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White House shares Blinken’s delusion on Afghanistan pullout: Goodwin

Those unfortunate souls who watched Tony Blinken’s two days of congressional testimony learned one clear thing: the secretary of state is a world-class bureaucrat. 
Read full article on: nypost.com
Travis Barker's Children 'So Happy' He's Engaged to Kourtney Kardashian
Blink-182 rocker Travis Barker popped the big question to Kourtney Kardashian nine months after they went public with their romance.
newsweek.com
Democrats struggle to define bills they can’t agree on: The Note
As a pivotal week in Congress begins, Biden and Manchin are openly warring with each other about what should and should not be in the massive social spending bill.
abcnews.go.com
Video of Joe Biden Maskless in D.C. Restaurant Viewed Over 600K Times
Photos also showed President Biden and the first lady emerging from a Michelin-starred seafood restaurant without masks.
newsweek.com
Wes Anderson’s Latest Is a Licorice Movie
The filmmaker’s work is as polarizing as those candies, and The French Dispatch is an especially gourmet variety.
slate.com
As Kourtney Gets Engaged, Here's Every Kardashian Engagement Ring
Kourtney Kardashian has announced her engagement to Blink-182 drummer Travis Barker after less than a year of dating.
newsweek.com
Who Is Megan Fox's Ex-Husband Brian Austin Green And How Many Kids Do They Have?
Actress Megan Fox is currently dating rapper Machine Gun Kelly, but before their relationship blossomed she was married for almost a decade.
newsweek.com
Timothée Chalamet and Zendaya Transformed Into 'Fortnite' Skins As 'Dune' Crossover Leaks
A new "Fortnite" bundle has been leaked, which will see Timothée Chalamet and Zendaya's characters from "Dune" become unlockable skins.
newsweek.com
JCPenney Shooting Sees Multiple People Gunned Down Inside Mall
The shooting happened after a group were seen getting into an argument inside the mall, according to police.
newsweek.com
Parents Warned Children as Young as Six Are Recreating Violent 'Squid Game' Challenges
Parents and guardians are being told to stay "vigilant" amid several reports of children re-enacting scenes at school.
newsweek.com
Workers injured in Kuwait refinery fire, output unaffected
A fire at Kuwait's Mina al-Ahmadi oil refinery on Monday injured several workers but operations were unaffected, Kuwait National Petroleum Company (KNPC) said.
edition.cnn.com
More than 20 dead after floods in south India
At least 22 people were killed after heavy rains lashed the south Indian state of Kerala over the weekend, officials said.
nypost.com
Out of the Shadows: Steele defiant on dossier, says Trump still 'potential' threat
British ex-spy Christopher Steele is stepping out of the shadows to discuss his so-called "Steele dossier," five years after it made explosive claims about Donald Trump.
abcnews.go.com
What are carbon offsets and do they work?
Companies and people who want to cancel out the impact of their emissions on the climate often turn to something called carbon offsetting.
edition.cnn.com
'Succession's' Brian Cox 'Committed' to Season 4 —And Says Playing Logan Is 'Good Therapy'
Brian Cox spoke with Newsweek about playing the Roy family patriarch in "Succession" and detailed what fans can expect in Season 3 and beyond.
newsweek.com
Nevada’s Sisolak suffers injuries in car accident
Gov. Steve Sisolak, the Democrat from Nevada, was briefly hospitalized on Sunday after being involved in a car crash, a report said.
foxnews.com
A timeline of the killing of Ahmaud Arbery and the case against 3 men accused of his murder
At first, the killing of Ahmaud Arbery in February 2020 went largely unnoticed outside the South Georgia community where the 25-year-old lived and died just weeks before the country was gripped by the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic.
edition.cnn.com
Murder trial for the killing of Ahmaud Arbery set to begin with jury selection in Georgia
Three White men accused of chasing down and killing Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man out for a jog, are set to stand trial for murder in Georgia this week in a case thick with issues of racism, self-defense and cellphone video.
edition.cnn.com
8 years. $28 million in deposits. The perplexing tale of a three-wheeled car that never arrived.
