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Trump calls Supreme Court ruling a 'historic win for families who want school choice'

Earlier this month, Trump called school choice the civil rights issue “all-time in this country.”
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5 things to know for July 6: Coronavirus, gun violence, China, gas pipeline, Japan
Here's what else you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day.
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Siberian tiger kills zookeeper in front of visitors
The zoo called the incident "highly tragic" but said there would be "no consequences" for the tiger.
cbsnews.com
Colin Kaepernick mocked for tweet calling Fourth of July 'celebration of white supremacy'
Colin Kaepernick was ripped on social media over the weekend over his tweet denouncing the Fourth of July holiday about nine years after he was celebrating it.
foxnews.com
Bryson DeChambeau wins Rocket Mortgage Classic after bulking up 40 pounds
Powered by 40 pounds of additional muscle, Bryson DeChambeau claimed his sixth PGA Tour title at the Rocket Mortgage Classic in Detroit.
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Ghislaine Maxwell arrest: FBI reportedly almost blew cover by lying to neighbor
The FBI agents who arrested Ghislaine Maxwell last week almost blew their cover when they lied to a neighbor who complained about noise from spy planes buzzing overheard, according to a report. A local told the UK’s Mirror that aircraft had been circling over the disgraced British socialite’s 156-acre hideaway in New Hampshire beginning before...
nypost.com
Several men taunt black family at Oregon beach, police say
Officers say the mean used racial slurs and Nazi salute, then challenged police who came to fight and set off illegal fireworks .
cbsnews.com
Blame Institutions, Not Individuals
Reopening is a mess. Photographs of crowds jostling outside bars, patrons returning to casinos, and a tightly packed, largely maskless audience listening to President Donald Trump’s speech at Mount Rushmore all show the U.S. careening back to pre-coronavirus norms. Meanwhile, those of us watching at home are like the audience of a horror movie, yelling “Get out of there!” at our screens. As despair rises, the temptation to shame people who fail at social distancing becomes difficult to resist.But Americans’ disgust should be aimed at governments and institutions, not at one another. Individuals are being asked to decide for themselves what chances they should take, but a century of research on human cognition shows that people are bad at assessing risk in complex situations. During a disease outbreak, vague guidance and ambivalent behavioral norms will lead to thoroughly flawed thinking. If a business is open but you would be foolish to visit it, that is a failure of leadership.Since March, Americans have lived under a simple instruction: Stay home. Now, even as case counts spike in states such as Arizona, Florida, and Texas, many other states continue to ease restrictions on businesses, and suddenly the burden is on individuals to engage in some of the most frustrating and confounding cost-benefit analyses of their life. Pandemic decision making implicates at least two complex cognitive tasks: moral reasoning and risk evaluation.[Julia Marcus: The dudes who won’t wear masks]My academic subspecialty is the psychology of judgment and decision making. The foundational experiment in this discipline began with the prompt: “Imagine that the United States is preparing for an outbreak of an unusual Asian disease.” (The glibly xenophobic use of “Asian” as a shortcut to inducing fear and confusion is a subject for another article.) The experiment asked participants to choose between two public-health policies: In option A, one-third of the population survives for sure, but no one else makes it; in option B, there is a one-third chance that all survive, but a two-thirds chance that none do. For some participants, these options were described in terms of how many lives would be saved; for others, how many would die. Participants consistently chose option A, which offered certainty, if they were thinking in terms of potential gains (saving lives) but option B, which involved more risk, if they were thinking about potential losses (dying). A weighty decision was swayed dramatically by the semantic framing. (This observation earned one of the experimenters the Nobel Prize for economics.)The cognitive-science canon is replete with uncanny predictions relevant to the coronavirus era. Researchers have studied the human tendency to discount preventable harms that arise from nature and to overreact to harms that arise from human action. The literature predicts that people will take comfort when a coronavirus fatality is attributed to “underlying conditions”—for instance, a patient’s age or chronic maladies—that they do not share, and they will be tempted by the quick dopamine hit associated with shaming those who fail at social distancing. Cognitive scientists even have experiments to explain the “declining marginal disutility” that people associate with others’ deaths—the feeling that the difference between no deaths and one death is really bad, but the difference between 110,000 and 111,000 deaths is negligible. Evocatively termed “psychophysical numbing,” this confounding juxtaposition of the mathematical and the existential is where Americans live now.