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Ted Cruz: The Media Is Obsessing Over My Cancun Trip Because of ‘Trump Withdrawal’

Fox News

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) attempted to brush off the controversy over his Cancun trip on Monday night, claiming he got bad press for leaving Texas high and dry because the media is “suffering from Trump withdrawal.”

Over the past few days, the Texas senator has found himself the target of a firestorm of criticism for his tone-deaf decision to flee to a tropical getaway as his home state struggled through a deadly winter storm that left millions without power, water, and heat. After quickly hustling back home on Thursday, Cruz proceeded to repeatedly blame the trip on his young daughters, claiming he was just trying to be a “good dad.”

While Cruz is still facing a widespread backlash, he has found a champion in Fox News host Sean Hannity, who has falsely framed the senator’s trip as nothing more than a “quick dropoff” and “escort” of his daughters. (Cruz was forced to admit that he was scheduled to stay through Sunday and only headed back earlier due to the controversy.)

Read more at The Daily Beast.


Read full article on: thedailybeast.com
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Neither regulated activity is economic in material respect.” Merely quoting this argument is enough to refute it. Again, Barker claims that removing someone from a home that they rent, for money, because that individual failed to pay the agreed-upon sum of money, is not an economic activity. But just in case it isn’t obvious that Barker is wrong, the Supreme Court’s decision in Russell v. United States (1985) directly contradicts him. Russell held that “the congressional power to regulate the class of activities that constitute the rental market for real estate includes the power to regulate individual activity within that class.” Barker’s opinion is still wrong even if you accept his claim that evicting someone from a rental home is not an economic activity. In Wickard v. Filburn (1942), the Supreme Court held that Congress’s power to regulate commerce extends to a farmer’s decision to grow wheat for personal use. Although this wheat was not sold on the commercial market, the Supreme Court explained in Wickard, “home-grown wheat ... competes with wheat in commerce,” and thus can affect the price of wheat in the national market. As the Court later summarized the Wickard opinion in Gonzales v. Raich (2005), Wickard stands for the proposition that Congress may regulate non-economic activity when that activity, “when viewed in the aggregate,” has a “substantial influence on price and market conditions.” Thus, in order to affirm Barker’s opinion, an appeals court would need to conclude that all the evictions that take place in the United States do not have a substantial impact on the American housing market. Again, to describe Barker’s opinion is to refute it. Barker’s decision is the second opinion this week from a Texas-based, Trump-appointed judge that blocks a federal policy while relying on dubious legal reasoning. 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