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LeBron James Is More Than an All-Time Great—He’s a Mogul
The NBA star's move to Los Angeles places his late-career basketball prospects squarely behind his cultural legacy.
7 m
WIRED
Arcimoto is opening its first rental center for its three-wheeled EV
Arcimoto's three-wheeled Fun Utility Vehicle is a blast to drive, but there's a catch: given that the first orders haven't arrived, there hasn't been an easily accessible way to take one for a spin. You'll have an option in a few days, though. The co...
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
How thinking like a geologist could help us fight climate change
“Society as a whole is unable to think on anything like geologic time scales,” says Marcia Bjornerud. “Or even decadal time scales.” It’s clear that we need to think long-term about climate and the environment, but instead political leaders are constrained by the two-year Congressional cycle and those working in business are beholden to quarterly earnings. Bjornerud is a geologist at Lawrence University in Wisconsin and the author of Timefulness: How Thinking Like a Geologist Can Help Save the World. If people understood the history of the Earth, she argues, “we would perceive our world very differently.” The Verge spoke to Bjornerud about geology’s PR problem, the big questions in the field, and what it means to be “timeful.” This interview has been lightly edited for clarity. Early on in your book, you mention that it’d be embarrassing for an adult not to be able to point out the continents, but most people don’t know the geologic time periods. Why is that? Photo: Rachel Crowl I think a lot of educated people don’t quite believe in the geologic past. It’s obscure, they haven’t had much background in it and it doesn’t seem real. As a geologist, of course that’s frustrating. The field of geology has such vast explanatory power. There’s really something heady about being able to look out at the landscape and see how things came to be. I sometimes tell students that geology is the etymology of the world and I think most people don’t realize it but would love to have a rational explanation for how the world around them got to be the way it is. Right, but most people don’t think about geology like that. Geology has this PR problem. People think it’s about dusty mineral collection or just oil and glass, but it actually has both the pragmatic and a deep philosophical side. It’s about big existential questions as much as finding resources. The analogy I like to use is that of a palimpsest, a which is a term used in medieval scholarship of a parchment that was written on and scraped on so it could be reused and reinked. But usually there’s some vestige of the earlier writing that persists underneath the most recent one. That’s the metaphor for the way we see landscapes. They’re a work in progress partially erased many times over. As geologists, you start learning how to read those vestiges of earlier inking and reconstruct past cycles of past landscape development. Everything in the natural world has a backstory and is the product of evolution over long periods of time. Once you get in that habit, it’s like a window goes up. You realize how ephemeral any particular iteration of the Earth’s surface really is. We urgently need people to see that we are embedded in geologic time. There isn’t a geologic past and the future. We are on a continuum and processes that have been going on on Earth for millennia and longer are going to continue and our activities feed into those in ways that are sometimes surprising to us but shouldn’t be if we have a better understanding of the way the Earth has unfolded in the past. Some people might think, who cares, the geologic past doesn’t affect me. Yet it’s created a lot of the environmental problems we face today because people are taken by surprise when the slow, inexorable processes that have always been going on interact with humans have undesirable consequences. What are some of the big questions in geology? The climate system is complicated, certainly, though virtually all geoscientists recognize that what we’re doing to the climate system now is nearly unprecedented. Right now, we’re changing things on this decadal scale and we can’t tell from the geological record whether previous changes happened over decades or centuries or thousands of years. There are fundamental questions about tectonics, especially earthquake recurrence. We can’t predict earthquakes in real time right now, and most geophysicists have reached the conclusion that we probably will never get to that point so the best thing we can do is make people better prepared by building infrastructure and resilient homes. So those are pretty fundamental humanitarian questions. Concretely, what’s a natural process that is useful to talk about in terms of longer timespans? Let’s talk about groundwater. Groundwater systems really are dependent on the geologic substrate. Here in Wisconsin we have two main types of aquifers [underground area saturated with water]. They’re glacier deposits or bedrock. If your well is in those shallow deposits, the rate at which rain comes into the system and flows through the glacial sediments might be on the rate of decades. But if you’re extracting groundwater from bedrock, that might be on the order of a century. So you need to know how fast rates of withdrawal are compared with rates of replenishment. And there can be real exceptions, too, which can cause problems with groundwater contamination. The take-home message is that you need to know the rock and sediment under your feet and transit times related to the properties of the geologic substrate in order to be able to maintain predictably productive water systems. What’s the natural process that takes the longest? If we really zoom out, it’s planetary formation. On Earth, it’s probably the tectonic cycle of supercontinents forming and breaking. That’s on a timescale of maybe 400 or 500 million years. People are probably familiar with Pangea, but that’s just the most recent. We can look back in the deeper past and construct at least two or three super-continents. So what exactly is “timefulness”? What does someone need to know to be considered “timeful”? It’s based on “mindfulness” and I hope it carries the connotation that people should pause and think about time in ways we don’t normally. But I also wanted it to be a deliberate counterpoint to the idea of timelessness, which is sterile. Everything in the natural world has a backstory and is the product of evolution over long periods of time. It’d be good to know the big chapters in Earth’s development, some sense of rates of natural processes, and how they compare to the rates at which humans are changing the geologic realm. Without that understanding, we’d blithely wander into the natural systems and disrupt them quite badly, or cause species to go extinct much faster than they can evolve, some sense of rates. We’re all facing common challenges and doing some estate planning, so to speak, and it seems like there are no grown-ups in the room right now planning ahead. Just some sense of temporal proportion is what I’m calling for.
