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Fast Company
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Fast Company
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Welcome to the anti-Coachella: Luck Reunion is all about the music and almost impossible to get into
This one-day concert every March in Texas outside Willie Nelson’s ranch features incredible musicians and a ticketing process that’s almost as mathematically difficult as the lottery. Believe it or not, the first Coachella was actually about the music. Twenty years later, it’s an excuse for teenagers to get drunk and wear flower crowns. Ariana Grande headlined the first weekend of the two-weekend 2019 festival, which ends April 21—and judging by this review, those of us who stayed home can be glad we saved $500 and the cost of a flight to LAX.  Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Columbine 20 years later: This map shows every school shooting since
A disturbing visual record of a uniquely American phenomenon. Twenty years ago on this day, two students opened fire at Columbine High School, killing 13 people and injuring 24 more. While the scourge of gun violence in U.S. schools didn’t begin with Columbine, the massacre near Littleton, Colorado, reshaped debates on gun laws, school bullying, mental health, and the media’s role in glorifying mass shooters.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
“The day innocence died”: How the media covered Columbine 20 years ago
On the 20th anniversary of the Columbine massacre, we look back at how media responded to the tragedy compared with school shootings today. First come the hashtags.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Why haven’t we evolved a solution to aging?
Reconciling the apparent paradox between the optimizing drive of evolution, and the inevitable deterioration of the body. Life pits the order and intricacy of biology against the ceaseless chaos of physics. The second law of thermodynamics, or the thermodynamic arrow of time, states that any natural system will always tend towards increasing disorder. Biological aging is no different, making death inevitable. However, one of the least-addressed questions of aging is the apparent paradox between the optimizing drive of evolution, and the inevitable deterioration of the body. Considering the 3.5 billion years in which we have evolved from single-cell organisms, why hasn’t life countered the inefficiency of aging? Or more accurately, how has aging persisted within the Darwinian framework of evolution?Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
The Bauhaus of Blunts? Today’s most ambitious cannabis companies are high on design
To stand out in the crowd, cannabis companies are getting creative with their lifestyle branding. Marijuana has come a long way from the days of plastic baggies and glass jars filled with OG Kush and Sticky Icky Icky. Today’s cannabis (née weed) is sold in posh retail outlets, which stock dozens of different products, from medicinal-style vaporizers to THC-infused candies, aimed at veteran users and neophytes alike. In the past year, $2.2 billion of venture capital has flowed into 324 cannabis deals globally, according to research firm CB Insights. In the United States, many of the deals are rooted in California, the largest legal market, where recreational use has been legal since 2018 and consumer-facing companies are scrambling to turn what is essentially a commodity product into something more distinctive.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
You should take “you have too much time on your hands” as a compliment
Having free time is a sign that you’re doing something right. Most people believe they want to hear certain phrases from a boss or coworker.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
As legalized cannabis spreads, its startup economy is booming
Canada has a head start, but investors see potential for explosive growth once regulation catches up with reality. April 20th has long been a day of defiance for cannabis activists, but in 2019, 420 is taking on new meaning as legalization continues to sweep across the U.S.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
How and when to watch the Lyrid meteor showers 2019
Mother Nature is putting on a show for Earth Day! When they talk about April showers, they usually mean rainstorms, but it could just as easily refer to meteor showers.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Disney CEO Bob Iger’s compensation is “insane,” says Abigail Disney
Disney, a filmmaker and activist, joined Howard W. Buffett and Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild at Fast Company’s Impact Council annual meeting on Thursday. In 2018, Disney CEO Bob Iger got a raise—a big raise. His total compensation increased 80% to hit $65.6 million. According to a recent study by Equilar, his compensation was 1,424 times that of the median Disney employee. For Abigail Disney, granddaughter of Disney cofounder Roy Disney, that level of pay is “insane.” Moreover, she says, executive pay at that level has “had a corrosive effect on society.”Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
“I think that the majority of design jobs and the genius in design right now is to bio-mechanically addict us.”
