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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
unread news (Demo user)
Trump White House, lost in time warp, reports socialism is bad
The title of the report alone–“The Opportunity Costs of Socialism”–betrays curled-lip snark and fears of growing support for single-payer healthcare. Sometimes, somehow, it just gets funny. In the same week that the Trump administration says it will leave the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty with Russia, the White House Council of Economic Affairs (CEA) lets loose with a new report called, “The Opportunity Costs of Socialism.”Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
How to watch the 2018 World Series without cable
It’s been more than a century since the Dodgers and Red Sox faced each other in the Word Series. Here’s how to watch if you don’t have cable. Ever since eating Tide Pods became a thing, it’s hard to call baseball our “national past time” anymore, but fans of the sport have plenty of reason to be excited about the 2018 World Series. The seven-game series will be a battle of East vs. West, as the Boston Red Sox take on the Los Angeles Dodgers. According to the good folks at the New York Times, it’s been more than a century since these two franchises have played each other in the big competition. I’ll have to take their word on that.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
You’re hours away from NOT winning the $1.6 billion Mega Millions drawing!
You could be as rich as Jay-Z—or buy the Mona Lisa—if you win the big lottery drawing tonight. Math nerds argue over whether it’s all worth the $2 ticket. If you’ve not yet bought your tickets for tonight’s historic $1.6 billion Mega Millions jackpot, you can be forgiven if your FOMO has reached fever pitch.Read Full Story
5 h
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
This one staff training change made a huge difference for Barre3
The boutique fitness brand’s cofounder and CEO Sadie Lincoln explains why a strong voice–literally–is vital to her empire’s bottom line. Barre3, the boutique strength conditioning gym, is known for its equal attention to both body and mind. Yes, there are grueling lunges and toning squats, but there are also elements of mindfulness and accepting one’s own strengths. Its philosophy encourages individuals to go at their own pace and trust intuition–it’s centered on the idea of feeling good inside and out, versus advertising how to get skinny arms. In fact, throughout its classes, you’ll hear a sentiment echoed repeatedly: You deserve to be heard.Read Full Story
6 h
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
How to set yourself apart in the future of work
It’s not about learning to code, it’s about teaching your brain how to think computationally. How do you future-proof your career in a technology-first workplace? At some point, someone probably told you to learn how to code.Read Full Story
7 h
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
A safer replica of the Titanic will set sail from Dubai in 2022
The $500 million cruise ship will be built in China and will follow the original route from Southampton to New York, minus the detour to the ocean bottom. Great news for Celine Dion fans and James Cameron enthusiasts: The Titanic is set to sail again. Titanic II, a replica of the original Titanic, will make its first voyage in 2022. It will have room for 2,400 passengers and 900 crew members and have the same cabin layout and decor as the original legendary ocean liner.Read Full Story
7 h
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
When it’s okay to do blackface: a comprehensive guide for Megyn Kelly
The daytime television host had some thoughts on white people doing blackface for Halloween, and so do we. Never. Blackface is never okay, Megyn.Read Full Story
8 h
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
This woman’s three-day opioid detox was broadcast on a NYC street corner
A new PSA from Truth Initiative, the Ad Council, and the U.S. Office of National Drug Control Policy aims to fight the stigma of addiction. Every day more than 115 people in America die from opioids.  A new PSA campaign from Truth Initiative, the Ad Council, and the U.S. Office of National Drug Control Policy, aims to show that opioid addiction can start in the most unexpected places.Read Full Story
8 h
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Kerry Washington: “Anita Hill taught me what fearlessness really is”
In her keynote at the Fast Company Innovation Festival, the Scandal actress was asked about what she’s learned from working with powerful women in entertainment and elsewhere. Kerry Washington is not one to mince words, especially when she’s performing eight nights a week on Broadway, feeling under the weather, and yet still has the fortitude to engage in a frank conversation about gender power dynamics in front of hundreds of people.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
What it’s like to take the world’s longest flight
