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US news | The Guardian
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US news | The Guardian
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Lee Radziwill: a life in pictures
Radziwill, the younger sister of Jackie Kennedy, has died at the age of 85. Married three times, she was a well-known socialite and a successful interior designer Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
How Swansea City went from model club to desperate cautionary tale | Stuart James
Chaotic transfer dealings and incompetence at the top have put the club into a nosedive with no obvious source of salvationAs the clock ticked down on transfer deadline day last month, and chaos reigned behind the scenes at Swansea City, Connor Roberts tweeted a gif showing Milhouse, a character from The Simpsons, throwing a frisbee to himself in the park. The Wales international removed the post not long afterwards but the inference was clear: Swansea’s players were feeling every bit as disillusioned as the supporters.Swansea were doing what Swansea now have a reputation for doing on deadline day – shifting everything they possibly can. The same happened last August, when four players departed in the final 24 hours of business. On that occasion it was the turn of the top scorer, Oli McBurnie, to post a soon-to-be-deleted message on Twitter expressing his bemusement. Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
Five Sundays to Brexit – cartoon
A few short steps from Jacob Rees-Mogg to no deal Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
Nico Walker: ‘I needed to show how bad Iraq was’
Currently in jail for bank robbery, the former army medic reflects on writing his book, serving in Iraq and finding solace in Albert CamusNico Walker was born in 1985 and grew up in Cleveland, Ohio. Aged 19, he joined the US army as a medic and served 11 months in Iraq, returning with what a forensic psychiatrist later described as one of the worst cases of PTSD he’d ever seen. Walker developed a heroin addiction and in 2011 began robbing banks, carrying out 10 heists in four months before he was arrested and sentenced to 11 years in prison. Now, with less than two years left on his sentence, he has published Cherry, a novel partly based on his experiences, which the Washington Post called “a miracle of literary serendipity, a triumph… his prose echoes Ernest Hemingway’s cadences to powerful effect”.What prompted you to start writing?Matthew Johnson, who runs Tyrant Books, read a [2013] BuzzFeed article about me. We started talking and he told me I should write a book about my experiences. I wasn’t so eager to do it, because a lot of the stuff touched raw nerves. But he convinced me, so I went at it one step at a time. I definitely didn’t want to write a non-fiction memoir. Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
Book clinic: what books will boost my 10-year-old son’s self-confidence?
The Bookseller’s children’s editor suggests titles that will stand younger readers in good stead when times are toughQ: What books would help instil confidence in a preteen boy?Stay-at-home mother, 33, trying to help her 10-year-old son to become calmer and more confident A: Fiona Noble, children’s books editor at the Bookseller, writes:The act of reading can itself create an oasis of calm in a busy world, and I believe children’s fiction can play a powerful role in building confidence and resilience. Look for stories showing characters facing and overcoming fears and persevering in tough times. SF Said’s modern classic Varjak Paw, with wonderfully menacing artwork from Dave McKean, is about a young cat on a voyage of discovery and self-acceptance in the big city, replete with martial arts and terrifying villains. Another thrilling tale of bravery is Katherine Rundell’s epic adventure The Explorer, last year’s Costa children’s book of the year. Four children lost in the Amazon jungle face a compelling physical struggle to survive while each facing their own, more personal battles. Continue reading...
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Historians fight back as TV raids their research treasures for its shows
Academics demand that producers ensure that dramas and documentaries credit their workThe ever-expanding number of history programmes on television ought to mean boom time for historians. Yet a growing number of authors and academics believe they are being unfairly cut out of the process.The Society of Authors says it has seen a rise in complaints from members about their work being used in TV shows without credit or payment. Continue reading...
