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RNC chairman on first primetime debate, Trump's impact on 2016 race

As the top 10 GOP candidates prepare for the first primetime primary debate of election season, Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus joins “CBS This Morning” from Cleveland, the location of Thursday night's debate.
Read full article on: cbsnews.com
Florida Man Ivan Andre Scott Gets 10 Years for Role in $3.3 Million Genetic Testing Fraud Scheme
Scott was found guilty of falsely telling Medicare beneficiaries that the federal healthcare program would pay for expensive genetic tests that could cost up to $6,000.
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newsweek.com
Donald Trump's opponents condemn violence at rallies
President Obama and Donald Trump's fellow presidential candidates on both sides of the aisle spoke about the hostility and the violence at the Republican front-runner's rallies. Julianna Goldman has more on that.
cbsnews.com
DHS Secretary Mayorkas has broken promise of weekly meetings: Border sheriff
Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, who is said to have agreed to weekly meetings with border sheriffs last week, has yet to follow through on that commitment.
foxnews.com
Disposable wipes clogging city pipes
Cities around the world are trying to spread a not-so-well-known message: Stop flushing disposable wipes. Contessa Brewer has more on the dirty problem.
cbsnews.com
Eric Garner's mother says Caron Nazario, who was pepper-sprayed in a Virginia traffic stop, is part of her family
Eric Garner's mother saw her son's last minutes after police put him in a chokehold six years ago. This week, she revealed that another family member -- US Army 2nd Lt. Caron Nazario -- was also involved in a controversial police encounter.
edition.cnn.com
Maria Sharapova not alone in using banned substance
Tennis star Maria Sharapova has started her suspension for using a banned substance, but she's not the only Russian athlete who's used it. Jonathan Vigliotti has more.
cbsnews.com
California hoping to use science to battle drought
After four years of drought, Southern California needs all the rain it can get. And officials are turning to scientists to help Mother Nature along. Carter Evans has more.
cbsnews.com
READ: Biden's remarks announcing Afghanistan troop withdrawal
President Joe Biden on Wednesday formally announced his decision to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan by September 11.
edition.cnn.com
CBS journalist arrested outside Donald Trump's canceled Chicago rally
Sopan Deb has been following Donald Trump's campaign for CBS News since it began last summer. After Trump's Chicago rally was canceled, Deb was capturing the clashes between protesters and supporters outside when he was grabbed from behind, thrown to the ground and handcuffed. Deb spoke about the incident. Jim Axelrod reports.
cbsnews.com
Shannon Bream: Democrats will face 'a lot of questions' over plan to add four Supreme Court justices
Democrats advocating legislation to expand the Supreme Court to 13 members from the traditional nine will face "a lot of pushback," Fox News chief legal correspondent and "Fox News @ Night" host Shannon Bream said Wednesday.
foxnews.com
Man tries to rush stage at Donald Trump rally
Secret Service agents had to form a protective cordon around Donald Trump when a man tried to rush the stage at a rally for the Republican presidential front-runner. The already high tensions at Trump's rallies escalated in recent days with a Trump rally in Chicago being postponed due to security concerns. Dean Reynolds has more.
cbsnews.com
Protester rushes Trump on rally stage, gets kicked out of event
Four Secret Service agents protectively circled Donald Trump as this demonstrator rushed at the GOP front-runner on stage at a rally in Dayton, Ohio. He was later escorted out by police officers as the crowds booed.
cbsnews.com
Forthcoming Russia sanctions won't include Nord Stream 2
DOJ's legal approval for a new slate of sanctions to stop the Russia-Germany pipeline was reversed recently.
politico.com
Watch: Secret Service run to Trump as protester rushes stage
Secret Service agents rushed to protect Donald Trump Saturday as a protester at his Vandalia, OH rally tried to climb on stage. Trump said he was "ready" to take him on but preferred to have security handle the disruption. Watch the video.
cbsnews.com
Trump: Sanders supporters caused violence
Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump defended his supporters as "really nice" after his Chicago rally Friday night was canceled due to protests and violence. The billionaire said Saturday that Bernie Sanders supporters taunted his "people" and the Vermont Senator needs to call on them to "stop". Watch Trump's first comments Saturday after the Chicago protests.
cbsnews.com
Officer who shot rioter won't be charged
The Capitol officer who fatally shot Ashli Babbitt as she jumped through a smashed window won't be charged; a watchdog report details more police failures.