[Read: Humans are too optimistic to comprehend the coronavirus]As states gradually reopen, seemingly simple judgments are likely to grow more fraught. What does six feet between people look like? The literature suggests that I am more confident I’m six feet away from a friend than from a stranger, that I’m more likely to blame people not of my race for standing too close, that I overestimate my compliance with public-health guidance but underestimate yours. Humans have difficulty calculating exponents, which is particularly crucial to understanding the speed of disease spread. They struggle to estimate the correct answer to a problem without drifting toward the answer that best serves their own interest. With more freedom of movement, Americans also have more opportunities to make judgments of others—who always seem to be doing it wrong. How can people be sitting in groups, chatting, at an outdoor bar? Who would take their kid to swim in a public pool? Are you inviting those people inside your house?Even when shamers have the risk calculus right, social-distancing shaming is still useless or even harmful to society. Each judgment is a chance not just to get the math wrong, but to let indignation outstrip empathy. Living in a dense, diverse city, I know that I place moral and practical value on playgrounds, parks, and, indeed, protest marches that I might have viewed as indulgences were I still living in my hometown in rural Maine. Individual citizens—citizens facing a range of permissible options, receiving confusing public-health messaging, triaging competing ethical commitments—are not the best targets of our practical and moral concern. Even within academic psychology, scholars are prone to focusing on individuals who make suboptimal choices—workers who do not save, or employees who choose bad retirement investments. In the pandemic, this urge is a red herring; it is too easy to focus on people making bad choices rather than on people having bad choices. People should practice humility regarding the former and voice outrage about the latter.[Derek Thompson: Social distancing is not enough]At the least, government agencies must promulgate clear, explicit norms and rules to facilitate cooperative choices. Most people congregating in tight spaces are telling themselves a story about why what they are doing is okay. Such stories flourish under confusing or ambivalent norms. People are not irrevocably chaotic decision makers; the level of clarity in human thinking depends on how hard a problem is. I know with certainty whether I’m staying home, but the confidence interval around “I am being careful” is really wide. Concrete guidance makes challenges easier to resolve. If masks work, states and communities should require them unequivocally. Cognitive biases are the reason to mark off six-foot spaces on the supermarket floor or circles in the grass at a park.For social-distancing shaming to be a valuable public-health tool, average citizens should reserve it for overt defiance of clear official directives—failure to wear a mask when one is required—rather than mere cases of flawed judgment. In the meantime, money and power are located in public and private institutions that have access to public-health experts and the ability to propose specific behavioral norms. The bad judgments that really deserve shaming include the failure to facilitate testing, failure to protect essential workers, failure to release larger numbers of prisoners from facilities that have become COVID-19 hot spots, and failure to create the material conditions that permit strict isolation. America’s half-hearted reopening is a psychological morass, a setup for defeat that will be easy to blame on irresponsible individuals while culpable institutions evade scrutiny.
theatlantic.com
On This Day: 6 July 1978
Richard Burton movie "The Wild Geese" had a royal premiere in London. (July 6)       
usatoday.com
Messi will finish career at Barcelona, says club president
Lionel Messi wants to stay with Barcelona until the end of his career, says club president Josep Maria Bartomeu.
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Lionel Messi will finish his career at Barcelona, according to club president Josep Maria Bartomeu
Lionel Messi wants to stay with Barcelona until the end of his career, says club president Josep Maria Bartomeu, amid rumors the star is unsettled.
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Messi will finish his career at Barcelona, club president says
Lionel Messi wants to stay with Barcelona until the end of his career, says club president Josep Maria Bartomeu, amid rumors the star is unsettled.
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LA County sets new record for daily coronavirus cases, health officials say
Los Angeles County saw a record 3,187 new coronavirus cases on Friday, the highest daily total since the start of the pandemic, according to health officials.
foxnews.com
Mexico's President Weathers A Torrent Of Criticism Over Meeting With Trump
Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's critics say he's making a mistake by going to Washington, and is giving in to the U.S. president's whims. But Lopez Obrador says, "We are going ... with our heads high."
npr.org
Spain's coronavirus antibodies study adds evidence against herd immunity
Spain's large-scale study on the coronavirus indicates just 5% of its population has developed antibodies, strengthening evidence that a so-called herd immunity to Covid-19 is "unachievable," the medical journal the Lancet reported on Monday.
