Tools
Change country:
npr.org
npr.org
In Coney Island, The Wonder Wheel Spins Again
After a year of being shut down due to the pandemic, Coney Island's amusement parks have reopened — at a third of their normal capacity. But business owners are glad to see the parks come alive again.
1 h
npr.org
U.K. Military Gun Salutes Honor Prince Philip A Day After His Death
The United Kingdom morns the loss of Prince Philip, who died Friday at the age of 99. Gun salutes were conducted at noon throughout the capitals of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.
3 h
npr.org
Colorado Assault-Style Weapons Ban Doesn't Look Likely
Weeks after the mass shooting in Boulder, Colo., the push for a statewide ban on assault-style weapons is losing steam, even among prominent Democrats who say it is the wrong strategy.
4 h
npr.org
50 Years Later, The Legacy Of U.S.-China 'Pingpong Diplomacy' Faces Challenges
With the balance of power in the Pacific shifting and U.S.-China relations at their worst in decades, analysts say the legacy of warming relations through pingpong diplomacy faces stark challenges.
5 h
npr.org
Biden Wants New Ban On Assault-Style Weapons. What Lessons Were Learned From The '90s?
Advocates face steep odds getting a new ban through Congress. If they can succeed, they hope to avoid a repeat of past mistakes that left the original law open to loopholes.
8 h
npr.org
Opinion: Remembering The Late Comedy Writer Anne Beatts
NPR's Scott Simon remembers comedy writer Anne Beatts, who died this week at the age of 74. She worked in male-dominated writer's rooms at Saturday Night Live and National Lampoon Magazine.
8 h
npr.org
Heinz Promises To Catch Up To Americans' Demand Amid Ketchup Packet Shortage
The pandemic is causing another new, yet uniquely American, shortage — ketchup. Heinz says it has to up its production by 25% to meet the demand for the popular condiment.
8 h
npr.org
Who Are The Oath Keepers? Militia Group, Founder Scrutinized In Capitol Riot Probe
Stewart Rhodes founded the militia in 2009. Now it's one of the largest extremist anti-government groups in the country, and a focus of the investigation into the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.
9 h
npr.org
Recent Attacks On The Capitol Have Reignited Debate Over Security And Fencing
Lawmakers worked in their districts over the last two weeks but the Capitol was marred by another deadly attack on April 2, reigniting the debate over security and the need for fencing on the campus.
9 h
npr.org
Newly Discovered Dinosaur Was Top Carnivorous Predator In Argentina
The dinosaur named Llukalkan aliocranianus was a predator with a menacing appearance and the ability to strike fear in its prey. Paleontologists said it roamed the Earth nearly 80 million years ago.
npr.org
Supreme Court Rules For Worshippers And Against California COVID Restrictions
The court's unsigned order came on a 5-to-4 vote, preventing the state from enforcing a rule that limits at-home gatherings to no more than three households.
npr.org
After Data Breach Exposes 530 Million, Facebook Says It Will Not Notify Users
Facebook said that "malicious actors" scraped the data through a vulnerability that it fixed in 2019. But the publicly available data still leaves millions of users vulnerable, security experts say.
npr.org
Coronavirus Vaccine FAQs: What's Up With Side Effects? Should You Still Double Mask?
So, you've successfully scored a vaccine — or at least an appointment. Congrats! That's amazing news, seriously! Now what about those side effects? And do you have to keep up that double masking?
npr.org
Why There Will Be Fewer Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccines Next Week
A dip of 86% in doses to be distributed to states follows a surge that occurred after one of J&J's third party manufacturers was finally able to release a stockpile.
npr.org
House Ethics Committee Investigating Florida GOP Rep. Matt Gaetz
The investigation follows a series of allegations against the Florida congressman, including illegal drug use and sexual misconduct.
npr.org
Can Vaccines Stop Variants? Here's What We Know So Far
One of the hottest areas of research right now: Studies to determine how well current vaccines work against emerging coronavirus "variants of concern."
npr.org
Expect More Tropical Storms, NOAA Warns
NOAA is updating its definition of what a "normal" Atlantic hurricane season looks like, based on the last 30 years. The average number of hurricanes in the new normal has risen from 6 to 7.
1 d
npr.org
Help Was On The Way For Shuttered Venues. Then The Website Crashed.
The Small Business Administration launched an application portal for its $16 billion relief program for shuttered venues yesterday, but technical problems prompted deactivation for repair.
1 d
npr.org
Kentucky Law Limits Use Of No-Knock Warrants, A Year After Breonna Taylor's Killing
Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear signed the partial ban on no-knock warrants at a ceremony on Friday as members of Taylor's family looked on.
1 d
npr.org
No Longer '20 Feet From Stardom': Singer Merry Clayton Steps Out Of The Background
Clayton sang backup with Ray Charles, Joe Cocker, Carole King and many others. Now she has a new album — where she's front and center — called Beautiful Scars. Originally broadcast in 2013.
1 d
npr.org
Filmmaker Finds An Unlikely Underwater Friend In 'My Octopus Teacher'
Craig Foster spent a year diving — without oxygen or a wetsuit — into the frigid sea near Cape Town, South Africa. His documentary is now nominated for an Oscar. Originally broadcast Oct. 20, 2020.
1 d
npr.org
North Korea's Kim Alludes To 1990s Famine, Warns Of 'Difficulties Ahead Of Us'
Kim Jong Un calls for the country to prepare for another "arduous march" — using a phrase that has come to describe the disastrous and prolonged food shortages of the '90s.
1 d
npr.org
Rapper and Actor DMX Dead at 50
The rapper died today at White Plains Hospital, after being on life support.
1 d
npr.org
It's A No: Amazon Warehouse Workers Vote Against Unionizing In Historic Election
Amazon avoided the prospect of a first unionized warehouse in America, where it's now the second-largest private employer. The vote in Alabama had prompted new interest in unions across the country.
1 d
npr.org
Georgia Secretary Of State Says New Voting Law 'Restores Confidence'
Brad Raffensperger defended the security of his state's election against former President Donald Trump's claims of fraud. Now the official backs a new law promising election integrity.
1 d
npr.org
Why So Many Asian Americans Are Learning Remotely
Multigenerational households and anti-Asian bullying may play a role.
1 d
npr.org
Conspiracy Charges Bring Proud Boys' History Of Violence Into Spotlight
Leading members of the far-right gang known as the Proud Boys are facing federal conspiracy charges in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Ahead of the riot, members of the group called for "war."
1 d
npr.org
Is India Running Out of Vaccine Doses?
India is the world's largest vaccine producer. But hundreds of its clinics have closed after running out of coronavirus vaccines — just as the country sees a new spike in infections.
1 d
npr.org
Great Britain's Prince Philip Dies At Age 99
Prince Philip of the U.K., husband to Queen Elizabeth II, who died Friday at Windsor Castle, was the longest-serving consort in British history.
1 d
npr.org
Hunger Remains Issue For Many Texans, 1 Year After Pandemic Began
Friday marks 1 year since an iconic photograph was captured: 10,000 cars waiting hours to receive food boxes in Texas. The state still distributes twice as much food as before the pandemic.
1 d
npr.org