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Philippines FM tells China to ‘Get the f--- out’ in tweet over South China Sea dispute

Teodoro Loscin, the Philippine foreign minister, took to Twitter on Monday to criticize China over what he called Beijing’s illegal activities in the South China Sea, a report said.
Read full article on: foxnews.com
Five migrant girls found abandoned in sweltering heat by Texas farmer
​Five young migrant girls were found by a Texas farmer on his ranch near the Rio Grande River as temperatures soared past 100 degrees.
nypost.com
Fish With Lost Wedding Ring Wrapped Around Body Spotted by Snorkeler
The ring is thought to have become lodged around the body of the fish when the creature was seeking food from the ocean floor.
newsweek.com
Washington Post Picks Sally Buzbee as Top Editor
After more than three decades at the respected news service, Ms. Buzbee becomes the successor to the star editor Martin Baron.
nytimes.com
French artist shows dignity in ordinary people with massive works of art
'JR' says he posts the huge photos on public structures so people can look at them and see themselves.
cbsnews.com
‘Home Town Takeover’ is the Most Radically Kind Show on TV
Ben and Erin Napier are too sweet to be believed.
nypost.com
South Carolina governor slams federal unemployment program as ‘road to socialism’
South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster has slammed federal programs that provide an extra $300 to the unemployed, saying it cripples incentive to work.
nypost.com
How Biden could expand paid family leave to more Americans
President Joe Biden promoting the American Jobs Plan in Norfolk, Virginia, on May 3. | Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images The government’s definition of the family could be expanded in Biden’s American Families Plan. That’s really important. President Joe Biden recently unveiled his American Families Plan, a $1.8 trillion proposal that, among other things, would provide 12 weeks of paid leave to workers caring for new children or a sick family member. Perhaps as important, the proposal could also fundamentally change how the US government defines “family.” The current law of the land is the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), from 1993, which requires large employers to allow workers to take leave for qualified family or medical reasons, but does not require that employees be paid during the time off. And not everyone can take advantage of it. When it comes to unpaid leave, the federal government’s current definition of who counts as family is tied pretty closely to the idea of a nuclear one: married partners and children under the age of 18. That leaves out a massive percentage of the population; just 18.4 percent of Americans live in traditional nuclear-family households. Nine states and the District of Columbia, representing a combined third of the country’s population, have government programs that fund or will soon begin funding paid leave, and each uses a definition of family that goes beyond the FMLA. But leave is governed by a patchwork of state and individual business policies, leaving most families out. Many Americans rely on extended or chosen family for care. For example, fewer than half of LGBTQ Americans surveyed in 2020 said they were most likely to rely on support from biological family when they are sick, according to a survey conducted by the progressive Center for American Progress. The American Families Plan currently does not explicitly include chosen and extended family in its paid leave protections, but it does say access will be expanded. As Sherry Leiwant and Jared Make, the leaders of A Better Balance, a paid family leave and reduced-cost child care programs advocacy group, told Vox, it will be up to groups like theirs to push lawmakers to ensure inclusivity in the congressional version of the plan. Any bill that extends who can take leave to care for loved ones could have massive implications; reframing how the federal government conceives of family could help level the economic playing field. Rep. Richard Neal’s (D-MA) Building an Economy for Families Act, a far more detailed paid leave plan introduced at the end of April, is another example. Leiwant and Make briefly spoke with Vox about Biden’s and Neal’s plans, and the effect a new definition of family would have. The following interview has been edited for length and clarity. Gregory Svirnovskiy Can you walk me through, in layman’s terms, how the federal government defines family? Does that manifest in the FMLA? Sherry Leiwant The federal government, in terms of the way they’ve defined sick leave for their own employees since the ’70s, really, when they began to think of family as other than just the nuclear family, has been very generous. It’s the federal government that coined the term “blood or affinity” as a relationship. And we’ve been using that, as Jared can attest, in all the states where we’ve written model sick leave laws or paid family leave laws. They are now just starting to also include those terms. So the federal government really was a leader here. The FMLA, on the other hand, is extremely narrow. It only applies to spouses and parents, and only to children under 18, which has always been a thorn in my side, because my children are older. So, you know, that’s a very narrow definition. Jared Make As long as A Better Balance has been in existence, we’ve heard