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Spain's antibodies study adds evidence against herd immunity
Spain's large-scale study on the coronavirus indicates just 5% of its population has developed antibodies, strengthening evidence that a so-called herd immunity to Covid-19 is "unachievable," the medical journal the Lancet reported on Monday.
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Pakistan's top health official tests positive for coronavirus
• Africa's battle against Covid-19 will be won or lost here • Ending coronavirus pandemic could cause over 1 million extra deaths from other diseases
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Gingrich and Rep. Reed: Cuomo's coronavirus nursing home disaster – Hold governor accountable
No one has been able to elicit an explanation from Gov. Cuomo on the decisions behind New York state’s disastrous nursing home policies during the coronavirus pandemic.
foxnews.com
Ranking the NFL’s most dynamic skill-position trios
Before fantasy football judged NFL teams by their quarterback-running back-wide receiver combinations, the Cowboys set the bar. Troy Aikman, Emmitt Smith and Michael Irvin were dubbed “The Triplets” on the way to three Super Bowls in the 1990s. Ever since, trios are a measure of explosiveness. The Post ranked the 16 most dynamic “triplets” in...
nypost.com
López Obrador heading to Washington to meet Trump amid controversy
Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's first foreign trip stirs controversy on both sides of the border.
latimes.com
Dear Care and Feeding: My Grandson Is Visited by a Spooky Lady Every Night
Parenting advice on spooky ghost ladies, dangerous dogs, and reporting childhood abuse.
slate.com
Unbundling the Police in Venice Beach, California
Almost seven years ago I rented an old house in Venice Beach, California, on Rose Avenue near Groundwork Coffee, where baristas sold T-shirts that said Venice: Where Art Meets Crime. In three minutes, I could walk to the corner of Lincoln Avenue, where there was a Whole Foods, a 99 Cents Only store, a check-cashing spot, two gas stations, a Oaxacan taco truck, and a Mexican restaurant, Casablanca, where a retired accountant named Chip made L.A.’s best margaritas. LAPD alerts about where crime was most likely to happen, based on a predictive analysis, often flagged the stretch between Chip’s margarita cart and my front door, even as neighborhood rents skyrocketed and median home prices surpassed $2 million.On those few blocks I saw a knife fight, a hit-and-run, car windows busted by smash-and-grab thieves, a heroin overdose, men shouting threats at passersby, perhaps two dozen late-night domestic disputes, and all manner of drunk or disorderly behavior. And I saw an LAPD officer kill a homeless 41-year-old white man named Jason Davis. That I couldn’t stop that killing still bothers me.In recent weeks, the protests over the killing of George Floyd have provoked an unusually wide-ranging debate about how to respond to police violence. Earmark funds for reform? Defund the police? Abolish them? Those years living in Venice and observing its street life convinced me that, at least in my old neighborhood, the best way forward is to “unbundle the police.”[Tracey L. Meares and Tom R. Tyler: The first step is figuring out what police are for]As my colleague Derek Thompson explained recently, big-city policing is “a bundle of services,” many of which have little to do with violent crime. In other neighborhoods, the most consequential sort of unbundling might involve charging an entity other than the police with enforcing traffic laws or maintaining the safety of public-school students. In Venice, a 3.17-square-mile neighborhood of Los Angeles covered by the LAPD, it would involve a new approach to engaging the homeless population and people experiencing a mental-health crisis. “More than one out of three times that a Los Angeles police officer used force in recent months involved a person experiencing homelessness,” the Los Angeles Times reported earlier this year. Roughly a quarter of the homeless population suffers from serious mental-health problems. On Rose Avenue, mental health, homelessness, or the combination of both seemed tied to most disorder I saw.Venice Beach is far safer now than it was in the high-crime 1990s, when the Los Angeles Times characterized its residents as “trapped by terror” amid “the most intense gang war raging in Los Angeles.” In 1994, a “mushrooming yearlong conflict” involving gang members from Venice, Culver City, Mar Vista, and Santa Monica took the lives of 17 people, the newspaper reported, “many of them innocent victims.” At least 50 other people were wounded by gunfire. By the time I moved to the neighborhood, in 2013, the crime rate had plummeted; Venice went without a murder from November 18, 2013, to May 11, 2015. Few residents worried about gangs. Instead, they worried about the homeless population, especially after, in a matter of months, at least five homeless men perpetrated break-ins while