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Elon Musk says Tesla will develop an 'electric leaf blower'
Joe Skipper / Reuters Tesla CEO Elon Musk says his company is planning to develop an electric leaf blower. The statement comes on the heels of Musk's other viral non-automotive-related creations, such as The Boring Company's "Not-a-Flamethrower" flamethrower. Like the flamethrower, electric leaf blowers already exist. Judging by videos, electric leafblowers still emit quite a bit of sound. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Tesla CEO Elon Musk says his company is planning to develop a new creation — only this time, it won't be rolling on four wheels. It's a leafblower:See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Watch Tim Cook unveil Apple's news-subscription service: Apple News+See Also:Tesla is taking direct aim at Uber and Lyft with claims it plans to roll out 1 million robo-taxis by next year — but the plan was lacking detailsElon Musk slams rivals' self-driving-car tech, says 'anyone relying on lidar is doomed'Elon Musk says the chances of Tesla's autonomous computer failing are 'substantially lower than somebody losing consciousness'SEE ALSO: Elon Musk says Tesla owners could make up to $30,000 a year turning their cars into 'robotaxis'
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Business Insider
Islamic State claims responsibility for Easter bombings in Sri Lanka that left more than 320 dead
AP As the death toll from the Easter bombings in Sri Lanka rose to 321 on Tuesday, the Islamic State group claimed responsibility and released images that purported to show the attackers. The country's prime minister warned that several suspects armed with explosives are still at large. Another top government official said the suicide bombings were carried out by Islamic fundamentalists in apparent retaliation for the New Zealand mosque massacres last month that a white supremacist has been charged with carrying out. Sri Lankan authorities have blamed the attacks on National Towheed Jamaar, a little-known Islamic extremist group in the island nation. Visit INSIDER's homepage for more stories. COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — As the death toll from the Easter bombings in Sri Lanka rose to 321 on Tuesday, the Islamic State group claimed responsibility and released images that purported to show the attackers, while the country's prime minister warned that several suspects armed with explosives are still at large. Another top government official said the suicide bombings at the churches, hotels and other sites were carried out by Islamic fundamentalists in apparent retaliation for the New Zealand mosque massacres last month that a white supremacist has been charged with carrying out.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: This video shows the moment Sarah Sanders lied to a room full of reporters about FBI agents telling her they were happy Trump fired ComeySee Also:Here’s everything we know about National Thowfeek Jamaath, the terror group Sri Lanka has blamed for the Easter bombings that killed nearly 300 peoplePeople around the world are honoring the victims of the Sri Lanka bombings that killed more than 300 peopleHow more than 300 people died in Sri Lanka's Easter bombings even though the government knew it was coming
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Business Insider
The 10 countries with the biggest piles of gold
Getty Images/Dario Pignatelli/Bloomberg The volume of gold bought by central banks in 2018 rose to its highest level since the end of the Gold Standard nearly a half a century ago. That trend has continued this year, with February seeing the most monthly purchases in four months. The US holds the largest amount of reserves — here are the countries that are closest behind.  In 2018, the volume of gold bought by central banks rose to its highest level since nearly a half a century ago. That trend has continued into this year, with February seeing the most monthly purchases in four months. Here's how much each country held as of early April 2019, according to the latest available data from the International Monetary Fund and the World Gold Council.10. India Reuters/Danish Siddiqui Official gold holdings: 608.7 tonnes Percent of foreign reserves in gold: 6.4% As the global economy slows, emerging markets have looked to increase holdings of the yellow metal. In India, reserves have been increasing steadily since last August. 9. Netherlands Michael Dalder/Reuters Official gold holdings: 612.5 tonnes Percent of foreign reserves in gold: 65.9% The Netherlands has also moved to bring its gold reserves closer to home in recent years. In 2014, the Dutch central bank said repatriating some of its holdings from New York would have "a positive effect on public confidence." 8. Japan Reuters Official gold holdings: 765.2 tonnes Percent of foreign reserves in gold: 2.5% Japan's share of global foreign exchange reserves rose to a 15-year high at 5.2% last year, according to the IMF. But gold only accounts for a relatively small portion of that, about the same percent as China. See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:Snap's 110% moonshot this year still isn't enough to get Wall Street rooting for it37 US jobs that are disappearing at an alarming rateBillionaire fashion CEO Anders Holch Povlsen says 3 of his 4 children died in the Sri Lanka bombingsSEE ALSO: Tesla unveils the 'best chip in the world' for self-driving cars
