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The Guardian
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The Guardian
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Housework could keep brain young, research suggests
Even light activity can slow down ageing of the brain, scientists findEven light activity such as household chores might help to keep the brain young, research suggests, adding to a growing body of evidence that, when it comes to exercise, every little bit helps.The findings mirror upcoming guidance from the UK chief medical officers, and existing US guidelines, which say light activity or very short bouts of exercise are beneficial to health – even if it is just a minute or two at a time – countering the previous view that there was a threshold that must be reached before there were benefits. Continue reading...
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Cocktail of the week: the Alcazar | The Good Mixer
Think manhattan, but with a Spanish flavour and a velvety, nutty finishThis is our take on a manhattan, using ingredients from Jerez in Spain. The technique of “washing” a spirit in beurre noisette gives a beautiful, velvety, nutty finish, but you can also make this with straight brandy. Continue reading...
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From prison to the stage and back to Tottenham
Gina Moffatt’s remarkable story inspired Emma Dennis-Edwards to write Funeral Flowers, a hit at last year’s Edinburgh fringe. Now, the story has come full circle back to north LondonThree years ago, the actor and writer Emma Dennis-Edwards went to Tottenham, north London. Chris Sonnex, then an artistic associate at the Royal Court theatre, “sent me here to write a short play for the Tottenham festival,” she says. “The only stipulation was it’s got to be for the people of Tottenham.”Dennis-Edwards was introduced to a local business-owner, Gina Moffatt, whose remarkable story influenced Funeral Flowers, a sold-out hit at last summer’s Edinburgh fringe, and winner of the Filipa Bragança award for an outstanding solo theatre performance. Now, three years on from the 10-minute snippet Dennis-Edwards wrote for the Tottenham festival, the play has come full circle. This month sees a run at London Bridge’s new Bunker theatre (under the helm of its new artistic director, Sonnex), before a week at Tottenham’s Bernie Grant Arts Centre. Continue reading...
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Aaron Ramsey hopeful of returning for Arsenal before end of season
• Midfielder suffered leg injury against Napoli in Europa League• Player has told manager he hopes to play again before Juve moveAaron Ramsey has told Unai Emery he is hoping to play for Arsenal again before the end of the season. The Wales midfielder limped off at Napoli during his team’s 1-0 Europa League win with a hamstring injury, but when player and manager chatted on Friday lunchtime Ramsey sounded confident that he could recover quickly.“We spoke about that – ‘Maybe in two or three weeks I can play some matches’ – and we are going to wait for that,” Emery said. Continue reading...
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Pirouettes like Jagger: inside the unlikely Rolling Stones ballet
Mick Jagger and his girlfriend Melanie Hamrick hosted the US premiere of their ballet, soundtracked by Rolling Stones songs“I hope you’re going to enjoy this wonderful, new ballet. And the music, of course.”That was part of the tongue-in-cheek audio-only introduction courtesy of Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger, unveiling his and partner Melanie Hamrick’s ballet inspired by the music of the rocker’s band. Dubbed Porte Rogue, it had its North American premiere at New York’s David H Koch Theater at Lincoln Center on Thursday night. Continue reading...
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India elections: man chops off finger after voting for wrong party
Pawan Kumar had voted for Modi party in confusion over symbols on machineA man has chopped off his index finger in desperation after voting for the wrong party in India’s general election.Pawan Kumar became confused by the symbols on the electronic voting machine and voted for Narendra Modi’s party instead of its regional rival in Uttar Pradesh state on Thursday, his brother said. Continue reading...
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Egypt holds snap vote on extending president's term limit
Voting in referendum to begin just four days after MPs backed constitutional changesEgyptians are due to vote in a referendum that is expected to confirm sweeping changes to the constitution and could allow President Abdel-Fatah al-Sisi to remain in power until 2030.The rush to the ballot boxes was triggered when 531 out of 596 members of parliament backed the constitutional amendments on Tuesday. The national electoral commission declared the next day that the public vote would begin on Saturday. Continue reading...
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US newsstand mogul James Cohen to buy National Enquirer
Former head of Hudson News will reportedly pay $100m for weekly magazineThe National Enquirer is being sold to the former head of a US airport newsstand chain, after a rocky year in which the tabloid has been accused of burying stories that could hurt Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign.Tabloid owner American Media plans to sell the supermarket weekly to James Cohen, whose family owns a newspaper and magazine distributor and previously owned the Hudson News chain of airport newsstands. Continue reading...
