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OkCupid to launch 'VILF' campaign to encourage voting

OkCupid is encouraging its users to vote, and it’s doing so with a provocative saying.
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Football and fashion week kick off: The Post’s week in photos
The regular football season has kicked off amid the ongoing pandemic, in addition the return of a socially distant fashion week.
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Review: A woman on the verge makes a stand in heart-pounding thriller 'Alone'
Jules Willcox and Marc Menchaca star in "Alone," an effective survival thriller from John Hyams about a vulnerable woman terrorized by a predator.
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latimes.com
Harvey Weinstein stripped of UK royal honor by Queen Elizabeth II
Harvey Weinstein was stripped of his British honorary award by Queen Elizabeth II. 
foxnews.com
‘The Boys’ Cast Knew They Had a Hit When They Saw Spice Girls Fan Art
"Oh s--t, we might be good."
nypost.com
Biden’s weakness among Hispanics is not his fault. It’s Trump’s.
Yes, Trump has gained significantly among Latinos.
washingtonpost.com
Review: Alexandra Daddario shines in the darkness of 'Lost Girls and Love Hotels'
A self-destructive American in Japan falls for a yakuza in 'Lost Girls and Love Hotels.'
latimes.com
Trump: America’s perfection shall not be questioned, except by me
What we all want to hear, he thinks, is that racism is over and we should hate anyone who says otherwise.
washingtonpost.com
Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston's 'Fast Times' reunion is awkward and fantastic
Former couple Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston joined fellow actors Thursday for a highly suggestive virtual table read of "Fast Times at Ridgemont High."
latimes.com
Florida parents are getting high and exposing themselves during kids’ virtual classes
Florida moms and dads have been spotted smoking weed, drinking and walking around half-naked in the background of their kids’ online classes, frustrated teachers said.
nypost.com
Jamison Crowder out on Sunday in tough Jets blow
Sam Darnold insisted he has enough playmakers around him even if his top receiver, Jamison Crowder, was unable to play. Now he’ll get the chance to prove it. Crowder (hamstring) was ruled out by coach Adam Gase before Friday’s practice, further hurting an already underwhelming group around Darnold. Running back Le’Veon Bell and rookie receiver...
nypost.com
TIFF 2020 kicks off a strange start to the Oscars race
A slimmed down Toronto Film Festival contained more than a few gems worthy of your time. But do awards await?
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Blue Bell Creameries slapped with $17M fine for listeria outbreak
Ice cream manufacturer Blue Bell Creameries has been hit a $17.25 million fine for causing a massive listeria outbreak in 2015. The fine, issued by a federal court judge in Texas, is the largest criminal penalty ever for a food safety case, the Department of Justice said in announcing the unappetizing fine on Thursday. “The...
nypost.com
Dems Leading GOP Counterparts in North Carolina, Arizona and Maine Senate Races, Poll Says
A new New York Times/Sienna College poll shows incumbent GOP Senators in three states at risk of losing in the November 3 election.
newsweek.com
Lakers' Kyle Kuzma reacts to Louisville's $12M settlement with Breonna Taylor's family
Los Angeles Lakers forward Kyle Kuzma didn’t appear to be pleased with the settlement Breonna Taylor’s family received after she was fatally shot by police six months ago.
foxnews.com
Tropical Storm Wilfred has formed in the eastern Atlantic, completing 2020's list of Atlantic hurricane names
Tropical Storm Wilfred formed in the eastern Atlantic on Friday, marking off the last name on the 2020 list of Atlantic hurricane names.
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How to Prevent Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria From Causing the Next Pandemic
Right now, evolutionary biology is making it hard to market new drugs.
slate.com
Case of rare mosquito-borne EEE virus suspected in Michigan
Michigan health officials this week reported a suspected human case of the dangerous mosquito-borne illness Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) virus. 
foxnews.com
New ‘historical’ American Girl doll is from way back in the ‘80s
The newest AG hails from a bygone era, an ancient decade few will remember.
nypost.com
Pittsburgh Museum Removes Diorama Showing Lion Attacking Arab Man, Camel From Public View Due to Ethics Concerns
The taxidermy display was covered up at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh after concerns were raised.