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Business Insider
Fintech startup SoFi is reportedly in talks to raise $500 million from Qatar, but won't gain any value from 2017
Asa Mathat for Vox Media Online lending company Social Finance is in talks to raise $500 million from the Qatar Investment Authority, Bloomberg reported Tuesday. The round would value SoFi around $4.3 billion, making it a flat round from its valuation in 2017, according to the report. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Online lending platform Social Finance is in talks to raise $500 million in funding from the Qatar Investment Authority and others, according to Bloomberg. The new round would value SoFi around $4.3 billion, the same valuation of its 2017 financing round led by Silver Lake, according to Bloomberg.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Facial recognition is almost perfectly accurate — here's why that could be a problemSee Also:This map shows which states in the US are competing to top California-based Uber's $15.7 billion in equity fundingTennis star Serena Williams has launched a venture firm for investing in women, people of color, and young entrepreneursLyric is a startup trying to combine the best parts of a hotel and an Airbnb — and it just got $160 million in a round led by Airbnb itselfSEE ALSO: A yet-to-launch tech news site backed by Craigslist's founder is facing a staff exodus after its renowned editor-in-chief was forced out
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Business Insider
Rochester Drug Cooperative fined $20 million in first US criminal case against a major drug distributor over opioids
Brendan McDermid/Reuters The US filed its first criminal charges against a major drug distributor and company executives over their alleged roles in fueling the nation's opioid epidemic by putting profits ahead of patients' safety. Rochester Drug Co-operative, one of the 10 largest US drug distributors, agreed to pay a $20 million fine and enter a five-year deferred prosecution agreement to resolve the charges. Two former RDC executives were also charged, including Laurence Doud, who had been its CEO for more than 25 years. Doud was accused of conspiring to distribute illegal narcotics and conspiring to defraud the US. NEW YORK (Reuters) - The US government on Tuesday filed its first criminal charges against a major drug distributor and company executives over their alleged roles in fueling the nation's opioid epidemic by putting profits ahead of patients' safety. Rochester Drug Co-operative, one of the 10 largest US drug distributors, agreed to pay a $20 million fine and enter a five-year deferred prosecution agreement to resolve charges it turned a blind eye to thousands of suspicious orders for opioids.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Take a look inside a $3 million doomsday condo that can sustain 75 people for 5 yearsSee Also:The 50 best-selling albums of all time7 mistakes you make after you wake up that ruin your day14 photos show what it's like inside China's new Mars simulation base where tourists can try on space suits and experience what it may be like to live on the planetSEE ALSO: States with legal medical marijuana have seen a drop in workplace deaths
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Business Insider
This $5 gadget helps you get every last drop of product out of your bottles
Insider Picks writes about products and services to help you navigate when shopping online. Insider Inc. receives a commission from our affiliate partners when you buy through our links, but our reporting and recommendations are always independent and objective. Flip-It Facebook It's very frustrating to knowingly waste products just because you can't get them out of the bottle. Flip-It ($4.99) is a bottle-emptying kit that uses a tripod attachment to help you get the last drops of product out of bottles that can't balance upside-down on their own. Flip-It was just pitched on "Shark Tank," and while the product didn't get a deal, we still think it's an affordable buy that'll help you save time, money, and frustration. Whether it's ketchup, hand soap, lotion, or honey, there's nothing more frustrating than struggling to get the last drops of a product out of the bottle. You've probably spent time vigorously shaking bottles, pounding them on the counter, continually pushing down on a pump that just won't work, or even cutting them open to get the last bits of product. See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:This $10 hair towel is deceptively simple — it's literally just a towel with some small design tweaks, but I swear by it for drying my hair quicklyThis $25 breakfast sandwich maker looks gimmicky, but it works well and saves me a ton of time in the morning11 'Shark Tank' cleaning products that are actually useful
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Business Insider
