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Texans still suffering after cold, power outages

Food and water distributions continue to serve thousands of Texans days after a record cold snap caused power outages and clean water shortages. (Feb. 22)      
Read full article on: usatoday.com
UFC 262 adds Jamie Pickett vs. Jordan Wright to lineup
A middleweight fight is the latest addition to UFC 262.       Related StoriesUFC 262 adds Jamie Pickett vs. Jordan Wright to lineup - EnclosureKennedy Nzechukwu's comeback started by staring into Carlos Ulberg's cornerUros Medic didn't think his buzzworthy finish of Aalon Cruz was all that crazy 
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usatoday.com
QAnon Shaman Jacob Chansley's Jail Release Request Denied as Capitol Riot Case Continues
Jacob Chansley is one of more than 270 people facing federal charges in connection with the January 6 riot, according to a George Washington University tracker.
newsweek.com
NYS AG hires lawyers for Gov. Cuomo probe, including ex-fed Joon Kim
A former top federal prosecutor in Manhattan will help lead the independent investigation into allegations that Gov. Andrew Cuomo sexually harassed female aides, state Attorney General Letitia James said Monday. Joon Kim — who closed out the probe of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s campaign-finance scandal — and veteran employment-discrimination lawyer Anne Clark will head the...
nypost.com
Cornel West Leaves Harvard for Union Theological Seminary
The public intellectual and professor of African-American studies will head to Union Theological Seminary in New York.
nytimes.com
Turkish olive farmer battles to save her land from coal mine
YATAGAN, Turkey — Behind Tayyibe Demirel’s olive groves in southwest Turkey lies a vast, grey expanse, stripped bare by a coal mine eating into the rolling hillside. On the horizon, heavy smoke billows from three giant chimneys of the power plant by the town of Yatagan. Determined to save her land and village, Demirel, a...
nypost.com
McEnany: 'I warned the reporters' Biden would be a no-show in White House Briefing Room
Former White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany told Fox News on Monday that she warned the press corps in the waning days of the Trump administration that the suddenly rare appearances by Donald Trump would be a primer for how the Biden administration would interact with the media.
foxnews.com
Meghan Markle Faced Racism. Where Does That Leave the Rest of Us? | Opinion
Racism is still prevalent today and Meghan Markle reminded us of that.
newsweek.com
Biden administration launches new TPS protection for 320K Venezuelans in US
The Biden administration on Monday announced that it is offering special status to the estimated 320,000 Venezuelan exiles living in the US. The decision to extend Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Venezuelans allows exiles to gain US work permits while avoiding the authoritarian socialist government of Nicolas Maduro. Venezuelans must have proof that they were...
nypost.com
Stream It Or Skip It: ‘Bombay Rose’ on Netflix, an Indian Animated Film That’s Like an Impressionist Painting Come to Life
In many ways, the movie is an homage to classic Bollywood (and Hollywood).
nypost.com
Creighton's McDermott reinstated after 'plantation' remark
Creighton announced Monday it has lifted Greg McDermott's suspension for making racially insensitive remarks to his players after a game last week.
foxnews.com
Fact Check: Will Illegal Immigrants Receive Stimulus Checks, As Ted Cruz Says?
Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) proposed an amendment to the American Rescue Plan that would bar illegal immigrants from access to the $1,400 stimulus checks. The amendment failed.
newsweek.com
America Has More Fully Vaccinated People Than COVID-19 Cases
The U.S. still leads the world in COVID-19 cases, but the number of fully vaccinated people now outnumbers the number of cases.
newsweek.com
Listen to Episode 36 of ‘Amazin’ But True’: Potential Lindor, Conforto Contract Extensions feat. Ed Coleman
Mets fans hope Francisco Lindor and Michael Conforto remain in orange and blue for a long, long time. Well, that hope could end up becoming a reality soon enough. The Mets reportedly are beginning talks with Lindor on a contract extension this week with Conforto potentially to follow. Nine figures will have to be thrown...
nypost.com
Italy’s Mount Etna sees spectacular explosion in the latest eruption
Belching out a towering cloud of ash and lava stone onto Sicilian villages, Italy’s Mount Etna volcano erupted again this weekend — the latest particularly spectacular blast in a series of explosions in the last month.