newsweek.com
Teen arrested, second suspect at large in ‘ambush’ shooting of Arizona trooper
A teen was arrested and a second suspect is in the wind following an “ambush”-style shooting of an Arizona state trooper Thursday, authorities said. Luis German Espinoza Acuna, 17, allegedly used an AK-47 to fire multiple shots at Arizona Department of Public Safety detectives in a residential area of Phoenix just before 9 a.m., the...
nypost.com
Donald Cerrone is a fan of Khamzat Chimaev's style: 'I like this son of a (expletive)'
Donald Cerrone likes what Khamzat Chimaev is doing in the UFC.        Related StoriesUFC free fight: Israel Adesanya outlasts Kelvin Gastelum in 2019 'Fight of the Year'It's all good if Michael Chandler gets an immediate UFC title shot | OpinionBellator champ Juan Archuleta wants Kyoji Horiguchi, but thinks he'll get Sergio Pettis 
usatoday.com
Kidnapper Who Raped Girlfriend Has Sentence Slashed As Court Says He Was Exasperated She Cheated
Man kidnapped his 43-year-old girlfriend punching her in the face and threatening her with a knife before dragging her to a bed by her hair and sexually abusing her.
newsweek.com
Kanye West worries fans as he tweets about being murdered
"WHEN PEOPLE THREATEN TO TAKE YOU OUT OF MY LIFE JUST KNOW I LOVE YOU"
nypost.com
Dog overcomes crippling anxiety — with his own emotional support dog
Yes, Frank the wiener dog has taken on the role canines — and peacocks, cats, opossums and miniature horses — typically fulfill for humans.
nypost.com
Russia, Following Skripal Playbook, Sows Conspiracy Theory about German Intelligence over Navalny
State Duma speaker Vyacheslav Volodin said foreign operators such as German intelligence agents may have poisoned the Kremlin critic.
newsweek.com
These are America's best casinos, both in and outside of Vegas
Place your bets       
usatoday.com
Trump won’t attend UN General Assembly in person due to COVID-19
But it remained unclear in what way the president would take part in the gathering for the 75th General Assembly, which is going virtual amid the global outbreak, according to reports.
nypost.com
Jared Kusher, Trump's Peace Team Named World's Most Influential Jews by Jerusalem Post
President Donald Trump's peace team was awarded the top spot on the paper's annual list for its role in negotiating the Abraham Accords.
newsweek.com
All the aides, allies and even family who have spoken out against Trump
Given the growing onslaught of Trump's internal critics, it can be difficult to keep them all straight.
washingtonpost.com
See Justin Bieber and Chance The Rapper reunite in new music video
Justin Bieber has reunited with Chance The Rapper for a new track, "Holy." Here's a look at the accompanying music video, also featuring Ryan Destiny from Fox series "Star" and Wilmer Valderrama from "NCIS."
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Erin Andrews featured on weird ‘Thursday Night Football’ cake
A portrait cake just doesn’t do Erin Andrews justice. Video posted to the Fox Sports NFL sideline reporter’s Instagram story Thursday showed off cakes the broadcasters were gifted with their faces on them at First Energy Stadium for the Bengals-Browns game. But there was something off with Andrews’ side of the dessert. “How cute is...
nypost.com
Emmy preview: 'Watchmen' and 'The Mandalorian' lead the way into a strange virtual weekend
The Emmys will be handed out this weekend, but 70 categories have already been presented during the lead-up to the main event in what is perhaps the strangest week in the award's 72-year history, while highlighting the unwieldy nature of the TV industry.
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Gun man targeted home of New Jersey police officers and their baby, public's help sought
Investigators seek public's help after attack on officers' East Camden home.        
usatoday.com
Aggressive Coyote Attacks Woman on Remote California Beach
The woman walked nearly two miles after being bitten in order to get to her car, before driving herself to a hospital.
