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White grad student apologizes for falsely claiming to be person of color

A graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has apologized and quit from their teaching post and worker's union position after confessing they were actually Southern Italian and Sicilian and not Black or Latino as they had led others to believe. 
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Read full article on: foxnews.com
Penny Nance: After Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death conservative women are ready to fight for Trump's nominee
Americans were given little time to remember the legacy of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
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foxnews.com
Sources: Trump Considers Coney Barrett, Lagoa, Thapar For Supreme Court Spot
Barrett sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit; Lagoa sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit; Thapar on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit.
npr.org
Law enforcement intercepts package of ricin mailed to Trump: report
The FBI and Secret Service are investigating a package containing the highly-toxic poison ricin that was mailed to President Trump last week, CNN is reporting. The package was intercepted by law enforcement, the report said. Two tests were done to confirm the presence of ricin in the package, law enforcement sources told the network. It’s...
nypost.com
Scalia's son on father's "odd couple" friendship with Ginsburg
"She said at one point that when they were judges together, initially on the appeals court, they sat next to each other and my dad would whisper jokes to her during arguments," Scalia's son recounted.
cbsnews.com
Antonin Scalia's son on his father's "odd couple" friendship with RBG
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's famously close friendship with Justice Antonin Scalia seemed, at first glance, an unlikely pairing. "I think we were all aware that it publicly seemed like an odd couple, but you know, when they were together, it never felt like that," Scalia's son Chris said on CBSN.
cbsnews.com
Killed in WWII, these New York City brothers were buried side by side
Alan Cahn was a young boy living in Forest Hills, when his cousins, Ferdinand and Alfred Lebrecht, were killed in combat during World War II. “It is kind of a biblical story,” the 80-year-old Cahn told The Post. The brothers were German Jews who had escaped Nazi Germany and settled on the Upper West Side...
nypost.com
Protesters outside McConnell's home use his own words to demand delay in filling Ginsberg's seat
Protesters gathered outside Mitch McConnell's home after he said he'd push to quickly fill Ruth Bader Ginsberg's seat on the U.S. Supreme Court        
usatoday.com
Arizona Senate candidate Mark Kelly could take office early if he wins, putting him in place for a court vote
If Democratic candidate Mark Kelly were to defeat Sen. Martha McSally, he could be sworn in before year's end – in time to vote on a court nominee.        
usatoday.com
NFL has come so far since Doug Williams made black QB history
Doug Williams was the first black NFL QB to win a Super Bowl in 1988 — and the league has come a long way since then, our columnist Steve Serby writes.
nypost.com
Georgia senate candidate Doug Collins urges Trump to replace RBG with pro-life judge
A Republican US Senate candidate used Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death to lash out on abortion. “RIP to the more than 30 million innocent babies that have been murdered during the decades that Ruth Bader Ginsburg defended pro-abortion laws,” tweeted Doug Collins, who is running for office in Georgia. “With @realDonaldTrump nominating a replacement that values...
nypost.com
Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Death Changed the 2020 Election Dynamic, Possibly in Trump's Favor
The prospect of a Supreme Court fight adds another variable into an already tumultuous presidential election.
newsweek.com
Cardinals vs. Pirates prediction: Under is smart play here
Kwang-hyun Kim has made five starts for St. Louis Cardinals in his first season in MLB after beginning his career in the Korean Baseball Organization, and in those starts has allowed just two runs, one of which was earned. Kim already has faced Saturday’s foe, the Pittsburgh Pirates, and gave up one unearned run in...
nypost.com
College Football TV Schedule: How to Watch Miami vs Louisville on TV and Online
The first matchup of the season among ranked programs in the ACC pits the No. 17 Hurricanes against the No. 18 Cardinals.