The Verge
Russia Linked to Triton Industrial Control Malware
Like so many other internet misdeeds, the notorious Triton malware appears to have originated in Moscow.
WIRED
FCC quest to kill net neutrality supported by Texas, Arkansas, and Nebraska
Republican AGs help FCC fight lawsuit against Democratic AGs from 22 states.
Ars Technica
Best gifts for her: What to get for the lady in your life
Holiday gifting to a special lady usually goes one of two ways:  1.You've been planning gifts all year and cannot handle keeping them a secret. 2. You push off gift shopping until the last minute and end up begging her friends for ideas. If you're in the latter camp, we get it — picking out the perfect gift to encapsulate how much she means to you can be a lot of pressure. Obviously, you know that wowing her is a must — but what's actually romantic is proving that you actually put thought into it. Flowers, chocolate, and blinged-out jewelry are nice, but they tiptoe the generic line and sometimes scream, "I literally did not try at all." Sure, they make great stocking stuffers, but assuming that every woman wants those cliché gifts is a bit archaic, right? Read more...More about Apple, Subscription Services, Shopping Amazon, Shopping Linkshare, and Gift Guide 2018
Mashable
Halloween ornaments painted on salvaged lightbulbs
David Irvine (AKA gnarledbranch) sent us a selection of photos of his delightful Halloween ornaments painted on salvaged lightbulbs. Read the rest
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Famous racist does everyone a favor and dies
Racists, emboldened by the policies of populist far-right leaning governments, seem to be everywhere these days. They're having rallies, breaking up families at borders and beating folks in the streets. Happily, time is a wheel: as our lives our lessened by the emergence of fresh bigoted bullshit, we're also gifted with what I hope is the incredibly painful passing of those who made it their life's work to spew hate and kindle chaos. From The New York Times: Robert Faurisson, a former literature professor turned anti-Semitic propagandist whose denial of the Holocaust earned him multiple prosecutions, died on Sunday at his home in Vichy, France. He was 89. Mr. Faurisson was regarded as a father figure by contemporary French exponents of Holocaust denial, the extremist fringe in a country with a long tradition of anti-Semitism. Contemporary far-right figures like the propagandist Alain Soral and Dieudonné, who calls himself a humorist, have followed in his footsteps, but none have had the long-range tenacity of Mr. Faurisson. At least in death, he might finally be able to contribute to something useful--fertilizing palm trees to provide observant Jews with shelter from the elements during Sukkot, for example. While things feel as permissive as hell here in North America, the French weren't willing to put up with Faurisson's holocaust denying nonsense. According to The New York Times, he became the first person in France to be convicted for saying that the Holocaust, a crime against humanity, never happened. More recently, the prick was fined 10,000 euros by the French courts for "propounding 'negationism'" in interviews published on the internet." Good riddance. Read the rest
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Deaf and hard-of-hearing customers in the U.S. celebrate Starbucks' first 'Signing Store'
Starbucks took a big step toward inclusivity today by opening its first "Signing Store" for Deaf and hard-of-hearing customers in the United States. The new Starbucks opened on Tuesday in Washington D.C., right next to Gallaudet University — the world’s only university designed to educate Deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Though the "Signing Store" has the classic Starbucks look and feel, every employee, otherwise known as a partner, at the cafe is proficient in American Sign Language (ASL). To prioritize communication even further, Deaf partners wear aprons that display the fingerspelling of "Starbucks," and hearing allies wear "I Sign" pins on theirs.   Read more...More about Starbucks, Social Good, Activism, Deaf, and American Sign Language
Mashable
San Francisco spends $3.1m/year on homeless toilets and $65m/year cleaning up poop
San Francisco's housing crisis is also (of course) a homelessness crisis, and homelessness crises beget public defecation crises -- and San Francisco has a serious public defecation crisis. Read the rest
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Firefox update adds improved tracking protection
Mozilla is trying to do something about that eerie feeling you get when you think of cat food and all of a sudden start seeing targeted ads about cat food -- with the new Firefox update, anti-tracking measures are being implemented that will prevent...
