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News : NPR
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News : NPR
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Supreme Court Rules Border Patrol Agents Who Shoot Foreign Nationals Can't Be Sued
In a 5-4 decision, the court ruled Tuesday that families of noncitizens shot by federal agents on foreign territory have no constitutional right to sue for damages in U.S. courts.
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Judge Weighs Roger Stone's Bid For A New Trial As Trump Attacks Her On Twitter
Roger Stone, a self-styled "dirty trickster" and longtime adviser to President Trump, is expected to appeal. The president, meanwhile, has left open the door to a possible pardon for Stone.
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Dow Drops 1900 Points In 2 Days As Markets Sell Off On Fears Of Coronavirus Spread
The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 879 points. That's on top of Monday's drop, when the Dow tumbled more than 1,000 points.
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Tesla Driver Was Playing Game Before Deadly Crash. But Tesla Software Failed Too
A Tesla driver was playing a mobile game as his car steered itself toward a barrier, and Tesla should have done more to prevent this "foreseeable misuse of technology," federal investigators said.
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Health Officials Warn Americans To Start Planning For Spread Of Coronavirus In U.S.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging Americans to start to prepare for the possibility of more aggressive measures to stop the spread of the new coronavirus in the United States.
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'Inside Story' Sheds Light On Facebook's Effort To Connect The World
How can one company be so wildly successful — and so thoroughly distrusted? Tech writer Steven Levy reflects on Facebook's enigmatic leader and its drive for expansion in his new book.
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Sabrina Ionescu Sets NCAA Record — Hours After Speaking At Bryant Memorial
The Oregon star spoke with deep respect for Gianna's game. "She had a fadeaway better than mine," she said. "If I represented the present of the women's game, Gigi was the future, and Kobe knew it."
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Who Gets 5G — And Who Gets Left Behind — Has Some Worried About Digital Inequality
As wireless companies continue to roll out 5G — the next generation of wireless technology — advocates worry this latest high-speed update will widen the digital divide.
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What Happens If You're Critically Ill In China — But Not With Coronavirus
Residents say their relatives have been unable to get care for cancer, for childhood diseases and more as Wuhan and other cities put a priority on treating COVID-19 patients.
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Sell Or Stay? Australia's Fire Zone Experiment
After deadly 2009 wildfires, authorities offered to buy property to encourage people to move. Few accepted. The questions raised by Australia's experience are freshly urgent after its latest fires.
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Trump Says Sotomayor, Ginsburg Should Recuse Themselves From Cases Involving Him
The president's remarks came in apparent reference to a dissent by Justice Sotomayor who wrote that the government had claimed "one emergency after another" to seek an "unprecedented number of" stays.
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Hong Kong Bookseller Sentenced By China To 10 Years For Passing 'Intelligence'
Gui Minhai was kidnapped by Chinese agents while on vacation in Thailand in 2015. His conviction in a secret trial was announced in a brief statement by the court.
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Mubarark, Egypt's Ousted President, Is Dead At 91
For many Egyptians, Mubarak became the symbol of all that was wrong with their country. His nearly 30-year rule is recalled as a time of repression and economic stagnation for all but an elite few.
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5 Things To Watch For In Tuesday's South Carolina Democratic Debate
A lot is on the line in the 2020 primary debate. It might be the last chance for moderates to slow Bernie Sanders' momentum. And who comes out better — Joe Biden or Michael Bloomberg? Here's a guide.
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After Lengthy Career, Spotlight Lands On Amy Berman Jackson, Judge In Stone Case
Jackson has been a player in Washington, D.C.'s legal world for three decades and now is center stage amid disputes over Roger Stone and the independence of the Justice Department.
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Some U.S. Farmers Boxed In By Coronavirus Outbreak
Fewer ships from China are docking in the U.S., which hurts U.S. farmers who send exports on the ships' return trips. And perishables that do make it sometimes rot on the docks in China.
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America's Mental Health Crisis Hidden Behind Bars
Overcrowding, understaffing and poor treatment for inmates with mental health issues held in Los Angeles jails underscore growing failures in America's mental health and justice systems.
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Barr Heads To Senate With His Work Cut Out: Selling Republicans On FISA
The senate majority leader has asked the attorney general to meet with the conference to discuss surveillance legislation. The president also may need convincing.
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Nevada Dems Leader: It's Time To End The Caucuses, Shift To A Primary
Nevada State Democratic Party Chair William McCurdy joins a growing chorus of caucus skeptics, which now includes former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.
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MVP Pitcher Madison Bumgarner Has A Secret Life — As A Champion Cattle-Roper
The left-handed pitching ace has been entering — and sometimes winning — rodeo events under the alias "Mason Saunders."
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At 25 Years, Understanding The Longevity Of Craigslist
While other sites keep updating, Craigslist just looks old. "It's like a shark that's never had to evolve," says Jessa Lingel, who's written about the history of Craigslist.
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Some Oregonians Want To Leave And Take Part Of The State To Idaho With Them
Some residents are so frustrated with Democratic politics they are trying to change the map, so that most of Oregon and a chunk of Northern California would break off and join Idaho, a red state.
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Secretive Church Sect At The Center Of South Korea's Coronavirus Outbreak
With 833 cases, the country now says it is on "red alert" and is taking measures to contain the disease.
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Julian Assange Extradition Hearing Begins In London
The U.S. government wants the WikiLeaks co-founder to face 18 charges related to illegally obtaining and disclosing classified data. Assange's lawyers argue that the case is politically motivated.
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'Supreme Inequality' Argues That America's Top Court Has Become Right-Wing
In a new book, lawyer/journalist Adam Cohen makes the case that the Supreme Court has been "a right-wing court for 50 years," siding with corporations and the wealthy — and against the poor.
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Coronavirus Has 'Pandemic Potential' But Isn't There Yet, WHO Says
"Does this virus have pandemic potential?" Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Monday. "Absolutely, it has. Are we there yet? From our assessment, not yet."
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WATCH: Thousands Expected To Attend Kobe Bryant Memorial In Los Angeles Today
Some 20,000 people got tickets to say farewell to NBA great Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. People without tickets were being urged to watch at home.
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Latin America's Militaries Emerge As Power Brokers, Riot Police And Border Forces
El Salvador's troops deployed in congress. Bolivia's army advised the president to step down. Brazil's leader surrounds himself with top brass. The armed forces have made a comeback across the region.
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Harvey Weinstein Found Guilty Of Rape, But Acquitted Of Most Sexual Assault Charges
Jurors in Manhattan spared the 67-year-old former producer the harshest penalty he might have faced but convicted him on some counts. He faces the possibility of years in prison.
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Katherine Johnson, NASA Mathematician And An Inspiration For 'Hidden Figures,' Dies
Johnson was one of NASA's human "computers" and wrote trajectory equations for missions in the space agency's early days. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2015.
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