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'She became an easy target’: GOP opposition to Haaland rankles Native Americans

Her supporters say she's facing a level of criticism above and beyond the normal fiery Washington political rhetoric.
Read full article on: politico.com
'Pokémon Legends Arceus' Announced, Brings 'Breath of the Wild'-Style Exploration in 2022
Explore the Sinnoh region long before the events of "Diamond and Pearl."
8 m
newsweek.com
Cuomo's handling of nursing home COVID outbreak leaves health commissioner in the firing line
New York State Health Commissioner Howard Zucker faced a barrage of questions when he appeared for a hearing about the Cuomo administration’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic in the state.
foxnews.com
Lauren Boebert Is 'One-Trick Pony' Who Just Raises Money for GOP, Colorado Challenger Says
Gregg Smith dismissed the freshman Republican's suggestion that Democrats are coming to take away people's guns .
newsweek.com
These popular Everlane flats are just $39 before they get discontinued
When it comes to spring-time, shoes can be a tough one. Some days it’s too cold to wear your favorite sandals and on warmer days, people are sure to give you a side-eye if you strut the streets in your UGGs. Flats, on the other hand, are the perfect in-between season shoes. Not only that,...
nypost.com
CNN commentator appears on scandal-ridden Lincoln Project's YouTube show
CNN political commentator Charlie Dent appeared on the scandal-ridden Lincoln Project's YouTube show Thursday night, showing the mainstream media isn't ready to divorce itself from the disgraced political action committee.
foxnews.com
Xbox Live's Six-Hour Outage Inspires Memes and Jokes from Bored Gamers
The Xbox Live service went down on the same day that "Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War" season 2 was released.
newsweek.com
Brad Stevens has identity stolen as part of Celtics’ week from hell
Brad Stevens would prefer to forget this week. Not only has his team lost three straight games, but he dealt with identity theft and underwent root canal. “I was just telling my wife, I had a root canal and my identity stolen last week and I think those were two of my better days in...
nypost.com
California high court upholds ending adult trials for 14- and 15-year-old offenders
The five lower courts previously found no conflict.
foxnews.com
New Movies On Demand: ‘Minari,’ ‘The Obituary of Tunde Johnson’ + More
Get a jump on your award season bingo card by watching Minari this weekend.
nypost.com
WandaVision’s twist on Wanda Maximoff’s Scarlet Witch origin story, explained
WandaVision episode 8. | Marvel How WandaVision episode 8 sets up the show’s finale, and the MCU’s future. Spoilers follow for WandaVision episode eight, “Previously On.” The sitcom is over now. For the first time in WandaVision’s young history, the show’s latest episode didn’t feature our favorite telekinetic Avenger reenacting timeless television shows like The Dick Van Dyke Show, Bewitched, The Brady Bunch, or Modern Family. Instead, episode eight, “Previously On,” spelled out how Wanda, Vision, Agatha, and the rest of Westview’s residents ended up in their current predicament. It turns out that Agatha is an ancient witch who was drawn to Westview because of Wanda’s massive power display in creating the place. Throughout WandaVision’s previous seven episodes, it had looked to viewers — and to S.W.O.R.D. — like Wanda was just mind-controlling everyone and giving them new clothes. But to Agatha’s keen eye, Wanda was actually doing magic on a grand scale. Agatha takes Wanda through a journey of Wanda’s memories, trying to figure out where her powers came from. The very traumatic therapy session yields a couple of revelations about Wanda’s past, but also her sitcom connection — Wanda grew watching sitcoms as a way to escape from the trauma of war and grief; when faced with the ultimate grief, she literally put herself and Vision into a sitcom to escape. The revelations and twists in this episode are maybe a little less flashy than what WandaVision has given us in the past. Instead of hurtling us forward, “Previously On” provided much more information about Wanda and developed her as a character more than Marvel’s movies ever have. And in doing so, it laid the foundation for Wanda — or, as Agnes calls her, the Scarlet Witch — to embark on future big-screen endeavors. Here’s a little more detail into what we now know about Wanda, how it connects to Marvel’s comics, episode eight’s mid-credits scene, and what all of this means as WandaVision’s nine-episode season begins to wrap up. Wanda’s powers are actually magical