Business
117
Sports
171
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
unread news (Demo user)
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
unread news (Demo user)
Apple Hires Ex-Microsoft Exec to Revamp Smart Home Business
CNBC reports that Apple has hired ex-Microsoft exec and former CEO of a smart lock company to revamp Apple's home initiatives. Hiring Jadallah is the latest signal that Apple plans to get serious about its own efforts in the home. Recently, the company acquired a start-up called Pullstring, a start-up that specializes in voice-enabled toys. That purchase could help the smartphone maker become the center of a connected living room.Apple has been making movement into the home space for years, with the introduction of HomeKit as well as the HomePod which is powered by Siri. HomePod, however, has lagged behind its competitors despite making steady improvements. Apple's latest hire as well as recent acquisition of a voice technology company seems to indicate that they are refocusing their efforts. Sam Jadallah's Linkedin page Jadallah was most recently CEO of failed smart lock company Otto. Otto was described as a "luxury smart lock":With Bluetooth and Wi-Fi radios packed inside the surprisingly compact design, Otto promises to let you or anyone you choose inside with just a touch whenever it senses an authorized phone within range.That company ultimately failed, but it appears that Jadallah will be applying that knowledge forward at Apple. Related Roundup: HomePodBuyer's Guide: HomePod (Neutral)This article, "Apple Hires Ex-Microsoft Exec to Revamp Smart Home Business" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Apple Music Users Able to Gift a Month Subscription to a Friend
Apple is today sending out notifications to Apple Music subscribers that, when tapped, allows them to send a referral to friend to sign up for a free one-month subscription to Apple Music. According to Apple, the referrals for a free month of service can only be sent to people who do not already subscribe to Apple Music. The person who signs up for the free trial will see their subscription renew after a month, or one month after the standard free trial. That means people who have not used Apple Music before can get a total of four months of service for free, because Apple already offers a three month free trial for everyone. Those who have already used a three month trial and then canceled may be able to get an additional month through this referral link. Not all Apple Music users appear to be getting these notifications at this time, but we've seen multiple reports both from MacRumors readers and on Twitter. Apple has promoted Apple Music in similar ways in the past, offering free trial extensions to those who previously signed up for Apple Music.This article, "Apple Music Users Able to Gift a Month Subscription to a Friend" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
2 d
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Apple Acquires Voice App Startup PullString
Apple recently purchased PullString, a San Francisco startup that enables the design and publishing of voice apps through its PullString Converse platform, reports Axios. PullString could be used to improve the voice capabilities of Siri, Apple's personal voice assistant. On its website, PullString says that it can be used to "collaboratively design, prototype and publish voice applications for Amazon Alexa."At PullString, we strive to help people talk effortlessly with voice technology that surrounds us. Working at the intersection of creative expression and artificial intelligence, we provide agencies and enterprises with the leading solution to collaboratively design, prototype, and publish highly engaging voice applications for Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, and IoT devices.According to Axios, PullString was founded in 2011 by former Pixar executives and when it was first started, was used to create interactive voice apps for toys. The company broadened its horizons over the years, though, following the introduction of products like Amazon Echo and Google Assistant. Apple has not officially confirmed the acquisition and details about the purchase price are not available.Tag: Apple acquisitionThis article, "Apple Acquires Voice App Startup PullString" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
2 d
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Apple to Release AirPods With New Coating and Black Color in the Spring
Apple is planning to release AirPods that feature a new surface coating, wireless charging, and a black color option, according to a report from Taiwanese Economic Daily News. Apple supplier Inventec has been manufacturing the new AirPods and is ready to ship them in the spring, perhaps alongside the AirPower, which is now in mass production. Black AirPods from Colorware Economic Daily Times says that the AirPods will be priced the same as the previous version, which was $159 in the United States, though curiously the site suggests the prior pricing was $199. The information shared by the Taiwanese publication matches up with rumors that we heard earlier this week from MySmartPrice. That rumor suggested both the AirPods and the Charging Case will be available in black and white, with the updated accessory to get a special matte coating that will "enhance grip." We still don't know exactly when the AirPods are going to be released. Apple is holding an event on March 25, but it will focus on services and not hardware. Apple could choose to release updated AirPods and perhaps the AirPower right around that time via press release rather than through a dedicated event.Related Roundup: AirPods 2Buyer's Guide: AirPods (Caution)This article, "Apple to Release AirPods With New Coating and Black Color in the Spring" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