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Happy 17th Birthday to Apple's Original iPod
17 years ago today, then Apple CEO Steve Jobs stood on stage at the Apple Town Hall in Cupertino, California and showed off the very first iPod, a palm-sized device that held an entire music library and helped bring Apple back to profitability. As Jobs introduced the first iPod, he called it a quantum leap forward in technology and outlined its three major breakthrough features: ultra-portability, Apple's legendary ease of use, and auto-sync with iTunes. iPod is an MP3 music player, has CD quality music, and it plays all of the popular formats of open music. The biggest thing about iPod is that it holds a thousand songs. Now this is a quantum leap because for most people, it's their entire music library. This is huge. How many times have you gone on the road with a CD player and said 'Oh God, I didn't bring the CD I wanted to listen to.' To have your whole music library with you at all times is a quantum leap in listening to music. The coolest thing about iPod is that your whole music library fits right in your pocket. Never before possible.The first-generation iPod was advertised as the device that put "1,000 songs in your pocket," with the music stored on its 5GB 1.8-inch hard drive. Priced starting at $399, the first iPod lasted for 10 hours before needing to be recharged. The commercial that was shown during the keynote event where Jobs introduced the iPod Apple's original iPod featured a black and white LCD and Apple's first click wheel, a simple, intuitive mechanical scrolling interface designed to let users quickly scroll through long lists of music. The click wheel, which became an iconic feature of Apple's iPod lineup, included easy access buttons for playing, pausing, rewinding, and fast forwarding through music content. A later version of the iPod classic Following the launch of the first iPod, new versions followed on a yearly basis. Other notable updates included the iPod Photo in 2004, which had the first color display; the smaller iPod mini, which also came in 2004; the smaller and more portable iPod nano, introduced in 2005; the tiny iPod shuffle, even smaller than the nano, which came in 2005; the third-generation iPod nano "fatty" with a wider, squatter body, introduced in 2007; and the first iPod touch, also released in 2007. Today, the iPod has been largely replaced with the iPhone, which was first introduced in 2007. Today's iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR feature music storage and Apple Music, along with messaging and calling capabilities, a full App Store, and so much more. The iPhone XR comes in multiple colors, much like Apple's iPods did Apple retired the iPod nano and the iPod shuffle in July of 2017, and has slimmed down the iPod lineup to a single iPod -- the iPod touch. Apple has not updated the iPod touch since 2015, and it's likely that at some point, the entire iPod lineup may be put to rest for good. It's not clear when that might happen, and for now, the iPod touch remains available for sale. It can be purchased from Apple for $199 for 32GB of storage or $299 for 128GB of storage. Unfortunately, there have been no rumors of an update, so Apple's future plans for the iPod remain up in the air.Related Roundup: iPod touchBuyer's Guide: iPod Touch (Caution)Discuss this article in our forums
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Leaked OnePlus 6T specs confirm Snapdragon 845, 8GB RAM, and dual SIM support
We already know quite a bit about the OnePlus 6T. It’s launching on October 29th with an event in New York City that was moved up a day to avoid conflicting with Apple’s iPad Pro event. And the phone will come with an in-display fingerprint sensor and a tiny notch at the top of its bezel-less display. There’s even a leaked image of the front and back of the phone that circulated earlier this month. But we may have just gotten a better picture of the device’s specs, thanks to an accidental leak from German retailer Otto, which posted a listing for the OnePlus 6T that was then spotted by GSMArena. The listing is only for the 128GB variant, which is said to come with 8GB of RAM. But it also clearly listed the device’s 6.4-inch AMOLED display with 2340 x 1080 resolution. It will also come with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 chip, dual-SIM capability, a 3,700mAh battery, a USB-C port, 16-megapixel / 20-megapixel rear-facing dual cameras, and a 16-megapixel front-facing camera. The device will ship with Android 8.1 Oreo from what we can tell. And finally, it looks like this particular model will retail for €580 (about $665 at current currency conversion rates). Although this latest leak means that OnePlus won’t have too many surprises to announce next week, it probably still won’t end up being the most-leaked Android smartphone to launch this year.
The Verge
How to Watch Picture-in-Picture Videos On Chrome 70
Picture-in-picture (PIP) video playback is a user-favorite feature on Android’s Chrome app, and you can now get it on your Chrome desktop browser—as long as you’ve updated to Chrome 70, that is.Read more...
Lifehacker
Italy may kill the EU's copyright filter plans
When the EU voted for mandatory copyright censorship of the internet in September, Italy had a different government; the ensuing Italian elections empowered a new government, who oppose the filters. Once states totalling 35% of the EU's population oppose the new Copyright Directive, they can form a "blocking minority" and kill it or cause it to be substantially refactored. With the Italians opposing the Directive because of its draconian new internet rules (rules introduced at the last moment, which have been hugely controversial), the reputed opponents of the Directive have now crossed the 35% threshold, thanks to Germany, Finland, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Belgium and Hungary. Unfortunately, the opponents of Article 11 (the "link tax") and Article 13 (the copyright filters) are not united on their opposition -- they have different ideas about what they would like to see done with these provisions. If they pull together, that could be the end of these provisions. If you're a European this form will let you contact your MEP quickly and painlessly and let them know how you feel about the proposals. That’s where matters stand now: a growing set of countries who think copyright filters and link taxes go too far, but no agreement yet on rejecting or fixing them. The trilogues are not a process designed to resolve such large rifts when both the EU states and the parliament are so deeply divided. What happens now depends entirely on how the members states decide to go forward: and how hard they push for real reform of Articles 13 and 11. Read the rest
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
God of War creators share some of the funniest bugs from development
Peeking behind the curtain to see the process of game development is already a rare joy, but it’s even more unusual to see some of the flawed, erroneous moments that had to be polished out of a finished piece of work. Thankfully, Sony Santa Monica, the makers of PS4 hit God of War, have lifted that curtain for us in a newly posted video. “Making a video game is difficult,” reads the YouTube description for the video, which showcases some particularly choice prerelease gameplay bugs. “Making a stable game that both pushes the capabilities of the hardware and creates a super immersive, no-camera-cut, epically-sized AAA gaming experience like the one seen in the new God of War, is vastly more difficult. This massive task, involving hundreds of people developing and implementing content simultaneously, which can often have a tendency to break things, definitely added to the challenge.” Some of the glitches are the sorts of things you’d expect: hovering models, limbs going places where they shouldn’t, repeating lines. Others, though, like Atreus’ warping face and Kratos’ endless punches, make this highlight reel a hilarious viewing experience. More developers should share content like this — it makes it clear just how much work and struggle goes into these games, and how easily they could go terribly wrong.
The Verge
Transdev ordered to stop using self-driving shuttles as school buses
The United States National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has intervened and shut down operations of Transdev's autonomous school bus project in Florida, calling the project "unlawful." The post Transdev ordered to stop using self-driving shuttles as school buses appeared first on Digital Trends.
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
SoundCloud users can now share song links to Instagram Stories
SoundCloud users will no longer have to settle for screenshots when they want to share music on Instagram, as the company announced today that tracks can now be shared to Instagram Stories directly from the SoundCloud app. Instagram announced at F8 t...
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Ebola outbreak in Congo: things are getting worse
The latest Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has proven a sumbitch to contain. Since this latest "oh shit" moment in the history of this infectious outbreak started on August 1st, the brave healthcare professionals and epidemiologists throwing their shoulders into the problem have reported 200 total cases of the disease, 117 confirmed Ebola-related deaths and 35 deaths that are probably related to the illness. This latest outbreak, the 10th to have cropped up in Congo since 1976, is proving more difficult, logistically, than past outbreaks have been. The epicenter of the outbreak is in North Kivu Province: chockablock with danger as government forces, local militias and regional warlords get their violence on. This makes getting folks in the region to the care that they need and, just as vital, containing the disease, far more difficult than it already is. From The New York Times: Congolese rebels have killed 15 civilians and abducted a dozen children in an attack in the center of the latest outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus, Congo’s military said Sunday. The violence threatened to again force the suspension of efforts to contain the virus. Congo’s health ministry has reported “numerous aggressions” in the new outbreak against health workers, who have described hearing gunshots daily. Many are operating under the armed escort of United Nations peacekeepers or Congolese security forces, and ending work by sundown to lower the risk of attack. The World Health Organization hasn't classified the outbreak as a world health emergency, yet. Read the rest
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Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
iPhone: The Missing Manual
Bought an iPhone XS or XS Max, or just thinking about upgrading? Apple’s latest flagship phone features an improved camera, better battery life, and more. But how do you become a great shooter, master notifications, and optimize the experience? Here's everything you need to know to get the most out of your new smartphone. Related categories: […] The post iPhone: The Missing Manual appeared first on Digital Trends.
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Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Elon Musk Appears to Be Building Some Sort of Batcave Underneath Los Angeles
According to new plans filed with city officials, the Boring Company is building a car elevator inside the garage of a nondescript house near Los Angeles. The steel shaft is designed to lower a vehicle down to a test tunnel that snakes beneath the city of Hawthorne. And as some jokesters have pointed out, the whole…Read more...
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Gizmodo - We come from the future.
Meet Jelly, the new electric scooter science project run by Ford
Jelly is a new electric scooter company preparing to launch at Purdue University in Indiana. Outwardly, it appears very similar to other scooter startups that have quickly spread across the country in the last 12 months. Except for one key difference: Jelly is apparently a subsidiary of Ford, one of the largest automakers in the world. Ford wanted to stay anonymous at first Of course, you wouldn’t know that by going to Jelly’s website, because there’s nothing there except the words “Coming Soon!” set against a purple background. Nor would you know it to read Purdue University’s announcement, which describes Jelly as “a campus-wide research project on best practices for using e-scooters,” but makes no mention of Ford. Purdue’s eagle-eyed... Continue reading…
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The Verge
Firefox 63 released with Enhanced Tracking Protection to block third-party cookies
Mozilla has released Firefox 63, which introduces Enhanced Tracking Protection, a feature that blocks third-party trackers to increase your privacy online. Mozilla has been focused on data and privacy in recent months, announcing upcoming features like having Firefox block ad-tracking software by default and partnering with ProtonVPN to sell subscriptions to a small group of Firefox users. For now, Firefox 63 has Enhanced Tracking Protection off by default, but it gives users the option to block third-party tracking cookies or block all trackers. Users can also create exceptions for sites they trust, in case they break due to having trackers blocked. In a detailed blog post discussing this feature, the company explains finding the right trade-offs between having stronger privacy protections and inadvertently hurting small websites that use third-party tools. Apple’s Safari was the first browser to block third-party cookies by default, and the company also introduced an Intelligent Tracking Prevention feature in 2017 that reduced apps’ abilities to track users across websites. Mozilla Today’s Firefox update also includes an update to the New Tab page, which pins users’ top sites. Additionally, Siri Shortcuts is now available for Firefox on iOS, which lets users open a new tab via voice commands. Finally, the new browser will now adapt to match the dark or light theme you’re using in your Windows settings. You can download the latest version here.
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The Verge
Apple reportedly planning global rollout for its streaming TV service next year
Apple’s streaming television service, which is said to resemble Amazon Prime Video and Netflix, will launch in the first half of next year, according to a report today from The Information. The service, which may exist as a standalone app or within the existing TV app, will launch in the US first and become available in more than 100 countries after a few months of availability, the report says. It will feature a mix of original programming, access to third-party services, and the ability to subscribe directly to channel packages offered by network and cable providers, similar to Amazon’s Channels feature. For years, Apple has been trying to crack streaming like it did digital media and smartphone apps. But due to complex licensing deals and media conglomerates’ tight control on pricing and bundling, the iPhone maker has been less successful than competitors like Amazon and Netflix, both of which have built strong ecosystems mixing licensed content and original programming. And although Apple has sold its own set-top box since 2006, the device has largely remained a conduit for other companies’ media, and it lags behind Amazon and Roku hardware in market share. Apple lags far behind Amazon and Netflix in the streaming market Apple appears ready to try and change that with the launch of its official streaming TV service, which will live on iOS devices and as the home interface of its Apple TV line, reports The Information. One snag is that Apple doesn’t appear willing to let the software exist outside its own hardware, which may limit its ability to expand. Both Amazon, through its Prime Video app, and Netflix exist as mobile apps, built-in native smart TV apps, and streaming set-top box apps. In the case of Amazon, which produces the Fire TV line, its software is the entire home interface on its devices. That means consumers have numerous access points to Prime Video and Netflix, while Apple will necessarily limit its own service’s reach. Still, this mirrors Apple’s approach to many of its other hardware and software products, and it could prove to be irrelevant if the company can sign millions of iOS and Apple TV users up for the service. The obvious solution there is original programming, which Apple has reportedly set aside $1 billion for in 2018 alone. So far, Apple has put its original shows, like Carpool Karaoke and Planet of the Apps, on Apple Music. But this new service would be home to a dizzying number of in-the-works projects that have been confirmed in the last couple of years. As my colleague Andrew Liptak put it, there’s a lot Apple is working on: So far, Apple has signed a multiyear deal with Oprah Winfrey to develop new shows, ordered a pair of children’s shows from the creators of Sesame Street, a reboot of the science fiction anthology show Amazing Stories, a Hunger Games-style dystopian show called See, a series from La La Land director Damien Chazelle, a thriller series from M. Night Shyamalan, a space drama from Battlestar Galactica creator Ron Moore, a drama about a morning show starring Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston, and an adaptation of Isaac Asimov’s classic science fiction novel Foundation. There are also reports that it’s working to acquire the rights for an animated film. We have no idea if this programming will be any good. Considering it took years for Amazon and Netflix to find their footing in Hollywood and start turning out Emmy- and Oscar-winning projects, it could be a while before Apple attracts the same level of talent and creates a production environment where high-quality television and film can succeed. But Apple clearly has the money to spend and the desire to compete. Fifteen years ago, iTunes dominated the digital media landscape as the place where you went to browse, purchase, and play music, TV, and movies on your computer and MP3 player. Despite the dominant position of the iPhone in the age of the smartphone, Apple missed the boat on streaming video and is still playing catch-up with Spotify on streaming music. With the launch of a successful TV service, however, the company could start making up for lost time.
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The Verge
Amazon is actively pitching face-recognition to ICE
Despite an uprising of Amazon employees over the use of the company's AI facial recognition program ("Rekognition") in law enforcement, the company is actively courting US Immigration and Customs Enforcement in the hopes that it will use the wildly inaccurate technology. Thanks to work by McKinsney, ICE and Amazon's sales team met over the summer to discuss how Amazon's facial recognition could help the agency, which has cemented its reputation for performative xenophobic cruelty with a program of stealing babies from immigrant parents, dooming thousands of babies and children to never see their parents again. ICE could use facial recognition as part of its illegal surveillance of medical facilities and houses of worship. Amazon founder Jeff Bezos recently described his pro-immigration views ("I’d let them in if it was me, I like ‘em, I want all of them in"). In an email to ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) office dated June 15, 2018, an Amazon “sales principal” described the meeting and spelled out follow-up “action items.” One was setting up a tech briefing for ICE officials about tools including the tagging and analysis capabilities of Amazon’s real-time facial matching system, dubbed “Rekognition.” “Thanks again for your interest in AWS [Amazon Web Service] to support ICE and the HSI mission,” the Amazon salesperson wrote. The email lists “actions items from our conversation,” starting with an “Innovation Workshop focused on a big HSI problem,” but does not describe the problem. Regarding that problem, the Amazon employee wrote, “I would be happy to arrange for a 1 day workshop. Read the rest
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Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
HP packs 20 hours of battery life and 4G LTE in redesigned Spectre x360 models
For the fall season, HP is introducing refreshed versions of the Spectre 13, Spectre 15, and also a new Elitebook X360 1040 G5. Some of the new devices come packed with 4G LTE mobile internet access. The post HP packs 20 hours of battery life and 4G LTE in redesigned Spectre x360 models appeared first on Digital Trends.
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Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Apple's Upcoming TV Service to Launch in 100+ Countries in 2019, Starting With the U.S.
Apple's rumored television service that is in the works to showcase its original TV shows will be available in more than 100 countries, according to a new report from The Information citing details obtained from three inside sources. Apple is said to be planning to launch the service in the United States in the first half of 2019, with a global expansion to follow later in the year. According to The Information, Apple's original content will be made available for free to Apple device owners, a rumor we heard earlier this month from CNBC. While Apple's content will be available at no cost, Apple will encourage users to sign up for television subscriptions from other cable networks such as HBO or STARZ. Apple has reportedly started negotiating with content providers about what it will pay to carry TV shows and movies, but programming is not expected to be the same in each country. It is also not quite clear how Apple content will be positioned alongside content from third-party services.It is unclear how the original programming will appear next to media companies' channels, which is an issue as some try to negotiate with Apple about getting their shows on the app, said another person familiar with these discussions.By making third-party content available via the streaming service and launching it in most countries around the world, Apple will be able to better compete with Amazon Prime Video and Netflix, both of which are available in 190+ countries. Apple has more than a dozen original television shows in the works, and some with high-profile actors and actresses that are likely to attract a number of viewers. Apple has also inked deals with Oprah Winfrey and Sesame Workshop for new television shows, including children's programs.Related Roundups: Apple TV, tvOS 12Tag: Apple's Hollywood ambitionsBuyer's Guide: Apple TV (Caution)Discuss this article in our forums
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Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Sonos is selling a limited-edition Beastie Boys speaker for charity
Prior to today, the easiest way to get the Beastie Boys on your Sonos Play:5 was to queue up your favorite songs from the trio. A new limited edition version of the speaker will always have the Rock and Roll Hall of Famers on it, even when you're lis...
