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The Republicans’ sweeping plan to sabotage Biden’s presidency

It's playing out at every level and in every available forum. And if the country is the real victim, so be it.
Read full article on: washingtonpost.com
Missing Girl Survives Freezing Blizzard by Hugging Stray Dog for 18 Hours
Dozens of people in Uglegorsk on the island of Sakhalin in Russia's far east searched throughout the night after the girl did not return home from school.
9 m
newsweek.com
Donald Trump Claimed Apartment Was Three Times Its Actual Size To Increase Value: NY AG
Letitia James' office alleges that Trump valued his apartment at $327 million based on a claim it was 30,000 square foot in size.
newsweek.com
When Does 'Rainbow Six Extraction' Launch? Unlock Time for Ubisoft's Multiplayer Shooter
"Rainbow Six Extraction" will be unlocking in certain territories before others. Here is when the multiplayer game will be available in the United States.
newsweek.com
Man Has Lucky Escape After Falling Into 15-Foot 'Sinkhole' Under His Porch
The 33-year-old from Central Virginia told Newsweek: "It was then I realized that I had fallen into some type of sinkhole and that from my chest down I was dangling into an unknown depth."
newsweek.com
Singer Hana Horká Dies of COVID After Catching It on Purpose To Avoid Vaccine
The Asonance singer voluntarily exposed herself to coronavirus to get a health pass allowing her to visit the sauna and theater, according to her family.
newsweek.com
12/21/18: CBSN Evening News
Federal government now partially shut down; Rare Albino Orangutan released into the wild.
cbsnews.com
5 things to know for Jan. 19: Voting, Covid, Capitol riot, Trump business, Antitrust
Here's what else you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day.
edition.cnn.com
8/10/17: CBSN Evening News
Trump says his North Korea warning maybe "wasn't tough enough"; Nashville pizza joint delivers for its neighborhood.
cbsnews.com
Does this 'Yellowstone' Scene Confirm Elsa Has Ennis' Baby in '1883'?
"Yellowstone" flashback scenes give clues as to the fate of Elsa Dutton while actor Eric Nelsen suggests there is more to come from Ennis in "1883."
newsweek.com
Is Covid Becoming Endemic? What Would That Mean?: QuickTake
Two years into the pandemic, weary governments are hoping the fast-spreading but less severe omicron variant marks a turning point, a shift toward a more predictable and manageable phase. Determined to escape the crisis and avoid more restrictions, officials in some countries suggest it’s approaching time to treat Covid as an endemic disease, like seasonal flu. World Health Organization experts say that’s premature. With omicron ripping through populations and vast parts of the planet still unva
washingtonpost.com
The question we should be asking about violent crime in American cities
When it comes to our current crime trends, two things are true: Deadly violence isn't as pervasive as it was 20 years ago, but homicide numbers are rising in many major American cities. We should not collectively live in fear of deadly violence, Jill Filipovic writes, and we shouldn't wait to hit all-time crime highs before we act. But to decrease rates of violent crime, we have to do more than simply police.
edition.cnn.com
8/14/17: CBSN Evening News
President Trump calls out the KKK, Neo-Nazis and white supremacists; Stephen Colbert interviewed former White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci on the late show.
cbsnews.com
On This Day: 19 January 1967
In 1967, The Monkees topped the U.K singles chart with "I'm A Believer." (Jan. 19)      
usatoday.com
Video of 'Masked Bandit' Cat Delights Internet—'The Hero We Need!'
One admirer on Reddit quipped: "I bet he's quite the cat burglar!"
newsweek.com
UCLA student killed at L.A. furniture store texted about "a bad vibe"
Brianna Kupfer was found dead on the floor of the store minutes after she had sent an ominous text message to a friend, police said.
cbsnews.com
To Tennessee Titans, 2020 loss to Cincinnati Bengals was 'enough to make you puke'
Last season's 31-20 defeat to the Cincinnati Bengals was the low point for a Tennessee Titans defense that has improved greatly in 2021.       
usatoday.com
Even the new Girl Scout cookie is having supply-chain issues — but it’s worth tracking down
The scourge might make it harder to get your mitts on the newest variety of the organization's famous treats.
washingtonpost.com
Gaslighting Anti-Semitism in America | Opinion
Jews in the United States are being targeted by three distinct types of anti-Semites. But they are only being protected against one.
newsweek.com
Our Second Civil War | Opinion
America's political Left and Right no longer share much, if any, common ground. The question today is whether this can end without open conflict.