A New York Times story about YouTube's internal 'Condom Challenge' deliberations shows why keeping toxic content off the site is such a daunting challenge (GOOG, GOOGL)
Stephen Lam/Reuters A recent New York Times report highlighted the difficulties YouTube faces when deciding whether or not controversial content should remain on its site.  A policy review meeting held to discuss "Condom Challenge" videos, displayed just how seemingly arbitrary distinctions can be, even when the company's CEO, Susan Wojcicki, is involved.  While these internal debates may be the most critical part of YouTube's business for it to get right, its ability to produce clear and repeatable results at the company's massive scale may ultimately be its toughest battle yet.  Read the full New York Times story on Wojcicki here.  Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories. At a recent policy review meeting at YouTube's headquarters in San Bruno, California, the company's chief exec, Susan Wojcicki, weighed-in on a certain set of "challenge" videos that had become wildly popular on the platform, according to a New York Times report last week.  The videos — which make up a phenomenon called the "Condom Challenge" — show a water-filled contraceptive falling onto a person's head in slow motion. Nothing is particularly raunchy about the videos (besides knowing that condoms are being used), and they are, admittedly, fascinating to watch. See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: The Mars 2020 rover started as a pile of aluminum panels that took over 5,000 hours to assemble. Here's how it was made.See Also:The mother of the YouTube and 23andMe CEOs has a 5-letter catchword for raising successful children and she wrote a book about itIt seems like Amazon and Google may finally be ending their streaming video feudA Google employee in Silicon Valley has been diagnosed with measles according to a reportSEE ALSO: Here are all the details on the plan to totally change YouTube's business model that Google CEO Sundar Pichai reportedly killed in 2017
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Business Insider
16 signs we're in the middle of a 6th mass extinction
Eliseo Fernandez/Reuters The planet is undergoing a sixth mass extinction: the sixth time in the history of life on Earth that global fauna has experienced a major collapse in numbers. Historically, mass extinctions have been caused by catastrophic events like asteroid collisions. This time, human activities are to blame. The primary culprits are deforestation, mining, and carbon dioxide-emissions, which cause the planet to heat up. As a result, frogs and insects are dying off at record rates, animal species are experiencing "biological annihilation," and invasive aliens are driving native species to extinction. The phrase "mass extinction" typically conjures images of the asteroid crash that led to the twilight of the dinosaurs. Upon impact, that 6-mile-wide space rock caused a tsunami in the Atlantic Ocean, along with earthquakes and landslides up and down what is now the Americas. A heat pulse baked the Earth, and the Tyrannosaurus rex and its compatriots died out, along with 75% of the planet's species. Although it may not be obvious, another devastating mass extinction event is taking place today — the sixth of its kind in Earth's history. The trend is hitting global fauna on multiple fronts, as hotter oceans, deforestation, and climate change drive animal populations to extinction in unprecedented numbers. The United Nations is set to release an 1,800-page assessment of scientific literature on the state of nature on May 6, 2019. Early news of the report from AFP reveals that up to 1 million species will be threatened with extinction within decades, mostly due to human actions. "The pace of loss is already tens to hundreds of times higher than it has been, on average, over the last 10 million years," according to the report. Read more: Insects are dying off at record rates — an ominous sign we're in the middle of a 6th mass extinction Similarly, a 2017 study found that animal species around the world are experiencing a "biological annihilation" and that our current "mass extinction episode has proceeded further than most assume." Here are 16 signs that the planet is in the midst of a sixth mass extinction, and why human activity is primarily to blame.Insects are dying off at record rates. Roughly 40% of the world's insect species are in decline. Hillary Kladke/Getty Images A 2019 study found that the total mass of all insects on the planets is decreasing by 2.5% per year. If that trend continues unabated, the Earth may not have any insects at all by 2119. "In 10 years you will have a quarter less, in 50 years only half left, and in 100 years you will have none," Francisco Sánchez-Bayo, a coauthor of the study, told The Guardian. That's a major problem, because insects like bees, hoverflies, and other pollinators perform a crucial role in fruit, vegetable, and nut production. Plus, bugs are food sources for many bird, fish, and mammal species — some of which humans rely on for food. Dave McDonnell/Getty Another recent study, published in the journal Nature Communications, reported that