Elio Motors got 65,000 deposits worth tens of millions of dollars but hasn't delivered a single vehicle.      
usatoday.com
Capitol Hill Democrats face tough choices over major economic package in pivotal week ahead
With a debt limit crisis averted for now, the Democratic Party's effort to finalize a sweeping economic package to expand the social safety net will be front-and-center on Capitol Hill this week.
edition.cnn.com
Jill Biden surprises the stranger who helped her rediscover her faith in God
In May 2015, emotionally hobbled from watching her son, Beau Biden, fight and then succumb to brain cancer, Jill Biden said "goodbye" to God.
edition.cnn.com
The complex world of carbon offsets explained
Carbon offsetting promises a way to rebalance greenhouse gas emissions through reforestation and renewable energy. But can it avert a climate catastrophe or is it actually doing more harm than good?
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edition.cnn.com
Right-Wing Nonprofit Lavishes Millions on Top Brass
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Photos Getty ImagesThe American Conservative Union touts itself as “the nation’s original conservative organization” and loves to rail against “reckless spending”—but it’s hardly cautious about turning over supporters’ cash to its own top executives.The ACU, best known as the group behind the annual Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC, has enriched companies belonging to two of its directors to the tune of $4 million in the past five years, according to a review by The Daily Beast of their yearly tax forms and other required filings.This cash has poured out of the ACU’s own coffers, out of its political committees, and straight from the pockets of the right-wing rank and file into firms controlled by Vice Chairman Charlie Gerow—now a candidate for governor of Pennsylvania—and Kimberly Bellissimo, secretary of the ACU’s foundation.Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
The Bizarre and Unsettling Rise of True-Crime Makeup Videos on YouTube and TikTok
Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily BeastTikTok user @fatalfaye delicately brushes a hot pink eyeshadow in the shade “Emoji” onto their eyelid. Over the primping plays an audio clip, crackling with feedback. “I just killed my mom and my sister,” a teenager confesses. The combination of the jarring 911 call and an otherwise normal makeup video may seem bizarre, but the incongruous pairing belongs to a trend of true crime makeup videos that has been growing in popularity across social media platforms like YouTube and TikTok.Welcome to the weird world of true crime makeup videos.In January 2019, YouTuber Bailey Sarian uploaded her first “Murder, Mystery & Makeup” vlog about the case of Chris Watts, a man who murdered his pregnant wife and two daughters (the case would later become the subject of a Netflix documentary, American Murder: The Family Next Door). Sarian was already a seasoned YouTuber in the makeup arena and decided to talk about the case while getting ready, though it is clear that she wasn’t sure how the macabre shift would sit with viewers. “Let me talk about somebody getting murdered while I do my makeup,” Sarian says, her voice dripping with self-derision. “I don’t even know how to approach this without sounding insensitive at all,” she admits. Sarian’s gamble proved successful, as reflected by her social media success. To date she has over 5.65 million YouTube subscribers and boasts an additional 2.1 million followers on TikTok.Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
HBO Exposes the Violent Chaos of Trump’s Jan. 6 Rioters in ‘Four Hours at the Capitol’