newsweek.com
The Books Briefing: How to Remake America
The Constitution denied Danielle Allen’s enslaved ancestors the right to full citizenship—but she still believes in its ability to shape America for the better. Revisiting documents and moments from this country’s founding to parse how they can guide our future is the the central idea of The Atlantic’s new series “Making America Again.” The project offers a look at the United States’ profound failures (including current-day happenings such as the pandemic and racist police killings) and what it might take to mend them.The staff writer Adam Serwer considers the failure of Reconstruction, drawing from historical texts such as The Dance of Freedom, by Barry A. Crouch, and The Death of Reconstruction, by Heather Cox Richardson. Serwer argues that today’s catastrophes offer the opportunity to finally remake America as a multiracial democracy. In Stakes Is High, which was excerpted in The Atlantic, Mychal Denzel Smith makes the case for sweeping reform, writing that incremental change won’t fix policing.Some believe that the possibility for expansive reform after the pandemic may extend to other arenas as well. In The Riches of This Land, the journalist Jim Tankersley looks at what measures might help rebuild the middle class. Works such as Triumph of the City, from the economist Edward Glaeser, and The Race Underground, by the journalist Doug Most, provide insight into the ways that visionary responses to calamities have changed urban life before—and might change it again today. ​Every Friday in the Books Briefing, we thread together Atlantic stories on books that share similar ideas. Know other book lovers who might like this guide? Forward them this email. What We’re ReadingDjeneba AduayomThe flawed genius of the Constitution“The Constitution’s slow, steady change has regularly been in the direction of moral improvement. In that regard, it has served well as a device for securing and stabilizing genuine human progress not only in politics but also in moral understanding.”
theatlantic.com
Michigan judge extends deadline for absentee ballots by 2 weeks
A Michigan state judge on Friday dramatically expanded the window for when absentee ballots can arrive and get counted after Election Day.
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What's going to happen to TikTok on Sunday
The Trump administration said it will restrict access to TikTok on Sunday, Sept. 20. What does that mean for users of the short-form video app?
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Trump-backed GOP Senate nominee Jason Lewis mocked elementary school sexual harassment in 1999
Jason Lewis, a former GOP congressman running for a US Senate seat in Minnesota, dismissed in a 1999 television show sexual harassment and assault in K-12 schools as being insignificant cases of children teasing each other and argued against a school's legal responsibility to limit harassment between students.
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Poll: Biden Maintains Lead Over Trump
The Democratic nominee leads by 9 points against President Trump, who continues to face an uphill reelection battle. But Joe Biden is underperforming with people of color who are likely to vote.
npr.org
Coronavirus Has Killed 7 Teachers Since School Year Began
A high school teacher in Wisconsin was the latest to die following COVID-19 infection.
newsweek.com
Guitarist Jason Sinay seeks $6.5 million for pedigreed West Hollywood villa
Musician Jason Sinay's Mediterranean villa built by celebrity architect Ted Grenzbach is on the market for $6.5 million in West Hollywood.
latimes.com
See massive turnout for early voting despite pandemic
Large crowds of people have lined up in Fairfax, Virginia, to cast their vote early in the 2020 election, despite the looming threat of coronavirus. CNN's Kristen Holmes reports.
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No need to wait for an occasion to pop this $10 bubbly from Italy
RECOMMENDED | Plus, Greek and Italian white wines, a California sauvignon blanc, and a savory rioja for this week’s sips.
washingtonpost.com
The ROC certification could become the gold standard for wineries, and the earth
The new wine certification aims to go beyond organic and biodynamic.
washingtonpost.com
HBCUs entering the game: Black colleges join the esports bandwagon
Video gaming can be lucrative, and not just for players.