2 d
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Apple Shares Humorous 'Bokeh'd' Ad Highlighting iPhone Depth Control Feature
Apple today shared a new "Bokeh'd" video on its YouTube channel, which highlights the Depth Control feature on the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR. In the spot, a group of mothers are looking at photos, when one notices that her son has been blurred out in the background of an image. "Did you bokeh my child?" she asks, while the other mother attempts to explain that it was accidental. The mother who took the photograph uses Depth Control to show that she can remove the bokeh effect so that the blurred child is back in focus. From the video description:Depth Control on iPhone XS and iPhone XR lets you adjust the bokeh effect on backgrounds before or after you shoot. So you can turn a cute portrait of two kids into a stunning portrait of one kid.Introduced in the new 2018 iPhone lineup, Depth Control is designed to allow you to control the amount of blur in the background of your images. When taking a Portrait Mode image, you can adjust it before or after capturing it to change how much background blur is used. This feature is limited to the 2018 iPhone lineup and isn't available on older iPhones.Tag: Apple adsThis article, "Apple Shares Humorous 'Bokeh'd' Ad Highlighting iPhone Depth Control Feature" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
2 d
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Twitter Has Been Keeping Deleted DMs for Years
If you've deleted your DMs, they may be unavailable on your phone and on the web, but Twitter is still saving them, according to data from security researcher Karan Saini that was shared today by TechCrunch. Twitter also keeps direct messages and data sent to and from accounts that have either been deactivated or suspended, according to Saini, who discovered years-old messages in a file from an archive of data from an account that was no longer active. A bug in a now-deprecated API used to allow him to get direct messages even after a message was deleted by both sender and recipient. Twitter says that accounts that are deactivated and deleted are removed along with all of their data after 30 days, but TechCrunch found that's not the case.But, in our tests, we could recover direct messages from years ago -- including old messages that had since been lost to suspended or deleted accounts.Twitter lets you download all of the data associated with your account, even a suspended or deactivated account, which lets you see everything that the company is storing. Saini told TechCrunch this is a "functional bug" that lets people bypass Twitter mechanisms to prevent access to these kind of accounts, but as TechCrunch points out, it's also a reminder that delete doesn't mean delete when it comes to direct messages. Twitter told TechCrunch that it is "looking into this further to ensure we have considered the entire scope of the issue."Tag: TwitterThis article, "Twitter Has Been Keeping Deleted DMs for Years" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
2 d
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Study Finds iPhone XS Max Users Experience More Than Twice as Fast LTE Speeds as iPhone 5s Users on Average
iPhone XS Max users experience more than two times faster real-world LTE data speeds as iPhone 5s users on average in the United States, according to OpenSignal, although there are caveats to consider. OpenSignal says it measured speeds on hundreds of thousands of iPhones across the United States from October 26, 2018 to January 24, 2019 and found that iPhone XS Max users experienced an average LTE download speed of 21.7 Mbps compared to just 10.2 Mbps for iPhone 5s users. iPhone XS users saw an average LTE download speed of 17.6 Mbps, while iPhone 6 through iPhone 8 Plus users posted average LTE download speeds of between 15.6 Mbps and 17.1 Mbps, as measured by OpenSignal. OpenSignal attributes the faster data speeds on newer iPhones to improved modems and antenna designs in those devices, such as 4x4 MIMO support in the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max compared to 2x2 MIMO on older iPhones, but the results are also likely influenced by socioeconomic factors. Someone who is still using an iPhone 5s in 2019 could be a price-conscious consumer who is unable to justify the cost of upgrading to a newer iPhone, for example, while relying on a discount carrier with inferior wireless coverage or capped data speeds compared to major carriers such as Verizon and AT&T. That said, while the results may be somewhat skewed, a newer iPhone should be able to achieve faster data speeds than an older iPhone, assuming it's connected to a cellular tower with the latest LTE equipment.Related Roundup: iPhone XSTags: LTE, OpenSignalBuyer's Guide: iPhone XS (Neutral)This article, "Study Finds iPhone XS Max Users Experience More Than Twice as Fast LTE Speeds as iPhone 5s Users on Average" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