18 hours and 45 minutes from Newark to Singapore. Singapore Airlines Ltd. just reclaimed the title of flying the world’s longest commercial flight, swiping that honor from Qatar Airways’ route from Doha to Auckland. The 10,400-mile nonstop flight between New York and Singapore ensures that passengers can live out their Crazy Rich Asian fantasies after a mere 18 hours and 45 minutes in the air.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Airbnb’s Chip Conley is doubling down on being a “modern elder”
The Joie de Vivre founder and Airbnb exec wants to know: Are you experienced? Chip Conley found himself at a crossroads at age 52. He had already found success with the boutique hotel group Joie de Vivre that he ran as CEO for 24 years. At midlife he wasn’t sure what was next, until he got a call from the young founders of Airbnb, who asked him to join their startup and guide their growth into a hospitality behemoth. Conley was happy to join in, but quickly realized that he lacked the digital fluency he needed to make it in the tech world. He hadn’t heard of the sharing economy and didn’t have the Uber or Lyft apps on his phone, and was neck-deep in a venture that was not his natural habitat. “The brave new home-sharing world didn’t need most of my old-school, brick-and-mortar insights,” he said onstage at the Fast Company Innovation Festival.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
These posters celebrate things that really do make America great
The new book “What Really Makes America Great” features a series of inspirational posters on things–women! space exploration! public lands!–that inspire artists about the country. In the wake of the 2016 election, a community of artists started to answer a question: What really makes America great? Trump’s campaign hadn’t defined what “great” meant, or how the country would know that it had been reached “again.” Some called the slogan a racist dog whistle–a sanitized version of a Tennessee politician’s 2016 billboard that literally said, “Make America White Again” and tried to evoke white nostalgia for the 1950s.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Kyocera’s new business card-sized phone is the thinnest ever
It’s the latest contender in the dumb phone wars–and a sign of the times. I’m impressed. With its 0.2-inch metal body the size of a credit card and its e-ink display, the new KY-01L is a sight to behold; a black monolith that promises intelligent use of digital resources and a healthy life almost free of distractions. It looks like just what I wanted and yet, I find myself thinking: Is too simple just inadequate?Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Why managers should overlook results in these situations
By focusing on culture and people first, you can set your team up for success in the long run. Being a manager is largely a balancing act, constantly weighing the wants, needs, and priorities of different people against each other.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Hilton gets a new “Motto”, an affordable chic hotel brand
It’s like a hostel for grownups As Hilton nears its 100th anniversary, the hotel group is shaking off the cobwebs with a new brand geared to young travelers who lost their Hostelling International membership card at Glastonbury. Today they announced Motto by Hilton, an affordable, stylish brand aimed at travelers who like the “trifecta of centrally located, reasonably priced and less traditional lodging”, according to a statement. It’s like a youth hostel, minus the whole sleeping-with-strangers thing.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
The surveillance state is outsourced to Silicon Valley, says report
Immigrant and privacy activists detail involvement of big tech–especially Amazon–with the military, ICE, and local law enforcement. The federal and local governments have long relied on private companies for defense and law enforcement technologies, from Lockheed Martin jetfighters to Booz Allen Hamilton data analysis. But increasingly, the government is expanding beyond classical contractors making weapons to the company that also provides free shipping and online TV.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
This single-room hotel is 400 years old and eight feet wide
Architect Tom Verschueren sees your tiny house and raises you a minuscule hotel. The boutique hotel game is all about cozy charm and exclusivity–and the latest overnight stay to open in Antwerp, Belgium, fits the bill on both counts to near comic effect. The precious new one-room hotel, designed by Belgian architecture firm dmvA, is a stunning, three-story, 17th-century gabled home with a historic facade that measures less than eight feet wide, and accommodates just one guest bedroom.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Don’t buy bottled water: This app tells you the closest place you can fill up for free
The Tap app can help you make sure you’re always hydrated, by providing walking directions to the nearest fountain or restaurant with a fill-up station. Millions of plastic bottles are sold around the world each minute. Many of those are water bottles that end up in the trash a few minutes later, despite the fact that the people who buy them are not far from a drinking fountain or a restaurant willing to refill a bottle.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
General Motors expands its peer-to-peer ride-sharing service to 10 cities