newsweek.com
Supreme Court justices celebrate Ginsburg’s legacy as a “hero” for justice
US Supreme Court justices posing for their official court portrait in November 2018. | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images RBG’s former colleagues remember her, at turns, as a “distinguished jurist,” who was full of “warmth” and “spent her life fighting for the equality of all people.” The eight remaining Supreme Court justices mourned and celebrated their late colleague Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg in individual statements Saturday, calling her a “woman of valor,” a “hero” to many Americans, and a “cherished colleague and friend.” “To me, as to countless others, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a hero,” wrote Justice Elena Kagan. “Her work was as careful as it was creative, as disciplined as it was visionary. It will endure for as long as Americans retain their commitment to law.” Justice Stephen Breyer, who said he heard of her passing at Rosh Hashanah service, said “the world is a better place for her having lived in it.” Ginsburg, who died Friday due to complications from cancer, served on the court for 27 years and had seen the Court’s makeup change dramatically over those years. Many of the justices — from those who joined the bench decades ago to those who joined more recently — acknowledged the kindness with which she had welcomed them to the nation’s highest court. “I will miss Ruth greatly,” wrote Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who was appointed by President Barack Obama. “She welcomed me to the Court with a warmth I could not have expected, and I came to feel a special kinship with her. She was someone whose wisdom, kindness, and unwavering support I could always rely on.” Justice Samuel Alito, a President George W. Bush appointee, echoed those sentiments: “Martha-Ann and I were deeply saddened by the news that Justice Ginsburg has passed away. Ruth and [her late husband] Marty made us feel at home immediately when I joined the Court, and we will certainly miss her.” Her former colleagues across the political spectrum honored the contributions she had made to American society. “No American has ever done more than Justice Ginsburg to ensure equal justice under law for women. She was a cherished colleague, and she inspired me, and all of us, with her unparalleled work ethic and devotion to the law,” wrote Justice Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump’s most recent nominee, who faced sexual assault allegations during his confirmation process. A number of the Court’s justices specifically saluted Ginsburg’s judicial work advancing gender equality. In a testament to Ginsburg’s influence, however,even many of those who voted to restrict some of her landmark rulings on issues like abortion rights had nothing but the highest praise for their former colleague. “Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature,” wrote Chief Justice John Roberts. “We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her — a tireless and resolute champion of justice.” Many of the justices wrote eloquently, too, of the human they will miss, with Justice Clarence Thomas calling her “the essence of grace, civility and dignity,” and Justice Neil Gorsuch recounting “happy memories ... like traveling with Ruth to London where (to her delight) an uninformed guide kept calling her ‘Ruthie,’ or all the opera she tried so valiantly to teach me, or her sweet tooth at lunch, or the touching stories of her remarkable life with Marty.” And Kagan wrote, “I will miss her—her intellect, her generosity, her sly wit, her manifest integrity, and her endless capacity for work—for the rest of my life.” Read the justices’ statements here, or below. Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr. Our Nation has lost a jurist of historic stature. We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn, but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her — a tireless and resolute champion of justice. Justice Clarence Thomas My wife, Virginia, and I are heartbroken to learn of the passing of our friend, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Ruth and I first met when I began my tenure on the D.C. Circuit in 1990. With the exception of the brief period between our respective appointments to the Supreme Court, we have since been judicial colleagues. Through the many challenges both professionally and personally, she was the essence of grace, civility and dignity. She was a superb judge who gave her best and exacted the best from each of us, whether in agreement or disagreement. And, as outstanding as she was as a judge, she was an even better colleague – unfailingly gracious, thoughtful, and civil. Through her loss of her wonderful husband, Marty, and her countless health challenges, she was a picture of grace and courage. Not once did the pace and quality of her work suffer even as she was obviously suffering grievously. Nor did her demeanor toward her colleagues diminish. The most difficult part of a long tenure is watching colleagues decline and pass away. And, the passing of my dear colleague, Ruth, is profoundly difficult and so very sad. I will dearly miss my friend. Virginia and I will keep her family in our thoughts and prayers. Justice Stephen G. Breyer I heard of Ruth’s death while I was reciting the Mourner’s Kaddish at the Rosh Hashanah service. I thought: a great Justice; a woman of valour; a rock of righteousness; and my good, good friend. The world is a better place for her having lived in it. And so is her family; her friends; the legal community; and the nation. Justice Samuel A. Alito Martha-Ann and I were deeply saddened by the news that Justice Ginsburg