residents were home. One young actress awoke to a drug-addled man in her house. Half-dressed, she fled onto her roof, where she cowered under eaves to hide as the intruder tried to find her. Passersby looked up at the scene in horror. By 2015 assaults and property crime were up. The cops blamed a huge influx of people in their teens or early-to-mid-20s who came to Venice to live on the streets in a place with good weather, a famous beach, and easy access to drugs. They would get off the bus on Lincoln Avenue and walk down Rose toward the sand.During these same years, Rose was changing from a quasi-residential street with a half-dozen businesses into a bustling commercial strip with pricey restaurants, boutiques, a fancy ice-cream shop, hair salons, a yoga studio, and a purveyor of $12 cold-pressed juices. Every day brought fraught interactions among residents, visitors to local businesses, and the area’s homeless men and women. Many nights, as I worked by the window facing the street, I overheard the snores of people sleeping in cars and altercations on the benches outside Groundwork.Questions about whether and when to call the cops were unavoidable. I was painfully aware of how badly encounters with cops could end, especially when people with mental-health issues were involved. But I also worried about failing to summon help that could stop a fight before it turned deadly or spare someone from being assaulted or save a person in crisis from an overdose. If a man was breaking beer bottles on the sidewalk or defecating on the curb in front of my house or shouting expletives for two hours straight, that didn’t meet my threshold––but I didn’t know where my neighbors had set their limit.[Read: Nobody knows what to do about L.A.’s homelessness crisis]What about a man shouting, “I’m going to rape you!,” or, “I’m going to kill you!”? I heard both without calling the cops, because, in context, the yeller didn’t seem to mean it. Another time, when a homeless woman kept screaming, “Call 911, she’s going to kill me!,” I obliged. The police came and deftly broke up a conflict with another homeless woman that didn’t seem dangerous in hindsight. Still, on many nights I wanted someone other than the cops to call. I searched for alternatives and found, to my surprise, that the L.A. County Department of Mental Health maintains a 1-800 number, 24/7, and can deploy “response teams,” sometimes alongside police.On June 10, 2015, I published an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times urging Angelenos to consider that alternative to calling 911. Most people had never heard of it, and I don’t think my article changed that.A few weeks later, on July 13, I was walking my dog back from the park when I sensed something amiss as I reached the corner of Rose and Bernard Avenue. Looking left, I saw an LAPD officer standing in the middle of my street, in front of Groundwork, with his gun drawn. It was pointed at a white man holding a box cutter. I watched the police officer shoot the man without fully realizing what was happening––as the man crumpled to the ground, I thought he had only been Tasered.His name was Jason Davis. Earlier that day he’d entered the outdoor patio of Groundwork, where the staff is generally adept at handling disruptive people. According to the L.A. County District Attorney’s Office report, Davis looked disheveled and was drinking out of a bottle filled with dirty water blackened by cigarette butts. He was left alone until he began to vomit. When a manager asked if he was okay, he became verbally aggressive. Someone said he had a knife. The manager cleared the patio. Someone called 911. Davis refused to leave and told bystanders, “Film my death for YouTube. This is the day I’m going to die.” He told another employee, “You’re going to watch me die and it’s your fault.”Two LAPD officers, Ryan Connell and Ivan Lombard-Jackson, responded to the call. According to the DA’s report, the officers found Davis in the patio area holding a box cutter with the blade exposed and ordered him to drop it while standing approximately 10-to-15 feet away. One officer held a Taser, the other a gun. After multiple commands to drop the blade, Davis reportedly stood up and yelled, “Today is the day that you motherfuckers are going to kill me!” Perhaps if the cops had simply left right then, no harm would have come to anyone, but they didn’t have that option. They are the people others call to handle problems that they could not or did not resolve.I came on the scene right then. “Connell again ordered Davis to drop the knife, but Davis walked toward him with it raised over his head,” the DA’s report states. “Lombard-Jackson fired his Taser at Davis’ chest, activating a five-second burst. Davis was stunned by the Taser but continued to approach Connell with the box cutter raised over his head. In fear for his life, Connell fired two rounds from his service weapon at Davis from a distance of approximately eight feet.” I didn’t think that he got quite that close. Davis was struck in the