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UK weather: bank holiday weekend could be warmest Easter on record
Met Office says peak temperatures expected to rival Turkey, Greece and FranceBritain could be in for its hottest Easter to date, with peak temperatures over the weekend expected to rival Turkey, the Greek island of Corfu and the south of France.The Met Office expects Sunday to challenge the previous record of 25.3C, set in 2011, as temperature continue to rise this week, with plenty of warm, dry and sunny weather expected across the UK over the bank holiday weekend. Continue reading...
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Three mountaineers killed in avalanche in Canada
Parks service says no chance of finding David Lama, Hansjörg Auer and Jess Roskelley aliveThree of the world’s most accomplished and well known mountaineers have been killed after an avalanche in the Canadian Rockies.The two Austrian climbers, David Lama and Hansjörg Auer, and the American Jess Roskelley, had been missing since going to attempt a climb on a remote face of Mount Howse in Alberta’s Banff national park earlier this week. Continue reading...
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'I'm a Londoner': Ilford man's 15-year battle for new postcode
Wilson Chowdhry says Essex postal identity means the town misses out on investmentOn Valentine’s Day 2017, the Ilford businessman Wilson Chowdhry was forced, once again, to set the record straight about his hometown. A BBC presenter had said the east London town of 165,000 people, located a few miles from the Olympic stadium, was in Essex, and Chowdhry was furious.“I found it really grating. It wound me up for the whole day,” he said. He set up a petition, did a callout on social media and sent a firm email to the public broadcaster. He went to bed after midnight, frustrated – and even more committed to his 15-year campaign to give Ilford a London postcode. Continue reading...
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I am depressed about the world my grandchildren are inheriting
Let’s take a closer look at you. You say you don’t think you’re depressed, despite feeling depressed. How you feel is important: don’t belittle itI’m in my early 70s and have four beautiful grandchildren in their teens. I am so depressed about the world they are growing up in. I know life has to go in cycles and being despondent never helps, but when I try to look on the bright side I feel I’m pretending. I don’t think I’m depressed – my life is good, enough money, good health, loving husband, friends and plenty to keep me busy. How can I make the pretence feel real?It’s great you care about what’s going on around you, and I don’t think you should pretend otherwise. We all need to care a hell of a lot. But I understand that’s not what you’re asking. It’s about how to really feel everything is going to be OK. Some days, that’s a tall order, isn’t it? But perhaps the more realistic quest is to find a way to care, stay engaged and not tip over into a feeling of inevitability and inertia. Continue reading...
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Is a daily routine all it’s cracked up to be? | Oliver Burkeman
To be productive, creative and sane, we’re told, you need a regimen. But do they work?Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past few years, you’ve been repeatedly told – including by me – that if you want to be productive, creative and sane, you’ll need a routine, especially a morning routine. Frankly, even if you have been living under a rock, you’ve probably been forwarded several blogposts by twentysomething Silicon Valley guys who also live under rocks, explaining how they emerge from under the rock no later than 5.30am every day for some yoga poses and a green smoothie, followed by a spot of journalling. “The one thing more difficult than following a regimen is not imposing it on others,” wrote Marcel Proust, but these days almost nobody even bothers attempting the latter. And, certainly, nobody seems to find time between their yoga stretches and their gratitude meditation to ask a forbidden question: what if you don’t need a routine – or might even be better off without one?This is, of course, a matter of balance. Routines are good. It’s easier to make something a habit if you plan it in advance and do it daily; plus there’s the (controversial) phenomenon of “decision fatigue”, which implies that you should “routinise” as many choices as possible – such as when to get up and what to do first each day – to save energy for others. Some people are so disorganised that a strict routine is a lifesaver. But speaking as a recovering rigid-schedules addict, trust me: if you click excitedly on each new article promising the perfect morning routine, you’re almost certainly not one of those people. You’re one of the other kind – people who’d benefit from struggling less to control their day, responding a bit more intuitively to the needs of the moment. This is the self-help principle you might call the law of unwelcome advice: if you love the idea of implementing a new technique, it’s likely to be the opposite of what you need. Continue reading...
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Game of Thrones betting guide: who will live, who will die, who will get it on?
As the final season gets underway, the loose ends are piling up. We run the odds on the biggest burning questions, from who Arya will kill to whether Brienne and Tormund will make ‘giant warrior babies’Season eight of Game of Thrones has more than a few smouldering questions it needs to answer in its six bumper-length episodes. And as it’s the final season, no character is safe. Who will live, who will die – all bets are off. Which invariably means all bets are on.It’s not all about total warfare, feudal politics and draogonry, either – seven densely packed seasons have left dozens of secondary plot threads wafting in the breeze. Smaller things that might not mean a whole lot in the grand scheme, but mean a lot to those invested in the minutiae of Westeros. How will the show go about resolving these? Will it simply not bother? And what else might be in store? Continue reading...