one-third of 353 wild bee and hoverfly species in the UK experienced declines between 1980 and 2013. The study authors noted that the geographic range of bee and hoverfly species declined by 25% — that's a net loss of about 11 species per square kilometer, primarily due to a reduction in the pollinators' habitats. Insects aren't the only creatures taking a severe hit. In the past 50 years, more than 500 amphibian species have declined worldwide — 90 of them going extinct — thanks to a deadly fungal disease called chytridiomycosis that corrodes frog flesh. Brad Wilson/Getty A recent study in the journal Science recounts the spread of chytridiomycosis, or chytrid fungus, and how quickly and quietly it wreaked havoc on frog, toad and salamander species in Central and South America, Africa, Europe, and Australia. Humans have enabled the fungal disease to spread further than it otherwise could have, in large part because of the global wildlife trade. According to the study authors, amphibian deaths associated with the chytrid fungus represent the greatest recorded loss of biodiversity attributable to a disease, and highly virulent wildlife diseases are contributing to Earth's sixth mass extinction. See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:On Earth Day, stunning photos reveal the fragility and resilience of the planet and its animals23 images that show how much we've reshaped planet Earth over the last centuryWe’re altering the climate so severely that we’ll soon face apocalyptic consequences. Here are 11 last-ditch ways we could hack the planet to reverse that trend.SEE ALSO: So many animals are going extinct that it could take Earth 10 million years to recover
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Business Insider
'Avengers Endgame' will completely blindside fans who think they know anything about the 3-hour franchise-ender
Warning: There are the mildest of spoilers below for "Avengers: Endgame" that have been seen in trailers.  "Avengers: Endgame" is in theaters Friday and it's the culmination of 22 movies in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.  If you've been a fan of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, you're going to want to see this one right away to avoid getting spoiled.  Bust out the tissues, Marvel fans. "Avengers: Endgame" is going to make you laugh, cheer aloud, tear up multiple times, and cry. By the film's end, there were audible sniffles throughout INSIDER's 10 a.m. press screening Tuesday morning.  "Endgame" is an emotional punch straight to the gut and an experience that demands to be seen on the largest screen possible — not only for the scope of the movie but for its final 30 to 40 minutes. See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: What happens to your body when you drink too much coffeeSee Also:New footage from 'Avengers: Endgame' teases an important mission for Rocket and an emotional reunion'Avengers' stars Brie Larson and Scarlett Johansson wore jewelry designed to look like the Infinity Gauntlet at the 'Endgame' premiere33 important questions 'Avengers: Endgame' needs to answer
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Business Insider
'Avengers: Endgame' is a mix of a heist movie and revenge tale that is even better than 'Infinity War'
Disney "Avengers: Endgame" may be three hours, but it never feels long, as the action and fun plot keep the story moving. The movie also surprisingly has a lot of humor in it, following the dramatic ending of "Avengers: Infinity War." It may be hard to believe, but "Endgame" is a better movie than "Infinity War." Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories.   Directors Anthony and Joe Russo have pulled off a rare feat in today's franchise-heavy Hollywood. The brothers didn't just make a stellar movie to close a franchise (or "phase," as it pertains to the Marvel Cinematic Universe), but made a better movie than the penultimate entry.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: These dinosaur puppets come to life in the live 'Jurassic World' showSee Also:Demand is so high for 'Avengers: Endgame' that many AMC theaters will be open 24 hours a day all weekend36 movies coming out this summer that are worth your time and money, and could help break box-office records5 confirmed 'Star Wars' projects are coming after 'The Rise of Skywalker' — here are all the detailsSEE ALSO: "The Karate Kid" star Ralph Macchio explains why he agreed to reprise his iconic role in YouTube hit "Cobra Kai" after 30 years of saying no to reboots and sequels
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Business Insider
Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Trump met behind closed doors to discuss social media ahead of the 2020 election