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Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Senator Jeff Flake on Kavanaugh's denial of sexual assault: "I don't know if I believed him"
Today on the ABC's The View, Senator Jeff Flake admits that he doesn't know if Brett Kavanaugh, accused by three women of sexual assault, was telling the truth or not during his hearing before being confirmed to the Supreme Court Justice. It was Flake who requested a delay in the confirmation process to make room for a week-long FBI-investigation into the sexual assault accusations against Kavanaugh. At about 5:20 in the video, he's asked if he believed Ford, and he answers, "She was very compelling. He was very persuasive. I don't know. I don't know. I wish I had the certitude that some of my colleagues expressed. But I said on the floor before that hearing, we’re likely to hear the hearing with as much doubt as certainty. And that’s how I felt afterwards.” Later, at 6:15, he's asked again, "So you didn't believe her?" And he answers, "I don't know. I don't know if I believed him, either." Via Daily Beast Read the rest
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Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
With a real rangefinder, Pixii brings film favorites to digital in odd mash-up
The rangefinder is back -- and in digital. The Pixii is a digital rangefinder camera that uses M-Mount lenses. Made by a start-up of the same name, the Pixii is a manual focus camera without a back LCD screen. The post With a real rangefinder, Pixii brings film favorites to digital in odd mash-up appeared first on Digital Trends.
2 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Arizona superintendent fails in last attempt to limit evolution teaching
Not reelected, sees standards written by science educators adopted over her dissent.
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Ars Technica
There's a Pokémon movie coming to theaters for only four days
Pokémon: The Power of Us — a sequel to 2017's Pokémon the Movie: I Choose You! — is making a blink-and-you'll-miss-it appearance in U.S. theaters right around Thanksgiving. Here's a new trailer to get you in the mood. The movie will screen Nov. 24, Nov. 26, Nov. 28, and Dec. 1 in a limited number of theaters, with theater locations and tickets available through the Fathom Events website. Read more... More about Entertainment, Film, Pokemon, Pokemon The Power Of Us, and Entertainment
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Mashable
Intel’s augmented reality brings Red Bull Rampage into your living room
The extreme mountain biking action of Red Bull Rampage is coming to your living room thanks to the power of augmented reality and 360-degree video that lets fans load a scale replica of the course right in their phones. The post Intel’s augmented reality brings Red Bull Rampage into your living room appeared first on Digital Trends.
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Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
The wonderful Uni-Ball Signo Gel Pens are $3.72 for a 3-pack
I love the ink in the Uni-Ball Signo Gel Pen. It's stark, smooth, and pure. If you've not tried one yet, you're in for a treat. Amazon has them on sale right now - a 3-pack for $3.72. Read the rest
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Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
2019 Fiat 500 Abarth first drive review
We head to Streets of Willow with Fiat’s performance-tuned 500 to see what this diminutive hot hatch can do. The post 2019 Fiat 500 Abarth first drive review appeared first on Digital Trends.
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Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
HP updates Spectre x360 2-in-1s with webcam privacy switch, more battery life
HP also debuted a new Elitebook convertible with a battery life up to 17 hours.
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Ars Technica
HP’s latest Spectre x360 has a new angular design and 22.5 hours of battery life
HP is updating its popular Spectre x360 convertible laptops today. Both the 13- and 15-inch versions are getting a new “gem cut” design with a more angular look and feel. The new design also includes a USB-C port that’s angled on the edge of the Spectre x360 to improve cable management. As you’d expect, HP is including Intel’s latest 8th Gen quad-core processors inside the 13-inch Spectre x360, and six-core options for the larger 15-inch model. The big promise of the new 13-inch Spectre x360 is the “world’s longest battery life in a quad-core convertible.” That’s quite the claim, and HP is promising up to 22.5 hours of battery life. We’ll need to test that fully, but even if it manages half of that it will be solid battery life.... Continue reading…
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The Verge
How to Keep Your Tesla From Getting Stolen
Earlier this week, a Tesla owner in Essex, Great Britain, posted security camera footage of his Model S getting stolen by a pair of thieves who were able to unlock and start the car with a smartphone and a tablet. By hijacking the owner’s key fob, they were able to get in, turn on the car, disable remote tracking, and…Read more...
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Lifehacker
HP's latest Spectre x360 laptops boast up to a 22-hour battery
HP is once again tweaking its Spectre x360 convertible laptops, but this time the changes promise to be more tangible. The new Spectre x360 13 and 15 boast common functional upgrades, such as a dual-chamfered design (it's now easier to lift the lid)...
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Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Apple reportedly targeting 2019 for iPad Mini update and AirPower launch
Apple’s second fall event is rapidly approaching, but noted TF International Securities supply chain analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has some predictions of what won’t be at the event: an updated fifth-generation iPad Mini, which Kuo says won’t be coming until sometime in 2019, via 9to5Mac. When it does arrive, though, Kuo says that the new iPad Mini will get “an upgraded processor and a lower-cost panel,” which would seem to position it as a smaller option for those considering Apple’s entry-level iPad model rather than a miniature version of the iPad Pro. An iPad Mini update has been a long time coming — Apple last updated the device with the iPad Mini 4 back in 2015. The iPad Mini was last updated in 2015 Kuo also says that Apple is still looking at either late 2018 or early 2019 for the AirPower charging mat along with the rumored AirPod update that would add a Qi-compatible case. It’s still not clear whether those will be showing up at next week’s event, or if Apple will even mention the still missing charging pad at all. Additionally, Kuo’s report also reiterated his main predictions for the upcoming October 30th event: A pair of updated iPad Pros (presumably to replace the existing 12.9-inch and 9.7-inch models) with the rumored Face ID integration, reduced bezels, and USB-C support A new Apple Pencil — which Kuo says will have an “all-new” design (that may mean support for USB-C, given the iPad rumors) New Macs, including a “low-price” MacBook, and spec bumps for both the iMac and the long-neglected Mac Mini
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The Verge
Meet Messenger 4: Facebook’s makeover both simplifies and customizes your chats
Messenger will soon be getting a new look. Facebook has unveiled Messenger 4, an update with the same tools but a simplified look. The chat app is also getting a new customization feature. The post Meet Messenger 4: Facebook’s makeover both simplifies and customizes your chats appeared first on Digital Trends.
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Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Super Mario Bros. 3 — the greatest game ever — just turned 30
Super Mario Bros. 3 was launched in Japan on October 23rd 1988 (and every game since has been sub par). It’s incomprehensible that this isn’t a globally recognized holiday, but nonetheless, we’re here to help you celebrate this momentous occasion in gaming history. It doesn’t matter how old you are, Super Mario Bros. 3 is the greatest game ever made. That’s a fact. If you’re my age, it was the absolute peak of 1980s video game technology, and you were the perfect age to appreciate it. Nothing else was close. If you’re older than me: whatever ancient Atari game you’re… This story continues at The Next Web
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The Next Web | International technology news, business & culture
This glow-in-the-dark, scorpion-skinned Fiat 500 Abarth helps fight cancer
Fiat's Abarth division has teamed up with a Dutch artist to create a one-of-a-kind 500 painted with pieces of scorpion skin. Rest assured that no scorpions were harmed to create this hot hatch; a scorpion molts 16 times in its life. The post This glow-in-the-dark, scorpion-skinned Fiat 500 Abarth helps fight cancer appeared first on Digital Trends.
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Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
This Is How Different Wheel Sizes Affect Winter Tire Performance
It’s about that time of year when most people start thinking about shopping for winter tires in preparation for the cold and snowy months. We’ve written about the importance of winter tires before, but here’s how you can decide what size tire to buy. Read more...
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Lifehacker
Facebook Is Finally Adding a Dark Mode to Messenger
At least one Facebook app will soon be bathed in the shadowy beauty that is dark mode, that coveted color scheme where the background is black and my eyes aren’t so angry.Read more...
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Gizmodo - We come from the future.
Wirelessly charging an EV in 15 minutes sounds crazy, but it’s getting closer
Researchers at the Department of Energy want you to be able to wirelessly charge your electric vehicle in just 15 minutes. And they've recently passed a major milestone on the journey to that goal. The post Wirelessly charging an EV in 15 minutes sounds crazy, but it’s getting closer appeared first on Digital Trends.
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Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
The Fan Bingbing saga shows China’s willingness to control overly wealthy celebrities
China’s highest-paid actress Fan Bingbing (X-Men: Days of Future Past) disappeared this summer following accusations of tax evasion. This month, an apology for breaking the law appeared on her social media account, and Fan has been ordered to pay 884 million yuan ($127 million) to avoid criminal prosecution. Last week, she resurfaced in paparazzi shots, but the Chinese release of her upcoming film Air Strike (also commonly translated as Unbreakable Spirit or The Big Bomb), also starring Bruce Willis, was canceled. In the span of four months, one of the most famous and beloved women in China transformed into a symbol of corruption in a saga that captivated Chinese social media. So what happened? It all began in May when TV presenter Cui... Continue reading…
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The Verge
Facebook shut down a spam network in Brazil
Facebook's crackdown on misleading content continues, this time in Brazil. The social network gave the boot to 68 pages and 43 accounts -- all linked to a single marketing group -- for violating the company's policies on misrepresentation and spam.
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Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features