Imran Choudhri, the founder of Humane and designer of the iPhone’s user interface, and Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing, came together at Fast Company’s first annual Impact Council to discuss ethics in design. //The crisis in tech is largely a design problem A BIT VAGUE, CAN WE COME AT THIS MORE DIRECTLY?// and we’re all familiar with its worst manifestations—from iPhones that encourage excessive screen time to social media platforms like Facebook and YouTube that are addictive and prioritize sensationalized content. But what do we do about it? That’s where the debate continues to rage.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
This skin care line was created by a rocket scientist
KPS Essentials uses rocket science for better beauty. When Natalie Novak-Bauss was working at a department store in California, she went to clean up the stock room after one of the mild earthquakes that occasionally shakes up the state. There, she found that one of the skin care products she was selling people had spilled—and eaten a hole into the carpet. She was horrified that she had been recommending that product to her customers and wanted to do something different. Luckily, she knew just the person.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
The heavy hand of New York’s social media-powered policing
New York said an unprecedented raid on young gang members in 2016 stopped a criminal conspiracy. Others say it showed the crude power of emerging police tactics. This documentary and article originally appeared on The Appeal, a nonprofit criminal justice news site. Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
To fix the climate, we have to fix our soil
Decades of intensive agriculture and deforestation have degraded around half of the world’s soil, which is one of the most effective natural systems for sequestering carbon. Soil scientist Asmeret Asefaw Berhe argues in a TED talk that we need to stop treating soil like dirt. “One of our most important solutions to the global challenge posed by climate change lies right under our feet.” That’s according to Asmeret Asefaw Berhe, a soil biochemist at the University of Merced, and she’s talking about soil, which isn’t acknowledged as a key factor in the fight against climate change.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Michelle Pfeiffer on why her new safe scents pass the smell test
At the Fast Company Impact Council, the actress explained how fragrance is the last frontier in personal-care transparency. As consumers continue to demand safer personal-care products, the clean beauty industry is booming, with one forecast saying it will top $25 billion by 2025. It’s no wonder that big brands like Sephora are paying more attention.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Here’s a horse doing ASMR so you’ll be inspired to visit Lexington, Kentucky
Mr. Ed’s got nothing on this horse. ASMR is the hottest new trend in hospitality. If the Moxy Hotel’s ASMR bedtime stories don’t convince you, perhaps this ASMR horse whisperer video published by the Lexington, Kentucky, visitors’ bureau will.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
That tone-deaf Ancestry ad was playing on Canadian emotions
The now-pulled Canadian ad was rightly criticized for its sugar-coated depiction of a relationship between a white man and a black woman during slavery. “Abigail, we can escape to the North,” a white man says to a black woman, both wearing 19th-century period costume. “There is a place we can be together, across the border. Will you leave with me?”Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Running a business helped me recover from burnout. Here’s how
Setting her own schedule helped this overachiever overcome burnout early in her career. I was less than two years into my first job after college when I found myself on a sunny Saturday morning, struggling to find the strength to leave my bed to call my parents. When I eventually picked up the phone, I said, “Mom, Dad, I’ve been crying for four hours straight. What’s wrong with me?”Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
High CO2 levels will wreck plants’ nutritional value, so don’t plan on surviving on vegetables
CO2 is stripping the food we eat of essential proteins and nutrients as well as warming the planet, says the lead author on last year’s IPCC report at TED in Vancouver. We know that rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are raising global temperatures and creating unstable and extreme weather patterns that will continue to threaten communities across the globe. And perhaps few people are more familiar with this fact than Kristie Ebi, the University of Washington professor who was the lead author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s blockbuster report last fall on the need to limit global warming to below 1.5 degrees Celsius.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
This mobile cinema is helping women in Pakistan learn their rights
At TED, Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy talks about using her Oscar-winning documentary “A Girl in the River: The Price of Freedom” to change culture. In 2016, Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy won an Academy Award for her documentary film A Girl in the River: The Price of Freedom. The film told the story of a woman in Obaid-Chinoy’s home country of Pakistan whose father and uncle attempted to kill her after she married someone she chose instead of having an arranged marriage. This is not uncommon in Pakistan; the Human Rights Commission counted 460 such murders–called “honor killings”–in 2017. What’s uncommon is that this woman survived, and was able to tell her story.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
The end of Likes? Instagram follows Twitter in mulling downgrade to influencer mentality