Getty/HBOFor those eager to revisit one of the darkest days in American history, Four Hours at the Capitol provides a first-hand account of the insurrection carried out by then-President Donald Trump’s delusional acolytes on Jan. 6, 2021. Culled from numerous up-close-and-personal video sources, and narrated by congressmen, journalists, and traitorous Proud Boys and “activists” who participated in the attack, it’s a time capsule that’s short on context—and condemnation of the numerous figures responsible for inciting the mêlée—but long on harrowing and damning footage of the disgraceful assault.Director Jamie Roberts’ feature-length HBO documentary (Oct. 20) features no prologue covering the 2020 presidential election that concluded with Donald Trump decisively losing to Joe Biden, or Trump’s subsequent promulgation of the “Big Lie” which stated that he’d been cheated out of a second term due to “election fraud” that innumerable legislatures and courts—many overseen by Republicans—confirmed did not exist. Nor does it cover both the efforts of congressional Republicans to back Trump’s “Stop the Steal” conspiracy theory by refusing to certify the election’s results, and national right-wing media’s endless coverage of this fictional miscarriage of justice. The result is a narrowly focused work that, by eschewing the bigger picture, feels like only half the story, concerned far more with experiential you-are-there horror than comprehensive censure.Four Hours at the Capitol would have benefited from more coverage of Trump, Josh Hawley, Ted Cruz, Marjorie Taylor Greene, and Rudy Giuliani stirring the pot for weeks and months before Jan. 6, intent on convincing their supporters that some great democracy-undermining travesty was taking place. Instead, it assumes viewers know that backstory, and simply sets about situating them in the thick of the abominable action. The film begins at 10:35 am, with wheelchair-bound Proud Boy Eddie Block videotaping himself and his white-nationalist buddies as they attend Trump’s speech (during which the president tells his followers, “If you don’t fight like hell, you’re not going to have a country anymore”), and then take his advice and head to the Capitol. There, they and many other faux-patriots rile themselves up with chants like “Fuck ANTIFA!” and “1776”—the latter a revolutionary rallying cry that misses the point that this 2021 rebellion is against the United States—until they all finally decide that words aren’t enough and begin storming the insufficiently defended barricades.Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
Doctor Inseminated Women With His Sperm—and Wasn’t Punished
Getty ImagesIt was shocking for Susan Crowder to learn that her adult daughter—conceived 45 years earlier via in vitro fertilization—was the offspring not of an anonymous medical student sperm donor, but of her own fertility doctor.Even more shocking was the fact that nobody would do anything about it.Crowder and her husband started IVF in 1975, after moving to the small town of Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Her husband, a dental surgeon, had recently learned that he was sterile, so the couple set about finding a fertility specialist. Their search led them to nearby Louisville and to Dr. Marvin Yussman, a respected OB-GYN based out of the University of Louisville School of Medicine.Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
Some drought relief forecast for areas in the West
A steady flow of moisture is forecast to flow into the Pacific Northwest beginning Wednesday. This will help with the drought, but could impact burn areas left by the devastating wildfire season. CNN Meteorologist Pedram Javaheri has the forecast.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
Elio Motors promised an 84 mpg 3-wheeled car for less than $7,000
Elio Motors has taken 65,000 deposits for its promised 3-wheeled, 2-seat, 84 mpg car. It was supposed to cost less than $7,000. It hasn't happened.      