has passed away. Ruth and Marty made us feel at home immediately when I joined the Court, and we will certainly miss her. Justice Ginsburg will go down as a leading figure in the history of the Court. She will be remembered for her intelligence, learning, and remarkable fortitude. She has been and will continue to be an inspiration for many. Justice Sonia Sotomayor My dear friend and colleague Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an American hero. She spent her life fighting for the equality of all people, and she was a pathbreaking champion of women’s rights. She served our Court and country with consummate dedication, tirelessness, and passion for justice. She has left a legacy few could rival. I will miss Ruth greatly. She welcomed me to the Court with a warmth I could not have expected, and I came to feel a special kinship with her. She was someone whose wisdom, kindness, and unwavering support I could always rely on. I will forever cherish the moments we shared. I send my deepest condolences to her children, grandchildren, and great-grandchild. I know how much she treasured and loved you. She often said that leading a meaningful life means living for one’s family and one’s community, not for oneself. Ruth lived a profoundly meaningful life, and the numerous ways in which she changed ours will never be forgotten. Justice Elena Kagan To me, as to countless others, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a hero. As an attorney, she led the fight to grant women equal rights under the law. As a judge, she did justice every day—working to ensure that this country’s legal system lives up to its ideals and extends its rights and protections to those once excluded. And in both roles, she held to—indeed, exceeded—the highest standards of legal craft. Her work was as careful as it was creative, as disciplined as it was visionary. It will endure for as long as Americans retain their commitment to law. Ruth reached out to encourage and assist me in my career, as she did for so many others, long before I came to the Supreme Court. And she guided and inspired me, on matters large and small, once I became her colleague. I will miss her—her intellect, her generosity, her sly wit, her manifest integrity, and her endless capacity for work—for the rest of my life. I give my deepest condolences to her beloved children and grandchildren. May her memory be a blessing. Justice Neil M. Gorsuch Louise and I have lost a cherished colleague and friend. For forty years, Ruth served the American people as one of our most distinguished judges. Her sacrifices for the country were many, but always performed with honor. We are blessed by the happy memories that will remain, like traveling with Ruth to London where (to her delight) an uninformed guide kept calling her “Ruthie,” or all the opera she tried so valiantly to teach me, or her sweet tooth at lunch, or the touching stories of her remarkable life with Marty. We will miss Ruth and our hearts go out to her family. May she rest in peace. Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh Ashley, Margaret, Liza, and I are profoundly saddened by the loss of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and we extend our prayers and deepest condolences to her family and to her four decades of law clerks. No American has ever done more than Justice Ginsburg to ensure equal justice under law for women. She was a cherished colleague, and she inspired me, and all of us, with her unparalleled work ethic and devotion to the law. A meticulous and pathmarking judge, she held herself to the highest standards of precision and accuracy in her beautifully crafted opinions. And she inspired all of us to try to meet those same exacting standards. I learned from her principled voice and marveled at her wonderful wit at our weekly conferences and daily lunches. Justice Ginsburg paved the way for women to become lawyers and judges. She made it possible for women and girls like my daughters to compete on equal footing as student-athletes. When Justice Ginsburg was last in my office earlier this year, I pointed out a photo I keep of her standing with four women who served as law clerks in my chambers in my first term. As long as I am fortunate enough to serve on the Supreme Court, I will keep that photo prominently in my office as a continuing tribute to Justice Ginsburg and as a daily reminder to work hard and pursue equal justice. May God bless Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Justice Anthony M. Kennedy The members of the Court always will cherish all that Justice Ginsburg meant to us as a distinguished jurist and an inspiring, wonderful person. She will have an esteemed piece in the history of our Court. Ruth was a close, dear friend. Mary joins me in sending our deepest sympathies to her family. In our court sessions and conferences Ruth was remarkably well prepared for every case, down to the smallest detail. If the two of us disagreed, it was always in a civil, principled, respectful way. By her learning she taught devotion to the law. By her dignity she taught respect for others and her love for America. By her reverence for the Constitution, she taught us to preserve it to secure our freedom. Will you help keep Vox free for all? The United States is in the middle of one of the most consequential presidential elections of our lifetimes. It’s essential that all Americans are able to access clear, concise information on what the outcome of the election could mean for their lives, and the lives of their families and communities. That is our mission at Vox. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone understand this presidential election: Contribute today from as little as $3.