foxnews.com
Bucknell women's basketball poised to be lone unbeaten team entering NCAA Tournament
Though the Bison have played just nine games this season due to COVID-19 cancellations, it's the only tournament-eligible squad without a loss.       
usatoday.com
'Scary to watch': Minneapolis business owners on edge over possible repeat of riots
Minneapolis business owners are fearing more riots will erupt in the city as jury selection begins in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, who is charged with murder in the death of George Floyd.
foxnews.com
Disturbing video shows NYC man shoot at cops in apartment stairwell standoff
Disturbing video shows a Brooklyn man opening fire on NYPD cops in the stairwell of an apartment building, striking two officers who “narrowly avoided being killed,” police said Monday. The officers were responding to a 911 call about a man shot inside his Prospect Lefferts Gardens home at around 9 p.m. Sunday. CCTV footage released...
nypost.com
Bryson DeChambeau says he received motivational text from Tiger Woods prior to victory at Bay Hill
Bryson DeChambeau held onto a victory over Lee Westwood to claim the Arnold Palmer Invitational on Sunday afternoon.
foxnews.com
Sewage in bathtubs, more mold, stinky closet: Officers sue landlord over Monterey housing
Two military officers and their families are suing their privatized housing companies, alleging that pervasive mold in their Monterey, California, houses has caused continuing health problems and ruined their personal belongings. In one family’s case, sewage backed up in their bathtubs, the lawsuit alleges. The other family dealt for months with a smelly closet that...
nypost.com
Charges permanently dropped against Breonna Taylor's boyfriend for shooting officer the night she was killed
Charges have been permanently dismissed with prejudice against Breonna Taylor’s boyfriend, who shot a police officer during the deadly raid that killed Taylor, according to reports.
foxnews.com
'Really disturbing': Friend of Prince Harry reacts to Oprah interview
CNN's Brooke Baldwin speaks to Dean Stott, a friend of Prince Harry's, about the interview Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, gave to Oprah Winfrey.
edition.cnn.com
Critics slam Cuomo’s call for due process in sex harass probe as double standard
Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s calls for due process amid his sexual harassment scandal set a double standard given his history of demanding other embattled figures resign their posts without waiting for the results of a full investigation, critics said Monday. A defiant Cuomo on Sunday vowed that there was “no way” he’d resign with five women...
nypost.com
Netflix's 'The Queen's Gambit' getting stage musical adaptation
Hit Netflix miniseries "The Queen's Gambit," starring Anya Taylor-Joy, will be receiving a stage musical adaptation.
foxnews.com
"I still get asked, 'Where are you from?'" Senator Tammy Duckworth speaks out against recent spike in anti-Asian rhetoric and violence
Senator Tammy Duckworth of Illinois joins CBSN's "Red & Blue" anchor Elaine Quijano to discuss the recent spike in violent attack against Asian Americans. She also weighs in on recent sexual harassment allegations against New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, and why she says President Biden's former nominee for budget director, Neera Tanden, faced discrimination during the confirmation process.
cbsnews.com
Cuomo Inquiry to Be Led by 2 Lawyers, Including Ex-U.S. Attorney
The attorney general named a former federal prosecutor, Joon H. Kim, and an employment lawyer, Anne L. Clark, to lead the investigation that may determine the governor’s future.
nytimes.com
Jane Seymour, 70, flaunts beach body in Hawaii
Seymour turned 70 in February.
nypost.com
Protesters raise sculpture at Cuomo's NYC office
Demonstrators gathered in front of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office on Monday to protest subminimum wages. They said a tipped wage structure forces workers to put up with harassment from customers or the risk of not being paid. (March 8)      
usatoday.com
Meghan Markle wears floral dress for second maternity shoot
The dress is a nod to International Women's Day.
nypost.com
YouTube star Grace Victory ‘awake’ after giving birth in COVID-related coma
YouTube star Grace Victory is making a victorious return to timelines after contracting COVID at Christmas, being placed in a coma and delivering her baby two months early.
nypost.com
'QAnon shaman' must remain in jail, judge rules
A federal judge ruled Monday that the so-called "QAnon shaman" who was charged in the Capitol insurrection is too dangerous to release and must stay in jail while his case moves forward.