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usatoday.com
White People Sharing Racist Videos Are Telling on Themselves
Photo Illustration by Thomas Levinson/Photos Getty ImagesVideos of white people being racist, often circulated by other white people condemning them, have become so ubiquitous that they’ve become a genre in and of themselves. Videos of anti-Black police violence have played on viral loops for years now, but more recently there’s been a wave of low-stakes stuff, like “Karens” yelling at people. Across social media, week in and week out, cellphone footage clips document—just for example—white women hurling the n-word at Black children and defending their use of the n-word; white men yelling “go back to Africa” at Black American strangers; white teenagers who can’t even make it through a homecoming proposal without shoehorning in a racist “joke” about slavery.It’s exhausting to watch this unstinting, grotesque orgy of American white folks performing American whiteness in ways so uncreatively unchanged from the American whites who came before them—and to see other white people sharing those clips as if condemning (and circulating and amplifying in the process) explicit acts of racism is the same thing as being anti racist. It’s not, and maybe that’s why I’ve hit an unprecedented peak of “racist video fatigue.” And I know I cannot be alone in experiencing RVF.Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
Why This Last-Ditch Ploy to Combat Predatory Priests Is Doomed to Fail
GettyROME—When Father Eric de Moulins-Beaufort, the head of the French Bishops Conference, suggested that the Catholic Church lift the veil of secrecy on confessions as a way to combat clerical sex abuse this week, eyes rolled at the Vatican. The seal of secrecy on confessions is hundreds of years old and has survived intact through every major sex abuse scandal of the modern era and scores of popes—and any priest who breaks it is automatically excommunicated from the church.Moulins-Beaufort made the comment on the heels of one of the worst sex abuse scandals to rock the church since Spotlight won an Oscar, with the revelation that thousands of Catholic nuns, priests and lay people abused more than 300,000 minors over a 70-year period. “The scope of the violence and sexual assaults against minors revealed by the report demands that the church revise its practices in light of this reality,” he said in a radio interview. “It is therefore necessary to reconcile the nature of confession with the need to protect children.”Less than a day after his comments made waves, the spokeswoman for the French bishops clarified that they would not in fact seek to make any changes and that the seal of confession was “above the laws of the Republic” anyway. “One cannot change the canon law for France as it is international,” Karine Dalle told the National Catholic Register. “A priest who today would violate the secrecy of the confession would be excommunicated.”Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
Cutting Massive Bill Threatens to Blow Up Progressive Unity
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Photos Getty ImagesDemocrats promised to Build Back Better in the Joe Biden era, but the political reality surrounding their marquee policy package is forcing them to pick between two far more diminished mantras: Do Less Better, or Do More Worse.Over the summer, Democrats laid the groundwork for a sprawling $3.5 trillion bill that would substantially fund a number of their top priorities, from expanding Medicare to include dental and vision benefits, to implementing aggressive new climate change measures, to making community college tuition free and pre-K universal.But a group of centrists are objecting to the size and scope of that proposal, and with Democrats unable to lose a single vote in the U.S. Senate, lawmakers are moving toward a smaller package that could end up investing $2 trillion less than what leaders set out to.Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
Virtual Reality Could Help Stop Domestic Abuse Against Women
Adapted from S. Seinfeld et al./Scientific Reports 2018“I have to come home every day and look at your shitty face,” the man barks to his partner. “When we married, you were hot. Look at you now. You look like shit.” The man advances, knocking the phone to the ground, until his face looms menacingly close.This harrowing scene is not what it appears to be. The victim isn’t a real person—she’s the virtual reality avatar of a man already imprisoned for domestic abuse. The scenario is unfolding, in 3D, inside a VR headset strapped to the prisoner’s head. And it’s part of a novel intervention. The idea is that by experiencing domestic abuse through the eyes of the victim, abusive men might gain some insight into their acts—and empathy for the women.Some new ideas for rehabilitating abusers would certainly be welcome: Domestic violence affects about a third of all women at some point in their lives, according to the World Health Organization. And while some jurisdictions require people convicted of domestic violence to participate in intervention programs, there is limited evidence that these treatments prevent offenders from harming their partners again.Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
Hate Pretentious Wine Tastings? Visit This Country
GettyWhen I visited winemaker Levan Andronikashvili a few weeks ago, his cellar sounded like a dozen cauldrons of soup boiling simultaneously. The sputtering from the fermenting vats was so feverish I could hardly hear his instructions over the din: “Quick, grab that pole! Let’s punch down the grape skins!” Seconds later I was breaking a sweat, turning his freshly pressed grapes into wine.Spontaneous thrills like helping a farmer with punch-down are typical in Georgia—locals are so hospitable that at most wineries you’re received as a houseguest as opposed to a tourist. Swirling cabernet in a tasting room is one thing; wolfing down soup dumplings in a winemaker’s backyard to the backdrop of the Caucasus Mountains, your fingers still sticky with rkatsiteli juice, is another entirely. This is wine tourism returned to its roots: rustic, generous, and delicious in every sense.Even jaded enophiles will geek out in Georgia. For starters, the country has roughly 400 native grape varieties, a staggering diversity for a country smaller than Ireland. Tsitska, jghia, mtsvane, saperavi—Georgia’s consonant-heavy grapes are as exotic to the Western palate as they sound, bearing what seems to be no genetic relation to the European grapes that dominate the market. Translation: You’ve never tasted wines like these before.Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
FIFA fears recent abuse cases in women's football are just 'tip of the iceberg'
After allegations of abuse in women's football surfaced in recent weeks in the US, Venezuela and Australia, the sport's world governing body FIFA fears they could be the "tip of the iceberg."