and existed before the Infinity Stone experiments All season long, the question underscoring WandaVision has been: Who’s behind all of this? The broadcast, the sitcom hijinks, the costumes, the energy field, Vision’s resurrection — who or what was capable of doing all that? And further, could it really be Wanda Maximoff? The answer, according to the penultimate episode, is unequivocal: Yes, it’s absolutely Wanda. How Vision was able to purchase the deed for property in Westview, I’m not entirely sure — nor am I an expert in synthezoid real estate transactions. But spurred by trauma and grief, Wanda created an entire world for her and Vision in Westview, completely changing the reality around her on an atomic scale while also mind-wiping its citizens. The explanation behind Wanda’s sudden power surge, which had a little help from one Agatha Harkness, is that everyone, including Wanda, has been thinking of Wanda’s powers in a skewed way. Being a witch herself, Agatha recognizes Wanda’s powers as a series of spells or magic rather than telekinesis and telepathy gifted to her by an Infinity Stone (as was first mentioned in the post-credits scene of Captain America: Winter Soldier; her powers were then referenced again in Avengers: Age of Ultron). The Infinity Stone simply amped up Wanda’s latent magical abilities. The mind control and energy-blasting that Wanda’s been doing in Marvel’s movies are, it turns out, just the tip of the iceberg — a small taste of how Wanda’s magic has manifested itself. This new origin story aligns itself with Marvel’s comics and Wanda’s powers there. Thanks to multiple retcons, Wanda’s powers in the comic are a convoluted and complicated mix of what’s called “chaos magic” (which Agatha says at the end of the episode) and reality warping.In a world full of order, math, science, and technology, Wanda’s powers are an anomaly that bucks those concepts. According to Marvel, she can use magic to rewrite reality if she so desires. Marvel explains: Due to exposure to mystic energies and forces at an early age, Wanda may reshape reality to various extremes. Known as a “hex” in her formative years as an Avenger, the Scarlet Witch believed she used the ability to affect probabilities for a positive benefit to herself, though at times to imprecise outcomes. Later, she mastered the ability and began to understand it as a literal altering of reality. WandaVision has been hinting at this since the very beginning.In the show’s first episode, Wanda burns a chicken she’s cooking and then tries to undo the damage — but turns the chicken into a basket of eggs. That episode also features the wife of Vision’s boss muttering the word “chaos” — an Easter egg referencing Wanda’s comic book powers. Episode two featured more of Wanda dabbling in magic, at a convenient neighborhood magic show. It also seems she is able to affect reality: When the beekeeper-looking figure emerges from the sewer, Wanda “rewinds” him out of the picture. She also made herself pregnant. In episode five, Darcy, Monica, and Agent Woo realized that Wanda is manipulating matter. The three note that Monica went through the Westview energy field wearing a Kevlar vest, but when she was zapped out of Westview, it appeared that Wanda had changed the vest into a period-appropriate costume. She seemed to have done the same thing with a S.W.O.R.D. drone, which became a toy helicopter. In episodes six and seven, we learn that Monica’s cells were rewritten when she passed through the energy field and she now displays electricity- or light-based superpowers. While Agatha and Wanda are seemingly headed for a duel in the season finale, the revelation of Wanda’s magic-based powers also tie into the future of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Wanda is reportedly a big figure in the upcoming 2022 Marvel sequel, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. It makes a lot of sense, then, that, assuming Wanda gets through this ordeal in Westview, she’ll seek out the most powerful magic-user in the MCU. Or perhaps it’s the other way around and the most powerful magic-user in the MCU will seek out Wanda, someone who may be even more powerful than him. It’s been Agatha Harkness all along. But what does she want with the “Scarlet Witch”? Marvel Kathryn Hahn as Agatha Harkness in WandaVision episode eight. Episode eight also gives us a bit of Agatha’s backstory, which goes all the way back to 1693 Salem. Apparently, Agatha is a very old witch whose coven attacked her because she was dabbling in magic that was too powerful. During their attack, she turned the tables and seemingly absorbed all their powers and sucked the life out of