edition.cnn.com
At least five killed as flooding continues in South
Days of torrential rainfall have triggered flooding in the lower Mississippi Valley. Some rivers are expected to crest Saturday, adding to the trouble. At least three weather-related deaths have been reported and hundreds of rescues have taken place. David Begnaud reports from Bossier City, Louisiana.
cbsnews.com
The Dish: Marcus Paslay
Born and raised in Arlington, Texas, Marcus Paslay yearned to become a chef from an early age. His grandparents’ farm was nearby and he worked in their garden and helped can vegetables, which shows today in his farm-to-table cooking philosophy. After leaving business school, he enrolled in The Culinary Institute of America and then spent years mastering his art in restaurants across the country. Two years after returning to Texas in 2013, he opened his own restaurant, Clay Pigeon, in Fort Worth and it quickly became a hit. Chef Paslay joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss his journey.
cbsnews.com
Artist recreates iconic photos with actor John Malkovich
Nearly a century ago, the versatile actor Lon Chaney was known as the "man of a thousand faces." Now, that title might be passed to actor John Malkovich instead. Working with his long-time collaborator -- the acclaimed photographer, Sandro Miller -- Malkovich morphed into 41 famous figures in his new coffee table book, "The Malkovich Sessions," due out April 5th. Sandro Miller joins “CBS This Morning: Saturday” to discuss how he recreated the iconic photos.
cbsnews.com
This Boston Marathon bombing survivor is on a mission to give fellow amputees the prosthetic legs insurance won't cover
Heather Abbott was severely injured in the Boston Marathon bombing. Today, she is helping fellow amputees of all ages receive customized prostheses that allow them to live full, active lives.
edition.cnn.com
Sanders says he disagrees with Tlaib's call for 'no more policing'
Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders said Wednesday evening that he disagreed with Michigan Rep. Rashida Tlaib, a fellow progressive, after she called for "no more policing, incarceration, and militarization" in the wake of Daunte Wright's fatal encounter with police in Minnesota.
edition.cnn.com
How NCAA selection committee seeds March Madness tournament
It is a big weekend for men’s college basketball. March Madness is about to begin, and the men’s basketball selection committee will announce brackets for the field of 68 teams. About 40 million fans will fill out the brackets. NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Committee chairman Joe Castiglione joins “CBS This Morning: Saturday” to discuss the seeding process.
cbsnews.com
Teams, venues say goodbye to paper tickets
Paper tickets for concerts or games are quickly becoming a thing of the past. So in the digital age, are we closing in on the death of the paper ticket? Quartz reporter Ashley Rodriguez joins “CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss the transition.
cbsnews.com
Inspector general blasts Capitol Police preparedness for riot
The inspector general is set to testify Thursday.
abcnews.go.com
Over 50 percent of U.S. diet made up of "ultra-processed" foods
A new study finds "ultra-processed" foods make up more than half of all the calories in the U.S. diet. Also, the United Nations is highlighting the importance of a group of foods that can have big benefits for your health -- "pulses." Finally, could a bit of chocolate help keep your brain sharp? CBS News contributor Dr. Holly Phillips and Samantha Heller, a registered dietitian and exercise physiologist, join “CBS This Morning: Saturday” to discuss these health issues.
cbsnews.com
Democrats planning to unveil bill that would add 4 justices to Supreme Court
Democrats are preparing to unveil legislation that would add four seats to the US Supreme Court, according to reports on Wednesday. The bill is expected to be introduced on Thursday, The Intercept and The Wall Street Journal reported. It would up the number of seats on the high court to 13 from the current nine....
nypost.com
NYC school holding event on 'raising our babies to value anti-racism'
A Manhattan private school for young children is hosting an event for parents to learn about raising babies to value anti-racism.
foxnews.com
The mystery of Michigan's overwhelming Covid surge
Kent Sepkowitz writes that in Michigan, daily Covid cases are nearing their highest highs. There are a lot of factors including transmission among young, unvaccinated people and a premature return to normal life that could be fueling this spike.
edition.cnn.com
Video shows police shooting at Ohio hospital
Police body camera footage shows a routine police pat-down of a man in a hospital emergency room erupting within minutes into a fatal police shooting after the man apparently fires a gun he had concealed in his possession. (April 14)      
usatoday.com
Democrats to introduce legislation to expand Supreme Court
The measure would increase the court's size to 13.