from workers that the definition of family under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act is incredibly narrow. And it doesn’t include not only core immediate family relationships — like adult children, domestic partners, siblings, grandparents, grandchildren — but also, you know, the broader chosen family that Sherry mentioned, that the federal government does recognize for its own workers. So there’s a disconnect there, but it’s an area where we’ve seen states really lead the way, and it’s exciting to now see proposals and support federally for paid family and medical leave that will have an inclusive family definition. Gregory Svirnovskiy How have those narrow definitions in the FMLA impacted nontraditional families, particularly members of the LGBTQ community? Jared Make I think the unfortunate reality is it’s left most of those families out historically, and that continues to this day. You know, a major gap is that domestic partners, for example, are not covered. And this certainly before marriage equality was a complete exclusion of same-sex couples. Now that we have marriage equality, of course, married same-sex couples are covered, all spouses are. But the definition continues to leave out domestic partners. Sherry Leiwant Also the immigrant community. In many cases, you have people who are here and have left their most immediate family behind, but they are living with other family members who care for them and whom they care for. You have a lot of people living in extended families. And that can also have a disparate racial and ethnic impact. So it’s very important across the board. Gregory Svirnovskiy Now we have two new proposals for family leave in President Biden’s American Families Plan and in Rep. Richard Neal’s Building an Economy for Families Act. Do these plans go beyond current nuclear family definitions? Sherry Leiwant The Biden team is completely committed to a broad family definition, including the blood or affinity. And that is true also of Rep. Neal, who’s head of the Ways and Means Committee, which is now looking at language for a possible paid family medical leave program for the nation. He has put out a discussion draft that also has a broad and inclusive definition of family. In fact, it kind of follows the FMLA on everything on purposes and weeks and so forth. But there is a specific exception for family definition so that it’s broader. And it’s basically what we’ve been using, and what we’ve been talking about here. Gregory Svirnovskiy I’m glad you brought that up, because one of the things that’s really troubled me is I’ve scoured the internet, and haven’t been able to find any defined language on exactly who can qualify to take leave under the Biden plan, other than these broad allusions to it being more inclusive. Sherry Leiwant Well, I mean, I think what we always expected from the president was a very broad-strokes program that would then be defined more specifically in Congress. This is what he’s sending, he’s not sending detailed legislation. I think working with the committee or the various committees is really important in terms of seeing what actually comes through. And I’m sure that the White House will be involved in some way in what it looks like. Gregory Svirnovskiy Can you tell me more about Rep. Neal’s proposal? Does it differ at all from Biden’s AFP? Sherry Leiwant It expands the family definition. So FMLA, it’s just for parents with young children under 18. The Neal proposal would expand that to a variety of named relatives, as well as those who have the equivalent of a family relationship through blood or affinity. All the nuts and bolts are in there. I’m not sure that, you know, the stakeholders, such as the advocates or the business community or the disabled community will agree with what they’ve done. And there’ll be pushback, and there’ll be conversation, and I’m sure things will be changed. But there are massive amounts of detail in that document. Gregory Svirnovskiy Is there anything missing in the plans Biden or Neal are presenting to Congress right now? Will families that take paid leave be guaranteed their jobs on returning from leave, for instance? Sherry Leiwant The FMLA continues to be the only job protection statute or legal remedy. If you’re taking care of someone in your extended family, you could get benefits for that if Neal’s discussion draft were to pass, or Biden’s, but the FMLA continues to be the only job protection statute. We would have to expand the definition of family there. The AFP is silent [on job protection], isn’t really addressing that issue. Neal’s proposal, also silent. There’s nothing in there. It doesn’t mean that the Biden proposal wouldn’t include something. But I don’t believe they said anything one way or the other. Gregory Svirnovskiy In the end, though, looking at Biden’s proposal and Rep. Neal’s plan for paid leave, can you speak to the symbolic importance of that for the American family? Sherry Leiwant Yes, it’s extremely important. I mean, I think it’s time. The time has long passed, really, for us to recognize that American families are not just mother, father, child, and parents. People rely on loved ones for their care. And many of our particular communities like the LGBT community, disability community, a lot of immigrant families, are extended families that care for each other, and we need to start recognizing that. This is a huge step in that direction.