newsweek.com
We Are All Hostages to Anti-Semitism
Most people do not realize that Jews make up just 2 percent of the U.S. population and 0.2 percent of the world’s population. This means simply finding them takes a lot of effort. But every year in Western countries, including America, Jews are the No. 1 target of anti-religious hate crimes. Anti-Semites are many things, but they aren’t lazy. They’re animated by one of the most durable and deadly conspiracy theories in human history.This past Saturday in Texas, another one found his mark. According to the latest news reports, Malik Faisal Akram traversed an ocean to accomplish his task, flying from the United Kingdom to America in late December. On January 15, he took Colleyville’s Congregation Beth Israel hostage for more than 11 hours. When it was all over, Akram was dead and his captives were not. The hostages escaped after their rabbi engineered a distraction, drawing on security training he had received from the Anti-Defamation League and other communal organizations. Something else most people don’t realize is that many rabbis need and receive security training.Speaking about Jews as symbols is always uncomfortable, and that’s especially the case when bullet holes are still fresh in the sanctuary. But the sad fact is, that’s why the Texas congregants were attacked in the first place: because Jews play a sinister symbolic role in the imagination of so many that bears no resemblance to their lived existence.After Akram pulled a gun on the congregation, he demanded to speak to the rabbi of New York’s Central Synagogue, who he claimed could authorize the release of Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani woman serving an attempted murder sentence in a Fort Worth facility near Beth Israel.Obviously, this is not how the prison system works. “This was somebody who literally thought that Jews control the world,” Beth Israel Rabbi Charlie Cytron-Walker told The Forward. “He thought he could come into a synagogue, and we could get on the phone with the ‘Chief Rabbi of America’ and he would get what he needed.”[Gary Rosenblatt: Is it still safe to be a Jew in America?]I happen to know Angela Buchdahl, the rabbi of that New York synagogue, and I think she would make an excellent chief rabbi of America. But no such position exists. Jews are a famously fractious lot who can rarely agree on anything, let alone their religious leadership. We do not spend our days huddled in smoke-filled rooms plotting world domination while Jared Kushner plays dreidel in the back with Noam Chomsky and George Soros sneaks the last latke.The notion that such a minuscule and unmanageable minority secretly controls the world is comical, which may be why so many responsible people still do not take the anti-Semitic conspiracy theory seriously, or even understand how it works. In the moments after the Texas crisis, the FBI made an official statement declaring that the assailant was “particularly focused on one issue, and it was not specifically related to the Jewish community.” Of course, the gunman did not travel thousands of miles to terrorize some Mormons. He sought out a synagogue and took it hostage over his grievances, believing that Jews alone could resolve them. That’s targeting Jews, and there’s a word for that.The FBI later corrected its misstep, but the episode reflects the general ignorance about anti-Semitism even among people of goodwill. Unlike many other bigotries, anti-Semitism is not merely a social prejudice; it is a conspiracy theory about how the world operates. This addled outlook is what united the Texas gunman, a Muslim, with the 2018 shooter at Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life synagogue, a white supremacist who sought to stanch the flow of Muslims into America. It is a worldview shared by Louis Farrakhan, the Black hate preacher, and David Duke, the former KKK grand wizard. And it is a political orientation that has been expressed by the self-styled Christian conservative leader of Hungary, Viktor Orbán, and Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader of Iran’s Islamic theocracy.The fevered fantasy of Jewish domination is incredibly malleable, which makes it incredibly attractive. If Jews are responsible for every perceived problem, then people with entirely opposite ideals can adopt it. And thanks to centuries of material blaming the world’s ills on the world’s Jews, conspiracy theorists seeking a scapegoat for their sorrows inevitably discover that the invisible hand of their oppressor belongs to an invisible Jew.At the same time, because this expression of anti-Jewish prejudice is so different from other forms of bigotry, many people don’t recognize it. As in Texas, law-enforcement officials overlook it. Social-media companies ignore it. Anti-racism activists—who understand racism as prejudice wielded by the powerful—cannot grasp it, because anti-Semitism constructs its Jewish targets as the privileged and powerful. And political partisans, more concerned with pinning the problem on their opponents, spend their time parsing the identity of anti-Semitic individuals, rather than countering the ideas that animate them.In short, although many people say they are against anti-Semitism today, they don’t understand the nature of what they oppose. And that’s part of why anti-Semitism abides.This ignorant status quo has proved deadly for Jews, and that alone should be enough for our society to take it seriously. But it has disastrous consequences for non-Jews as well. This is because people who embrace conspiracy theories to explain their problems lose the ability to rationally solve them. As Bard College’s Walter Russell Mead has put it: People who think “the Jews” run the banks lose the ability to understand, much less to operate financial systems. People who think “the Jews” dominate business through hidden structures can’t build or long maintain a successful modern economy. People who think “the Jews” dominate politics lose their ability to interpret political events, to diagnose social evils and to organize effectively for positive change. For an example, just look at what happened in Texas. An anti-Semitic gunman took a synagogue hostage in the false hope that its parishioners could somehow free a federal prisoner. That prisoner herself was sentenced to 86 years in jail after she tried to fire her Jewish lawyers at trial, demanded that Jews be excluded from the jury, and declared that her guilty verdict came “from Israel and not from America.” One hateful person after another was destroyed by their own delusions. And such debilitating delusions can reverberate outward.