vox.com
Biden in 2016: President Has 'Constitutional Duty' to Nominate Supreme Court Justice, Even Months Before Election
The current Democratic presidential nominee said in 2016 that he would push ahead with the nomination of a Supreme Court appointee "even a few months before a presidential election."
newsweek.com
Alicia Keys: I was supposed to end up a prostitute or a drug addict
In a stunning new interview, Grammy-winning songbird Alicia Keys admits her life is an improbable dream come true.
nypost.com
Ruth Bader Ginsburg gave her life to country — and her heart to the performing arts
Stories of the late Supreme Court justice’s devotion to theater, opera go on and on.
washingtonpost.com
Yolanda Hadid hugs daughter Gigi Hadid’s baby bump in sweet shot
As Gigi Hadid inches closer to welcoming her first child into the world, mother Yolanda Hadid is already showering her future grandchild with love.
nypost.com
Bavarians hold toned-down Oktoberfest amid virus
Oktoberfest celebrations got underway in Munich on Saturday with the traditional tapping of a keg and the cry of "O'zapft is" or "it's tapped." But this year's festival is non-traditional and highly regulated over coronavirus concerns. (Sept. 19)       
usatoday.com
Gary Sanchez’s resurgence has been ‘massive’ for Yankees
BOSTON — It took nearly until late September, but the Yankees are finally just about where they want to be. With Friday night’s win over the Red Sox, the Yankees slid by the Twins for the fourth seed in the American League and would host Minnesota in a wild-card series. They also had won nine...
nypost.com
New York Gov. Cuomo says Ginsburg statue to be erected in Brooklyn
Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that New York will erect a statue of Ruth Bader Ginsberg in the justice’s native Brooklyn, where she was born and raised."
foxnews.com
Ruth Bader Ginsburg on 60 Minutes in 2008
The Supreme Court justice told Lesley Stahl about her view of the Constitution and her friendship with Antonin Scalia.
cbsnews.com
What Justice Ginsburg’s death means for the future of abortion rights
A protester holds a Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg sign during the Woman’s March in New York on January 18, 2020. | Ira L. Black /Corbis via Getty Images With Ginsburg gone, Roe is more at risk than ever. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was one of the Supreme Court’s strongest champions for abortion rights. Her death on Friday at the age of 87 throws the future of those rights into doubt. Ginsburg always maintained that the right to an abortion was key to women’s autonomy. In her dissent in the 2007 case Gonzales v. Carhart, for example, she called it “a right declared again and again by this court — and with increasing comprehension of its centrality to women’s lives.” And though her view did not carry the day in that case, which upheld a ban on so-called “partial-birth” abortion, she was a crucial bulwark on the Court against any direct assault on Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 decision that established abortion rights in America. Now that bulwark is gone. If President Trump is able to appoint Ginsburg’s replacement, he will likely give conservatives on the Court the votes they need to overturn Roe, or at least to weaken it beyond recognition. The result will be an acceleration of what is already happening around the country: a two-tiered system of abortion, in which the procedure is accessible in blue states (and for people who can afford to travel) and out of reach everywhere else. For many reproductive rights advocates, that’s a dark future. But it’s also one they’ve been anticipating for years, as state-level restrictions made abortions harder and harder to obtain. And they’ve been preparing — with abortion funds that help people travel across state lines, as well as advocacy around self-managed abortion, allowing people to terminate their own pregnancies with medication outside of a clinical setting. The end of Roe will have major legal consequences. But advocates on the ground have already seen what a post-Roe world looks like, and are getting ready for everyone to live in it. Ginsburg’s death could be the beginning of the end for Roe During his 2016 campaign, Trump promised to appoint Supreme Court justices who would overturn Roe. And when he made his second pick, Justice Brett Kavanaugh, generally seen as an opponent of abortion rights, conventional wisdom held that conservatives had the votes to reverse the decision. But others were more doubtful. In anti-abortion circles, some believed that conservatives would actually need more than a 5-4 majority