2 d
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
MacRumors Giveaway: Win a Luna Display Adapter for Turning Your iPad Into a Second Screen
For this week's giveaway, we've teamed up with Astropad to offer MacRumors readers a chance to win a Luna Display adapter. The Luna Display is a handy little dongle that's designed to turn your iPad into a second screen for your Mac. You may be familiar with the Astropad software, which mirrors the Mac's display to an iPad, but the Luna Display extends the Mac's display to the iPad instead of mirroring it for full second screen functionality. Using Mini DisplayPort or USB-C, the Luna Display plugs right into your Mac and then works with the iPad using the Luna Display software for Mac and iPad. Setup takes just a few seconds and the device works over a Wi-Fi connection. At $80, the Luna Display is an affordable option for those who want a second portable display for the Mac that's perfect for use both at home and when on the go. The connection between the two devices is seamless with little to no lag depending on your connection. Luna Display works with any modern iPad, dating back to the iPad 2, along with the iPad mini and the iPad Pro. Newer iPads will perform better, of course, due to the faster hardware. You can also use the Luna Display with any 2012 or later Mac. We've even set up an iPad Pro as a display for a Mac mini using the Luna Display, as seen in our video below, and it worked well. You can buy the Luna Display from the Luna Display website, and we also have five of them to give away to MacRumors readers. To enter to win our giveaway, use the Rafflecopter widget below and enter an email address. Email addresses will be used solely for contact purposes to reach the winners and send the prizes. You can earn additional entries by subscribing to our weekly newsletter, subscribing to our YouTube channel, following us on Twitter, following us on Instagram, or visiting the MacRumors Facebook page. Due to the complexities of international laws regarding giveaways, only U.S. residents who are 18 years or older and Canadian residents (excluding Quebec) who have reached the age of majority in their province or territory are eligible to enter. To offer feedback or get more information on the giveaway restrictions, please refer to our Site Feedback section, as that is where discussion of the rules will be redirected. a Rafflecopter giveawayThe contest will run from today (February 15) at 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time through 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time on February 22. The winners will be chosen randomly on February 22 and will be contacted by email. The winners will have 48 hours to respond and provide a shipping address before new winners are chosen.Tag: giveawayThis article, "MacRumors Giveaway: Win a Luna Display Adapter for Turning Your iPad Into a Second Screen" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
2 d
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Classical Music on Apple Music: What's Wrong and How Apple Can Fix It
Last August, Apple Music was updated with a new section in Browse curated by Deutsche Grammophon, one of the biggest classical music labels in the world. While classical music fans welcomed the specific focus of the area, many of our readers quickly pointed out the numerous issues that remain for classical listeners on a daily basis within Apple Music, and the fact that they've been there since the launch of the service with seemingly no correction in sight. To help break down and highlight these problems, we reached out to a few experts in the classical music field, including professor Benjamin Charles, who wrote a blog post about his frustrations with streaming music services last October. We also spoke with Franz Rumiz, a classical music fan whose article "Why Apple Music fails with classical music" struck a chord with the community in early 2017. Frustrations with classical music streaming are nothing new, but as Charles tells us, this is a problem that affects nearly every streaming music service, including Apple Music rival Spotify. In an effort to find out exactly what's wrong with classical music on Apple Music -- and what steps could be taken to address these problems -- we asked Charles and Rumiz to detail the biggest issues with classical music on Apple Music. The Problems Classical music is treated as a single genre When you tap on "Genres" in Apple Music's Browse tab, you're treated with a list of over 30 styles of music, from Alternative and African Music to Christian, Electronic, K-Pop, and Metal. This is where classical music fans have to visit to find their favorite music, within the singular "Classical" genre section. For Charles, this is the first in a long line of problems. The section spans centuries, including all of the notable composers like Mozart (born 1756, died 1791), Maurice Ravel (b. 1875, d. 1937), and John Cage (b. 1912, d. 1992), but this grouping is frustrating for classical music aficionados, given how little