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Samsung stops releasing Blu-ray players in the US
Did you notice that Samsung hasn't made a peep about Blu-ray players at CES or other recent trade shows? There's a good reason for it: the company is exiting the category in the US. Samsung told Forbes and CNET that it's no longer introducing Blu-ray...
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
LG’s first 5G phone just leaked — here’s the V50 ThinQ
OK, I’m about convinced that Vlad is right — phone manufacturers aren’t even trying anymore. Hot on the heels of learning practically everything Samsung could possibly announce at its Galaxy S10 press conference later this month, including up to five phones and an entire wearables lineup, LG’s new superphone — the LG V50 ThinQ — has just broken cover, and it turns an entire trail of bread crumbs into a remarkably full picture of a phone worth watching for. We knew that LG was bringing a 5G smartphone to Sprint in the first half of 2019 — and separately, we’d heard that the company might debut its rumored, 5G-equipped V50 superphone alongside the likely-to-be-more-reasonably-priced LG G8 at Mobile World Congress later this month. But now, prominent phone leaker Evan Blass (@evleaks) has given us what’s almost certainly our full first press pictures of the V50, and it seems those two rumors are one and the same. The LG V50 ThinQ appears to be headed to Sprint, and we should see an announcement on February 24. LG V50 ThinQ for Sprint 5G pic.twitter.com/TNLQsYPgPS— Evan Blass (@evleaks) February 16, 2019 Why am I so certain about that date? It’s not just the date teased in the center of the screen, though that’s certainly cute — it’s the fact that LG already officially revealed in a Korean press release that its first 5G phone will be unveiled on the 24th as well. And because that press release officially announced some early details of that phone, it’s probably safe to assume those details will apply to the V50 ThinQ as well — meaning we should expect this phone to come with Qualcomm’s latest Snapdragon 855 processor, a new (and large, with 2.7 times the surface area) vapor chamber cooling system, and a fairly high-capacity 4,000mAh battery as well. LG spilled these details trying to address 5G early adopter fears In that release, LG suggested that the battery in particular would help address fears that 5G phones might have lower battery life, which is a pretty dang valid one considering how poor the first 4G LTE phones’ batteries were, and I’m wondering if more capable cooling systems will be a necessity for the first 5G phones as well. It’s not clear from Blass’s image how thin the LG V50 ThinQ might be or whether it’ll still have a 3.5mm headphone jack, but we can see a few notable features nonetheless — while the inclusion of a rear fingerprint divot might be disappointing for those who are hoping LG migrates to in-display fingerprint sensors, it’s impressive to see that LG may have managed to cram the LG V40’s three rear cameras — wide angle, normal, and telephoto zoom — into a package that lays flat instead of bulging out the back of the phone. We’ll almost certainly find out more at LG’s event at Mobile World Congress on February 24.
The Verge
The NBA app-controlled ‘smart jersey’ of the future lets you change your player name and number
NBA Commissioner Adam Silver gave the world a peek at the future of jerseys during this week’s NBA All-Start Technology Summit, an event dedicated to illustrating how technology might advance the sport by 2038. In addition to mentioning fans gaining entry into games via facial recognition, hologram mascots, and more personalized game experiences, Silver demonstrated the future of jerseys: a piece of smart clothing that can change the name and number displayed on them through a mobile app. Details on how the jersey is made weren’t shared, but it’s a neat, concept and something we haven’t seen before. You can check out the demo below: Adam Silver unveils the NBA jersey of the future. pic.twitter.com/h5GePOwOjx— NBA (@NBA) February 15,... Continue reading…
The Verge
Ja Rule Claims He's Planning Another Fyre Festival-Like Event, Which Seems Fine
Surely you haven’t forgotten about Fyre Festival, the event that scammed models, the rich, and many Bahamian vendors into believing it would be one of the greatest events of the decade—headlined by Blink 182 for god’s sake—before it all came crashing down.Read more...
1 h
Gizmodo - We come from the future.
How to Temporarily Store Your Luggage When You're Staying at an Airbnb
Back when we all stayed in hotels when we traveled, figuring out what to do with your luggage was easy. If you arrive in town long before you’re supposed to check in or your flight is long after check out time, any reasonable hotel offers luggage storage and will hold on to your bag for you for the price of a tip to…Read more...