edition.cnn.com
'QAnon shaman' must remain in jail, judge rules
A federal judge ruled Monday that the so-called "QAnon shaman" who was charged in the Capitol insurrection is too dangerous to release and must stay in jail while his case moves forward.
edition.cnn.com
Chicago to allow some fans for baseball
Come Opening Day, Chicago's two Major League Baseball teams will be allowed to seat a limited number of fans in the stands. (March 8)      
usatoday.com
Rare Kobe Bryant rookie card sells for almost $1.8 million
A rare Kobe Bryant rookie card sold for more than $1.795 million on Saturday, "an all-time record" for any Bryant card, according to the Goldin Auctions, an online auction house.
edition.cnn.com
Congresswoman Katie Porter says $1.9 trillion relief bill has "a lot of wins"
The House is set to vote on President Biden's $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan as early as Tuesday. Over the weekend, the Senate stripped progressive priorities passed by the House, including increasing the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour. Congresswoman Katie Porter, a Democrat from California, joined CBSN to give her take on the bill as well as discuss her latest climate change proposal.
cbsnews.com
RNC brushes back Trump on 'cease-and-desist' demand
The committee's top lawyer says in a new letter to Trump's attorney that the former president signed off on the RNC's activities in a conversation with chair Ronna McDaniel.
politico.com
College educators form alliance to defend free expression
NEW YORK — Around 200 scholars from across the country have formed the Academic Freedom Alliance, which has a mission to help college educators “speak, instruct, and publish without fear of sanction, bullying, punishment, or persecution.” Launched Monday, the non-profit organization arose out of discussions among some Princeton University faculty members over how to counter...
nypost.com
Get NCAA Basketball Tournament Bracket Ready With Championship Week on ESPN+
Catch the rest of Champs Week on ESPN+ before March Madness hits.
nypost.com
US nursing homes have a staffing crisis. Here’s one way to fix it.
New research finds nursing staff at long-term care facilities churns constantly, leading to worse care. A minimum wage increase could help fix that. | Gabrielle Lurie/The San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images Staff turnover at nursing homes is appalling. Raising the minimum wage could help. Raising the minimum wage is one way Congress and the Biden administration could start to fix America’s long-term care crisis. The minimum wage will not be increased as part of the Covid-19 relief bill passed by the Senate this weekend and expected to be approved by the House this week. It did not comport with the Senate’s finicky rules about what provisions could be included in a bill passed under the “budget reconciliation” process. But there is still some optimism that a minimum wage increase could pass this Congress, and with bipartisan support; a handful of Republican senators have expressed interest in the issue. And if Democrats and Republicans did manage to reach a deal on raising the minimum wage, it could make a real difference addressing a problem identified in new research published this month in Health Affairs: The constant turnover of the nursing staffs at America’s nursing homes, which erodes the quality of care received by the 1.5 million patients who live in long-term care facilities. The study’s authors — Ashvin Gandhi and Huizi Yu of UCLA, along with David Grabowski at Harvard — made a startling discovery after examining data from more than 15,500 nursing homes: On average, there is near-total turnover in nursing staff at long-term care facilities every year. Turnover rates either approach or exceed 100 percent for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified nursing assistants, depending on the metric used. Ashvin Gandhi, Huizi Yu, and David C. Grabowski/Health Affairs Patient care is likely suffering as a result. During the Covid-19 pandemic, the researchers wrote, more infection control violations might have resulted from new staff members who were less familiar with the protocols. At least 172,000 nursing home residents and workers have died during the pandemic. But the risks to patients if their nurses are constantly changing were already well substantiated in the research literature before the current public health emergency. “New staff members might not be as familiar with the facility’s residents and practices, which may lead to quality problems,” the authors explained in their introduction. “For example, high rates of turnover have been found to lead to more rehospitalizations and more frequent use of physical restraints.” The retention problem is bigger than compensation: Registered nurses, for example, make $35 an hour on average, well beyond the scope of any minimum wage hike. Burnout is one likely culprit, given the emotional and physical difficulty of this work. The researchers also found that for-profit facilities, and those owned by large chains, saw higher turnover