vox.com
Suspected Russian Shooter Got Gun License Less Than 2 Weeks Ago, Lawmaker Says
A teacher, seven eighth-graders and a school staff member were the nine pronounced dead, with 21 others hospitalized, in Kazan. Russian media said the suspect was a former student at the school.
newsweek.com
Dad charged in Chicago toddler’s death
Police in Chicago say Rolando Ortiz slashed the throat of his 2-year-old son, Mateo Garcia Aguayo, nearly severing the boy’s head, because the child was keeping him from getting sleep. Charlie De Mar reports for CBS Chicago.
cbsnews.com
Production Problems for Russia's COVID Vaccine Lead to Suggestion of Six-Month Wait Between Doses
Mexico has yet to received the number of vaccines promised by Russia. They are unable to keep up with the productions of the first dose of Sputnik V, Russia denies and says both doses are being upscaled.
newsweek.com
Palestinians Echo Black Lives Matter as U.S. Activists Repay George Floyd Solidarity
A fresh spike in violence between Israelis and Palestinians has prompted expressions of anger and solidarity from the American left, including the Black Lives Matter movement.
newsweek.com
Dozens dead in suicide bomb attack near girls' school in Afghanistan
Afghan officials are blaming the Taliban for an attack on a girls' school, the first major attack since the U.S. military began withdrawing from Afghanistan. CBS News foreign correspondent Charlie D'Agata reports from Kabul.
cbsnews.com
Florida Gov. Rick Scott announces plan to combat school gun violence
Florida Gov. Rick Scott announced his plan Friday to improve school safety and reduce gun violence in wake of the Parkland school shooting. He proposed measures to keep guns away from those with mental illness, ban bump stocks and raise the age for purchasing certain firearms.
cbsnews.com
Utah climber rescued from spot called 'Certain Death’ after rock ‘size of a refrigerator’ rolled on him
A climber in Utah was rescued Sunday from a mountainous area known as "Certain Death" after a large rock "the size of a refrigerator" rolled on top of him, officials said.
foxnews.com
Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens indicted after affair and alleged photo blackmail
Some lawmakers are calling for Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens to step down, after a grand jury indicted him for felony invasion of privacy. The indictment is linked to accusations that he took a compromising photo to blackmail a woman he had an affair with before he was elected. CBS News' Jericka Duncan has details.
cbsnews.com
Sally Buzbee Named New Washington Post Executive Editor
REUTERSThe Washington Post has chosen Sally Buzbee to be its new executive editor, the first woman to hold the job. Buzbee is currently the executive editor of the Associated Press and will move into the new role next month, the newspaper announced Tuesday. More to come...Read more at The Daily Beast.
thedailybeast.com
United Airlines plane slides off runway in Green Bay
A United Airlines flight bound for Minneapolis made two unscheduled landings and eventually ran off a runway. The flight from Houston was diverted twice because of bad weather, first to Madison, Wisconsin, and then to Green Bay, where it skidded off the runway. Vladimir Duthiers reports with Anne-Marie Green.
cbsnews.com
The Escalation in Gaza Was Predictable—and Avoidable. Why The Tragic Cycle Never Ends | Opinion
At the end of the day, the victims are always the civilians who pay the price for the cynicism and cowardice of those political calculations: The death toll in Gaza at the time of this writing was 20, while an Israeli civilian has been wounded, too.
newsweek.com
NYC reeling from violence as police group, officials ask: 'When is this going to end?'