REUTERS/Anushree Fadnavis Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey met with President Donald Trump on Tuesday at the White House. The meeting was held to discuss "the world of social media in general," Trump said in a Twitter post. On the morning of Tuesday's meeting, Trump unleashed a series of tweets accusing Twitter of political bias and alleging the company removed some of his followers. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Twitter executives met with President Donald Trump on Tuesday to discuss the health of conversation on the platform ahead of the 2020 presidential election. Trump shared a picture on Twitter of the meeting that showed CEO Jack Dorsey and a number of other Twitter executives in the Oval Office. See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Everyone's talking about foldable phones, but a few things need to happen before people start buying themSee Also:Trump blasts Twitter as 'very discriminatory,' says the social-media company removes his followersThis guy made physical flip-flops out of Trump's contradictory tweets — and he sold out his entire inventory in less than a monthInstagram is mulling a new feature that would hide from others how many likes you get on your postsSEE ALSO: The CEO of a data-science-learning startup worth $184 million made 'uninvited physical contact' with an employee while dancing at a bar, sources say
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Business Insider
How Childish Gambino’s “Guava Island” Movie Was Made and What It Means
Childish Gambino produced and starred in a short music film, "Guava Island," and the film aired at this year's Coachella. The production team said they asked Rihanna to star in the film through an Instagram message. The film takes place in Cuba, uses several of Gambino's previous songs, and features a remake of his "This is America" music video. Following is a full transcript of this video: Alana: One of the biggest Coachella moments this year wasn't a live performance. "Guava Island," a short film produced by Donald Glover and starring Rihanna, aired at the festival, and the full movie hit Amazon Video a few days later. Now, there was talk of this Rih and Glover collab awhile back when pictures of the two in Cuba surfaced last year, but no one knew exactly what it was for. "Guava Island" is a musical that features several of Glover's songs and brings to life a folktale of how music helped unite an oppressed and overworked island. The standout scene: Glover completely remade his iconic "This Is America" video specifically for the movie. Here's how the movie was made and how the movie's meaning relates to the original "This Is America" video. Warning, major spoilers ahead. "Guava Island" was actually filmed in Havana, Cuba. The team behind the movie made sure that all the locals who were cast were Afro-Cuban, something rarely seen in mainstream media. But for how they got Rihanna, the highly underestimated DM approach. Ibra: We left a comment on her Instagram. "Movie? U in? Cuba..." And then the rest is history, baby.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:Inside Europe's biggest caviar farm that produces 28 tons per yearThese basement renovations hide slides and secret roomsHow Jelly Belly jelly beans are made
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Business Insider
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and the IRS blew through another deadline to turn over Trump's tax returns
Associated Press Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told Democrats on the House Ways and Means Committee that the IRS would not meet their second deadline to turn over six years of President Donald Trump's tax returns. The White House has previously said Democrats will "never" obtain Trump's tax returns. The request from Democrats is being made for the purpose of examining the IRS's audit process of presidents. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. WASHINGTON — The Treasury Department on Tuesday once again rejected requests from Democrats on the House Ways and Means Committee for the Internal Revenue Service to provide the committee with six years of President Donald Trump's tax returns, ramping up the ongoing fight over the president's personal finances. Trump has repeatedly refused to release his tax returns, either voluntarily or under official request from Congress. The latest refusal by the Treasury Department, of which the IRS is part, signals the fight is far from over.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Here are 7 takeaways from special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigationSee Also:The GOP tax cuts could help Trump get reelected in 2020, even though most Americans hate themTrump announces Herman Cain will not be nominated for Federal Reserve Board seat after string of controversiesTrump and the Republican-controlled Senate are increasingly at odds on everything from trade to Yemen to the border wallSEE ALSO: How the 15 richest members of Congress made their money
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Business Insider
This $10 hair towel is deceptively simple — it's literally just a towel with some small design tweaks, but I swear by it for drying my hair quickly