them. She became interested in Wanda and Westview, she tells Wanda, is because she sensed the magic Wanda was emitting. She not only wants to know how Wanda is capable of achieving the magic, but also wants it for herself. Ostensibly, it seems like Agatha will try to siphon Wanda’s powers like she did with those of the witches back in 1693. At the episode’s cliffhanger, Agatha says something very peculiar. She calls Wanda the “Scarlet Witch” — a name that seems to mean a lot to Agatha and the audience and not so much to Wanda. Scarlet Witch is Wanda’s comic book code name or alias, but not a name that we’ve heard in Marvel’s movies. In the MCU, she’s only ever gone by Wanda. Similarly, her brother Pietro has only ever gone by Pietro, though he’s known in the comics as Quicksilver. But Agatha isn’t saying it in a “code name” superhero kind of way. Instead, when Agatha says Wanda is the Scarlet Witch, it sounds like some kind of mystical being that Agatha has read about, or some kind of magical prophecy. And now that she’s met Wanda and knows that she’s capable of warping reality and manipulating matter, Agatha’s put two and two together. Agatha’s menacing portrayal on WandaVision is a slight deviation from the comics, where she is actually one of Wanda’s mentors who aligns herself with heroes like the Avengers and the Fantastic Four. She plays a big role in helping Wanda realize her powers. She figures prominently in a story about Wanda’s children, and the resurrection of at least one dead Avenger. While she often teaches through tough love, and while she is often antagonistic in the comics, Agatha is not as outright evil or power-hungry there as she is in her WandaVision portrayal. Being a fan of Kathryn Hahn, I’m selfishly hoping that Agatha and Wanda will figure out a way to talk this all out and become begrudging pals — or allies like they are in the comics. But it sure does seem like Agatha is determined to take Wanda’s chaos magic, which suggests things won’t end well. WandaVision’s penultimate episode’s mid-credits scene sets up its season finale While the magical duel is getting underway in Westview, there’s still the pesky matter of S.W.O.R.D. director Tyler Hayward going about his villainous business outside of the anomaly. He’s been wanting to bomb Westview and eliminate Wanda for a few episodes now. He’s also been trying, and failing, to resurrect Vision on his own. Episode eight’s mid-credits scene gives us a glimpse of Hayward, just beyond the hex, setting up a last-ditch effort. He and his team have brought Vision’s body along (the version of Vision in Westview was created by Wanda’s power surge and grief), and they attempt to resurrect it using residue power from Wanda herself, which was left in the drone he tried to kill Wanda with in episode five. “We took this thing apart and put it back together again a million times,” he tells his team, explaining they’ve tried every kind of power supply. “All we needed was a little energy directly from the source.” Hayward tells his team to push the button and the residue power charges up Vision’s corpse. This “Vision” comes to life, then blinks, before the scene cuts to black. Hayward, being kind of a jerk, will probably use his zombie Vision to attack Wanda and set up the finale: Wanda and Agatha duke it out while Hayward tries to eliminate all of Westview with his new toy. Maybe — and this is me again being a Hahn apologist — such a scenario could lead to Agatha and Wanda forming a truce to save themselves and the people of Westview? Or perhaps it could lead to Wanda’s version of Vision reuniting with his body? Maybe Monica, Darcy, and Agent Woo (whom we haven’t heard from in a while) have more tricks up their sleeve? Whatever happens, I selfishly hope this all ends with Hahn’s Agatha getting her own spinoff show, but we’ll all find out the answers in next week’s season finale.
vox.com
Gov. DeSantis kicks off CPAC with tribute to Rush Limbaugh, touts future of GOP
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, R., kicked off the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) this year with a roaring speech that paid tribute to his "friend," the late conservative talk radio icon Rush Limbaugh.  
foxnews.com
Airbnb and DoorDash give contrasting post-pandemic outlooks
Lockdown winners could become post-pandemic losers. Airbnb and DoorDash signaled very different possible paths forward after the pandemic ends. CNN's Paul R. La Monica reports
edition.cnn.com
Glitches, errors, a nonworking number: D.C. residents still struggle to get vaccine appointments
For the second day in a row, D.C.’s registration website was full of glitches and error messages.