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Honduran transgender woman freed after seven months in US detention
Nicole García Aguilar was granted asylum in October but was held while Ice appealed A Honduran transgender woman who was detained in a US immigration facility for seven months after being granted asylum has been released after a legal challenge.Nicole García Aguilar was freed from the Cibola County detention facility in New Mexico on Wednesday night, a week after lawyers filed a habeas corpus writ challenging her unjustified prolonged detention by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Ice). Continue reading...
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Gilets jaunes banned from protesting near Notre Dame in Paris
France’s interior minister says demonstrators are planning action on SaturdayAnti-government gilets jaunes (yellow vests) protesters will be banned from demonstrating near Paris’s fire-ravaged Notre Dame Cathedral on Saturday, as the police chief warned that any plans to march on the banks of the river Seine near the site were “pure provocation”.The French interior minister, Christophe Castaner, warned that rioters would be on the streets in several major cities in France on Saturday but “particularly Paris”. He suggested that extremist groups and troublemakers were planning to repeat the scenes of arson, looting and vandalism by masked men which took place on Paris’s Champs-Elysées last month on the edge of anti-government marches by demonstrators. He urged against Paris becoming “the capital of rioters” for the day. Continue reading...
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Time’s recognition of Mohamed Salah helps confront prejudice: Jürgen Klopp
• US magazine puts Liverpool striker among 100 ‘most influential’• ‘He’s a role model in so many different things,’ says managerJürgen Klopp has welcomed Time magazine’s recognition of Mohamed Salah as an important step in confronting the prejudice that has given rise to Islamophobia.The Liverpool striker was this week named as one of the 100 most influential people in the world by the American publication and featured as one of its six front-cover stars. The comedian and TV host John Oliver, a Liverpool fan, wrote the accompanying tribute to Salah in which he praised the 26-year-old as an iconic figure for “Egyptians, Scousers and Muslims the world over”. Continue reading...
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Schroders shareholders urged to rebel over CEO's £6m bonus
Adviser says re-election of chairman and appointment of Leonie Schroder should be blockedThe fund manager Schroders is at risk of a shareholder backlash after an influential advisory firm issued a warning about “excessive” bonuses and the appointment of a Schroder family member to its board.Glass Lewis has recommended that at next month’s annual meeting investors vote against the company’s pay report, as well as the election of Leonie Schroder, claiming she lacks the experience needed to challenge the firm’s executive team. Continue reading...
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How I learned saintly patience (or not) | Coco Khan
What punishment, I asked my counsel of 5ft 5in despots. ‘If he’s hungover, now is the time to drill things in the house,’ said EllieIt is exhausting to hold a grudge; to lug it around, a heavy bag of something unresolved, a tote of trauma. Better to find a resolution, or walk away, but hey – a grudge sure does make for a great girls’ night in.There’s nothing quite like curling up with your pals, plotting the downfall of those who’ve slighted you. It’s no help for serious issues but for the small stuff – the petty infractions by loved ones and acquaintances, – catharsis can be found in vino and vengeance (both served cold and disproportionately large). Continue reading...
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Half of UK consumers willing to pay more to avoid plastic packaging
Exclusive: eight in 10 trying to cut plastic waste and 46% feel guilty about it, survey showsEight in 10 consumers are trying to reduce their plastic waste and half would be willing to pay higher prices for eco-friendly packaging, according to a survey that highlights the impact of the Blue Planet documentary and the campaign to reduce such rubbish.The research by YouGov shows 46% of people in the UK feel guilty about the amount of plastic they use, which is motivating them to consider changes in their behaviour, including paying more so companies will find alternatives to single-use plastics. Continue reading...
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Sean McLoughlin: ‘If I was as funny as my girlfriend I’d be a millionaire by now’
The writer, standup and ‘the best comedian you haven’t heard of yet’ on the things that make him laugh the mostBrian Gittins. Gruff, absurd and sublime. I have seen him countless times and I’m always disappointed when he leaves the stage. Continue reading...
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Lyra McKee: 29-year-old journalist shot dead in Derry – video obituary
Lyra McKee was fatally wounded during rioting in Derry on Thursday night, becoming what is believed to be the first journalist killed in the UK since Martin O’Hagan was shot in Lurgan, County Armagh, in 2001. The 29-year-old was an acclaimed Northern Irish journalist, who wrote about the Troubles and campaigned for LGBT rightsLyra McKee: a proud and critical Northern Irish journalistDerry police blame dissident republicans for journalist’s death Continue reading...