rates. But low pay has been a chronic problem for retaining nursing-home staff, which is why raising the minimum wage could help to alleviate — if not solve — the problem described in this study. In particular, certified nursing assistants could benefit. CNAs, who work under more senior nurses, provide basic care to long-term care patients and help them with daily activities. Those duties include helping patients with bathing, measuring vital signs and conveying any worrying information to nurses, serving meals and helping patients eat, and turning or repositioning less mobile patients. For that work, they often make wages near the minimum. The average hourly wage for a CNA in 2019 was $14.25, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, below the new $15 minimum wage that many Democrats want to set. But some make as little as $10 an hour, according to BLS, which means even a more modest increase from the current $7.25 federal minimum wage could provide those health workers with more economic security. “Nursing home work is demanding and it stands to reason that many staff can make similar wages working other jobs,” Grabowski told me. “Low wages are not only the reason for staff turnover but raising wages would have a major impact on staff retention.” It would cost money: A Congressional Budget Office estimate on Democrats’ Raise the Wage Act found Medicaid spending would increase by $16 billion over 10 years, in part because Medicaid covers a lot of long-term care in the US. The Health Affairs study’s authors propose other suggestions for addressing retention, including making this information easily available both to give patients more transparency about specific facilities and to encourage those facilities to work on retaining their workers. Lawmakers could also mandate other benefits, such as health insurance and paid leave, or incentivize continuing education to give CNAs specifically upward mobility in their work. Raising the minimum wage might, broadly speaking, create some benefits and some tradeoffs. But this new research indicates it would also be one way to ensure the most vulnerable patients get the care that they deserve.
vox.com
For many interracial couples, Meghan and Harry interview about racism stirred painful memories
Many interracial couples said they related to Meghan and Harry's experiences with racism. Marriages between white and Black Americans remain rare.       
usatoday.com
Daniel Prude's children sue Rochester, alleging history of ignored police misconduct
The children of Daniel Prude claim in a lawsuit that the city of Rochester, New York, has ignored past allegations of police abuse.       
usatoday.com
Somber Kate and Camilla spotted day after Meghan’s Oprah tell-all
Kate Middleton and Camilla Parker Bowles were spotted looking somber Monday — the day after rogue kin Meghan Markle and Prince Harry roasted the royal family in a bombshell TV sit-down. A grim-faced Middleton — whom Markle accused in the special of making her cry — was photographed being driven into Kensington Palace in London...
nypost.com
Why Scientists Are Infecting Healthy Volunteers With The Coronavirus
Exposing people to a potentially fatal disease could hasten understanding of COVID-19 and development of new vaccines and treatments. But the risks of such studies raise serious ethical questions.
npr.org
Arizona police slap charges on women involved in Bath & Body Works brawl
The suspects have been identified as 25-year-old Briana Johnson and 45-year-old Johlyn O'Daniel, according to a report by Fox 10 Phoenix.
foxnews.com
World Uyghur Congress pressures International Olympic Committee to move 2022 Olympics out of Beijing
The World Uyghur Congress accused the International Olympic Committee (IOC) of ignoring an ethics complaint it filed last year to move the 2022 Winter Games out of Beijing due to China’s alleged human rights abuses against Uyghur Muslims and other minorities.  Former United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who serves as chair of the IOC’s Ethics Commission, is now being asked to either review and rule...
nypost.com
George Floyd's brother hopes justice will prevail
The brother of George Floyd, the Black man who died at the hands of Minneapolis police, says he is arming himself in prayer and keeping friends close as jury selection ahead of the trial was placed on pause Monday. (March 8)      
usatoday.com
12-year-old helps over 1,600 people get vaccinated
"I've had people tell me that they finally get to see their grandchildren for the first time. And that's amazing," Sam Keusch said.
cbsnews.com
Lincoln Project knew of some John Weaver allegations early last year: report
The anti-Trump Lincoln Project knew of co-founder John Weaver's inappropriate behavior, which allegedly included harassing messages, as early as January 2020, according to a new report.
foxnews.com
Trump Requests Mail Ballot for Third Time After Pushing Election Fraud Claims About Voting Process
The former president requested a mail ballot on Friday for the upcoming municipal election in Palm Beach County.
newsweek.com