these musicians have in common among one another.Charles: "...We’re treating around 300 years of music from various countries, forms, philosophies, and so on as one genre. As far as modern commercial music, we don’t group the past 50 years together: can you imagine how strange it would be to group LL Cool J, Metallica, and The Spice Girls together? These are all artists that were popular in the 90s; beyond that, they have virtually nothing in common. Grouping together Mozart, Ravel, and Cage makes even less sense." Rumiz: "The sorting of recordings follows the rules of pop & rock genre. For classical music this doesn’t fit at all, because you very often want to compare different recordings of the same pieces by the same composer with different soloists, orchestras and conductors. It is very complicated and sometimes impossible to sort and find recordings by these categories." Classical music wasn't designed to fit in modern album templates Streaming classical music on a service like Apple Music forces the expansive art form into a strict, boundary-ridden template. Because of this, numerous aspects of the music are truncated in a way that deflates their impact, particularly for anyone without existing knowledge of classical recordings. Charles says that one aspect of classical music that's mixed up in the shuffle is the listener's interest in a piece's composer versus its performer. While some artists, like Leonard Bernstein, both compose and perform their music, Charles questions how Apple Music determines the best recording for a piece of music: "Is a recording more significant because it is composed by Bach, or is it more significant because it is performed by Glenn Gould?" Further complicating matters, orchestral recordings introduce both the conductor and orchestra as contributors, essentially breaking any possibility for these pieces to be read and seen within the boundaries of a modern album format. With concerti, the soloist, composer, and orchestra also need credit. This results in albums with names like "Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Major, Op. 26 - Ravel: Piano Concerto in G Major, M.83; Gaspard de la nuit, M. 55," credited to "Martha Argerich, Berlin Philharmonic & Claudio Abbado." Not only is this far too much information to read clearly in Apple Music, but the app's basic UI functions fail to provide links to every credited artist, making further classical music discovery a frustrating endeavor. In the above example, the link for "Martha Argerich, Berlin Philharmonic & Claudio Abbado" directs listeners only to Martha Argerich's Apple Music profile page.Charles: "That is a lot more difficult to follow than The Wall by Pink Floyd. Clicking the performer’s name in this case links you to more Martha Argerich recordings—what if you’re curious to hear more of the Berlin Philharmonic or Claudio Abbado? (And I won’t even bother going into the complications that come with identifying an opera cast.) In short, classical music was not designed with the album format in mind. Some pieces are substantial enough that they could fill up an entire album (Mahler’s Symphony No. 5 comes to mind); some are even so long that they would exceed the length of a traditional album (Steve Reich’s Drumming comes to mind). Some are also less than a minute long (Bach Two Part Inventions come to mind)" On that note, Rumiz points out that classical music playlists are essentially nonsense. This is because each playlist takes in arias and overtures from various operas, completely disrupting the ordered way that classical music is intended to be listened to. This happens in playlists like Apple's "Essentials" for composers like Richard Wagner, and in mood playlists designed for studying or relaxing.Rumiz: "Again Apple offers something for their mainstream audience which doesn’t fit the genre. I don’t want to hear just one part of a symphony, I want to listen to the whole thing! The same applies to classical music radio." Siri isn't very helpful Because of these wordy titles, any voice-enabled features touted by Apple and found within Apple Music are much harder to use for classical music fans. As Charles bluntly puts it, "Can you imagine: 'Hey Siri, play the third movement of Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3 from the album Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Major, Op. 26 - Ravel: Piano Concerto in G Major, M.83; Gaspard de la nuit, M. 55 by Martha Argerich, Berlin Philharmonic & Claudio Abbado." In our tests, simply stating "Hey Siri, play Prokofiev's Piano Concerto" did lead to Siri playing the correct concerto in the correct order, but as with all things Siri, the command was not consistently reliable. The proclivity toward the use of foreign language titles for some pieces, and the acceptance of English versions of the same titles, also regularly stumps Siri. "Sometimes we use English titles, sometimes we use foreign language titles; 'The Rite of Spring' and 'Le Sacre du printemps' seem to be used equally to describe the same piece," Charles explains. There are breaks between each track Rumiz's biggest issue with classical on Apple Music is the breaks that happen between tracks in recordings (this frustration originally led Rumiz to write his Medium post on the topic). For any classical piece that is