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‘We have to try’: the migrants who brave frostbite in a desperate trek over the Alps
As Italy’s laws tighten, more and more arrivals are trying to find a way into France - even via an alpine pass in winterOn Friday morning, as skiers glided under a flawless blue sky down the resplendent slopes of Claviere, a tiny Italian ski resort on the French border, four migrants were contemplating their next move.They had been brought back to the town in the early hours after being intercepted by police while trying to walk into France, knee-deep in snow along a mountain track. Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
The Observer view on Gavin Williamson’s Pacific blunder | Observer editorial
Talking tough to China is typical of Mrs May’s gaffe-prone defence secretaryGavin Williamson is a loose cannon. That would not matter so much if, as was the case until a couple of years ago, he was a government whip whose views were of little account. But Theresa May’s surprise decision to make Williamson defence secretary has given him an international platform, and a degree of responsibility, to which he appears ill-suited.Until now, his most publicised blunder concerned his schoolboy remarks following last year’s chemical weapons attack in Salisbury. Asked how he thought Vladimir Putin might respond to British sanctions, he replied: “Frankly, Russia should go away and it should shut up.” He was widely mocked. Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
Let Shamima Begum return to UK or risk more terror recruits, says expert
Counter-radicalisation expert criticises Sajid Javid’s reaction, saying it feeds Isis narrativeThe home secretary’s response to teenage Islamic State bride Shamima Begum will guarantee new recruits to the ideology that underpins the terror group, a former senior counter-radicalisation expert for the government has warned.As the debate over whether to allow Begum, who left the UK to join Islamic State as a 15-year-old, to return home continued yesterday, Hanif Qadir said Sajid Javid’s reaction to the teenager’s predicament fed the narrative of Isis. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Blunt Rangers lose ground on Celtic after Saints stalemate
Rangers risk losing further ground in the title race after being frustrated at home by St Johnstone. The 0-0 draw with Tommy Wright’s men may mean Rangers have trimmed Celtic’s lead at the top back to five points for 24 hours.But Brendan Rodgers’ reigning champions will look to punish a wasteful display from the Light Blues when they travel to Kilmarnock by stretching their advantage to eight. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Buhari and opposition leader blame each other for Nigerian election delay
The vote was rescheduled just five hours before polls were to openNigeria’s president and his main challenger have blamed each other for the last-minute postponement of the country’s election, delayed just five hours before polls were due to open.Millions of Nigerians who had planned to vote woke up to the news on Saturday that the independent electoral commission (INEC) had deemed holding the poll “no longer feasible”. It will now be held on 23 February, INEC said. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
David Strettle try helps Saracens to the top of Premiership
• Saracens 33-10 Leicester• Tigers overwhelmed in second halfSaracens needed a bonus-point win to retake their position at the top of the table, so that was what they took. For the majority of the match a bonus point, at least of the attacking variety, was the farthest notion from any of the minds here assembled in Barnet. Indeed, with an hour gone, Saracens were trailing, as they had for the entirety of the third quarter. The stuff of champions it was not.This was one of those domestic matches in the shadow of the Six Nations that tend not to linger in the memory. Saracens took their first try early, but thereafter neither side could make anything stick. And, with a try all of a sudden on the stroke of half-time, it was Leicester who took unlikely lead into the break. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Teemu Pukki scores twice for rampant Norwich in thrashing of Bolton
As ways of responding to a setback go, this ranked pretty highly. Norwich delivered the kind of performance that doubles up as a statement, scored thrice inside 34 minutes, recorded their joint biggest win of the season and reclaimed the lead of the division less than 72 hours after losing it. They leapfrogged Leeds and now have a higher points total than they mustered in the whole of last season.Wednesday’s loss to Preston looked an anomaly after an expert dissection of Bolton. There was a gulf in class between clubs who may well be separated by two divisions come August. Norwich found and exploited space at will, orchestrated by their odd couple in attack, a free transfer and a No 10 who spent some of last year operating as a left-back. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Murray Wallace and Millwall put an end to AFC Wimbledon’s FA Cup fairytale
Millwall reached their third FA Cup quarter-final in seven years thanks to a resilient victory over AFC Wimbledon.Neil Harris’s side produced a solid performance to survive a physical test against the bottom team in League One, who lacked the wit to surprise their Championship opponents. Millwall controlled a tight south London derby and made it difficult for Wimbledon to replicate the heroics that caught our West Ham in the previous round. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Britain is discovering the difficult truth about trade deals | Phillip Inman
Wanting to forge new trading relationships after Brexit and securing them are two very different thingsA trade deal, any trade deal: that is all Liam Fox wants from his civil servants. It is not much for an international trade secretary to ask. Especially when the prospect of all-encompassing agreements on imports and exports was held up in the referendum and its aftermath as one of the chief benefits of quitting the European Union. Not least by Fox himself.Wanting a trade deal and securing one are not the same thing, as Fox has found out in the last two years of chasing down the 69 nations that have deals with the EU which the UK needs to replicate. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Stained-glass three-wheelers – in pictures
Reliant Robins, the celebrated three-wheeled British cars, have been given a makeover in Stuart Langley’s Stained Glass Cars. Inspired by the windows in Durham Cathedral, the project began in 2013 for Artichoke’s Lumiere festival. The Hartlepool-based artist fitted out three cars with British iconography, with a focus on north-east England: the Angel of the North appears on one; another depicts the Lindisfarne gospels. “The third car is a celebratory mashup of rock and royalty,” says Langley, “from Amy Winehouse to Prince Philip. He’s in the driving seat, but might be better as a passenger, given recent events.” The project will be showcased at Scarborough’s arts festival Coastival (22-24 February) and Lumiere Durham 2019. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Unions condemn Grayling's 'disastrous' part-privatisation of probation service
Private provider Working Links has gone into administration, before failings were revealed in a new reportUnion bosses have condemned former justice secretary Chris Grayling’s “disastrous privatisation programme” after a probation services provider went into administration.It was announced on Friday that Working Links, owned by the German-based asset management group, Aurelius, had collapsed. The same day, HM inspectorate of probation published a report saying that Working Links staff wrongly classified offenders as low-risk in order to meet government targets. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Newport County v Manchester City: FA Cup fifth round – live!