2 h
Lifehacker
Recommended Reading: The best of the Best Pictures
The Best Picture championship belt Adam Nayman and Sean Fennessey, The Ringer This year's installment of the Academy Awards is set for February 24th, but ahead of the festivities, The Ringer is looking back at the best Best Pictures with a unique...
2 h
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Save 60% off tons of online courses in honor of Presidents Day weekend
Oh Presidents' Day, the one day of the year when you can score mattresses at rock-bottom prices. We've decided to shake things up for 2019 and swap sleepy time for brain fuel: online courses, bundles, and e-learning packages.  Take your pick from this selection of hot courses and learn something new before Memorial Day comes around. Machine Learning and Data Science Certification Training Bundle ($1,600 value) Haven't you heard? The world revolves around machine learning and big data now. If you want to get in on the fun, this bundle breaks down the most head-scratch-inducing concepts into digestible lectures, allowing you to gain a deeper understanding of things like TensorFlow, Neural Networks, Clustering In R, and a whole lot more. Lost already? Read more...More about Presidents Day, Mashable Shopping, Shopping Stackcommerce, Shopping Onlinelearning, and Onlinelearning
3 h
Mashable
The replication crisis may also be a theory crisis
Theory protects from "personal intuitions and culturally biased folk theories."
3 h
Ars Technica
Signs that China's real-estate bubble will burst and take the economy with it
China's real-estate bubble is the largest in human history, and despite years of warning signs, it has grown and grown, spilling over into the rest of the world. It's hard to overstate just how crazy China's real-estate market is: 25% of the country's GDP comes from construction, and 80% of the nation's wealth is in domestic property holdings. That's $65T, nearly double the size of the economies of every G7 nation combined. The market has been kept afloat through China's massive "shadow banking" system, itself such a systemic risk that the Chinese government has been forced to crack down on it. Now, China's massive, blue-chip property developers have had their debt downrated to CCC and are struggling to issue new bonds -- Moody's rates the debt of 51 out of 61 Chinese property companies as "junk." China has 65 million vacant residences, but properties remain stubbornly high, even in "tier-two" cities like Jinan, where a 1000sqft apartment costs RMB2M, while a worker may only earn RMB6,000/month. This has tanked sales volume (down 44% year-on-year in the first week of 2019), but developers are not able to lower their prices in the face of popular uprisings from people who have overleveraged themselves to buy into the tier-one city markets. In one case, a cut to the price of unsold units sent Shanghainese property owners into the streets chanting and holding up signs reading "Give us our hard-earned blood-and-sweat money back!" The nation is staggering under massive real-estate debt, $3.4 trillion worth of it, and 47.1% of that is tied up in vacant properties, and the people who borrowed that money are not receiving rental income, nor are they living in those properties. Read the rest
3 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Starz‘ Counterpart has been canceled—which is bad, because the show is good
JK Simmons' spy skills haven't saved Counterpart yet, but the second half of Season 2 should.
3 h
Ars Technica
How ‘Alita: Battle Angel’ triumphed over the uncanny valley
When the first trailer for the live action Alita: Battle Angel dropped in late December 2017, the internet was abuzz about the eponymous character's large CG eyes. Heck, even we called them "creepy" and "weird." Now that the film's finally here and I...
3 h
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Apple's 'AirPods 2' might come in a stealthier black color
Since AirPods launched in late 2016, people have begged Apple to release them in a color other than white. After years, Apple might finally cave in to everyone's wishes. The latest rumor suggests Apple launch the second generation of its AirPods, tentatively called "AirPods 2," in black. SEE ALSO: Genius woman turns her AirPods into earrings so they won't get lost According to the Economic Daily News (via AppleInsider), Apple's supply chain has already started mass producing AirPods 2 in black as well as the AirPower wireless charging mat that has been delayed several times because of engineering challenges. Read more...More about Apple, Rumors, Wireless Earbuds, Airpods, and Airpods 2
3 h
Mashable
The best heated gloves of 2019
When temperatures plunge, the first thing that gets cold are your fingers. Ward off frostbite and keep your digits toasty warm with these best heated gloves. The post The best heated gloves of 2019 appeared first on Digital Trends.