GM has figured out how to monetize its cars long after they roll off the lot.  In the last few years, General Motors has placed big bets on the future of how people get around. For instance, it has acquired the self-driving car startup Cruise, and it kickstarted a car-sharing platform called Maven. This summer, the auto manufacturer moved beyond renting its own cars to renting out those of its customers. Maven initially offered peer-to-peer car sharing in Detroit, Chicago, and Denver. Now it’s expanding to Ann Arbor, Michigan; Baltimore; Boston; Washington, D.C.; Jersey City; Los Angeles; and San Francisco.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Watch the Fast Company Innovation Festival live stream
Our Fast Company Innovation Festival takes place this week at venues and offices around New York City. It’s all happening now, folks!Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
9 women executives on how MeToo has changed the way they mentor
For the few women at the top, the last year has impacted what they are telling the women they mentor. Here’s what they are saying. The #MeToo movement has created the permission to be vulnerable about the dark truths many women have kept hidden for decades. From entry-level assistants who were mistreated by older male managers to C-level women who still face discrimination no matter their level of accomplishment or respect–everyone knows someone who has come forward.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
This startup wants to kill passwords–and replace them with jewelry
“[T]his ring will become your connection from your physical self to your digital presence,” says Motiv CEO Tejash Unadkat. I’m logging into Facebook when that pesky window pops up, alerting me that the website has sent a pin number to my cell phone and requiring that I enter it to ensure I’m not a hacker. But this time, instead of digging around for my phone so I can painstakingly enter in each digit, I turn my hand as if unlocking a door. As if by magic, the digits appear on my screen. I’m in.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Watch Kerry Washington live at the Fast Company Innovation Festival
The Scandal star discusses the enduring power of live performance at a keynote event in New York. Imagine this scenario for a moment: You’re a beloved TV star, famous throughout the world and coming off one of the top-rated shows on U.S. network television. As your next act, why on earth would you choose the frenzied, frenetic schedule of a play, performing eight grueling shows a week for 800 people in a theater in midtown Manhattan?Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
What happened when I used a Bullet Journal for a month
The detailed journaling and list-making method has thousands of devotees, but is it too complicated to make me want to give up my regular to-do list? When it comes to productivity, I’m a 100% paper person. For the past few years, I’ve been using the Planner Pad to organize my schedule, but my daily to-do list is often longer than the allotted space. I end up using separate lists that leave me with multiple places to track. When I (finally) discovered the popular Bullet Journal method, it seemed like the perfect solution, so I decided to try it out for a month.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Could modular shoes be the next big sneaker craze?
Move over, Nike and Adidas. Sneakers are quickly growing into a $90 billion business–but they’re all built the same way, more or less, constructed out of a combination of soles and uppers. Nike has React and Flyknit. Adidas has Ultraboost and Primeknit. What if we could replace just part of a shoe, rather than the whole thing? It could be greener, cheaper, and more customizable, too.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Uber wants all-electric cars in London by 2025
It’s also open to buying Deliveroo. The ride-haling firm’s CEO Dara Khosrowshahi is in London today and dropped a number of interesting tidbits about the company to reporters, reports Reuters:Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Twitter takes down more accounts affiliated with Alex Jones’s Infowars
The accounts tried to get around Twitter’s ban on Infowars. The social networking site has confirmed to CNBC that it has removed more accounts associated with Alex Jones’s conspiracy website Infowars. Last month Twitter permanently banned both Jones and the Infowars website from its platform, citing violations of its behavior policies. But in that time multiple other accounts assisted with Infowars popped up on the service in an attempt to circumvent the ban. So far, Twitter has removed 18 such accounts and will be on the lookout for more.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Regulators order self-driving school bus test to be stopped
The NHTSA said the operator did not have permission to transport children during the test. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has ordered the French-based transport company Transdev to cease testing a self-driving school bus in Florida, reports the BBC. The NHTSA had given Transdev the green light to import its self-driving vehicle in March, but says it did not give the company permission to use it as a school bus or to transport human passengers.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Uber’s shot at replacing personal car ownership starts with Jump Bikes