New York City is reeling from a weekend of violence that even overtook one of the Big Apple’s most prominent tourist attractions, Times Square, and continued through Monday morning.
foxnews.com
Victor Hedman's health among potentially troubling issues facing NHL playoff teams
Victor Hedman's health is a question mark yet again for the Lightning entering the playoffs. Here are other teams showing potentially troubling signs.       
usatoday.com
Amanda Chase, Who Pushed Trump to Declare Martial Law, Loses GOP Nomination for Virginia Governor
Chase, who attended Trump's January 6 rally, charged Democrats with "treason" over the November presidential election.
newsweek.com
"60 Minutes" goes behind the lens with French artist JR
He's known for his art that covers buildings and walls instead of canvases. This week on "60 Minutes," French artist JR shows Anderson Cooper how he uses his photography around the world. Producer Magalie Laguerre-Wilkinson joined CBSN with a preview.
cbsnews.com
Man in custody after tiger spotted walking around front yard in a Houston neighborhood
Victor Cuevas has been arrested and charged with evading police after a tiger was seen in a Houston front yard.       
usatoday.com
Michael Che “Stunned” by Backlash to His ‘Gen Z Hospital’ Sketch
After his SNL sketch was accused of cultural appropriation, Che issued a response on Instagram.
nypost.com
California's $600 Stimulus Checks: When Does the Money Arrive?
Payments are being sent out on a rolling basis, so the sooner people file their taxes the sooner they'll receive their money.
newsweek.com
Get Sara Bareilles’ ‘Girls5eva’ Velvet Dress for 80% Off Right Now
It ain't butt cleavage and scrunchies, but these Girls5eva looks will make you party like it's 1999.
nypost.com
Two men punched, robbed in Queens road rage incident, video shows
The suspect stole Samsung cell phones from each victim, and a wallet from the older man, which held an ID and bank cards, cops said.
nypost.com
Dozens dead in Gaza after clashes between Israeli security and Palestinian militants
Palestinian militants launched rockets at Jerusalem, and Israel fired airstrikes across the Gaza Strip after a day of violent clashes between Israeli security forces.       
usatoday.com
White House says Biden will receive his physical exam later this year
President Joe Biden will receive a regular physical exam later this year, the White House said Tuesday, setting a timeline for when the oldest first-term president in US history might provide more information about his health.
edition.cnn.com
Why mental illness is only a part of preventing gun violence
President Trump is making mental health a focus of his efforts to curb gun violence. While experts welcome more resources and attention, some say the solutions are more complicated. Psychologist and CBS News contributor Lisa Damour joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the importance of looking at factors beyond mental health when trying to prevent violent behavior and the gaps in America's mental health services.
cbsnews.com
U.S. Olympian tours South Korea dog meat farm
4 years after rescuing 5 strays during Sochi Games, skier Gus Kenworthy continues advocacy by visiting "one of the saddest places"
cbsnews.com
Bebe Rexha talks new album "Better Mistakes," mental health
Two-time Grammy nominee Bebe Rexha is honest and vulnerable in her new album "Better Mistakes." Rexha joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss her songwriting process and why she chose to be open about her mental health in her new music.
cbsnews.com
‘Prodigal Son’ Cast “Gutted” By Series Cancellation
The series finale will air next week.
nypost.com
Matt Damon reacts to Ben Affleck, Jennifer Lopez rekindling romance: 'I hope it’s true'
Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez were recently spotted vacationing together in Montana.
foxnews.com
Will Trump's call to arm teachers actually lead to policy?
CBS News' Margaret Brennan was announced as the new anchor of "Face the Nation" on Thursday. Brennan joins "CBS This Morning" from Washington to discuss the White House's stance on gun control, the likelihood of gun reform and her new role at "Face the Nation."
cbsnews.com
Former Ulta Beauty manager says she felt pressured to resell used products
A popular personal products chain is accused of repacking and reselling used products as if they're new. Ulta Beauty has more than 1,000 stores in 48 states, but is now facing two class-action lawsuits after a social media post. Anna Werner reports.
cbsnews.com
What's it like for teachers at a school that allows armed staff?
The idea of arming teachers and staff to prevent school violence is not new. Schools across the country thought about it long before President Trump endorsed the idea. Forty states have laws against guns in K-12 schools, but many of those states also let school districts decide their own rules. Nikki Battiste speaks with a science teacher at a rural Colorado high school who volunteered to carry a firearm in class.
cbsnews.com
McDonald’s redesigns coffee cups to promote COVID-19 vaccines
The McDonald's promotion comes as demand for the life-saving shots has begun to taper off in many parts of the country.
nypost.com
Syrian mother living through Ghouta airstrikes: "The world is just watching"
We are learning more about the plight of two young Syrian girls caught up in one of the government's bloodiest sieges of the country's seven-year civil war. Noor and Alaa Khatib live in eastern Ghouta, which has been under government siege for six straight days. More than 400 people have been killed. Charlie D'Agata spoke with the mother of the two girls who is pleading for help.
cbsnews.com
California siblings allegedly held captive adjust to freedom
The California parents accused of torturing and starving their 13 children will be in court Friday for a procedural hearing. For the first time, lawyers representing the adult children are sharing how their recovery is going and what their dreams are for the future. Mireya Villarreal reports.
cbsnews.com
Trump doubles down on proposal to arm teachers
The president endorsed letting trained teachers carry weapons when he met with state and local officials on Thursday. That idea has people split along party lines according to a CBS News poll out Friday morning. Fifty percent of Americans are opposed to teachers carrying guns and 44 percent are in favor of it. Julianna Goldman reports.
cbsnews.com
Surging prices are spooking the stock market
US stocks tumbled out of the gate Tuesday as investors grow increasingly concerned about raw material price spikes, shortages and inflation.
edition.cnn.com
Keilar rolls the tape on Rand Paul's war with Dr. Fauci
CNN's Brianna Keilar rolls the tape on Sen. Rand Paul's (R-KY) coronavirus rhetoric and his never-ending feud with medical expert Dr. Anthony Fauci.
edition.cnn.com
Cheyenne Woods, Tiger’s niece, got a ‘little angry’ before dominating US Open qualifier
Tiger Woods' niece qualified for next month's US Open on Monday by medaling in the qualifier played in Spring Lake, NJ. And she credits her biggest mistake of the day for the turnaround.
nypost.com
Deputy assigned to Stoneman Douglas never entered school during shooting
The deputy sheriff assigned to protect Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School is out of a job, accused of failing to do his duty during last week's massacre. He never went inside the school building during the gunfire that left 17 people dead. Manuel Bojorquez reports.
cbsnews.com
Cat Nuzzles Sheep, Paws at His Fluffy Wool in Adorable Video
Luci the cat and Waffles the sheep were captured having an adorable bonding moment at their home in Memphis, and the video has gone viral online.
newsweek.com
Bebe Rexha's journey to hitmaker, new music about mental health
Singer-songwriter Bebe Rexha got her start writing hit songs for other artists before becoming a star in her own right. Rexha's new album "Better Mistakes" is one of her most honest records yet, and she is sharing her mental health journey. Gayle King takes a look at her career so far.
cbsnews.com
Texas Gov. commutes sentence of Bart Whitaker
Hours before Thomas "Bart" Whitaker was set to be executed, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott commuted his death sentence. Whitaker was convicted of masterminding the murder of his mother and brother. His father, who was also shot in the attack, said he will never forget the phone call when he found out. CBS affiliate KEYE's Christian Flores reports.
cbsnews.com