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Southwest cancels thousands of flights amid staff shortage

Tens of thousands of travelers were impacted this holiday weekend after Southwest Airlines cancelled nearly two thousand flights since Friday night, far more than any other carrier. The airline blamed weather and air traffic control problems for the string of canceled flights. Transportation correspondent Errol Barnett has more on the travel woes.
Read full article on: cbsnews.com
Expectations high at UConn in coach Hurley's 4th season
Dan Hurley needed three seasons as UConn's coach to get the Huskies back into the NCAA Tournament after a five-year absence.
foxnews.com
This NJ town has a problem with its school buses
One New Jersey town has seen five school bus crashes in just over a month, according to reports.
nypost.com
US woman stashed cocaine in heels, Australian authorities say
An American woman arrested at the airport is accused of hiding cocaine in her shoes and faces drug smuggling charges in Australia, authorities said.
edition.cnn.com
Australian PM Turnbull feels heat from spiky Trump call
A now-notorious phone call between US President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has turned into a diplomatic headache.
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Air France expands no-fly zone around North Korea after missile scare
Air France will expand its no-flyover zone around North Korea after concerns a recent missile test crossed a plane's flight path.
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Straight outta... China? The young Asian artists bucking hip-hop trends
Bridging East and West, Brooklyn hip-hop collective 88 Rising has been helping Asian rappers find an audience in America.
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Two US soldiers killed in Afghanistan convoy attack
An attack on a NATO mission convoy in Afghanistan has resulted in the death of two US service members, the Pentagon said Wednesday.
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Indian-administered Kashmir: Militant leader's death sparks protests
Violent protests have erupted in Indian-administered Kashmir over the killing of militant leader Abu Dujana early Tuesday.
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Suicide bombers kill dozens at Afghan mosque
A pair of suicide bombers killed at least 29 people Tuesday night at a Shiite mosque in Herat, Afghanistan, a provincial spokesman said.
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Chinese media to Trump: Stop the 'emotional venting' on Twitter
US President Donald Trump should stop conducting his international diplomacy on Twitter, Chinese state media said in a widely-published editorial, syndicated across the country.
edition.cnn.com
New female opposition leader quizzed on baby plans hours into job
New Zealand's new opposition leader said it was "unacceptable" for a professional woman to be questioned on her plans for children, hours after she faced exactly those queries.
edition.cnn.com
What's next after North Korea missile test?
North Korea's latest missile test has sparked new fears that the US mainland is now in reach of the country's arsenal. Here's what you need to know.
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Pakistan chooses new leader, but Sharif family waits in wings
Pakistan's Parliament on Tuesday elevated a former petroleum minister as prime minister after the country ousted former leader Nawaz Sharif over corruption allegations.
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Satellite photos reveal underground construction at Chinese military base
New satellite imagery of China's first overseas military base reveal it is bigger and more secure than previously thought.
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Pakistani village elders order retaliatory rape of 17-year-old girl
Village elders in Pakistan ordered the rape of a 17-year-old girl after her brother was accused of raping another girl.
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North Korea timeline: From Trump's inauguration to now
When US President Donald Trump took office on January 20, the new administration's policy on North Korea was unclear. More than seven months on, Pyongyang has tested two missiles capable of reaching the United States, while the US ambassador to the UN has declared "the time for talk is over." Here's how events have unfolded.
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US grapples for new approach on North Korea
Washington will not seek UN Security Council action following North Korea's latest missile test, according to US ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley, who says that the "the time for talk is over."
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USC frat member suspended amid protests of "drug-facilitated sexual assaults"
"I want this to stop," one student told CBS Los Angeles. "It happens all the time and nothing is done about it."
cbsnews.com
Mystery of exotic infectious disease traced to aromatherapy room spray
CDC has traced an unusual tropical disease to a very unusual source-- a lavender-scented room spray.
edition.cnn.com
Mystery of exotic infectious disease traced to aromatherapy room spray
It was a mystery by any definition of the word -- a rare tropical infection that had sickened people in the decidedly non-tropical states of Minnesota and Kansas, as well as Texas. The first patient to get sick, in Kansas in March, died.
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January 6 defendant spoke at far-right rally attended by Proud Boys, despite court order against associating with the group
An Arizona political commentator charged in the US Capitol riot spoke at a small right-wing rally in Phoenix last month that was attended by over a dozen Proud Boys, even though a federal judge had ordered him not to associate with any members of the extremist group.
edition.cnn.com
There's bipartisan cooperation brewing on Capitol Hill ... over beer
Some lawmakers are raising the bar for bipartisan cooperation, in the most unexpected of places.
npr.org
Inside the jaw-clenching world of cricket fighting in China
It's cricket fighting season in China, so NPR went ringside to learn about the centuries-old sport. Turns out, the bugs are really high maintenance, big money's involved and big mandibles matter.
npr.org
5 books not to miss: 'Going There' with Katie Couric, unpacking Alan Cumming's 'Baggage'
Katie Couric's much-discussed memoir "Going There" finally hits shelves, and actor Alan Cumming unpacks more of his fascinating life in "Baggage."       