You’ll have to find a new way to judge your popularity. Instagram may no longer want you to like on Instagram. Screenshots uncovered by researcher Jane Manchun Wong show that Instagram may be considering shaking things up on its social media site so posts no longer show exactly how many people have liked your post. Instead, you would see that a post was liked by a few named handles “and others.”Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Mental health concerns by state: This map shows the most googled terms
A new report examined Americans’ most googled mental health concerns and found that geography certainly plays a roll. How do New Yorkers’ psychological concerns differ from those in, say, South Dakota? A new report examined the most googled mental health concerns among Americans and found that geography certainly plays a roll.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
The real reason why luxury fashion brands love the art world
Luxury fashion houses, such as Ferragamo, Hermes, Prada, and Louis Vuitton, have invested aggressively in art in recent years. Are they the great art patrons of our time or are they simply burnishing their own brands? Louis Vuitton reopened its refurbished flagship store in Florence in March 2019 to great fanfare from the fashion industry. The brand made great play of the fact that, alongside all the luxury apparel and accessories, the store is replete with artworks including works by Italian artists such as Osvaldo Medici del Vascello and Massimo Listri.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Five things every cover letter needs and one thing to delete
Yes, you still need to write a cover letter, but don’t waste your time or theirs with something generic. Online job applications have taken the focus off of the cover letter, but that doesn’t mean it’s not important. Your cover letter is the opportunity to bring your resume to life with additional information. Overlook it and you’re missing a chance to stand out among the other candidates.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Calculate exactly how much plastic trash you generate in a year
This calculator lets you figure out–and visualize–the giant pile of plastic your habits end up creating. It’s getting easier to avoid plastic. Zero-waste grocery stores, from Brooklyn to Hong Kong to Berlin, sell food without plastic packaging. It’s possible to buy plastic-free toothbrushes, cardboard poop scoopers for your dog, and biodegradable vibrators (made from plastic, but plant-based). Still, plastic is ubiquitous, and most of us probably buy at least one item made from the material or packaged in it every day. A handful of calculators are designed to help you estimate how much you’re contributing to the problem.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Furniture made out of old jeans is way more beautiful than it sounds
The marble-like material is made out of old denim, collected from recycling centers. It was 2014, and Sophie Rowley was a design master’s student in Central Saint Martins in London. She needed to create a stunning final project, but she was broke. So she did what any resourceful person would do: She went dumpster diving. She experimented building with old CDs, glass, textiles, Styrofoam.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
5 surprising lessons I learned when I stopped using social media for a month
One writer wanted more time to work on her novel, so she deleted social media apps from her phone. She realized just how much time she was spending on her screen. I sat up and closed Tik Tok on my phone, staring in disbelief at the setting sun outside my window. It had been bright outside when I sat down to give myself a “ten-minute social media break” after work. The goal was to relax and flip through my apps for just a few minutes, then start my personal writing. Now the whole evening had passed. Bleary-eyed, hungry, worn through, I decided to start dinner and go from there.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Privacy is hard to see, so let’s put some numbers on it
We typically learn what our data privacy means only after it’s too late. Like any other grad student with sketchy dial-up service in the late ’90s, my hours of work were stored on a local hard drive. The day it crashed, my ensuing panic was entirely focused on getting my draft thesis back. I didn’t care about my journals, budget, contacts, or my (failing) diet plan. But that thesis was the culmination of 11 months of research and writing.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
20 years after Columbine, the long-term effects of gun violence linger
Last year there was a mass shooting nearly every day in the U.S. In the 20 years since Columbine, how is the country dealing with the ripple effects of trauma? Lauren Reese always said that she didn’t want her children to go to Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, where she was once a student.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
This folding chair is more structurally complex than some buildings
It can also be stored flat in seconds, making it the most high-flown folding chair we’ve ever seen. The chair looks like something that must have been grown in a lab. Its webbed panels look like they were woven by tree roots or spider webs. In fact, this chair has been 3D-printed with the help of computer algorithms. And even more impressively? The whole thing collapses down to the size of a Trapper Keeper when it’s not in use.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
This MIT team is reinventing building by looking at the ancient world
Using some clever physics, designers figured out how humans could move 1,000-pound concrete slabs on their own. Today, construction workers rely on cranes to lift the big slabs of concrete and other materials that go into many commercial building projects. But it hasn’t always been that way; for thousands of years, humans moved monumental stones by hand. A collaboration between Boston-based Matter Design and the building materials company Cemex Global attempts to return to those ancient methods–while introducing an entirely new way to move heavy concrete slabs with nothing more than human hands.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business