washingtonpost.com
'Untold: Patriots Revealed' honors unsung heroes of the American Revolution
Do you know the story of John Parker? Peter Salem? John Glover? Hugh Mercer? 
foxnews.com
Canada Authorizes AstraZeneca's Vaccine, the Country's 3d
The addition of a third vaccine may ease the country’s growing dissatisfaction about the sluggish pace of vaccinations.
nytimes.com
British Gymnastics faces legal action over alleged 'systemic physical and psychological abuse'
Seventeen former British gymnasts, including three Olympians, have notified British Gymnastics of their intention to take legal action, alleging coaches subjected them to "systemic physical and psychological abuse," according to a statement from their law firm Hausfeld.
edition.cnn.com
British Gymnastics faces legal action over alleged 'systemic physical and psychological abuse'
Seventeen former British gymnasts, including three Olympians, have notified British Gymnastics of their intention to take legal action, alleging coaches subjected them to "systemic physical and psychological abuse," according to a statement from their law firm Hausfeld.
edition.cnn.com
A Russell Wilson trade is unlikely, but Seattle’s star QB is unhappy. Here are the team’s options.
Here are the Seahawks’ options for fixing things with Russell Wilson (and avoiding a trade).
washingtonpost.com
All the essentials your dog actually needs, according to vets
Vets from across the country have laid out the essentials for every dog — and they're all on Amazon.
edition.cnn.com
DHS mandates state and local spending on domestic terrorism prevention
DHS mandates state and local spending on domestic terrorism prevention
edition.cnn.com
"48 Hours" looks for answers in Madeleine McCann's disappearance
This week's episode of "48 Hours" takes a new look at the story of 3-year-old Madeleine McCann's disappearance, which made international headlines back in 2007. Authorities now believe they may have some answers. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant joins "CBSN AM" to discuss the case.
cbsnews.com
‘WandaVision’ Episode 8 Recap: “The Witches Are Out”
It may look like a walnut...
nypost.com
Nikola admits founder Trevor Milton made ‘inaccurate’ claims
Nikola admitted that founder and former chairman Trevor Milton made several “inaccurate” claims about the electric-truck maker’s business before he resigned under pressure last year. An internal investigation affirmed several findings of the Hindenburg Research report that threw Nikola into chaos last fall after the short-selling firm alleged that the buzzy company had been built...
nypost.com
Biden's Syria airstrikes first test of role as world's police
Pentagon airstrikes against Iran-backed militias in Syria in response to a Feb. 15 attack in Iraq received both bipartisan praise — and criticism.       
usatoday.com
Compton fire roars through industrial area, burning structures and buses
The blaze erupted just after 4:30 a.m. at an industrial complex in Compton. No injuries have been reported.
latimes.com
Gov. DeSantis: 'Corporate media' was proven wrong on Florida's reopening
Florida is going to have a "budget surplus" despite "predictions of its economic doom," the Republican governor of the Sunshine State Ron DeSantis said on Friday.