usatoday.com
Confederate names on military bases could be replaced by Medal of Honor winner, Code Talkers
For decades, the Pentagon has venerated Confederate officers who betrayed their oaths by placing their names on property from military bases to ships.       
usatoday.com
Dodgers have played 86 playoff elimination games; here's the story of each one
The Dodgers are 44-42 in elimination playoff games. From Babe Ruth's Red Sox to the Atlanta Braves, here's who's stood in their way.
latimes.com
Again and again. Women's pro soccer players just the latest to deal with abuse
The NWSL is reeling from a scandal involving multiple coaches and alleged abusive behavior toward players, and it's refocused attention on a familiar problem: female athletes experiencing abuse.
npr.org
Biden's equity agenda hangs in balance in the Congress spending negotiations
President Biden has said he's open to compromise on his plans to expand the social safety, but some advocates are concerned that access to benefits may be too limited.
npr.org
Top oil exporter Saudi Arabia targets net zero emissions by 2060
Saudi Arabia's crown prince said on Saturday that the world's top oil exporter aims to reach zero-net emissions by 2060 and will more than double its annual target to reduce carbon emissions.
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Top oil exporter Saudi Arabia targets net zero emissions by 2060
Saudi Arabia's crown prince said on Saturday that the world's top oil exporter aims to reach zero-net emissions by 2060 and will more than double its annual target to reduce carbon emissions.
edition.cnn.com
Biden rescues CNN for one night only from network's 26-day streak of less than 1 million viewers
President Biden offered CNN a lifeline as the struggling network was desperate for a ratings boost after going nearly a month without any program averaging 1 million viewers.
foxnews.com
The Trailer’s guide to the November congressional elections
Three new members of Congress will officially or essentially be chosen in special elections happening Nov. 2: The general elections in Ohio’s 11th and 15th congressional districts and the Democratic primary for Florida’s 20th.
washingtonpost.com
Sen. Maggie Hassan: On National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, let's combat substance misuse together
The substance misuse crisis is ravaging communities in New Hampshire and across the country.
foxnews.com
College football games to watch, Week 8: Iowa State could be a real threat to No. 9 Oklahoma State
No. 9 Oklahoma State is looking at a major test against a dangerous Iowa State team, as the Cyclones might still be a factor in the Big 12 picture.       
usatoday.com
With roots in Havana, Jason Miyares seeks to make history in Virginia
The Republican candidate for attorney general has paired an uplifting personal story with a sharp-edged message on crime.
washingtonpost.com
After championing gay marriage and battling Trump, Mark Herring says he has more left to do
Virginia’s incumbent attorney general hopes for a third term to build on the “progressive powerhouse” he says he’s created.
washingtonpost.com
College Admissions Are Still Unfair
This week Amherst College announced that it was ending the use of legacy preferences in its admissions process. Its president, Biddy Martin, acknowledged that providing an advantage to applicants who are the children of alumni “inadvertently limits educational opportunity.” When incredibly wealthy, highly selective colleges such as Amherst (endowment: $3.7 billion; admission rate: 8 percent) make an announcement like this, it’s tempting to pour a bucket of cold water on the self-congratulatory fireworks they’re lighting for themselves. That should not happen this time.Still, the temptation is real. Why congratulate a college for doing something it should have done a long time ago? Many large public universities, including the University of California, the University of Texas, and Texas A&M, dropped legacy preferences years ago, as did Johns Hopkins University two years ago and MIT and CalTech before it. Pomona College, a highly ranked liberal-arts college like Amherst, dropped legacy preference in 2017. What’s more, even at those places that give the offspring of alumni an edge, or what admissions offices call a “tip,” legacies usually account for a small share of the enrolled class, and many of those admits would likely have gotten in without the advantage, or so the admissions deans defending the practice of birthright advantage like to say.Wouldn’t it be better to go after all those jocks on campus? Division III sports have been called “affirmative action for rich white students,” and almost a third of Amherst’s roughly 1,800 students play one of the college’s 27 varsity sports. That is nearly three times as many athletes as legacies. Amherst plays in the New England Small College Athletic Conference, of which 77 percent of athletes are white, while the college’s student body is only 43 percent white, which makes you wonder whether Amherst’s obsession with sports is also “inadvertently limit[ing] educational opportunity,” maybe even more so than legacy preferences were.Within a few hours of Amherst sharing its news, Catharine B. Hill, the managing director of the nonprofit consulting and research firm Ithaka S+R, dumped out her bucket. In a piece entitled “Ending Legacy Admissions Won’t End Inequity,” Hill stated bluntly, “Legacy admissions are bad from a public-relations perspective, but ending them would do almost nothing to improve socioeconomic diversity at these institutions or increase lower-income students’ likelihood of being admitted.” Splash! So much for your fireworks, Amherst.