predicts it will take years for the airline to rebound, with passenger counts down more than 90%.
cbsnews.com
Tom Bergeron, Erin Andrews out as ‘Dancing With the Stars’ hosts
The "Dancing With the Stars" ballroom is going to look vastly different for Season 29.
nypost.com
Passenger claims American Airlines flight attendant 'violently' shook her, accused her of stealing: suit
Nathalie Sorensen is claiming a flight attendant named “Thor” grabbed her arm and shook her “violently” while accusing her of stealing a blanket.
foxnews.com
Washington name change is complicated by one frustrated trademark expert
A Virginia man who owns 44 trademarks relating to potential new names for the Washington Redskins is begging the franchise to take one of them off his hands. “@NFL @nflcommish Take my trademarks please! You can put that in all caps,” 61-year-old actuary Martin McCaulay tweeted Monday. “I sent you an email on 7/4/2020 and...
nypost.com
Burger King launches Whopper made from cows on a green diet
Introducing the new and improved Whopper — now with fewer cow farts. Burger King is serving a version of its signature sandwich made from cows that spew less methane, a nasty greenhouse gas that’s contributing to climate change. The cows that produce the special patties — which go on sale in five cities Tuesday —...
nypost.com
Chicago mayor deploys 'Census Cowboy' to boost participation, in bizarre scene: 'Time to giddy-up'
The city of Chicago has been under a shadow cast by the coronavirus pandemic and a surge in violence. But Mayor Lori Lightfoot is calling in a hero to tackle a different problem -- low response rates for the U.S. Census.
foxnews.com
The Nintendo Entertainment System gets the Lego treatment complete with a Super Mario Bros Game Pack
On Aug. 1 you'll be able to build your own Lego version of the Nintendo Entertainment System console. And it's not just the NES console, but the controller, Super Mario Bros. game cartridge and a 1980s style TV.
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'Mythbusters' engineer star Grant Imahara dead from a brain aneurysm at 49
Grant Imahara, the engineer host of Discovery's science show 'MythBusters' and of Netflix's 'White Rabbit Project' died from a brain aneurysm at 49.        
usatoday.com
At least 17 shot in New York City as gun violence continues to soar
Brooklyn saw the most violence with 10 shooting incidents and a total of 12 victims, sources said.
foxnews.com
The Daily 202: Trump’s coronavirus blame game is part of a pattern from the White House
Anthony S. Fauci is the latest fall guy in a worsening pandemic, and response.
washingtonpost.com
Federal Government Executes 1st Prisoner In 17 Years After Overnight Court Rulings
Daniel Lee, 47, was put to death on Tuesday morning in the federal death chamber in the first federal execution since 2003. Other inmates are scheduled for death this week.
npr.org
Young conservative women who went viral for standing up to liberal mob say they've received death threats
Savanah Hernandez, who was targeted by Black Lives Matter protesters when she showed up to a rally with a sign that read “Police Lives Matter,” said she was “viciously attacked” and has “gotten death threats from people on the left” because they don’t like her message.
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