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An Indian Restaurant’s Rise Mirrors Asheville’s
The winner of a coveted restaurant prize says a lot about America’s changing tastes.
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Walmart Just Signaled the End of the Big-Box Bloodbath
The world’s biggest retailer won’t see its earnings decline as much as it thought. That’s more good news for the US economy on top of slowing inflation.
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AI Panned My Screenplay. Can It Crack Hollywood?
By using AI and huge databases to analyze scripts and audiences, Corto AI hopes to bring science to a movie business long run by gut instinct.
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Dodge will retire Charger and Challenger, its muscle car mainstays
“End of an era”: The company that helped give rise to a generation of cars with powerful engines and muscular styling is moving to cleaner-powered vehicles.
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‘Valorant’ reveals path for tier-2 teams into international leagues
Riot did not specify how teams would qualify for Challengers Ascension, a new tournament granting tier-two winners access to the tier one international leagues.
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5 ways the Inflation Reduction Act could save you money
Here’s a look at how the Inflation Reduction Act could affect your family’s finances, both now and in the future.
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Google is training its robots to be more like humans
In a drab Google office park in Silicon Valley, robots are going to school, using AI algorithms to learn how to play ping pong and clean up after humans.
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Swizz Beatz, Timbaland sue Triller for $28 million in missing acquisition payments
Triller bought music series Verzuz for an undisclosed sum in January 2021. Now its creators say they’re still owed money.
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Why Are Only Some Tax Breaks Adjusted for Inflation?
Popular provisions including the child tax credit don’t take rising prices into account, but they should.
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Future Remote Workers Need to Network More — in College
If young people won’t be interacting as much on the job, they’ll have to start early to make contacts for career advancement.
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‘Thymesia’ is a love letter to From Software with killer combat
If the Soulslike virus remains lodged in your core as it does in “Thymesia’s,” you should easily become absorbed into its diseased world.
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A 15% Minimum Corporate Tax Is No Economic Villain
History doesn’t support the notion that higher company taxes necessarily lead to higher prices or lower wages.
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The Stock Market’s Rebound Has History on Its Side
Since 1926, equities have recovered more than half of a 10% or larger decline 79 times and only once, in March 1930, did they reach a new low before setting a new all-time peak.
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A New Normal Is Dividing the Global Chip Industry
Greater uncertainty means higher inventories, but it’s not shaking out equally among semiconductor manufacturers. No surprise, TSMC is beating the rest.
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Single-family houses and townhouses in Bethesda development
BUYING NEW | Prices at the development start at $1.2 million for the townhouses, half with elevators, and $1.7 million for the single-family houses.
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Gmail is getting (another) redesign. Here’s how to find what you need.
Google says it wants to make it simpler to access different apps — like Chat, Spaces and Meet — from your Gmail inbox.
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Can Xi’s China Correct Course on Covid — Like Vietnam?
Saigon’s economy came back to life while lockdown threats still stalk Xi’s.
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Gen Z TikTok creators are turning against Amazon
The ‘People Over Prime’ campaign is a public setback for the company, which has courted young influencers.
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How to ensure you have adequate internet service when buying a home
TOWN SQUARE | When the pandemic opened more possibilities for remote work in far flung rural areas, some found that internet access is not a given.
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Italy’s Right Clings to the Past — and Falls Flat
The country’s right-wing coalition unveiled a policy manifesto that can essentially be summed up as patriotic talk and a cocktail of misguided tax cuts.
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Europe’s Next Ukraine Mission Is on the Home Front
Vladimir Putin is betting Western unity will crumble as gas and food prices surge and winter sets in. Here’s how to prove him wrong.
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Adam Neumann’s Cult of ‘We’ Is Now the Cult of Web3
There was another project from the WeWork founder before the new $350 million real-estate startup: carbon credit crypto. It says a lot about what techno-optimism gets wrong.
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European Credit Is Poised for a Renaissance
Second-half rebound in corporate debt sales is likely as market turbulence ebbs.
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Greensill’s Ghost Will Haunt the Finance World
SoftBank and Credit Suisse are the ones preparing for a legal showdown, but there’s a lesson here for everyone.
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China’s surprise rate cut, economic slowdown send oil prices plunging
The prospect of lower demand sent oil prices sliding 5 percent — pushing West Texas Intermediate crude to $87 a barrel.
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Samsung’s Odyssey Ark is a 55-inch, curved monster that eats your face
The monitor costs a bundle of cash but delivers high-resolution gameplay at a fast refresh rate, despite it's massive size.
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Biden’s No FDR. He’s Not Even Obama.
The Democrats’ crowing over their legislative victories is not persuasive. But it does help them rationalize coming down to earth.
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Why Did Trump Take Classified Documents in the First Place?
More pressing answers are needed for what the former president intended to do with sensitive information the FBI uncovered.  
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Peloton’s New Strategy Is Spinning All Over the Place
The fitness company is reasserting that it’s a luxury brand — as it lays off staff and closes stores.
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No Respite From Scorching Singapore Rents
The supply crunch can only ease with a better yield for homebuyers and completion of new housing projects next year.
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