[Read: College sports are affirmative action for rich white students]It’s important to say that Hill is not some internet troll or the kind of economist who thinks the market should decide who gets to go to college or drink clean water. She is the former president of Vassar College and a serious champion of college access. Under her leadership, Vassar reinstated its “need-blind” admissions policy and significantly raised its enrollment rate of students with Pell Grants. Hill’s absolutely accurate point is that increased institutional spending on grant aid—not loans—for students with economic need will do much more to increase the enrollment of working-class and low-income students at wealthy colleges than getting rid of legacy admissions will.The problem with Hill’s argument is that Amherst did precisely what Hill recommended: It increased its financial-aid investment to make an education there more affordable. Her critique poses a false choice. Amherst showed that it’s possible to do two good things at the same time. There’s no need to decide between getting rid of the legacy tip and increasing need-based financial aid. Furthermore, no one who is fighting for legacy admissions thinks it will “end inequity,” as Hill claims. Straw men should be kept away from the fireworks.Perhaps worst of all, arguing that legacy has no impact only gives further cover to the institutions that still think some children should inherit a leg up in the admissions process. This is also not true. Almost 400 University of Notre Dame freshmen, or 19 percent of the class, were legacies this year. At the University of Southern California, more than 500 freshmen legacies were enrolled last fall. Would they have gotten those spots without a legacy tip? Perhaps, but at Johns Hopkins, which is just as selective, the percentage of enrolled legacies declined from 12.5 to 3.5 percent, while Pell enrollment climbed from 9 to 19 percent.[Ronald J. Daniels: Why we ended legacy admissions at Johns Hopkins]There is also an important component of racial justice in dropping legacy preferences. The practice overwhelmingly benefits white applicants and harms first-generation, immigrant, low-income, and nonwhite students. A 2018 lawsuit against Harvard revealed that 77 percent of legacy admits were white, while just 5 percent were Black and 7 percent were Hispanic. At Notre Dame, the class of 2024 had five times as many legacies as Black students. The college-access advocate Akil Bello told me that “eliminating legacy preference at what I like to call highly rejective colleges matters because it ends the perpetuation of the generational head start and advantages that white people in this country have.” Colleges want to hold on to their institutional legacy, but discrimination is part of that legacy. And, looking at the legacy-enrollment rates of several highly ranked colleges versus their Black-enrollment rates in the chart below, the failure to serve all students remains a part of their present. ***Share includes legacies and donors, from data released according to CA legal requirements ****Data from trial documents and include Classes of 2015 to 2019 The fundamental reason to get rid of legacy preferences is that they are unethical; this led a group of young, first-generation students to create the “Leave Your Legacy” campaign, which helps alumni contact their alma mater to say they will not donate any money until the legacy preference is eliminated. This kind of pressure and the attention Amherst is rightly getting for dropping the tip for legacies could help persuade more colleges to give up an ugly and unfair practice.Eliminating legacy preferences is not the end of the fight for fairness in college admissions; it’s the beginning. Elite colleges and universities have a long way to go in making a meaningful commitment to diversity, but Amherst took one step closer to it this week. And for that, I’m happy to light a sparkler.
theatlantic.com
Spanish ISIS ring quashed by anti-terror op
Spanish authorities shut down a suspected ISIS terror cell on the resort island of Mallorca with a series of raids across Europe.
edition.cnn.com
Germany: Erdogan guards not welcome after DC brawl
Germany has warned Turkey that members of President Erdogan's security detail who were involved in a brawl in Washington "are not welcome in Germany."
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Ana Roš: The female chef putting Slovenia on the map
Five years ago, few people would have put trying Slovenian food on their bucket list.
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London fire: 600 other high-rises being tested
The UK is carrying out tests on 600 high-rise buildings across England which are covered in cladding in response to the fire at Grenfall Tower in London..
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British schoolboys don skirts to protest shorts ban
As a record-breaking heat wave grips Britain, some teenage boys are protesting their school's "no shorts" policy by donning skirts instead.
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Finsbury Park terror attack victim dies
A 51-year-old man who suffered "multiple injuries" during the Finsbury Park terror attack in London earlier this week has died, British police said on Thursday.
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Prince Philip discharged from hospital
Prince Philip, the 96-year-old husband of Britain's Queen, was discharged from hospital on Thursday, two days after being admitted as a "precautionary measure."
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Cumulative extremism: Why terror is like a 'perverted comic book'
When one man was killed and 10 people were injured in north London after a van plowed into Muslim worshipers early Monday morning, the majority of the world mourned. Stories of heroes surfaced. And calls for solidarity rang from communities of all stripes.
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Queen's hat has striking similarity to the EU flag; theories fly on Twitter
Queen Elizabeth II showed up to her speech at Parliament on Wednesday wearing a hat with striking similarities to the EU flag.
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Explosive TATP used in Brussels Central Station attack, initial exam shows
The powerful explosive TATP was used in the failed Brussels train station attack, according to an initial assessment of the remains of the device, a senior Belgian counter-terrorism official told CNN Wednesday. The official also said investigators believe the TATP failed to detonate because of the poor preparation of the explosive, which Belgium's federal prosecutor's office believes was made at the suspect's home.
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Queen's Speech renews doubt over Trump visit
US President Donald Trump's planned state visit to the UK wasn't mentioned in the Queen's Speech, prompting new doubts over whether the trip will happen at all.
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