“Anti-Semitism has real impact beyond just hate crimes,” the civil-rights activist Eric Ward once told me. “It distorts our understanding of how the actual world works. It isolates us. It alienates us from our communities, from our neighbors, and from participating in governance. It kills, but it also kills our society.”[Yair Rosenberg: Removing a hyphen won’t stop anti-Semitism]Neither Mead nor Ward is Jewish. The former is a noted white historian and the son of a southern priest; the latter is a Black activist who fights white nationalism. Yet despite coming from different places, both have devoted much of their work to combatting anti-Jewish prejudice, and for the same reason: It threatens democracy itself.“Anti-Semitism isn’t just bigotry toward the Jewish community,” Ward explains. “It is actually utilizing bigotry toward the Jewish community in order to deconstruct democratic practices, and it does so by framing democracy as a conspiracy rather than a tool of empowerment or a functional tool of governance.” In other words, the more people buy into anti-Semitism and its understanding of the world, the more they lose faith in democracy.Numerous historical case studies attest to anti-Semitism undermining its adherents at a large scale, from the defeat of the Nazis, who spurned scientific advances simply because they were discovered by Jews, to European countries that hobbled themselves for centuries by expelling their Jewish populations.“The rise of anti-Semitism is a sign of widespread social and cultural failure,” Mead writes. “It is a leading indicator of a loss of faith in liberal values and of a diminished capacity to understand the modern world and to thrive in it.”Seen in this light, one attack on one synagogue is not just a hate-crime statistic. It is also a warning. The mindset of a madman in Texas might seem alien to us today. But if we do not find a way to confront the conspiratorial currents that threaten to overtake our society, we may find ourselves hostage to the very ideas that animated him.
theatlantic.com
Maryland football loses wave of transfers but will get a boost from key returners
A look at Maryland’s scholarship players who had eligibility remaining but will not be returning for the 2022 season.
washingtonpost.com
12ft Alligator Blocks Florida's Alligator Ally
A photo shows where the huge alligator has escaped through a hole in a fence, built to keep the predators at bay.
newsweek.com
One-third of Biden's ambassador nominees, so far, are campaign 'bundlers'
President Biden pledged in 2019 that no ambassadors in his administration would secure their jobs because they’d given to his campaign.
washingtonpost.com
'Money Heist: Korea'— Everything We Know About Netflix's New Spin-Off
The highly anticipated Korean remake of Netflix's "Money Heist" series stars "Squid Game" actor Park Hae-soo and Yoo Ji-tae from the Korean film "Oldboy."
newsweek.com
Videos show widespread abuse of gays in Russia, advocates say
Human Rights Watch released a series of videos the group says shows that the beating and abuse of gays has become widespread. One 17-year-old from Sochi who was brutalized says Russia's new anti-gay propaganda law has been taken as encouragement by anti-gay groups. Mark Phillips reports.
cbsnews.com
What 2020's pro-Trump phony electors means for 2024
Robert Alexander writes that slates of phony electors from seven states were sent to then-Vice President Mike Pence in an effort to persuade him to discard the legitimate slates of electors he received -- an alarming, albeit unsuccessful, attempt to upend the 2020 presidential election results, and one requiring immediate remedy to avoid repetition in 2024.
edition.cnn.com
‘No One Heard the Doorbell’: Baby Found Dead in Bag Left at Unstaffed Chicago Firehouse
ReutersA newborn baby was found dead in a duffel bag left outside a Chicago firehouse over the weekend, and authorities say firefighters didn’t even realize the boy was there until they went out to shovel snow.“They were in and out so much that morning that no one heard the doorbell,” Chicago Fire Department spokesman Larry Langford was quoted saying by the Chicago Sun-Times. He noted that the firehouse on the Near North Side is often unstaffed and is used as an air supply maintenance facility, meaning crew members are usually away servicing supplies at other firehouses.It was not immediately clear how long the newborn was outside, where he was found in a duffel bag in the snow amid freezing temperatures. The Chicago Fire Department said crews discovered the boy at about 5 a.m. that morning.Read more at The Daily Beast.
thedailybeast.com
Texans hit with skyrocketing utility bills following deadly winter storm
As Texas works to restore power and clean water to all 29 million residents, some say they've received bills of thousands of dollars for just a few days' worth of service during last week's deadly winter storm. Dallas Morning News staff writer Maria Halkias joins CBSN's Lana Zak with more on the state's independent power grid and the steep price hikes.