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Lyra McKee's death shows the distance Northern Ireland still has to run | Henry McDonald
A fair and fearless truth-teller, she saw the schisms that remain in Northern Irish lifeLyra McKee was, in her own words, one of Northern Ireland’s “ceasefire babies”.When the IRA, and later the loyalist paramilitaries, declared their ceasefires in 1994, ushering in an era of relative peace and stability, she was barely in primary school. She was meant to grow up in a world free from bombings, shootings, sectarian carnage and 24/7 terror. She was part of the post-Troubles generation. Continue reading...
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UK's porn age-verification rules can be circumvented in minutes
Using simple Google search the Guardian was able to register and age verify a made-up accountThe first test of the UK’s new porn age-verification system can be circumvented in less than two minutes using a simple Google search, the Guardian has found, amid concerns the system is being implemented for political reasons before it is ready.Providers of legal pornography will be required to implement an age-verification system by 15 July, one of the first of its kind in the world, raising concerns from privacy campaigners. Continue reading...
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Tribunal restores benefit payments to acid attack victim
British woman had been told she was fit to work despite being in constant painThe victim of an acid attack who suffered 50% burns to her face and body has overturned an attempt to strip her of a disability benefit after being told she was fit for work.The woman, who finds it difficult to sit or stand for long without pain, and is bed-bound for weeks after reconstructive operations, appealed after officials awarded her zero points at an assessment to test her eligibility for disability employment benefit. Continue reading...
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Brad Barritt: ‘I had to be selfish and tell my three-year-old son to fill the ice machine’
The Saracens captain has relied on the goodwill of his family to recover from an ankle injury in time to tackle Munster in Saturday’s Champions Cup semi-finalLittle escapes the TV cameras now poking into every pre-match huddle but, in Brad Barritt’s case, armchair viewers do not know the half of it. Have you ever heard of a player so determined to be fit for a European semi-final that even his three-year-old son has been assisting his rehab? Simply running out for Saracens against Munster in Coventry will be a remarkable achievement for a player who, three weeks ago, feared his season was over. Related: The Breakdown | Return of the flamboyant fly-half: daring No 10s are back in fashion Continue reading...
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How to wear: brown | Jess Cartner-Morley
I’ve given up eating it for Lent, so am sating my cravings with the non-edible kindI’ve had chocolate on my mind recently. I’ve been thinking a lot about Burberry’s chocolate leather pencil skirt, worn with a cream lace-edged slip peeking out. Also Prada’s stiff deep-brown satin cocktail-hour Bermuda shorts (so much better than they sound, trust me) and Max Mara’s one-shoulder cotton sundress-alternative jumpsuit. And Rejina Pyo’s cream-on-brown polka dots, and Zimmermann’s low-rise trousers the shade of a bar of 90% cocoa chocolate.I mean, I have to acknowledge that the degree to which I have had chocolate on the brain over the last, ooh, six-and-a-bit weeks might not be entirely down to fashion. It is just possible that it has something to do with me having given up chocolate for Lent. Six weeks turns out to be a long time to go without so much as a tile of Green & Blacks. I have missed chocolate; I’ve been sating my cravings with the non-edible kind. Continue reading...
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Why musicians such as Pink and Quavo love ropey cover portraits
It’s the golden age of the rubbish self-portrait as album art, inflicting all corners of the music worldPink’s new album, Hurts 2B Human, has quite the album artwork – a multicoloured painting of the pop star gazing into the distance, either thinking philosophical thoughts or just congratulating herself on saving two whole letters on the album cover by using text speak from the early 00s. The result is very GCSE art final coursework but, fair play to her, after seven album-cover photoshoots, she’s probably running out of ideas.Pink is not the first pop star to put an arty twist on an album cover – a little-known band called the Beatles used Klaus Voormann’s sketch of the band on their Revolver album – but the recent trend seems to be less “experimental German artist on LSD” and more “draw me like one of your French girls”. Continue reading...
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Amazon's trees get taste of air of the future
Experiment aims to learn how rainforest copes in levels of CO2 that could be normal by 2050 An ambitious experiment deep in the Amazon rainforest aims to find out how the ecosystem is likely to respond to rising levels of carbon dioxide.In 2000 a research team at the UK’s Hadley Centre forecast that a combination of reduced rainfall and higher temperatures caused by global warming could decimate the Amazon by the end of the century. But the following decade another Hadley Centre team concluded that this scenario was unlikely. Continue reading...
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Skaters and stripes: Friday's top photos
The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world Continue reading...
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