for something as momentous as reversing Roe. Indeed, the first major abortion case to come before the Trump-era Court, June Medical Services v. Russo, was a disappointment to abortion opponents. Rather than delivering the rollback of Roe that some were hoping for, Chief Justice John Roberts sided with the liberals on the Court this year to overturn a Louisiana law requiring abortion providers to get admitting privileges at a local hospital. The case brought by the state of Louisiana was exceptionally weak, giving conservatives on the Court little to work with, and the ruling certainly left open the possibility of future challenges. But it was a signal, for some, that the Court wasn’t yet ready to tackle Roe. A big obstacle to doing so was Ginsburg. One of the staunchest liberals on the Court, she was a lifelong advocate of women’s rights, and saw the right to an abortion as crucial among them. “This is something central to a woman’s life, to her dignity,” she said in response to a question about abortion during her 1993 confirmation hearing. “It’s a decision that she must make for herself. And when government controls that decision for her, she’s being treated as less than a fully adult human responsible for her own choices.” Now that advocate is gone, probably to be replaced by a justice of Trump’s choosing. And another abortion case, Food and Drug Administration v. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, concerning whether patients should be able to obtain abortion medication by telemedicine during the pandemic, is already before the Court. With Ginsburg gone, that case, or another like it, could easily become a vehicle to overturn Roe. Abortion-rights advocates have been preparing for this moment for years As Vox’s Ian Millhiser has noted, Roberts in his concurrence on June Medical Services v. Russo made clear that while he could not support the state of Louisiana’s claim in that case, he was open to challenging Roe on other grounds. In addition to FDA v. American College, laws requiring an ultrasound or waiting period before an abortion, or limiting abortion for reasons of Down syndrome diagnosis, for example, have been challenged in lower courts and could make their way to the Supreme Court in future.And as many have pointed out, any case involving abortion could potentially serve as a vehicle for the Court to revisit Roe. When it does so, minus Ginsburg and plus a potential third Trump appointee, it may well overturn the decision, or weaken it so much that states essentially have carte blanche to restrict abortion out of existence. That will have serious consequences for patients, all of whom currently have, at least in theory, the legal right to an abortion in their state. But it will also be a continuation of something that’s been happening for years. Since 2010, when Republicans took over many state legislatures around the country, states have passed hundreds of restrictions on abortion. While they haven’t banned the procedure outright, these restrictions have closed dozens of clinics across the South and Midwest. Louisiana, where the June v. Russo case originated, has just three clinics. Six states, including Kentucky, Missouri, and Mississippi, have just one. Due to the lack of clinics in many places, as well as laws mandating waiting periods and other restrictions that make abortion more time-consuming and expensive for patients, the procedure is already all but out of reach in many red states, especially for people of color and low-income patients who can’t afford to travel long distances. But in these states and around the country, abortion rights advocates have responded by creating abortion funds to help patients access the procedure, including traveling across state lines. The New Orleans Abortion Fund, for example, has helped more than 1,500 patients since it was started in 2012. Other groups are working to break down legal barriers to self-managed abortion, so that patients who cannot access a clinic can do the procedure themselves with medication. Many of these efforts ramped up as the Court was considering June v. Russo, in anticipation of a potential defeat for abortion rights. They amped up further during the pandemic, when it became harder than ever for patients around the country to travel to a clinic and to afford an abortion in the midst of an economic depression. “The kind of organizing, the deep rapport-building and trust-building between different funds and practical support network that’s come out of this pandemic, has made us stronger and more prepared for whatever comes on decision day,” Elizabeth Gelvin, client and community coordinator at the