washingtonpost.com
What to watch this weekend, on all your favorite streaming platforms
Regina Hall in Support the Girls, Robert Pattinson in The Devil All the Time, and Emilio Estevez in The Mighty Ducks. | Magnolia Pictures; Netflix; Disney From indie gems to (maybe) the greatest movie of all time. In most of the US, movie theaters are reopening — but dismal box office numbers have revealed that most Americans aren’t rushing back, even with Christopher Nolan’s Tenet trying to lure them in. Thankfully there’s plenty to watch at home, both old and new. I’m always amazed by the vast cornucopia of entertainment available on streaming, from classics to new releases to underappreciated gems. So here are my picks from six streaming services — Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, HBO Max, Disney+, and the Criterion Channel — worth checking out this weekend. On Netflix: A peek into how the internet is trying to hack our brains The Social Dilemma is a new documentary about social media, and to be perfectly honest, it sounds like it ought to be a preachy snorefest. But this film sidesteps a boring lecture by focusing on the way algorithms learn and predict our behavior, and the great ripple effect they have on what we do and what we think. Directed by Jeff Orlowski, The Social Dilemma features interviews with a host of former executives at Facebook, Google, Twitter, Pinterest, and more, all of whom seem uneasy about their involvement in creating the world we live in now. But The Social Dilemma doesn’t stop there, injecting a bit of weirdness into the mix via fictional interstitial scenes about a family (including teens played by Booksmart’s Skyler Gisondo and Moonrise Kingdom’s Kara Hayward) who’s struggling with social media’s place in their lives, and three Vincent Kartheisers (a.k.a. Mad Men’s Pete Campbell) as a trio of devious algorithms trying to get inside their heads. You might like The Social Dilemma if: you’re feeling uneasy about social media but don’t want a sermon about it. Or for something a little different on Netflix ... Try the new film The Devil All the Time, a messy but interesting attempt at a Southern Gothic drama with a star-studded cast: Tom Holland, Riley Keough, Sebastian Stan, Eliza Scanlen, Jason Clarke, Haley Bennett, Mia Wasikowska, Mia Goth, Harry Melling, Bill Skarsgård, and the always-excellent Robert Pattinson as a degraded, predatory preacher. There’s lots of darkness, murder, corruption, sex pests, bad religion, and bad men, and also a lot of great acting. On Hulu: Laugh — and grimace — about women living in a man’s world The title of Support the Girls, writer and director Andrew Bujalski’s extraordinary 2018 film, is a barely concealed double entendre. The film is set in an even less coy Hooters-style bar called Double Whammies; every day, the waitresses — pretty girls in crop tops and cutoffs — serve beer and wings to the mostly male clientele, though Double Whammies insists it’s a family-friendly “mainstream” place. But Support the Girls is not at all the winkingly misogynist raunch-com for dudes that its set-up might imply. Starting out as a workplace comedy featuring a sparkling female ensemble, the movie — which unfolds mostly over a single day — morphs into an affecting, startlingly insightful depiction of the bone-weary work of being a woman in a man’s world. The cast includes Regina Hall, Haley Lu Richardson, James LeGros, and Shayna McHale, a.k.a. the rapper Junglepussy. You might like Support the Girls if: you’re feeling frustrated about the world, and could use some good company. Or for something a little different on Hulu ... Try Tyrel, another dark 2018 comedy, this one about a young Black man named Tyler (played by Jason Mitchell, who portrayed Eazy-E in Straight Outta Compton). Tyler travels to the Catskills with his all-white group of buddies, and the results aren’t quite on the level of Get Out, but the trip does turn into a kind of panicky horror film for him. The movie boasts a cast that includes Michael Cera, Christopher Abbott, Caleb Landry Jones, and Ann Dowd. On Amazon Prime video: Dip into an epic romance about early 20th-century activists, intellectuals, and artists Warren Beatty co-wrote, directed, and starred in Reds, a sweeping 1981 drama about real-life journalist John Reed, who in 1919 published his chronicle of the Russian Revolution, Ten Days That Shook the World. It’s a long movie (three hours and 15 minutes, with an intermission), but it goes by fast, telling the story of Reed and socialite-turned-journalist Louise Bryant (Diane Keaton), who leaves her husband to be with Reed and, from there, joins an intellectual community that finds itself fomenting — and fighting about — revolution. The cast also features Maureen Stapleton as activistEmma Goldman and Jack Nicholson as playwright Eugene O’Neill. You might like Reds if: you’re ready to be swept up in a world of passionate, determined, witty people who believe with all their heart in their cause. Or for something a little different on Amazon Prime Video ... Midsommar was one of the most talked-about films of 2019, a tale of dread and triumph from Hereditary director Ari