Insider Picks writes about products and services to help you navigate when shopping online. Insider Inc. receives a commission from our affiliate partners when you buy through our links, but our reporting and recommendations are always independent and objective. Alyssa Powell/Business Insider Drying your hair with a heavy towel or wringing out all of the water can be detrimental to delicate strands.  The Turbie Twist ($10) is an easy way to simply and safely towel-dry your hair. Plus, it makes getting ready and drying hair simultaneously a breeze.  I've been using this product for years now and I think just about every hair type could benefit from it.  Is it just me, or do movies and television shows have a way of making the act of getting ready seem oddly glamorous? Picture it: girl hops out of shower. In a hurry, she flips over her head and wraps her hair in a giant bath towel. Then, she expertly multitasks, rubbing lotion on her eggs, dabbing on foundation and powder, swiping mascara on her lashes, without any slips, all while balancing a giant towel on her headSee the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:This $25 breakfast sandwich maker looks gimmicky, but it works well and saves me a ton of time in the morningThis $82 retinoid serum helped get rid of my acne scars almost overnight — it’s saved me hundreds on laser treatmentsThe Coway Mighty Air Purifier is one of our favorite air purifiers, and it’s on sale for nearly $70 off right now
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Business Insider
Alphabet's drone delivery company just received FAA approval to start dropping packages on customer's front doorsteps in Virginia (GOOG, GOOGL)
AP Wing, the aerial-delivery venture spun out of Google, has become the first US drone operator to receive federal clearance as an airline.  That means Wing can start legally dropping packages on people's front doorsteps in the states.  Wing says it will begin testing services in two southwestern Virginia towns and hopes to launch there by later this year.  In Australia — where the company has been testing since 2014 — Wing drones deliver everything from burritos to coffees to over-the-counter medications. Commercial services in Virginia will likely be similar.  Other companies like Uber and UPS are vying for the same approval FAA approval, according to a Washington Post report. Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories. Wing, the aerial delivery venture spun out of Google, has become the first US drone operator to receive federal clearance as an airline — meaning it can start legally dropping packages on people's front doorsteps in the states.  Before news of the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) approval — which was first reported by Bloomberg on Tuesday — Wing had only been cleared to carry out its commercial delivery services in Australia, where it's been testing since 2014. See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Samsung, Motorola, and Huawei debuted foldable phones this year — here's how these folding screens workSee Also:How to share a Google Doc and customize its sharing settingsHow to create and customize a Google Form for polls and questionnairesIt seems like Amazon and Google may finally be ending their streaming video feudSEE ALSO: Google just beat Amazon to launching one of the first drone delivery services
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Business Insider
Why top automakers spend millions on concept cars they don't plan on making
Concept cars are big hits at auto shows, but the most daring designs rarely make it to production. They come in many shapes and sizes, are made for a variety of reasons, and can cost automakers millions to make. Business Insider spoke with the design department of some of the top automakers to find out why automakers spend millions on concept cars they don't plan on making. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.  The following is a transcript of the video. Narrator: Concept cars: a glimpse into the future. You may find them synonymous with outrageous designs, exaggerated interiors, and features that have never been seen in a production car, like this floating key. They're typically revealed at auto shows where enthusiasts and the media "ooh" and "ahh" at the future of mobility. It's no secret that these one-off designs can be expensive to build, sometimes with a seven-figure price tag. With so much invested in these cars, why does it seem like we rarely see these concepts make it to production? And why does it seem like the coolest elements are stripped away when they do? We spoke with the design department of some of the top automakers to find out why automakers spend millions on concept cars they don't plan on making. Ralph Giles: First of all, people don't realize that concept cars, yes, we would show them at auto shows typically, and they're there for the media to enjoy. But long after the media is gone, the auto show's around for a couple weeks, and the public comes around, and they may not know much about the brand sometimes, and they go, "Whoa," and they come across this concept car that makes an unmistakable statement about where the brand wants to go with technology.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:Watch Tesla unveil its full self-driving computer in under 5 minutesThe Qiantu K50 is China's first electric supercar coming to the USTake a look at the Genesis Mint, a two-seater electric vehicle concept with doors that ease access to the trunk in bumper-to-bumper parking
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Business Insider