New Orleans Abortion Fund, told Vox in advance of the June v. Russo decision. This work has likely prepared advocates, too, for the potential end of Roe. Such a decision would unquestionably bring serious new challenges. In the wake of a reversal of Roe, anti-abortion advocates could push for a full nationwide ban on abortion, putting it out of reach even in blue states. Meanwhile, laws criminalizing self-managed abortion in several states, like Arizona and South Carolina,make this option risky for many, even though experts say that medically, it’s often very safe. But reproductive rights advocates around the country are channeling Ginsburg’s memory now, and vowing not to give up. “Ginsburg’s ethos was greater than just the law,” Fatima Goss Graves, president of the National Women’s Law Center, said in a statement Friday. “She was an icon and a living symbol of a north star, so we must unite and do for her what she did for us — fight for what is right.” Will you help keep Vox free for all? The United States is in the middle of one of the most consequential presidential elections of our lifetimes. It’s essential that all Americans are able to access clear, concise information on what the outcome of the election could mean for their lives, and the lives of their families and communities. That is our mission at Vox. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone understand this presidential election: Contribute today from as little as $3.
vox.com
How Ruth Bader Ginsburg interpreted the Constitution
In 2008 Ginsburg told Lesley Stahl, “the genius of the United States is that, over, now, the course of more than two centuries, the notion of "we the people" has become ever larger.”
cbsnews.com
Video shows LAPD officer shooting protester in groin at close range
Body-camera video from Los Angeles protests this summer shows L.A. police officers yank a sign from a man and shoot him in the groin with a projectile.
latimes.com
Graham commits to supporting Trump 'in any effort to move forward' in filling Ginsburg's seat
Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham on Saturday said he will support President Donald Trump "in any effort to move forward" with a nominee to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court, just hours after Trump made clear he wants the seat left vacant by her death filled "without delay."
edition.cnn.com
Opinion: Losing Justin Verlander is massive blow to Astros' present and future as big decisions loom
With ace Justin Verlander out for Tommy John surgery, the Houston Astros may have to step back and make difficult decisions about their future.       
usatoday.com
A package containing the poison ricin and addressed to Trump intercepted by law enforcement
A package containing the poison ricin and addressed to President Donald Trump was intercepted by law enforcement earlier this week, according to two law enforcement officials.
edition.cnn.com
Ranking the most rewarding NY teams to come out of nowhere
The best part about the Islanders season, which ended in a heartbeat and a heartbreak Thursday, is that it was hard — impossible, even — to find even one member of the rank-and-file fan base who was anything other than utterly smitten by the team. These are always the most fun seasons, after all —...
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nypost.com
Rob Reiner Rages over RBG Replacement Battle: 'This Is War. Dems Have Powerful Weapons. Now Is the Time to Use Them'
Left-wing Hollywood filmmaker Rob Reiner is declaring war on Republicans over who will replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.  He has also accused Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of disrespecting Ginsburg by vowing to give President Trump's nominee a floor vote in the Senate.
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breitbart.com
Spirit Airlines flight attendant, passenger argue over neck gaiter as a face covering
A Spirit Airlines flight attendant and a passenger argued over whether a gaiter was a sufficient face covering in a video that has been posted on social media.
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foxnews.com
Who are the female frontrunners to replace Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg?
Here's President Trump's shortlist of women that will most likely replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.        
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usatoday.com
LeBron James 'pissed' over finishing second for MVP -- again
LeBron James expressed his unhappiness with finishing in second place in the NBA MVP voting for the fourth time in his illustrious career.