Aster. (And my explanation of the film’s ending has remained one of my most-read pieces for more than a year, which suggests a lot of people are interested in this movie.) If you haven’t seen it yet, now’s your chance — and if you fell in love with its star, Florence Pugh, when she played Amy in 2019’s Little Women, it’s a great showcase for another side of her talent. On HBO Max: Finally watch — or revisit — a true (and truly enjoyable) masterpiece Ask any group of people to name the greatest American film, and at least a few will say Citizen Kane, Orson Welles’s 1941 magnum opus about a wealthy demagogue named Charles Foster Kane, who’s haunted by the memory of a mysterious “Rosebud.” (If you don’t already know what Rosebud turns out to be, I’m certainly not going to spoil it for you now.) Citizen Kane is not just a masterpiece, though; it’s also a very funny, brilliantly acted, more-relevant-than-ever movie about media-obsessed men who manipulate the world to mirror their own image and are driven by an intense need to be loved by all. You might like Citizen Kane if: you’re ready to laugh, rage, gulp, and be reminded that there is nothing new under the sun. Or for something a little different on HBO Max ... Class Action Park is a wild ride of a documentary about Action Park, an amusement and water park in Vernon, New Jersey, that became notorious for its intensely unsafe rides and no-rules atmosphere. Through archival footage of the park and interviews with former patrons, employees, and eventually victims (including the family of a young man who died after a tragic accident there), the movie tells the tale of the park with both nostalgia and an air of warning. On Disney+: Get nostalgic with a classic ’90s sports film Travel back to 1992, when The Mighty Ducksfirst hit the big screen and spawned not just a series of sequels (which are also streaming on Disney+) but an actual pro hockey team. Emilio Estevez stars as a high-powered defense attorney who is sentenced to community service after getting arrested on a drunk driving charge and ends up coaching a terrible Pee-Wee hockey team. It’s truly a classic sports film, and revisiting it is nothing but fun. You might like The Mighty Ducks if: you’re feeling up for a rousing, inspiring, and just-corny-enough sports film. Or for something a little different on Disney+ ... Have you watched Hamilton yet? If not, it’s time. The filmed version of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s founding fathers musical took Broadway by storm and has sparked debate ever since. And if you’ve already watched Hamilton, there’s no better time than the present to watch it again. Criterion Channel: Feel some feels with a gentle, queer coming-of-age story One of the best films of 2017 was Princess Cyd, a modest but moving coming-of-age story. Director Stephen Cone is a master of small, carefully realized filmmaking; his earlier films such as The Wise Kids and Henry Gamble’s Birthday Party (both of which are also streaming on the Criterion Channel this month) combine an unusual level of empathy for his characters with an unusual assortment of interests: love, desire, sexual awakenings, and religion. Princess Cyd is his most accomplished film to date, about a young woman named Cyd (Jessie Pinnick) who finds herself attracted to a barista named Katie (Malic White) while visiting her Aunt Miranda (Rebecca Spence, playing a character modeled on the author Marilynne Robinson) in Chicago. As she works through her own sexual desire for Katie, Cyd unwinds some of the ways Miranda’s life has gotten too safe. They provoke each other while forming a bond and being prodded toward a larger understanding of the world. Princess Cyd is a graceful and honest film, and it feels like a modest miracle. You might like Princess Cyd if: you want a thoughtful, quiet movie about people finding their way toward their fullest selves. Or for something a little different on the Criterion Channel ... Olivia de Havilland — who died in July at the age of 104 — turned in one of her finest performances in William Wyler’s 1949 film The Heiress, a devastating costume drama about a scorned woman. Havilland plays Catherine, the daughter of a cruel but wealthy man; she falls in love with Morris (Montgomery Clift), who seems to return her affection. But when her father forbids her to marry Morris, their relationship changes, and Havilland’s performance turns on a dime. It’s an extraordinary, brilliant film. Help keep Vox free for all Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.
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What Makes a Pop Act a One-Hit Wonder, From “Volare” to “Maniac” to “Macarena”
If a second hit is not as well-known, the artist might still be considered a one-hit wonder. Young MC will always be known mostly for “Bust a Move."
slate.com
The US economy needs more help. Congress is too divided to provide it
Small businesses are disappearing. Unemployment claims remain unbelievably high. And state and local budgets are imploding. Yet Congress is likely to skip town this month without providing additional emergency aid to the economy, according to Goldman Sachs.
edition.cnn.com