through-composed (music intended to be played from beginning to end in one continuous stream), Apple Music interrupts the fluidity of the piece by placing a break of ~1 second between each track. Rumiz does point out that Apple has removed these breaks from many recordings over the years, but it isn't solved for all recordings.Rumiz: "I find these breaks in the middle of a thrilling, highly emotional classical symphony to be annoying — they are destroying the concentration and pleasure of the listener." There is a large barrier to entry for new listeners This is Charles' biggest problem with classical on Apple Music. Although the browsing and playback experience can be awkward, the music professor ultimately notes that his background and education in the subject help him navigate Apple Music's less-than-stellar classical music selection with some ease. If you're on the other end of that spectrum, trying to get into the genre and navigating 300+ years of music on Apple Music, it's "effectively impossible." Charles is understandably disappointed in the lack of education and forethought put into classical selections on Apple Music. There are no program notes, select few pieces of biographical information, and no guidance when navigating among composers. Despite the music having thorough research readily available, Apple Music ditches all interconnections between notable composers in favor of static tabs of music lists. One of the few educational areas in Apple Music's classical section is buried at the very bottom of the page, and offers a quick overview of the genre's history. Listening to classical music often requires the listener to understand the work in context to get everything out of it. Without these tidbits of history, connective tissues between composers, and educational program notes, Apple Music fails this fan base.Charles: "So in short, classical music is left to an exclusive crowd of enthusiasts that already know what they are looking for. Apple prides itself on making devices and services with user interfaces that anyone can use, yet classical music remains locked in a vault for the select few that already know it inside and out." There's a lack of legitimacy As an extension of the previous grievance, Apple Music's Beethoven page lacks a link to the composer's spiritual successor, Brahms, but it does provide a link to an artist named "Chopin." Unfortunately, this is not the Polish composer, but a rapper who appeared on a hip-hop song named "Circumstance," which was released in 2018. "Even if it did link to the correct Chopin, there are far more relevant composers to link to," Charles points out. Furthermore, Apple populates composer pages with songs from albums and playlists that don't necessarily paint these artists in a respected light. Beethoven's "Top Songs" include songs from albums like "The World's Most Beautiful Wedding Music," "Classical Music for Power Pilates," and "Exam Study." While relevant to each of these activities, Apple's decision to push these results higher on the page above more reputed collections "sends strong signals of a lack of legitimacy in the classical music world," Charles argues. The Solutions Build better composer pages and offer more categories This would be feasible, since Apple just last year updated the artist pages across Apple Music with new profile picture designs, new featured albums, album reorganization, and a "play all" button. Although composers and their works are inherently more complex, Charles points out that some already have their own identification systems, including the Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis (BWV) catalog for Bach and the Köchel (K) catalog for Mozart, which have the potential for streamlined integration into Apple Music. In the same vein, Rumiz says more categories would do wonders for expanding the ease-of-use of classical on Apple Music, by offering more complex categories like "soloist" and "conductor," instead of following the rules of pop and rock music where songs only have one artist. While this would be a big task for Apple, Rumiz notes that it will be "necessary if they want classical music fans to continue using Apple Music on the long run." Fix irrelevant recommendations In a simpler and easier solution, Charles hopes Apple can more intelligently guide users to important and noteworthy composers, pieces, and musicians, that actually have relevance to one another. No more erroneous "Chopin" pages and "Ode to Joy" recommendations found within Power Pilates playlists. Make it smarter and hire a human curator Overall, Charles is hoping for Apple to boost the intelligence of its classical music section on Apple Music. To start, he recommends Apple hire a musicologist whose job it would be to personally back the rejuvenation of the classical music features on the service. This would be just like most other sections of Apple Music, where algorithms are backed and double-checked by human editors, like Arjan Timmermans's role as Apple Music's "Head of Pop." This includes adding program notes that would enhance the listener's understanding of classical music, so that they're actually taking part in digesting and understanding the composition and not just passively listening. Charles explains the importance of knowing a piece's real-world history: "Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique is a great example: it features a story (loosely based on the composer's own life) of an artist obsessing with a love interest, taking opium, and murdering his beloved in a drug-induced trip. This sort of thing kind of changes how you hear a piece!"Charles: "Effectively, the service should offer somewhat of a university-style music appreciation course for the average listener." Acquire a company that does most of this already In a move that would make sense given Apple's history, Apple could also simply acquire a company that's doing most of these things already, and implement the technology within an update to Apple Music. Charles pointed me toward the Berlin Philharmonic's Digital Concert Hall [Direct iTunes Link], a classical music streaming service that has live and on-demand concerts (up to 40 each season), hundreds of archived recordings covering five decades, composer interviews, documentaries, artist portraits, and a family-friendly education program that dives into the history of each piece. While the Digital Concert Hall mostly lacks simple music streaming, if Apple made a deal with Berlin Philharmonic, the service's features would greatly boost classical music offerings on Apple Music. Rumiz doesn't recommend an outright acquisition, but he does point towards a company and service that is already leagues ahead of Apple in the classical music field: IDAGIO [Direct iTunes Link]. This service costs $9.99/month and focuses solely on classical music. While some important recordings are missing and require him to return to Apple Music or Spotify, Rumiz says that IDAGIO's usability and interface are far better than Apple Music, eliminating many of the frustrations classical fans have with streaming services. Boost the video offerings According to Rumiz, a well-organized and fully featured suite of classical video content "could be an important selling point" for a streaming service intent on gaining more classical fans. Apple has a few of these, offering background interviews with artists, but Rumiz points toward YouTube Music as the current leader in this category, since it offers full recordings of concerts and operas. The Future In the end, Apple -- and Spotify, Google, Amazon, etc. -- have a tricky battle ahead of them if and when they decide to address the issue of classical music on streaming services. "It doesn't seem to be a business priority [for Apple]," Charles admits, and in the current scheme of things, the company's focus on pop and hip-hop in Apple Music is logical from a financial standpoint. But that doesn't change the fact that there are millions of classical music fans willing and ready to pay the company that can get these things right. "This is a completely untapped market," Charles tells me. "One streaming service could completely own the classical music audience if it wanted to."Tags: Apple Music, classical musicThis article, "Classical Music on Apple Music: What's Wrong and How Apple Can Fix It" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
2 d
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Apple Extends iPhone XR and iPhone XS Trade-Up Promotion Until March 25 in China
In late November, Apple launched a limited time promotion that offers up to $100 in additional credit when trading in an iPhone 6 through iPhone 8 towards the purchase of a new iPhone XS or iPhone XR in the United States. Apple expanded the promotion to additional countries in late December. While no end date has been set in the United States, fine print on Apple's regional Chinese website reveals that the extra credit will be available through March 25, 2019 in China, an extension of the previous February 28 end date in Japan. March 25 happens to be the rumored date of Apple's next event, where it is expected to announce new subscription-based news and streaming video services — although March 25 in China is March 24 in the United States due to time zone differences. The promotion is available at Apple Stores in participating countries. It is also offered on Apple.com and with monthly payments in the United States. With the monthly payment option, customers can get a new iPhone XR for as low as $18.99 per month or a new iPhone XS for as low as $29.99 per month for 24 months. If paying in full, the iPhone XR and iPhone XS start at $449 and $699 respectively with the trade-in of an iPhone 7 Plus or iPhone 8 in the United States. Apple has been heavily promoting iPhone XR and iPhone XS trade-ins with a prominent banner on the homepage of its website, store signage, App Store editorials, emails to older iPhone users, and more since the smartphones launched last year. In a letter to shareholders last month, Apple said it saw fewer iPhone upgrades than it anticipated last quarter, primarily due to greater than expected economic weakness in the Greater China region. Apple said making smartphone trade-ins at its stores easier is one step it is taking to improve results.Related Roundups: iPhone XS, iPhone XRTag: Apple trade-inBuyer's Guide: iPhone XS (Neutral), iPhone XR (Buy Now)This article, "Apple Extends iPhone XR and iPhone XS Trade-Up Promotion Until March 25 in China" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
2 d
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About