foxnews.com
This golden statue of Trump at CPAC is a perfect metaphor for the state of the GOP
I imagine this is how Trump sees himself when he looks in the mirror. | Screengrab of a video by William Turton Apparently CPAC attendees missed the part of the Bible about the Golden Calf. The Golden Calf is one of the most famous stories in the Old Testament. The Israelites, newly freed from Egyptian slavery, have a crisis of faith while God is speaking with Moses on Mount Sinai. They melt down the golden jewelry to construct a physical god — a statue in the shape of a calf — to worship in place of their abstract, invisible deity. It’s a story about the allure of idolatry, how easy it is to abandon one’s commitments to principle in favor of shiny, easy falsehoods. This biblical tale trended on Twitter in the US Friday morning because of the following video, filmed on the first day of the 2021 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC). Someone involved in the conference constructed a golden statue — not of a calf, but of Trump — and wheeled it out to cheers from conference attendees. “That is so cool,” one of the onlookers says. #CPAC #AmericaUncancelled pic.twitter.com/mVqBuF2blY— William Turton (@WilliamTurton) February 26, 2021 There are so many reasons why this is a perfect metaphor for the state of the GOP after the Trump presidency. The party sacrificed its commitment to political principles, including previously cherished ideals like free trade, on the altar of Trumpism. White evangelicals abandoned their alleged commitments to godliness in public servants and embraced a man accused of serial sexual assault who had an affair with a porn star and paid her hush money to cover it up. Conservatism, once seen as a high-minded intellectual tradition, became undeniably base and degraded in the Trump years. But above all else, the statue points to the way in which the GOP remains the party of Trump even after his presidency — gaudy golden aesthetic and all. The party’s base is so committed to the former president that they construct idols of him, literally, to stand up at their premier political conference. The party leadership understands that, of course. It’s why the vast bulk of the GOP Senate caucus embraced flimsy constitutional rationales for acquitting Trump in the most recent impeachment trial, despite clear evidence that he incited the January 6 riot at the US Capitol that threatened their lives. They are too afraid of their own voters to turn on Trump, and so have no choice but to embrace him — despite knowing how much of a threat he poses to their party and American democracy. Trump’s hold is so powerful, in fact, that even his children are now considered leading possibilities for the 2024 GOP nomination — despite the complete lack of relevant qualifications. A recent poll found that Donald Trump Jr. was one of the most popular choices for the 2024 nomination, doing better than Sens. Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley combined. On Fox News Thursday night, former GOP House member and Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows openly proclaimed that it’s still Trump’s party — either Donald, Donald Jr.’s, or Ivanka’s. “We will see the start of planning for the next administration and I can tell you — the people that are at the top of that list, all of them have Trump as their last name,” he says. Meadows: We will see the start of planning for the next administration and I can tell you, the people that are at the top of that list, all of them have Trump as their last name pic.twitter.com/69DMdyFSOO— Acyn (@Acyn) February 26, 2021 In the Bible, the Golden Calf story ends with a furious Moses destroying the idol — dumping its ashes into water and forcing the Israelites to drink it as punishment. In theory, the voters in 2020 could have been the party’s Moses, the loss of the White House and the Senate their bitter ashwater. And yet, here they are, still building idols of a false god.
vox.com
Prince Harry says Meghan Markle was The One after this moment: ‘We went from zero to 60 in two months’
Prince Harry spoke about dating Meghan Markle to James Corden during his appearance on "The Late Late Show."
foxnews.com
Asian man stabbed in back in New York City's Chinatown, suspect arrested
A 23-year-old has been charged with stabbing an Asian man in the back in New York City. He told detectives that he "didn’t like the way" the victim "looked at him."
abcnews.go.com
Mark Meadows says Trump is ‘planning for the next administration’
Former President Donald Trump is working on how his "America First" agenda will move forward, his former chief of staff revealed, adding that they are "planning for the next administration."
nypost.com
Single dose of Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine may protect against asymptomatic infection, preprint study says
edition.cnn.com
Pie in the sky: Skydivers share pizza in 14,000-foot plummet
These are some daring pie-divers.
nypost.com
Scott Walker at CPAC says ‘America is under siege’ on campuses, in culture
Former Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is charging that the nation is “under siege” from the political left.
foxnews.com
Survivors describe Iranian missile attack on Al Asad Airbase
David Martin reports on the attack that nearly caused war between the U.S. and Iran, Sunday on 60 Minutes.
cbsnews.com
Gregg Jarrett: Cuomo sex harassment allegations – could the governor face criminal charges?