FA Cup fifth-round updates from the tie at Rodney ParadeNewport County: inside story of a club that rose from the deadAnd feel free to email Gregg or tweet @GreggBakowski 4.40pm GMT Here’s what the Newport manager, Michael Flynn, has to say having just seen that City lineup: “That just goes to show how much respect Pep Guardiola has not just for us but for City fans too. We want to put on a show and stop them. I think it would be [the biggest Cup upset ever] because of the finances in the game and the level they are playing at.”On the pitch, which looks pretty good to me from the few shots I have seen: “ I want football to be played the right way. The people of Newport deserve to see how good these players can be. Not just City players but our lot too. This day is for our fans too. It’s a one-off but who knows?” 4.38pm GMT Newport County: Day, Butler, Demetrio, O’Brien, Bennett, Poole, Bakinson, Labadie, Willmott, Matt, Amond: Subs: Townsend, Pipe, Franks, Dolan, Marsh-Brown, Sheehan, McKirdy.Manchester City: Ederson, Zinchenko, Stones, Otamendi, Danilo, Fernandinho, Sane, Silva (C), Foden, Mahrez, Gabriel Jesus. Subs: Muric, Laporte, Walker, Gundogan, De Bruyne, Sterling, Bernardo Silva. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Florists: Fresh blooms could become preserve of the rich in no-deal Brexit
Independent florists in Cambridge tell how high-cost imports and long border delays would hit their tradeIt is Valentine’s Day in Cambridge and, at a market stall near King’s College, Nicki Lark is cheerfully selling bouquets of roses, daffodils and tulips to young lovers in the sunshine. But, behind her smiles, she is worried.She fears that, like many other UK businesses that rely heavily on imports from Europe, this family-run florist, which has operated in the city’s market square for the past 60 years, will have to increase its prices in the event of a no-deal Brexit – and might struggle to survive. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
The nine best Oscars ceremony outfits
From Elizabeth Taylor in Dior to Lupita Nyong’o’s Prada, here are some of those who have lit up the night over nine decades Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Green house: inside a plant-filled London home
A forest of house plants plus rooflights and glass sliding doors cleverly merge the outside with the inside in this Georgian townhouseThe greening of Julia Thompson’s townhouse began long before the current trend for houseplants in all their frondy, glossy, Instagrammed glory. “Plants bring a house to life, so I’ve always been slightly obsessed with them,” she says.As any seasoned interiors stylist or photographer will tell you, plants are a go-to way to add colour and texture to a space, handily filling an empty corner or a gap on a shelf. But, for Thompson, plants are just one of a range of elements that make up her personal style, which mixes contemporary art and surfaces with pieces from the 1970s and beyond. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
The Direct approach: why ailing UK retailers are turning to Mike Ashley
The clothing tycoon is one of the few players still willing to invest in the high street as Britain’s shoppers desert itMike Ashley, the high street’s most voracious corporate shopper, underlined his power over British retail last week when he was allowed to peruse the books of a long-coveted target: Debenhams.As the 54-year-old entrepreneur scrutinised the struggling chain’s finances, he also managed a tilt at two failed retailers over the past fortnight. HMV was ultimately sold to a Canadian entrepreneur and Patisserie Valerie went to a management buyout, despite a blink-and-you’ll-miss-it proposal from Ashley. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Nadine Labaki: ‘I really believe cinema can effect social change’
The Oscar nominee talks about being a female director in Lebanon, the child poverty that inspired her latest film and the Syrian refugee crisisNadine Labaki is a Lebanese actor and director whose latest film, Capernaum (meaning confusion or chaos in Arabic), won the jury prize at the 2018 Cannes film festival and has since been nominated for a Bafta (beaten by Roma) and an Academy Award. The film tells the story of a 12-year-old boy, Zain, who lives in a Beirut slum and whose parents are incapable of taking care of him. Having run away from home, he lives for a while with an illegal immigrant from Ethiopia, Rahil. None of those who appear in the film is a professional actor.How did you come to start thinking about Capernaum? In Lebanon, we are exposed to the sight of children suffering on a daily basis. They are there on the streets, selling gum or flowers or carrying heavy loads, such as gas tanks. Sometimes, they’re just lying there. I once saw this kid on a cement block in the middle of the road at one o’clock in the morning. He wanted to sleep, but he couldn’t. It began with feeling responsible, with wanting to become the voice of these kids. I thought: if I stay silent, I’m complicit in this crime – and it is a crime that we allow this to happen. I don’t know how we live with ourselves. These children are in perpetual danger. So I started going out with my co-writers to the most difficult neighbourhoods – to the slums, to the detention centres, to the courts – just watching. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
UK fracking industry pushes for review of earthquake limits