4 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Saturday's Best Deals: Rakuten Sitewide Sale, Instant Pot, Slime Gold Box, and More
A Samsung QLED TV, Aukey USB-C Cables, and a World Wide Stereo Sale lead off Presidents’ Day Weekend’s best deals.Read more...
4 h
Gizmodo - We come from the future.
4 small appliances that have changed the way we cook food (for the better)
These are exciting times for home cooks seeking to advance or simplify their technique in the kitchen, thanks in part to four small appliances that have made a splash in the past few years. Here’s why you should consider buying them. The post 4 small appliances that have changed the way we cook food (for the better) appeared first on Digital Trends.
5 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
HoloLens 2: Everything you need to know
The HoloLens 2 is ripe for an announcement. Here's what Microsoft has revealed so far, what's likely in store for the next generation HoloLens, and everything that we know about this mixed reality headset. The post HoloLens 2: Everything you need to know appeared first on Digital Trends.
5 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Photography news: Wacom’s slimmer pen, Leica’s cinema special edition
In this week's photography news, Wacom launches a new slimmer pen for pro users. Leica's upcoming M10-P is designed for cinema, inside and out, with built-in cinema modes in the updated software. The post Photography news: Wacom’s slimmer pen, Leica’s cinema special edition appeared first on Digital Trends.
5 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Shoot your movie now with this filmmaker's master class
High-def cameras are available to anyone and for much less than they were just a decade ago. Even the phones in our pockets can be used to shoot and edit short films. It's never been easier to be a filmmaker, providing you have the technique. Enter the Film & Cinematography Mastery Bundle, an online boot camp that will take your movie idea from first shot to final cut. In three separate courses, you'll get insights into every step of the moviemaking process from conception to distribution. An overview tutorial lets you know what missteps to avoid when writing your screenplay, and how to raise funds for the shoot once it's done. Then, you'll dive into the shot-by-shot details with an exhaustive course on cinematography, teaching you how to pick your shots and what equipment you'll need to capture them. Whether it's audio recording, lighting or editing, you'll have a working knowledge of almost every aspect of the process. Lifetime access to the Film & Cinematography Mastery Bundle is on sale now for $29. Read the rest
5 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Out Magazine's latest issue celebrates women and non-binary femmes, and it's a blessing
This is One Good Thing, a weekly column where we tell you about one of the few nice things that happened this week. Between the loss of queer publication Into and the partial closing of AfterEllen, it's been a crushing few years for queer people in media. So it was downright uplifting to see Out Magazine feature the women and non-binary femmes otherwise known as the "Mothers and Daughters of the Movement" in its latest issue.  It's so rare to see this community represented in media, forget gracing a cover.  SEE ALSO: Miss Spain is the first-ever trans woman to compete in Miss Universe Here's how the editors of the magazine describe the "Mothers and Daughters:" Read more...More about Women, Culture, Lgbtq, Out Magazine, and Culture
5 h
Mashable
These are the Netflix shows Gen-Z thinks actually represent them
When it comes to entertainment, diversity has become one of those words repeated so often that it sometimes seems to have lost all of its meaning. Diversity in programming is often lauded as a goal for networks and, in the case of the world's most-watched streaming platform, Netflix, but as audiences grow more connected it's hard to pinpoint which shows are actually getting it right.  Generation Z, those who were born after 1996 and have barely known a world without WiFi and bingeable shows, experience an overabundance of choice when it comes to their entertainment needs. In coming years, theirs are the opinions that will be most important when determining which shows sink or fail. Read more...More about Netflix, Netflix Originals, Gen Z Tv, Entertainment, and Movies Tv Shows
5 h
Mashable
Golden State updates the dystopian thriller for the #FakeNews era