A former aide to Gov. Andrew Cuomo has come forward to accuse him of persistent sexual harassment and unwanted physical touching. 
foxnews.com
‘Real Housewives’ crossover all-star series in the works at NBC’s Peacock
The show will reportedly air on NBC's streaming platform Peacock.
nypost.com
Cuomo sexual harassment allegations: NY AG reviewing letter from Republican state senators asking for probe
New York Attorney General Letitia James is reviewing a letter from state senators asking her office to investigate the sexual harassment allegations against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Fox News has learned.
foxnews.com
Pandemic grief could become its own health crisis
Acknowledging not just the lives lost but also the loved ones mourning is key.
washingtonpost.com
Mitch McConnell Plays Long Game on Donald Trump, Keeping His Focus on Republican Power
The Senate minority leader said his attention is on 2022 when asked about the future prospects of the former president.
newsweek.com
Joe Manchin Stands by Senate Parliamentarian in New Showdown With Furious Progressives
Shortly after Elizabeth MacDonough's ruling, a number of progressives called for the White House to overrule the decision and include the minimum wage increase in the bill.
newsweek.com
NOAA mulls moving start of Atlantic hurricane season up to May 15
Meteorologists have noticed storms forming earlier in the year over the last decade
washingtonpost.com
Annie’s removing a chemical in mac and cheese linked to fertility issues
Annie’s Homegrown, largely known for its macaroni and cheese, is taking steps to remove a potentially harmful class of chemicals, called ortho-phthalates from its products and packaging materials. 
foxnews.com
Here Are the 14 New Books You Should Read in March
The best new books arriving this month are written by authors both established and emerging. March brings with it much-anticipated new fiction from Viet Thanh Nguyen and Kazuo Ishiguro, as well as buzzy debuts from Alexandra Andrews and Gabriela Garcia. Many of these books push us to consider the places we frequent and how they’ve…
time.com
Rachael Kirkconnell of ‘The Bachelor’ asks fans to stop defending her
Rachael Kirkconnell recently apologized for "offensive and racist" actions in her past.
nypost.com
Comedian Jeff Ross defends 'SNL' star Michael Che's joke about Israel slammed by ADL as 'anti-Semitic'
Comedian Jeff Ross backed Michael Che this week after the 'SNL' cast member came under fire for making a joke many critics called "anti-Semitic."
foxnews.com
The Books Briefing: The Many Sides of Loneliness
I’m alone now much more than I used to be. I cook alone, work alone, and occasionally walk alone. The pandemic has limited my social life and forced me into a period of isolation, just as it has for so many others. Sometimes this solitude feels like a restorative pause; other times it just feels lonely.Literature can capture the breadth of these experiences. Some writers explore the nature of solitude by focusing on those living extremely isolated lives. The journalist Michael Finkel profiled a hermit who lived entirely alone for 27 years (excluding one encounter with a passerby) in The Stranger in the Woods. In the fictional The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland, the novelist Nicolai Houm also follows a solitary character—this time a creative-writing professor who ends up isolated in the Norwegian wilderness. In other books, writers explore more uncommon experiences with aloneness. Ruminative works that combine elements of fiction and memoir by writers such as Karl Ove Knausgaard and Chris Kraus feature narrators who emphasize their distance from other people. The novelist Amy Tan says that she writes strong characters by focusing on their uniqueness—all the factors that make them different from others.Kristen Radtke’s upcoming book Seek You: Essays on American Loneliness covers a broad range of these lonely experiences. In 2018, the author asked people about the loneliest they’d ever felt. The answers, some of which are excerpted in The Atlantic, are quietly sad, showing the emptiness of moments without companionship. ​Every Friday in the Books Briefing, we thread together Atlantic stories on books that share similar ideas. This week’s newsletter is written by Kate Cray. The book she’s reading next is How Beautiful We Were, by Imbolo Mbue. Know other book lovers who might like this guide? Forward them this email. What We’re ReadingADRIAN TOMINE Lessons of the hermit “The Stranger in the Woods … combines an account of [Christopher] Knight’s story with an absorbing exploration of solitude and man’s eroding relationship with the natural world.”
theatlantic.com
ISIS bride Shamima Begum loses bid to return to UK in citizenship fight
ISIS bride Shamima Begum — the British woman who fled to Syria to join the terror group in 2015 and quickly married one of its fighters – lost her bid Friday to return to the UK to fight for the restoration of her citizenship because she poses a security risk. A unanimous ruling by Britain’s...
nypost.com
‘WandaVision’ Post-Credits Scene Explained: Who Is White Vision?
Crack open your West Coast Avengers and relive the thrill of "Vision Quest," folks!
nypost.com