E-bikes and scooters are a key part of the company’s pivot from ride-hailing giant to mobility platform–and integral to its future vision for cities. On a cool, sunny afternoon in mid-June, Jump founder and CEO Ryan Rzepecki is riding one of his company’s bright red e-bikes down Market Street in San Francisco, thinking about the past. He’s been a bicycle evangelist since the mid-2000s when he discovered that commuting around New York City made much more sense on the back of a bike than just about any other way. Back then, he was a grad student in urban planning at Hunter College. He started Jump in 2008–originally under the name Social Bicycles–while working a day job in the bike program with the New York City Department of Transportation.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
This $800 countertop pizza oven is the pinnacle of human achievement
And proof that we’ve reached peak pizza. I’ve eaten 10 pizzas in three days, and I regret nothing.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
How Dara Khosrowshahi’s Iranian heritage shapes how he leads Uber
As CEO Dara Khosrowshahi remakes Uber with an eye toward an IPO, his Iranian childhood and heritage are essential to understanding how he leads. [Editors’ Note: This story was produced for the November 2018 issue of Fast Company, before the suspected murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi Arabian embassy in Istanbul. Prior to Dara Khoshrowshahi joining Uber, in June 2016, the company raised a $3.5 billion round led by Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund. When Khoshrowshahi became CEO, he negotiated a $9 billion investment from SoftBank Vision Fund, whose largest limited partner is the Saudi Arabian PIF. Shortly after the news of Khashoggi’s disappearance, Khoshrowshahi was among the first CEOs to announce that he would not attend the Saudi government sponsored Future Investment Initiative.]Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Dara Khosrowshahi and 37 other Iranians who power Silicon Valley
Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi is just one of dozens of execs and investors who’ve shaped the tech industry, from Airbnb to Google to Y Combinator. The Hostage Crisis, Death to America, The Axis of Evil, The Great Satan, The Travel Ban–these are hardly the buzzwords that form the foundation for a fruitful relationship, yet Iranian-Americans have flourished amid the rancor. How they’ve managed to is instructive, not just for the next generation of innovators, but for policy-makers, immigration activists, and anyone wishing to better understand the relationship between the United States and its purported adversaries.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Tech companies are spending more on lobbying in Washington
With Amazon reaching a company record this past quarter. But Google still spent the most. Most tech giants spent an increasingly large amount of cash this quarter versus previous quarters lobbying U.S. officials on their various interests. Amazon, Google, and Twitter all saw their lobbying expenditures increase in the most recent quarter that just ended last month, Bloomberg reports. Among the major tech and communication companies that have reported their most recent lobbying expenses:Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Cava is giving its 1,600 employees paid leave to vote on Election Day
The Mediterranian-style fast food chain is the first known restaurant chain to be offering the benefit. The Mediterranian-style fast food chain is the first known restaurant chain to be offering the benefit. On November 6th, all of its employees will receive two hours of paid leave so they can get to the polls and vote, the Washingtonian reports. Cava cofounder Ted Xenohristos says that he sees the offer as just another of the chain’s employee benefits, which already includes paid sick, parental, and vacation leave as well as paid community service days for all employees.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
This fleet of underwater robots will help citizen scientists make the case for ocean conservation
OpenROV’s cheap robots help people explore their local waterways, and National Geographic is helping get them to more people so they can map their discoveries. Since David Lang cofounded OpenROV, a low-cost underwater drone company, in 2012, thousands of citizen scientists and explorers have used the bots to explore things like starfish deaths in the Pacific Northwest, or where along the coast of Mexico Nassau grouper tended to spawn. That information launched bigger efforts to study, document, and ultimately try to protect those species and the places they live.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
“The Fall of Donald Trump” is the fantasy we deserve, if not the one we may want
“A ‘President Show’ Documentary: The Fall of Donald Trump” is not here to make you feel good before the midterms. Releasing a mockumentary called The Fall of Donald Trump just before the 2018 midterms seems like nothing short of a Krassensteinian call to arms for #Resistance Twitter. In that sense, the crew who brought you The President Show have honored their namesake by delivering a classic bait-and-switch.Read Full Story
Fast Company | The Future Of Business
The Dodo’s humans were upstaged by Dixie the adoptable dog
The animal website regularly features adoptable dogs on Facebook Live, and it knew Dixie was destined for greatness. People gathered at The Dodo’s downtown New York office today to learn about how to take a niche subject (in The Dodo’s case, photogenic animals) and make it mainstream (to the tune of millions of views a month) all the while staying true to your brand’s identity and slowly becoming a traffic behemoth, with billions of video views on Facebook.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
There’s probably microplastic in your poop
The most common forms were polypropylene–commonly used in bottle caps and in packaging for food like yogurt–and PET, commonly used in water bottles. Tiny pieces of plastic have been found in beer, fish, sea salt, honey, and other food. It’s not surprising, then, that a new pilot study also found microplastic in human poop.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Move over, Oscar: Podcasts are getting their own awards show
The first annual iHeartRadio Podcast Awards will be live streamed from Los Angeles on January 18. Public radio folks are going to have slip on their formal Allbirds and head to Hollywood, because podcasts are going mainstream and are getting the awards show to prove it.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
4 ways to track the monstrous Hurricane Willa
This hurricane season is shaping up to be especially eventful for both coasts of North America. This hurricane season is shaping up to be especially eventful for both coasts of North America. After hurricanes Florence, Gordon, and Michael (to name a few) pummeled the East Coast and Gulf states, the newly formed Hurricane Willa is now bearing down on the West Coast of Mexico.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Stay away from these two phrases when you speak to a customer
You might not realize how condescending you sound. There’s a straightforward rule of customer service–never make your customer feel like an idiot. This might seem obvious, but if you’re not careful, it’s pretty easy to send this message unintentionally. Sometimes, all it takes is a single word.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Apple Music Beats 1 just opened an NYC studio
If they can make it here . . . Apple Music is ready to take Manhattan.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
Paid time off to vote is on the rise, survey says
An estimated 44% of companies will give workers paid time off to vote this year, up from 37% last year. More companies than ever will offer their employees paid time off to cast their ballots this year, Bloomberg reports.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
“Halloween” just broke this box office record, but what does that even mean?
Headlines are touting its status as the top-grossing film with a female lead over 55 years old, something the internet does not appear to have been keeping track of. Anytime a horror movie has a big opening weekend, the resulting headlines are haunted by familiar puns. “The Exorcism of Some Lady SCARES UP $35M.” “Knifey McKillmurder 2 SLICES UP $47M.” “Son of Chupacabra has MONSTER opening with $54M.” And further examples.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
The 2016 election was so stressful it gave college kids symptoms like they had PTSD
Female and minority students were the most effected. A few months after the 2016 presidential election, some college students experienced levels of stress comparable to what witnesses feel half a year after a mass shooting. A study of hundreds of Arizona State University students in early 2017, published today, found that 25% showed clinically significant levels of stress.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
SoulCycle CEO Melanie Whelan talks expanding abroad and online
The SoulCycle CEO talks about the challenges of growing the cult fitness company internationally and digitally, while remaining authentic. SoulCycle CEO Melanie Whelan, in conversation with master instructor Trammell Logan, said that the company will bring its cult fitness classes to London in 2019 as it eyes international expansion. SoulCycle will also increase its digital offerings for customers through its new media division.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
AWS CEO joins Tim Cook in urging Bloomberg to retract its Chinese spy story
Multiple companies have said there’s no truth to the report about Chinese spies hiding hardware on server motherboards. Amazon Web Services CEO Andy Jassy has joined Apple CEO Tim Cook in calling on Bloomberg Businessweek to retract a disputed story claiming Chinese spies placed hidden chips built for espionage on server motherboards.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business
They know… that you just uninstalled their creepy app
App makers can harness push notifications to figure out who’s uninstalled their apps. App makers have figured out how to determine who’s uninstalled their software and potentially target them with ads urging them to reinstall, Bloomberg reports.Read Full Story
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Fast Company | The Future Of Business