1 h
edition.cnn.com
California School Walkout as Thousands of Parents Defy Child Vaccine Mandate
California requires school students to be vaccinated following the full FDA approval of the COVID-19 vaccine for grades 7 to 12 and K-6.
1 h
newsweek.com
10 Dishes With Pastry Chef Hedy Goldsmith
Groot HospitalityAfter a shift what is your favorite guilty pleasure to eat? “My guilty pleasure is a tie between frozen custard and pizza.”Is there one dessert you won’t make? “I will not make any dessert with blue cheese.”What’s the best ice cream topping? “The best ice cream topping is fruity olive oil and a touch of Maldon Sea Salt.”Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
Taylor Heinicke isn’t going deep, and that could limit the length of his WFT starting stint
Read more
1 h
washingtonpost.com
Taylor Heinicke isn’t going deep, and that could limit the length of his WFT starting stint
After another uneven performance in Sunday's loss to the Chiefs, Washington's Taylor Heinicke will have to dig deep — and go deep.
1 h
washingtonpost.com
Liz Peek: Biden team off to UN climate summit as their green energy policies fuel inflation at home
Good news! Pete Buttigieg will emerge from his months-long family leave in time to attend the U.N.-sponsored climate gathering. Pete will not go alone to COP26, which starts Nov. 1 in Scotland.
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foxnews.com
What you need to know about the trial set to begin in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery
Three white men are accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery, a Black man shot and killed as he was jogging down a residential street after being chased by pickup trucks. Jury selection begins Monday.
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npr.org
What's at stake as Biden decides whether to stick with Jerome Powell as Fed chief
President Biden has a big decision to make: Whether to reappoint Jerome Powell to a second term as Federal Reserve chairman or choose someone else for one of the world's most powerful economic jobs.
1 h
npr.org
D.C.-area forecast: Sunshine galore this week as temperature rise through Thursday and then ease back
After mid-70s midweek, the coolest weather of the fall so far arrives over the weekend.
1 h
washingtonpost.com
Trump wanted to slash the federal government. But federal agencies are doing just fine.
Despite criticism of federal agencies, civil servants and private-sector managers and executives are about as likely to feel they can do their jobs well, our research finds.
1 h
washingtonpost.com
Havana Syndrome is a mystery illness with 200-plus documented cases. Lawmakers are demanding action.
Four years after the first Havana Syndrome cases emerged, the US still doesn't know who is behind the attacks on diplomats and intelligence officers.       
1 h
usatoday.com
Trump Missed the Part About No Do-Overs
And apparently no one from his party is going to explain it to him. 
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nytimes.com
Hey Parler, Nashville Isn’t Turning Red
Nashville may be having an identity crisis. But our moral commitment to equality will never change.  
1 h
nytimes.com
The Stock Market’s Gains Could Be Spread More Fairly
The markets going up even as wages stagnate is not a sign of a rigged system.
1 h
nytimes.com
How Not to Reform the I.R.S.
The I.R.S. needs more resources. But it also needs to protect taxpayer rights.
1 h
nytimes.com
Is Mark Zuckerberg a Man Without Principles?
The veteran tech journalist Walt Mossberg unpacks the Facebook Files with historical context and personal anecdotes.
1 h
nytimes.com