American speculative fiction can trace its roots back to the country’s puritanical origins, which left its mark on a wide range of authors. Starting with Nathaniel Hawthorne and continuing through Shirley Jackson and Margaret Atwood, these writers focus on the role that their characters play in society at large, and what those societies do to keep their subjects in line. That influence cuts through Ben H. Winters’ latest novel, Golden State, in which a police officer uncovers a troubling conspiracy in an alternate future where truth is absolute, and where lying is swiftly and severely punished. The country of Golden State sits on what used to be California, and Winters quickly illustrates the state’s response to lying. His main character, Laszlo Ratesic, has an almost supernatural ability to see when someone is lying. While eating in a diner, he overhears a young man named Todd lying to his mother, so Ratesic chases him down and arrests him. Todd’s brother Eddie stole pills from his mother, and will get six months in jail for the crime. Todd, on the other hand, will get upwards of 10 years for “a forceful and purposeful distortion of the truth.” Some spoilers for the book ahead. Ratesic is quickly pulled into what at first looks like a mundane case — a construction worker is killed due to a fall from a roof, and the local police want to make sure that there was nothing off about the situation. Ratesic is fuming — he’s been tasked with a young rookie, Aysa Paige, who is joining the service and has abilities that are similar to his own. However, he takes her under his wing as they begin to look into who the worker was, and what led up to his untimely end. As they investigate, Winters paints a picture of a society obsessed with codifying reality. The government has installed cameras everywhere (in door frames, lights, and even on clothing) in order to document everything that is happening. People greet one another with affirming phrases like “the Earth is in orbit around the sun,” and “six sixes is thirty-six.” Citizens are required to obsessively journal, chronicle, and archive their lives in “daybooks.” Much as in his 2016 book Underground Airlines, Winters has built a wholly believable alternative world, one which feels entirely plausible and familiar to our own. Image: Mulholland Books As Ratesic and Paige begin to look into the case, a strange number of anomalies begin to stack up. To start, there are two weeks’ worth of files missing from the dead roofer’s personal files, and the owner of the house, a prominent judge, admits to having had many affairs, leading them to believe that someone might have been trying to blackmail him. The deeper the two dig into the case, the more it looks as though there’s a greater conspiracy at hand, one designed to undermine the legitimacy of the Golden State’s authority to determine who is permitted to say what is truth and what is not. There’s a Minority Report-like element to this thriller, in that some unknown party is manipulating the system in order to undermine and cast doubt on the established order — something that Ratesic and Paige walk right into. Golden State plays to a long tradition of dystopian fiction Golden State plays to a long tradition of dystopian fiction, in which a hero essentially wakes up to the problems that serve to oppress the society’s citizens. Ratesic’s Golden State is certainly an oppressive society; its people are surveilled and policed for any minor infraction or untruth, with harsh punishments for those who step out of line. There are certainly comparisons that one can draw between Winters’ book and classics like Yevgeny Zamyatin’s We or George Orwell’s 1984. He brings in enough detail to allow us to realize how such a truth-obsessive society came to be, and how closely we’re surveilled now. At one point, Ratesic lectures his junior partner on the state of the world when she complains about Todd’s strict punishment. “Strip away the context and the foundational truth is that he lied. In a public place, purposefully and specifically, he told a purposeful and specific untruth... Imagine if everyone did it. Imagine if each person was allowed the luxury of claiming their own truth, building a reality of their own in which they can live. Imagine the danger that that would pose, how quickly those lies would metastasize, and the extraordinary threat that would pose to the world.” It’s easy to imagine what Winters is commenting on with a passage like that. He recently told NPR’s Weekend Edition that he began writing the book the day after President Trump was sworn into office and after hearing Kellyanne Conway’s infamous phrase “alternative facts.” Winters extrapolates what a world might look like where lying isn’t possible Winters extrapolates what a world might look like where lying isn’t possible, and ultimately lands on a dystopian state where the truth is rigorously policed. It’s a clever satire that flips our current problems on their head to imagine the opposite of a world where “fake news” isn’t a common refrain from politicians. But the book isn’t exactly playing the role of devil’s advocate, as though to say “no look, even if we tell the truth, things won’t be better.” Rather, it’s a novel that shows how one can miss the forest for the trees. The obsessive codification of the truth by anybody means that white lies — like a kid lying to his mother — are treated as if they were equal to flagrant untruths. Like any good dystopian yarn, Golden State shows just how insidious this line of thinking is, and how any organization or government can warp good intentions into truly harmful ones.