stomach and collapsed, bleeding. He was transported to a hospital and pronounced dead hours later. According to the same report, “Davis had a history of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. He attempted suicide on three occasions in 1993. In 2000, Davis told his mother he was going to commit ‘suicide by cop’ but she was able to successfully intervene by calling the police.”That shooting weighed on me, and does still. I’d watched many police killings on YouTube for work, often with anguish, but seeing a shooting in person was more affecting than I had anticipated. Could an unarmed person trained in managing mental-health crises have resolved the problem without violence? Maybe so, I thought, and not for the first time. Earlier in 2015, Brendon Glenn, a homeless black man, had been shot to death by the LAPD on the other side of Venice after a series of altercations with restaurant employees. “LAPD Chief Charlie Beck took the unprecedented step of publicly recommending that prosecutors charge the officer with manslaughter,” The Argonaut, a local newspaper, later reported.If the LAPD’s presence often seemed to create more danger or violence than it discouraged or averted, that wasn’t the whole story. In 2015, a hotel owner and a gang member named Francisco Cardenaz Guzman had a heated argument near Rose and Ocean Front Walk with a group of homeless men congregating by his hotel’s entrance. A 26-year-old homeless man nicknamed “Shakespeare” tried to intervene as a peacemaker and was shot to death by Guzman, who then fled the scene in an SUV. Guzman said he was defending his neighborhood and was later convicted of murder. Would the altercation and the murder have been avoided had the hotel owner called the cops to disperse the loitering men? The LAPD was certainly useful in finding and arresting Guzman, who is now locked up in prison.[Annie Lowrey: Defund the police]The status quo in Venice doesn’t work. Pedestrians avoid whole blocks—3rd Street between Rose and Sunset Avenue, Hampton Drive between Rose and Marine Street—as tent encampments expand. Women are sexually harassed when they go out for a jog. Chop shops for stolen bicycles operate openly on street corners. Residents wake up to human waste deposited on their front lawn or outside their alley-facing garage doors. At least until Los Angeles solves its homelessness problem, the most disruptive transients will continue to have confrontations with residents and businesses.Many residents will keep clamoring for more police officers, citing fear of building and car break-ins, fights among homeless people, aggressive panhandling, syringes littering rain gutters, and sidewalk-blocking tents that force folks into the street as they walk their kids to school. Business owners will keep relying on police to respond when someone pulls out a box cutter, or enters a restaurant dining room and starts shouting racial slurs at patrons, or picks up a metal chair and throws it into the plate-glass window of an architecture office, or uses the front garden of a plant store as a dog run for three uncollared pit bulls. (I saw all of that on Rose Avenue.) And residents and business owners will continue to be upset if the LAPD fails to arrive quickly or to solve the problem or goes about solving it in a way that seems needlessly harsh or at odds with the neighborhood’s bohemian self-image.Abolishing the LAPD would likely make the situation in Venice worse, not better. Some business owners and residents would use guns or other weapons to handle their own disputes. Perhaps residents would band together to hire private security guards, some armed. Outside such zones of control, where people would protect themselves commensurate with their ability to pay, I suspect that street harassment and crime would spike and some number of residents would once again feel “trapped by terror” while others fled to someplace with more cops, fewer transients, or both of those qualities. I suspect that homeless people, already at heightened risk of violence, would suffer more than most residents.What could reduce both police violence and crime in Venice is hiring people other than the police to reach out to homeless or distressed people and to resolve incidents without violence whenever possible. Calling the cops should be a measure of last resort, not a first attempt at finding outside help.The health department’s 1-800 number is better than nothing, but it leaves a lot to be desired. When you call, you get a menu of options to navigate before reaching an operator and then a hold cue. The public-health system just isn’t built to match the speed or volume of 911. Perhaps it’s not surprising that the majority of residents default to that universally known, better staffed, and impossible-to-forget number. The local government has tried to improve the 911 system to better handle mental illness: A “co-responder” program under the auspices of the LAPD currently has 17 “mixed” teams that include police officers and L.A. County Department of Mental Health staff. That, too, is better than nothing, but to put those 17 teams in context, the LAPD has roughly 9,000 total sworn officers––one for every 433 residents, which is one of the lowest ratios among major cities in the U.S.Besides, the fix I’m envisioning wouldn’t just send people parachuting into Venice in a crisis involving the mentally ill. What I have in mind is a network of trained city employees who walk a neighborhood beat, learn its characters, and preempt trouble.[Read: Who will hold the police accountable?]Like the police, but also like lifeguards and firefighters and paramedics, these helpers would be obligated to assist in fraught situations, especially involving mental illness and people living on the streets. And they’d make a point of knowing merchants and residents, including homeless people. Unlike the cops, their tool kit would not include violence. They would never shoot, Taser, punch, strike, or arrest anyone. Even if just as many cops were employed, this new resource would reduce police interactions and could conceivably pay for itself by reducing break-ins and car vandalism and bicycle thefts and emergency-room visits and jail occupancies. After the 2015 police killing of Brendon Glenn in Venice, the man’s family secured a $4 million settlement from the city. Averting just one incident like that would save a life and pay for a lot of helpers.Venice is crowded with people in need of one type of help or another. Many of them are disinclined to seek it from the LAPD. Let’s put unarmed helpers on the streets and study what happens.
theatlantic.com
Australia to seal off 6.6 million people in virus-hit state as outbreak worsens
Australia will isolate 6.6 million people in the state of Victoria from the rest of the nation at midnight on Tuesday, as authorities take drastic action to control a coronavirus outbreak in the city of Melbourne.
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David Mitchell’s New Novel Offers a Slice of Paradise
Utopia Avenue shows the Cloud Atlas author is best when he stays grounded.
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slate.com
Australia to seal off 6.6 million people in virus-hit state as outbreak worsens
Australia will isolate 6.6 million people in the state of Victoria from the rest of the nation at midnight on Tuesday, as authorities take drastic action to control a coronavirus outbreak in the city of Melbourne.
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edition.cnn.com
At least 2 dead as planes collide over Idaho lake, crash into water
As many as six others missing. The NTSB was leading the investigation into what happened.
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cbsnews.com
Why the picture of Spacey and Maxwell on the British throne matters
CNN's Max Foster reports on the image of British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell sitting alongside "House of Cards" star Kevin Spacey, who has also faced allegations of sexual misconduct, apparently at Buckingham Palace in 2002, which was first published by the UK-based Daily Telegraph newspaper.
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South African airlines are struggling, but FlySafair hopes to weather the storm
For more than two months, airport terminals in South Africa sat eerily silent. As the spread of coronavirus crippled demand for air travel across the globe, the country enacted one of the world's strictest lockdowns on March 27, effectively banning all commercial passenger flights.
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South African airlines are struggling, but FlySafair hopes to weather the storm
As South African airlines struggle to stay aloft during the pandemic, one low-cost carrier plans to withstand the economic turbulence without a bailout.
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19 people were injured after a tree fell on a garage during a child's birthday party
Nineteen people gathered for a child's birthday were injured during a violent storm after a tree fell on a garage in Pasadena, Maryland.
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Kansas Newspaper Owner Apologizes for Cartoon That Equated Mask Order to Holocaust
The cartoon depicted Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly wearing a mask with a Jewish Star of David on it, next to a digitally altered image of people being loaded onto train cars
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time.com
At least 5 children were killed by gun violence across the nation this holiday weekend
At least five children were killed by gun violence over the holiday weekend, sparking calls from officials in three cities to end the shootings.
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edition.cnn.com
Tree falls on Maryland garage in storm, sends 19 to hospital: report
A large tree toppled onto a detached garage in a Maryland neighborhood where people attending a child's birthday party sought shelter from a storm, sending 19 people to hospitals Sunday afternoon, authorities said.
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foxnews.com
Japan says Chinese ships spend record time violating its territorial waters
Chinese coast guard ships have twice intruded into Japan's territorial waters in the past four days, forcing Japanese coast guard vessels to block the Chinese ships from approaching Japanese fishing boats on at least one occasion, authorities in Tokyo said Monday.
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edition.cnn.com
First person charged under Hong Kong's national security law appears in court
Tong Ying-kit is charged with inciting secession and terrorist activities, meanwhile fears of censorship in Hong Kong are rising as public libraries suspend loaning out several titles by political activists.
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First person charged under Hong Kong's national security law appears in court
The first person in Hong Kong to be prosecuted under the city's sweeping new national security law has been denied bail after appearing in court on Monday.
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edition.cnn.com
Japan says Chinese ships spend record time violating its territorial waters
Chinese coast guard ships have twice intruded into Japan's territorial waters in the past four days, forcing Japanese coast guard vessels to block the Chinese ships from approaching Japanese fishing boats on at least one occasion, authorities in Tokyo said Monday.
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edition.cnn.com
'Why should I bleach the color of my skin to be deemed beautiful?' Cricket star's anger over racist Indian nickname
The word brought back painful and uncomfortable memories.
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edition.cnn.com
Cricket star's anger over racist Indian nickname
The word brought back painful and uncomfortable memories.
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edition.cnn.com
'Why should I bleach the color of my skin to be deemed beautiful?' Cricket star's anger over racist Indian nickname
The word brought back painful and uncomfortable memories.
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edition.cnn.com
Iran says fire at nuclear facility resulted in 'significant' damage after first claiming destruction was 'limited'
A fire at Iran's Natanz nuclear facility site resulted in "significant" damage, impacting both the construction and development of the country's advanced nuclear program, officials confirmed Sunday, contradicting previous claims that the impact from last week's blaze had been "limited."
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edition.cnn.com
How a Black cricketer found out he was being called a racial slur by watching Netflix
West Indies cricketer Daren Sammy tells CNN about his finding out his teammates were calling him a derogatory racial term in the Indian Premier League and what cricket can do to improve racial justice.
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Trump Presses 'Cancel Culture' War, But Here Are 6 Numbers That Matter More
Over the holiday weekend, President Trump warned of an attempt to erase American history and values. But other factors are likely to play bigger roles in his reelection effort.
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npr.org
Federal Prosecutors Discussed 'Burying' Evidence In Troubled New York Case
The government acknowledged problems with sharing evidence with the defense, but prosecutors argue the missteps were inadvertent, not malicious. A judge is assessing the matter.
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npr.org
Abu Dhabi: The adventure paradise I can't wait to explore again
It's Friday morning. My friends and I are out cruising on my speed boat. We skim across the water, flat like ice, through the waterways that weave around nearly 200 islands.
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edition.cnn.com
Images emerge of Iranian nuclear complex damaged by fire
A fire at Iran's Natanz nuclear facility site resulted in "significant" damage, impacting both the construction and development of the country's advanced nuclear program, officials confirmed. CNN's Nick Paton Walsh reports.
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edition.cnn.com
Images emerge of Iranian nuclear complex damaged by fire
A fire at Iran's Natanz nuclear facility site resulted in "significant" damage, impacting both the construction and development of the country's advanced nuclear program, officials confirmed. CNN's Nick Paton Walsh reports.
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edition.cnn.com
Coronavirus stalled MTA’s efforts to prevent OT fraud, agency watchdog says
The coronavirus pandemic has stalled the MTA’s efforts to prevent overtime fraud after the crisis put high-tech time clocks into quarantine, the agency’s watchdog said Monday. Inspector General Carolyn Pokorny’s office said in a new report it was “concerned” with a delay in integrating fingerprint-scanning gadgets that were billed as a fix to combat allegations...
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nypost.com
Will the Facebook advertising boycott force the social media giant to change? Not likely
Advertisers say they won't spend money on Facebook over concerns the company isn't doing enough to stop hate speech. But will it force changes?       
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usatoday.com