politico.com
Baylor refuses title Jeep after dealer’s ‘out of the hood’ remark
WACO, Texas — Baylor and coach Scott Drew have refused to accept a vehicle wrapped with the school’s national championship logo after an insensitive remark made by the dealership’s general manager when discussing it during a live TV interview. The customized Jeep Wrangler was driven in the team’s championship parade through downtown Waco on Tuesday...
nypost.com
‘Kung Fu’ Star Eddie Liu Discusses What’s Next for the Hit Series
"Henry really is just a nice guy willing to help," Liu told Decider.
nypost.com
FLASHBACK: That time Biden called court-packing a 'bonehead idea'
President Biden’s one-time opposition to the concept of “court-packing” could soon be put to the test as top Democrats introduce legislation to expand the Supreme Court.
foxnews.com
Paul Daley, Sabah Homasi detail past altercation involving Dustin Poirier that sparked feud
Ahead of Bellator 257, Paul Daley and Sabah Homasi reveal a hotel confrontation involving Dustin Poirier that sparked their ongoing feud.       Related StoriesPaul Daley sees catchweight fights as possibility but understands Bellator 257 could be itPaul Daley sees catchweight fights as possibility but understands Bellator 257 could be it - EnclosureKelvin Gastelum says UFC on ESPN 22 winner should get Israel Adesanya rematch 
usatoday.com
Body found in Mississippi River identified as missing LSU student
A body recovered in the Mississippi River this week has been identified as missing Louisiana State University student Kori Gauthier, authorities said.
abcnews.go.com
A new bill would add 4 seats to the Supreme Court
Judge Merrick Garland at the announcement of his nomination to the US Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, DC, on March 16, 2016. | Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images It’s on! Four Democratic members of Congress plan to introduce legislation that would add four seats to the Supreme Court, which would, if passed, allow President Biden to immediately name four individuals to fill those seats and give Democrats a 7-6 majority. The bill, which is being introduced by Reps. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), Hank Johnson (D-GA), and Mondaire Jones (D-NY) in the House and by Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) in the Senate, is called the Judiciary Act of 2021, and it is very brief. It amends a provision of federal law providing that the Supreme Court consist of a chief justice and eight associate justices to read that the Court shall consist of ‘‘a Chief Justice of the United States and twelve associate justices, any eight of whom shall constitute a quorum.” Although the Constitution provides that there must be a Supreme Court, it leaves the question of how many justices shall sit on that Court to Congress. Under the Judiciary Act of 1789, the Court originally had six seats, and it briefly had 10 seats under President Lincoln. Realistically, the bill is unlikely to pass anytime soon. Until recently, adding seats to the Supreme Court was considered a very radical tactic — President Franklin Roosevelt proposed similar legislation in 1937, and it did not end well for him. President Biden has in the past expressed reluctance to add seats to the Court. But the politics of Supreme Court reform have moved very quickly in recent years, and it’s possible to imagine a critical mass of lawmakers rallying behind Court expansion if a majority of the current justices hand down decisions that are likely to outrage Democrats, such as a decision neutralizing what remains of the Voting Rights Act. The new court-expansion bill would effectively neutralize a half-decade of work by Republicans to manipulate the Senate confirmation process in order to ensure GOP control of the nation’s highest Court. In February of 2016, Justice Antonin Scalia died. In response, Senate Republicans refused to give President Obama’s nominee to fill that seat, now-Attorney General Merrick Garland, a confirmation hearing or a floor vote. To justify this decision, Republicans invented a new rule, claiming that it is not appropriate to confirm a Supreme Court nominee in a presidential election year. Prior to 2016, there had been seven election-year confirmations since the beginning of the 20th century, including the confirmation of Justice Anthony Kennedy in 1988. The vacant seat was eventually filled by conservative Justice Neil Gorsuch after President Trump took office in 2017. Then Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died in September of 2020. Republicans immediately abandoned the rule they invented to justify blocking Garland’s confirmation and confirmed Trump nominee Amy Coney Barrett just eight days before the 2020 election, which Trump lost. It’s worth noting, moreover, that Trump lost the popular vote by nearly 3 million ballots in 2016. And, while Republicans controlled the Senate for Trump’s entire presidency, they only controlled it because the Senate is malapportioned to effectively give extra seats to small states. Throughout Trump’s presidency, the Democratic “minority” in the Senate represented millions more Americans than the Republican “majority.” And all three of Trump’s appointees to the Supreme Court — Gorsuch, Barrett, and Justice Brett Kavanaugh — were nominated by a president who lost the popular vote and confirmed by a bloc of senators who represent less than half of the country. So legislation adding seats to the Supreme Court would give Democrats control of a body that they rightfully would already control if the United States chose presidents and senators in free and fair elections where each citizen’s vote counted equally.
vox.com
Biden's Intel Community Agrees with Rubio: Chinese Virus 'Plausibly' Originated at a Wuhan Lab
The U.S. intelligence community conceded Wednesday that China is still keeping America in the dark about the true origins of the novel coronavirus, stressing that it may have accidentally leaked out from a lab in Wuhan, China.
breitbart.com
Democrats to propose legislation expanding the Supreme Court
Several Democratic lawmakers are expected to introduce legislation this week that would expand the number of justices on the Supreme Court.
foxnews.com
Judge Jeanine rips Democrats' proposal to expand Supreme Court, tells Tucker 'this is madness'
Fox News host Judge Jeanine Pirro joined "Tucker Carlson Tonight" Wednesday to discusses legislation proposed by House and Senate Democrats that would add four justices to the Supreme Court.
foxnews.com
Trump protesters shut down Chicago rally
A Chicago Donald Trump rally was first shut down, then cancelled when protests broke out Friday night. Demonstrators overwhelmed the crowd both inside and outside the arena.
cbsnews.com
Chicago protesters: "We stopped Trump"
After a Donald Trump rally was cancelled Friday night in Chicago due to clashes between supporters and protesters, a crowd of anti-Trump protesters chanted jubilantly "We stopped Trump. We stopped Trump."
cbsnews.com
Donald Trump & Ben Carson: A rocky relationship mashup
On March 11, 2016, Ben Carson endorsed Donald Trump and it looked as if they were the best of friends. But it wasn't always that way.
cbsnews.com
Defense's medical expert classifies George Floyd's manner of death as "undetermined"
Dr. David Fowler, the defense's medical expert, says George Floyd died from cardiac arrhythmia due to his underlying heart condition. Floyd said there were also a number of contributing factors, such as Floyd's drug use and exposure to carbon monoxide, leading him to classify Floyd's manner of death as "undetermined." The Hennepin County Medical Examiner ruled Floyd's death as a homicide. CBS News legal contributor Rebecca Roiphe breaks down what this means for the case.
cbsnews.com
Father charged with murder after 5-year-old daughter dies in DUI accident
A California man is facing murder charges after his 5-year-old daughter died when he allegedly crashed his car while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Another child was injured when Ernesto Avalos, 28, drove into a light pole outside San Bernardino Sunday, according to People Magazine. Avalos is charged with murder, two felony counts...
nypost.com
Nurse and patient switch roles decades after first meeting
Twenty-eight years ago, Lynn Bartos helped nurse a young girl with a life-threatening intestinal problem back to health. Now Bartos has become a patient herself, battling Rheumatoid arthritis, and there's a familiar face providing her with care. Steve Hartman went "On the Road" to tell their story.
cbsnews.com
Black Lives Matter activist from Seattle charged with anti-Asian hate crime
A Black Lives Matter activist from Seattle has been arrested — for an alleged anti-Asian hate crime, according to reports. Christopher Hamner, 51, who is black, was charged with allegedly attacking three Asian-American women in two separate incidents last month, according to KIRO 7. In the first incident on March 16, Hamner allegedly shouted “Asian...
nypost.com
Watch: Full funeral service of Nancy Reagan
1,000 guests have gathered for former first lady Nancy Reagan's funeral service at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California. Speakers at the service included Patti Davis, Diane Sawyer, and Tom Brokaw. Watch the full 2-hour funeral service here.
cbsnews.com
Brittany Maynard's doctor on the right to die
Brittany Maynard has become a symbol for those who believe the terminally ill should control how they die. She suffered from brain cancer and took her own life at the age of 29. Dr. Jon LaPook spoke with Maynard’s husband and the doctor who prescribed her the lethal dose of barbiturates for "60 Minutes."
cbsnews.com