1 h
foxnews.com
US sends armored vehicles to Syria amid fears of ISIS resurgence
On Friday, six Bradley Fighting Vehicles — courtesy of the Army — rolled into northeast Syria and the Navy's USS Nimitz aircraft carrier with two guided-missile cruisers steamed into the region.
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nypost.com
Ruth Bader Ginsburg Once Criticized Kavanaugh Hearings, Wanted Bipartisan Support for Nominees
"I wish I could wave a magic wand and have it go back to the way it was," Ginsburg said in 2018.
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newsweek.com
A Tip Sheet to the Senate Fight Over Ginsburg’s Seat
The future of the Supreme Court rests on the personal and political calculations of these Senate Republicans. Follow updates here.
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nytimes.com
Discussing Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement doesn't 'dishonor' her, Brit Hume says
Fox News senior political analyst Brit Hume defended the idea that people could discuss Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement, especially given her reported dying wish.
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foxnews.com
The Daily 202: Nine implications of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death – for 2020 and beyond
Trump will probably pick a woman, and John Roberts will no longer be the deciding vote.
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washingtonpost.com
Southern California shook up by magnitude 4.6 earthquake
Southern California spent Saturday bracing for aftershocks from a magnitude 4.6 earthquake that rattled the region the night before. The US Geological Survey recorded the earthquake at around 11:40 p.m., about two miles outside of South El Monte, near Los Angeles, ABC News reported. The agency estimated the tremor was about 11 miles deep. No...
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nypost.com
Andrew McCarthy: Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death means Trump should pivot to this surprising strategy
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lived an extraordinary American life.
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foxnews.com
Ovince Saint Preux feels home at 205, but not ruling out a return to heavyweight
Ovince Saint Preux's experiment with heavyweight is not over yet.        Related StoriesVideo: Relive all of Colby Covington's UFC finishes ahead of Tyron Woodley showdownBellator featherweight title challenger Pedro Carvalho shares his 'biggest moment'Fedor Emelianenko, Kimbo Slice, more: Bellator's best finishes by legends 
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usatoday.com
Supreme Court justices remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as 'a superb judge' who 'inspired us all'
Ginsburg's colleagues on the high court recalled her as as "a jurist of historic stature" "who gave her best and exacted the best from each of us."        
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usatoday.com
Trump Says Republicans Have “Obligation” to Fill Supreme Court Vacancy
The president is expected to unveil his nominee to fill Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's seat within the next few days.
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slate.com
Former Ginsburg clerk Gillian Metzger on the legacy of her former boss
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being remembered for her legacy as a champion for equal rights and progressive values after her death. Gillian Metzger, a professor at Columbia Law School and former clerk of Ginsburg's, joined CBSN to break down her legacy.
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cbsnews.com
Jared Walsh could be your unexpected fantasy baseball savior
If there is one thing we’ve learned in 2020, it is that we should expect the unexpected. We never expected our living rooms would double as our offices, yet here we are. We never expected a 19-ounce can of Lysol disinfectant spray to cost $15, yet here we are. We never expected to get sick...
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nypost.com
Trump: We have obligation to nominate Supreme Court justice "without delay"
President Trump and his fellow republican leaders are moving forward with plans to nominate a Supreme Court justice to fill the seat left vacant after the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Sean Sullivan, a CBSN political contributor and national political reporter for The Washington Post, spoke to Lana Zak about the tight timeline for the coming fight.
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cbsnews.com
ActBlue Raises Nearly $31 Million Following Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Death
Left-wing ActBlue raised a record amount of money from Friday evening until Saturday morning following the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
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breitbart.com
Two-time Cy Young Award winner Justin Verlander to undergo Tommy John surgery, will miss 2021 season
Astros pitcher Justin Verlander said Saturday he will undergo Tommy John surgery; the two-time Cy Young winner will likely miss all of 2021 season.       
2 h
usatoday.com