Firms say regulations forcing operations to stop if they trigger tremors greater than 0.5 magnitude threaten viabilityThe UK’s nascent fracking firms are headed for a crunch moment that will determine whether the industry has a future, according to observers and insiders.The past fortnight has seen a concerted lobbying drive by two of the leading shale companies calling for the government to review rules on earthquakes caused by their operations. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
From Soho to Paris, how migrant music brought two capitals to life
From the 1960s to the 1980s, music from afar united Paris and London in a vibrant cultural age. A new exhibition celebrates the eraLondon, 1962: the Rolling Stones make their debut at the Marquee Club and the Beatles arrive from Liverpool to record their first single, Love Me Do. Across the Channel, the “French Elvis” Johnny Hallyday, Françoise Hardy, Georges Brassens and Brigitte Bardot are topping the music charts.So far, so European, but the music scene in both capitals would soon undergo a profound transformation. Waves of migrants shipped to London from newly independent British West Indian colonies – the Windrush generation – and to Paris from former French colonies in north and sub-Saharan Africa, were trying to adapt to new lives and make themselves heard. Many did so through music. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Karl Marx's London memorial vandalised for second time
The words ‘doctrine of hate’ and ‘architect of genocide’ were painted on Highgate cemetery memorialThe tomb of Karl Marx in London’s Highgate cemetery has been vandalised for the second time in the space of a month.The words “doctrine of hate” and “architect of genocide” were found daubed in red paint across the Grade I-listed monument in the north London graveyard on Saturday. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Iran rejects as 'laughable' Mike Pence's accusation of antisemitism
US vice-president stands by comments and claims ‘the Iranian regime openly advocates another Holocaust’Iran on Saturday rejected accusations of antisemitism by US vice-president Mike Pence, who, after visiting the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland, accused Iran of Nazi-like ambitions. Related: Pence hails 'remarkable, extraordinary' Trump tenure in attack on US allies Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Clan Des Obeaux underlines Gold Cup hopes with imperious Ascot win
• Odds-on favourite powers clear to win Denman Chase• Coneygree retired by connections after pulling up in raceClan Des Obeaux cemented his Cheltenham Gold Cup claims with a facile success in the Betfair Denman Chase at Ascot.This recognised trial for the blue riband at Prestbury Park next month was swiftly re-scheduled following the abandonment of racing at Newbury last Saturday because of the outbreak of equine influenza. With connections of last season’s Gold Cup hero Native River deciding against running at Ascot, Clan Des Obeaux’s task appeared significantly more straightforward than it would have been at Newbury a week ago – and he was priced up accordingly as the 2-5 favourite for Paul Nicholls. Continue reading...
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Mektoub, My Love: Canto Uno review – leery summer romance
Abdellatif Kechiche’s laidback follow-up to Blue Is the Warmest Colour again focuses on young female sexualityAbdellatif Kechiche is a maximalist: following his Palme d’Or-winning epic melodrama Blue Is the Warmest Colour (2013) comes another three-hour love story infatuated with its central women. And this is only Canto Uno; adapted from François Bégaudeau’s 2011 novel La blessure, la vraie, a Part Two is set to follow.Set during the summer of 1994 in the coastal town of Sète, southern France, it follows a group of absurdly attractive local youngsters during their summer holidays. There is Amin (Shaïn Boumédine), a shy, sexually ambiguous French-Tunisian medical student, his lothario cousin Tony (Salim Kechiouche), sensual farmhand Ophélie (Ophélie Bau, the film’s most arresting presence) and vacationing tourists Charlotte (Alexia Chardard) and Céline (Lou Luttiau). Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Sam Harris, the new atheist with a spiritual side
The neuroscientist, controversial podcaster – and longtime exponent of meditation – talks about his new app and why he is definitely not an IslamophobeBack in the middle of the first decade of this century, a new movement was heralded by the publication of several books on the same subject. The main four authors were Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens, Daniel Dennett and Sam Harris. And the movement was called the New Atheism.At the time, Harris, who was actually the first to publish, with his book The End of Faith, was unquestionably the junior partner. The others had global reputations in their fields – Dawkins in evolutionary biology, Hitchens in journalism and public speaking, and Dennett in philosophy and cognitive science. All Harris had was his book and a BA in philosophy. The four, who would become known as the Four Horsemen, got together in 2007 at Hitchens’s apartment in Washington to discuss arguments for atheism or, more accurately, against faith. The event was recorded and is available to watch on Youtube. Continue reading...
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