cbsnews.com
Blinken arrives in Ukraine, says Russia could attack at short notice
U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken arrived in Kyiv on Wednesday in a whistle-stop diplomatic push to defuse tensions with Moscow over Ukraine.
nypost.com
South Africa facing violent unrest following jailing of former President Jacob Zuma
More than 200 people have died in South Africa during a week of violent unrest sparked by the jailing of former President Jacob Zuma. Outrage in the country has been heightened by economic disparities that were highlighted during the pandemic. The Wall Street Journal's Africa Deputy Bureau Chief Gabriele Steinhauser joins CBSN to break down the unrest in the nation.
cbsnews.com
China Uses Anal Tests To Detect Omicron As COVID Variant Spreads Before Winter Olympics
The testing method—considered impractical for larger outbreaks—has been in use since the start of the pandemic.
newsweek.com
Testing requirements for nursing home visits leave families stuck in 'another lockdown'
As Covid-19 cases rise again in nursing homes, a few states have begun requiring visitors to present proof that they're not infected before entering facilities, stoking frustration and dismay among family members.
edition.cnn.com
Off-Duty Deputy Dies As Mom Suffered 'Possible Self-Inflicted Gunshot Wound'—Police
A Texas sheriff said: "It is with heavy hearts that we confirm the death of our deputy. Please keep her in your thoughts and prayers."
newsweek.com
Ukraine warns Russia has 'almost completed' build-up of forces near border
edition.cnn.com
Abcarian: How to persuade the willfully unvaccinated? Make their lives more difficult
France has just mandated "vaccine passes" for public places. We should too.
latimes.com
Op-Ed: My city's new gun control laws will help more than waiting on Congress to do something
San Jose will soon require gun owners to purchase liability insurance and to pay annual fees to fund violence-reduction initiatives.
latimes.com
'Bull' Canceled: Why the Show is Ending After 6 Seasons
The Michael Weatherly-starring CBS show's current season will be its last. But why is "Bull" coming to an end?
newsweek.com
Man wanted in Florida murder arrested in Southern California
A man wanted in connection with the killing of a woman at a Florida motel earlier this month was captured last week in Southern California, authorities said on Tuesday.
foxnews.com
Biden administration in court to defend controversial Trump-era border policy barring asylum seekers
The Biden administration will be in court Wednesday defending the use of a controversial Trump-era policy that's resulted in more than 1 million expulsions of migrants arrested at the US-Mexico border.
edition.cnn.com
Letters to the Editor: What's behind those train package thefts? A railroad seeking a bigger profit
Long trains, the kind that move slowly and are easy pickings for thieves, are better for the railroad's bottom line but not for security.
latimes.com
They settled on a Georgia island while enslaved. Now they fight rising seas, land loss to preserve culture.
The historic Gullah Geechee community came to Sapelo Island while enslaved and made it their home. Centuries later, they're fighting for survival.       
usatoday.com
More real estate trends to watch in 2022
REAL ESTATE MATTERS | According to CoreLogic, a leading real-estate-analytics company, homeowners with mortgages saw their equity increase by more than 31 percent in the third quarter of 2021, fueling a refinancing boom which is expected to continue in 2022.
washingtonpost.com
'Black Hawk Down' pilot Mike Durant aims for Alabama Senate seat, Lauds American principles over liberal media
Former U.S. Army Special Operations aviator and Alabama Senate candidate Mike Durant has set his sights on Alabama's opening Senate seat following the retirement of Sen. Richard Shelby at the end of his term. Durant has touted his military and small business owner experience in stating his case to Alabamians.
foxnews.com
USPS on the hook for White House's free Covid-19 test deliveries
The US Postal Service says it's prepared to deliver the first 500 million home Covid-19 tests to homes across the US. But USPS is facing problems, with communities in several states dealing with mail delays because of Omicron.
edition.cnn.com
Letters to the Editor: Anti-vaccine lies are killing good people. This family shows how
A father who was unvaccinated died last year. His son, racked with guilt, later committed suicide. That's two lives lost to anti-vaccine disinformation.
latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: L.A. Times, why wasn't the Texas synagogue standoff front-page news?
Amid a spike in antisemitic attacks, some readers ask why coverage of the Texas synagogue attack wasn't given more prominence.
latimes.com
Former McDonald’s employee claims this one item is free
A former McDonald’s worker has revealed that there is one menu item that fans can reportedly get for free: pickles.
foxnews.com
Granderson: Why aren't Democrats making Election Day a state holiday?
It would be such an easy way to improve voting access.
latimes.com