5 h
The Verge
The Pentagon Needs to Woo AI Experts Away From Big Tech
Opinion: Without more DOD investment, there just aren’t enough incentives to lure talent away from high-paying jobs with great benefits into a life of public service.
5 h
WIRED
Sci-Fi Author Robert Heinlein Was Basically MacGyver
Gregory Benford's new book portrays the writer as a man of action and improvised traps.
5 h
WIRED
Denis Villeneuve’s Dune will hit theaters in November 2020
We finally know when Denis Villeneuve’s adaptation of Dune will come out: November 20th, 2020, according to Variety. The film is the latest adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic 1965 science fiction novel, set on a desert planet in a feudal galaxy. Villeneuve comes to the film with an impressive track record when it comes to science fiction, first with his first contact film Arrival, and with Blade Runner 2049. Last year, the director said in an interview that his goal was to direct two films, which Herbert’s son Brian backed up, saying that the first screenplay roughly covered the first half of the novel. Already, we’ve seen a steady drip of casting news, revealing a spectacular cast for the project. Villeneuve’s film is the latest take on the novel. David Lynch famously directed an adaptation in 1984 that’s gone on to achieve cult status, and the SCI FI channel produced a miniseries and a sequel in 2000 and 2003. The story follows a noble house, the Atreides, as they’re given control of the desert planet Arrakis. The planet is the only known source of melange (spice), a drug that enhances human mental abilities, and makes space travel possible. When the family is overthrown by the rival Harkonnen house, Paul Atreides flees and is taken in by nomads known as the Fremen. He becomes their messianic leader, and works to lead a revolution on the planet to overthrow the Harkonnens. Herbert went on to write several sequels, while his son continued the series with a sprawling series that continued to expand and explore the world.
5 h
The Verge
The Morning After: Amazon drop 'LotR' hints
Hey, good morning! You look fabulous. Welcome to your weekend! We're closing things out with a teaser from Amazon, as well as a preview of Samsung's big Galaxy S10 reveal. Some of the highlights from last week include a Zelda remake and our review o...
5 h
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
How to turn off Live Photos on an iPhone
If you want to save storage space on your iPhone or reduce the size of your backup for iCloud, then you should think about turning off Live Photos in the camera app. Find out exactly how to do it with our easy guide. The post How to turn off Live Photos on an iPhone appeared first on Digital Trends.
5 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Space Photos of the Week: The Trail of Opportunity and More
As hard as it is to say goodbye to our favorite little rover, the mission had a hell of a run on Mars.
6 h
WIRED
10 adorable videos of turtles eating strawberries
There is nothing quite as pure as watching animals try to eat cumbersome people food. Dogs and peanut butter, hamsters and crackers — it's a match made in viral video heaven.  But our personal favorite physical manifestation of cuteness comes in the form of turtles trying to eat strawberries. Their mouths are just too small to wrap completely around the strawberry, and their bodies too slow to chow down on the fruit. Adorable. SEE ALSO: 2018: The Year Humans Called Animals Hot If you need to purify your internet browsing experience, take a moment to watch these turtles take some fantastic nibbles.  Read more...More about Youtube, Animals, Culture, Viral Videos, and Turtles
6 h
Mashable
Amazon’s HQ2 New York plans didn’t need to end this way
After the pageantry of searching for a new spot for its headquarters, some had expected Amazon's decision to move to New York be a done deal. Not so. It took Amazon months to decide to bring one of two new headquarters to Long Island City, and mere m...
6 h
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Walmart Presidents’ Day sale: Instant Pot, Google Home, and 4K TV deals
Presidents' Day weekend is one of the best times of the year to find deep discounts on 4K TVs, laptops, Instant Pots, clothes, mattresses, and furniture. And Walmart is offering deals on all of those things and more. The post Walmart Presidents’ Day sale: Instant Pot, Google Home, and 4K TV deals appeared first on Digital Trends.
7 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews