Business
384
Sports
346
Technology
unread news (Demo user)
Technology
unread news (Demo user)
Twitter Makes It Easier Than Ever to Switch Between Latest and Top Tweets
Twitter has finally delivered on its promise to give users more control over their timeline. It comes in the form of a new button on the main screen that lets you switch between two different kinds of tweets. The post Twitter Makes It Easier Than Ever to Switch Between Latest and Top Tweets appeared first on Digital Trends.
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Amazon and Facebook Reportedly Had a Secret Data-Sharing Agreement, and It Explains So Much
Back in 2015, a woman named Imy Santiago wrote an Amazon review of a novel that she had read and liked. Amazon immediately took the review down and told Santiago she had “violated its policies.” Santiago re-read her review, didn’t see anything objectionable about it, so she tried to post it again. “You’re not eligible…Read more...
Gizmodo - We come from the future.
Elon Musk Unveils the Boring Company’s Car-Flinging Tunnel
The Tesla and SpaceX CEO showed off the details of his latest scheme to slay traffic.
WIRED
Samsung adds QLED screens to its artsy Frame and Serif TVs
Samsung designed the Frame and Serif TVs to be stylish additions to your home, like some sort of art piece that you can also use to watch movies. So, it's not surprising that the tech giant has announced an upgrade that's supposed to make them look e...
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Facebook Caps Off 2018 With Yet Another Massive Privacy Scandal
This has been a terrible 2018 for Facebook so far, from numerous revelations about its shady privacy practices and high-profile political spats to admissions it helped enable genocide. With 13 days left in the year, it’s still getting worse. Much worse.Read more...
Gizmodo - We come from the future.
Elon Musk's underground tunnel has potential, but leaves a lot to be desired
At first, the alley looked like many others: cinder block walls, neglected asphalt, and chain link fences that back up on beige single family bungalows. There was one big difference, though. At the end of this unnamed alley between 122nd and 120th streets in Hawthorne, California is a subterranean elevator that can transport a small SUV underground. Oh, and that car-sized elevator? It's owned by Elon Musk. The guy helming Tesla and SpaceX. On Tuesday, Musk's Boring Company held a proof of concept launch event for its 1.4-mile long test tunnel at SpaceX headquarters, which is just outside Los Angeles. Musk said he chose SpaceX HQ as the location for his first tunnel so that he would be able to watch progress from the window at his desk.  Read more...More about Elon Musk, Boring Company, Tech, and Transportation
2 h
Mashable
Elon Musk's LA tunnel turns Teslas into a 'rail-guided train'
The Boring Company is starting its launch event for the test tunnel it successfully built in LA running from SpaceX property to "O'Leary Station," and Elon Musk has already shared a few details. In tweets he showed off a sedan settled onto wheel gear...
2 h
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Facebook gave Spotify and Netflix access to users’ private messages
What to make of the New York Times’ latest story about Facebook’s broad data-sharing agreements? The story, which draws on internal documents describing the company’s partnerships, reports on previously undisclosed aspects of business partnerships with companies including Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Spotify, and Netflix. In some cases, companies had access to data years after it was supposed to have been cut off. Here’s how the story is framed by reporters Gabriel J.X. Dance, Michael LaForgia, and Nicholas Confessore: The documents, as well as interviews with about 50 former employees of Facebook and its corporate partners, reveal that Facebook allowed certain companies access to data despite those protections. They also raise questions about whether Facebook ran afoul of a 2011 consent agreement with the Federal Trade Commission that barred the social network from sharing user data without explicit permission. In all, the deals described in the documents benefited more than 150 companies — most of them tech businesses, including online retailers and entertainment sites, but also automakers and media organizations. Their applications sought the data of hundreds of millions of people a month, the records show. The deals, the oldest of which date to 2010, were all active in 2017. Some were still in effect this year. The story, which builds on reporting earlier this year from both the Times and the Wall Street Journal, describes a variety of data-sharing partnerships, some of which users were likely unaware of. They include: Giving Apple access to users’ Facebook contacts and calendar entries, even if they had disabled data sharing, as part of a partnership that still exists. Apple told the Times it was unaware that it had special access, and of the data described would never leave the user’s device. Giving Amazon the names and contact information of users, in a partnership that is currently being wound down. Amazon wouldn’t discuss how it used the data other than to say it had used it “appropriately.” On Twitter, Gizmodo’s Kashmir Hill speculated that Amazon may have used the data to fight review fraud. Giving Bing, the Microsoft search engine, access to see names and other profile information of a user’s friends. Microsoft said it has since deleted the data. Facebook says that only user data set to “public” was accessible to Microsoft. Giving Spotify, Netflix, and the Royal Bank of Canada the ability to read users’ private Facebook messages. The access described in the Times story falls into three types of Facebook partnerships. The first are what Facebook calls “integrations,” and they refer to custom-built apps that Facebook built for OEMs like BlackBerry. Because they were integrated with phone operating systems, they require a broad exchange of data with OEMs. They’ve gotten a lot of attention this year, but I think most users would reasonably assume that their personal data was being exchanged with the phone manufacturer in those cases. The second type of partnerships, which is represented by the Bing deal, are part of a now-defunct program called “instant personalization.” This feature, which launched in 2010, opted every Facebook user in by default. It allowed all of its partners to personalize their own services using whatever Facebook knew about you and was willing to share. Yelp, for example, would show visitors which of their Facebook friends used the site when they visited. The program drew significant criticism when it launched, and it was eventually killed off in 2014. But according to the Times, Bing continued to have access to the data through 2017, and two other companies still had access this summer. On one hand, this was all public data — friends’ names, hometowns, and that sort of thing. On the other hand, Facebook’s failure to shut down data access here is reminiscent of the failure that sparked the Cambridge Analytica data privacy scandal: a company said it had deleted a bunch of user data turned out to have instead used it in an influence to sway the 2016 presidential election. The final type of partnerships are essentially one-off deals that Facebook made over the years. The scariest-sounding of them all was a deal Facebook made with companies including Spotify, Netflix, and the Royal Bank of Canada in which partners were granted read and write access to users’ Facebook messages. This was the result of a broadly written API, launched in 2010 as part of an early (pre-Messenger) effort to build a messaging platform. In Spotify’s case, for example, the company plugged into your chat window to send songs to your friends. It seems possible that a rogue employee made mischief in someone’s messages, but the Times story doesn’t include any examples. There are other worrisome details in the Times story, including reports that Yahoo and the Russian search company Yandex both retained access to user data years after it was supposed to have been cut off. Collectively, they speak to an indifference toward data security that flies in the face of recent Facebook pronouncements on the subject — most notably, chief marketing officer Carolyn Everson’s statement last week that privacy “is the foundation of our company.” Everson made her comments on the same day that Facebook opened a pop-up kiosk in New York City’s Bryant Park where users could ask questions about how their data is used on the platform. Presumably, they would have had more questions to ask if they had access to the list of 150 companies that had been making data partnerships with Facebook over the past decade. In response to the Times’ report, the company acknowledged it had more work to do to regain user trust. It also highlighted some of the benefits of data sharing, including the ability to create more personalized experiences on other sites and services. “Facebook’s partners don’t get to ignore people’s privacy settings, and it’s wrong to suggest that they do,” said Steve Satterfield, director of privacy and public policy at Facebook, in an email. “Over the years, we’ve partnered with other companies so people can use Facebook on devices and platforms that we don’t support ourselves. Unlike a game, streaming music service, or other third-party app, which offer experiences that are independent of Facebook, these partners can only offer specific Facebook features and are unable to use information for independent purposes.” I find it helpful to read the allegations in the Times’ story chronologically, starting with the integration deals, continuing with the one-off agreements, and ending with instant personalization. Do so and you read a story of a company that, after some early success growing its user base by making broad data-sharing agreements with one set of companies — OEMs — it grew more confident, and proceeded to give away more and more, often with few disclosures to users. By the time “Instant personalization” arrived, it was widely panned, and never met Facebook’s hopes for it. Shortly after it was wound down, Facebook would take action against Cambridge Analytica, and once again began placing meaningful limitations on its API. Then basically nothing happened for three years! Whatever is happening, it’s happening ... now. It has been only two months since the largest data breach in Facebook’s history. It has been only five days since the last time Facebook announced a significant data leak. It has been only two days since I said I would be taking the rest of the year off of writing this newsletter. It has only been a few hours since Cher announced she was quitting. WONT USE GOOGLE,GETTING RID OF FACEBOOK ACCOUNT I DIDNT KNOW I HAD.WOULD GET RID OF TWITTER IF IT WASN’T 4 ❤️ OF YOU.THESE COMPANIES HAVE NO ALLEGIANCE TO,OR ❤️OF ANYTHING BUT MONEY . THEY MIGHT AS WELL BE CONSPIRING WITH RUSSIA TO DESTROY OUR DEMOCRACY.WHERES❤️OF — Cher (@cher) December 18, 2018 Here are two last things to chew over as we think about this story in the coming days. One, it’s now clear that a data partnership with Facebook can create reputational risks for the companies making the deals. Every company named in the report will be held account for the Times’ findings, and they better have good and thorough answers when shareholders, lawmakers, and reporters start asking. Two, it’s amazing how much oxygen we all have given to the false notion that Facebook sells your data — when the real story was the data they were giving away.
2 h
The Verge
NYT digs deeper into Facebook's creepy data sharing excesses
We regret to inform you that we may have published our article titled "Facebook's terrible 2018" just a few hours too early. Tonight the New York Times has once again dug into the social network and assembled, based on internal documents and intervie...
3 h
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Apple Sending Unsolicited Notifications for New Carpool Karaoke Episodes and Apple Music Echo Support
Apple has recently been sending out unsolicited notifications to iOS users, promoting Carpool Karaoke episodes and the availability of Apple Music on Amazon Echo devices. Multiple unwanted and unapproved notifications direct from Apple have gone out during the month of December, irritating iPhone users who aren't interested in the features that Apple is promoting. Image via Twitter user Brian Roemmelle Apple started sending out Carpool Karaoke notifications earlier this month via the TV app, letting users know that a new episode was available. It didn't take long for iPhone and iPad users to take to Twitter to complain about the unsolicited notifications. The Apple Music Amazon Echo notifications appear to have gone out today, based on multiple reports from Twitter users who received the info from Apple. Apple Music support for Amazon Echo devices rolled out last Friday. Apple doesn't appear to be sending these push notifications to all users, so it's not clear what criteria the company is using to determine who to send content to. Apple Music and the TV app, the apps that the notifications are coming from, are installed on iOS devices by default and are not apps that users elected to install. Why did Apple just send me a notification about an all new carpool karaoke, something I've never watched and have absolutely no interest in?— Mark Fletcher 📎 (@wingedpig) December 14, 2018 If you've been receiving notifications from Apple, you can stop them by turning off notifications for the apps via the Settings app. Go to Notifications > Music or TV, and toggle off "Allow Notifications." Unfortunately there's no way to keep the TV or Music notifications you do want without also getting the unwanted notifications from Apple. Apple has previously sent out unsolicited notifications on multiple occasions, but the frequency appears to be picking up. Just recently, the company sent out notifications encouraging people to upgrade to the iPhone XR or XS and letting users know about discounted iPhone XR pricing with trade-in. Apple's own App Store rules do not allow for apps to send notifications for advertising, promotions, or marketing purposes, but it appears those rules don't apply to Apple's own notifications.Discuss this article in our forums
3 h
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Yes, there is an 'Aquaman' dildo you can buy
While everyone isn't quite pleased with Aquaman, maybe this clearly unlicensed piece of merchandise will do better. Australian company Geeky Sex Toys have released AquaMoan, a silicone dildo which features a scaly texture and curves reminiscent of the Justice League hero, played by Jason Momoa.  SEE ALSO: How erotic fanfiction lets women explore their sexuality without shame The A$85 ($61) sex toy is a limited release of 500, and yes, it's really a thing. Image: geeky sex toys Image: geeky sex toys The company has previously made toys inspired by franchises like the Avengers, Star Wars, and Guardians of the Galaxy. What legal threats? Read more...More about Culture, Justice League, Sex And Relationships, Aquaman, and Culture
3 h
Mashable
Google Chrome may soon keep your back button from being hijacked
You've been there: Caught on a dodgy website, faced with a barrage of ads or suspicious content, and found yourself trapped — no matter how much you hit the back button. It's a sinister issue called "history manipulation," where multiple dummy pages are inserted into your browser's history to fast forward you to the page you were trying to leave. SEE ALSO: Google hits pause on selling facial recognition tech over abuse fears The issue has been on the Chrome team's radar since 2016, and now it could be a thing of the past in a future release of the browser, as spotted by 9to5Google. In a series of published Chromium code changes, Chrome would flag pages that have been added to the back/forward history without the user's intention, then skip them when the user hits the back button.  Read more...More about Google, Google Chrome, Tech, and Big Tech Companies
4 h
Mashable
The first 'Rocket League' Hot Wheels car arrives this month
Want a tangible sign of your devotion to Rocket League, but would rather not drop $180 on an RC car kit or even several dollars on a Pull-Back Racer? Don't worry, you can buy something with your pocket change. Hot Wheels is launching its first Rock...
4 h
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
GDPR transformed the internet in 2018, and it's not done yet
Time seems to work differently when you spend your days online. The memes, moments, and scandals that feel like ages ago are often really only months, weeks, or even days in the past — and what was once unthinkable quickly transforms into how it's always been.  The General Data Protection Regulation, known as GDPR, only went into effect on May 25 of 2018, but by now the regulation has reached so far into the everyday life of the internet that it's becoming harder to imagine a time before. Things online are changing as a result of GDPR, even if you have to  to remind yourself of that fact, and as we move toward closing out 2018 it's important to take a moment to explore just what those changes are — and the battle that's still to come.  Read more...More about Entertainment, Gdpr, Tech, and Other
4 h
Mashable
Samsung’s stylish The Frame and Serif 4K TVs will soon come in more sizes with better picture quality
Ahead of CES, Samsung is announcing upcoming refreshes of its two most stylish 4K TVs, The Frame and Serif. These are lifestyle pieces that aim to make people rethink what a TV can and should look like. They don’t offer Samsung’s best picture performance — that’s still reserved for the proper QLED lineup — but they’re definitely good for attracting conversation in the home. The Frame is being upgraded with an improved picture over its previous two iterations. The 2019 model will feature Samsung’s quantum dot display technology for a wider HDR color palette. Aside from offering a better picture, The Frame will also now come in a new 49-inch size. (Last year’s edition came in 43-, 55-, and 65-inch sizes.) Samsung markets The Frame to... Continue reading…
4 h
The Verge
Universal has found a new writer for its ‘Battlestar Galactica’ film
Universal Pictures has recruited Jay Basu, who wrote 'The Girl in the Spider's Web' as well as the upcoming 'Charlie's Angels' and 'Labyrinth' feature films, to breathe new life into its big screen 'Battlestar Galactica' reboot. The post Universal has found a new writer for its ‘Battlestar Galactica’ film appeared first on Digital Trends.
4 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
The 'guys really live in apartments like this' meme has a point
We stan a meme that calls for standards.  Last week, Twitter user Kat Hasty posted a picture of a depressing living room, bare except for a single reclining armchair and a TV. There's no art on the walls, no surfaces other than the kitchen counter, and no lamps other than a harsh overhead light. It's ... sad.  "Guys really live in apartments like this and don't see any issue," she said.  guys really live in apartments like this and don’t see any issue pic.twitter.com/c7FQqgDgov — kat hasty (@kathasty) December 13, 2018 In response, some people felt personally attacked and defended their minimalist decor. Amid all the digital hand waving, though, Hasty's tweet sparked a meme calling out the men who have absolutely no standards for their living spaces.  Read more...More about Twitter, Memes, Culture, and Web Culture
5 h
Mashable
Walmart’s $100 2018 iPad discount is one of the best we’ve seen yet
The 2018 iPad is one of the best tablets we've ever seen and the tablet we recommend to the vast majority of users. Now, Walmart is offering one of the best deals so far on the device: $100 off the 32GB space gray version. The post Walmart’s $100 2018 iPad discount is one of the best we’ve seen yet appeared first on Digital Trends.
5 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Very Good Boy (tap tap tap)
This may be a potty dance, but it's the most adorable potty dance ever. This is a very good dog. Tap tap tap tap tap tap tap (fixed) And here's a more upstream original version, no cropping. Good boy [via] Read the rest
5 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Let’s stop worshipping Silicon Valley in 2019
Silicon Valley is basically this American generation’s Detroit. It’s a business hub, an economic engine, and the stuff we’re most proud of producing comes from there. We deify all the Silicon Valley bullshit.  Fail fast. Break things. Venture capital. But what if this is all leading us down the wrong path? Let’s analyze this through a couple of quotes First up: Chamath Palihapitiya, the founder of Social Capital (former exec-level dude at some tech firms). He talked about “failing fast” while speaking to Stanford Business School students. “Fail fast” has become the conventional wisdom of Silicon Valley. And when it comes to… This story continues at The Next Web
5 h
The Next Web | International technology news, business & culture
Asus ZenBook 14 UX433 vs. Apple MacBook Air
Asus has built some tiny bezels into its latest ZenBooks, and the ZenBook 14 is a 14-inch notebook that's as small as many 13-inch models. We compared it to Apple's refreshed MacBook Air to see which is better. The post Asus ZenBook 14 UX433 vs. Apple MacBook Air appeared first on Digital Trends.
5 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
DT Live: Boring Company demo, plant-robot hybrids, and 2018 advances
Episode 39 of Digital Trends was all about reflection as we discussed advancements in cars and robotics over the last year. We were also joined by Alana Mitchell of Skincare by Alana to talk about how her company is utilizing tech. The post DT Live: Boring Company demo, plant-robot hybrids, and 2018 advances appeared first on Digital Trends.
5 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Google’s Gboard communication app reaches 500 languages in only 2 years
In December 2016, Google launched Gboard with support for an already-impressive 100 languages. Since then, however, Google has added a hefty 400 languages to the software keyboard, bringing the total number to 500. The post Google’s Gboard communication app reaches 500 languages in only 2 years appeared first on Digital Trends.
5 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Holiday carols, one-handed guitar, stump duct tape pick
“I was born without my right hand and play guitar with a duct tape pick I made,” says IMGURian abshow. “I play drums too!” Here is the ABShow YouTube channel. This is a clip of my drum cover of Pentatonix' version of this Christmas classic! Hope you enjoy -- feel free to SHARE and let me know your thoughts below! Check out the rest of my channel to see how I do other things with only one hand! View this post on Instagram A clip of my drum (one handed) cover of “God Rest Ye Merry Gentleman” by @ptxofficial
6 h
Boing Boing - A Directory of Mostly Wonderful Things
Walmart discounts the Roomba 618 just in time for last-minute holiday shoppers
Normally priced at $269, the iRobot Roomba 618 robot vacuum is currently on sale for just $229 from Walmart during their last-minute gift sale. With free two-day shipping, you can even get it before Christmas. The post Walmart discounts the Roomba 618 just in time for last-minute holiday shoppers appeared first on Digital Trends.
6 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Chrome OS beta brings Google Assistant to more devices
To date, native access to Google Assistant on a Chrome OS device has meant splurging on Google-made hardware like the Pixelbook or Pixel Slate. You won't have to be quite so picky for much longer, though. Google has started testing Chrome OS 72 in...
6 h
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
2019 Lamborghini Urus first drive review
Twenty five years after the demise of the V12-powered LM002, Lamborghini rejoins the sport-utility segment with the Urus, a veritable tour de force of technology, luxury, and speed. The post 2019 Lamborghini Urus first drive review appeared first on Digital Trends.
6 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Fitbit supercharges its smartwatches with its new 3.0 operating system
Fitbit announced a new software update for the Versa and Ionic, called Fitbit OS 3.0. The new OS will allow for things like on-device daily views, as well as 10 new third-party apps on the watch. The post Fitbit supercharges its smartwatches with its new 3.0 operating system appeared first on Digital Trends.
7 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
After rocky start, Windows 10 October 2018 update is finally available to all
The Windows 10 October 2018 update is now available for everyone to download. After a serious bug derailed its initial release, the update is back and users are now able to check for it through Windows Update. The post After rocky start, Windows 10 October 2018 update is finally available to all appeared first on Digital Trends.
7 h
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Apple releases a tiny iOS update in 12.1.2, fixing connectivity bugs
iOS 12.1.2 is just for iPhones, it seems.
7 h
Ars Technica
Nintendo Switch’s US sales surpass the PS4 and Xbox at the same age
Nintendo today revealed the Switch has now sold over 8.7 million units at the 21-month mark in the US, more than both the PlayStation 4 and the Xbox One did when they were the same “age.” Given how little we know about the sales of at least one of the consoles past that mark, this might be the last time we get to compare the three reliably. The information comes from data analysis company The NPD Group, which tracks video game sales. The little hybrid console also outsold one of its predecessors, the Nintendo Wii, within the same timeframe, and… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Xbox,Nintendo
7 h
The Next Web | International technology news, business & culture
Spam calls grew 300 percent worldwide in 2018, according to Truecaller
Spam calls grew by 300 percent worldwide this year, according to a new report from Truecaller, a caller ID service. But while the scourge continues to grow overall, some countries actually saw a slight decline — including the US. The United States fell from the 2nd most spammed country to the 8th in one year, according to Truecaller. Truecaller users received about 17 calls per month, down from 21 in 2017. The bulk of calls purported to be about insurance or debt collection, according to the report. While no reason was given for the drop, authorities have increasingly tried to crack down on illegal callers. The Federal Trade Commission has brought several lawsuits, while the Federal Communications Commission has considered various regulations to deal with the issue and in one case slapped an egregious robocaller with an $82 million fine. Brazil was the most spammed country The issue continues to escalate elsewhere. Brazil was found to be the most spammed country in 2018, with the average Truecaller user getting over 37 spam calls a month. This was likely due to calls from telecom operators and calls made related to the general election, the company said. India, which was the most spammed country in 2017, has dropped down to second place, with a decrease of 1.5 percent. Truecaller says that in total, its users received 17.7 billion spam calls between January and October. The report counted a call as spam if it was flagged by algorithms or manually by users. Since Truecaller doesn’t count data outside of its customer base, its results and rankings have to be taken with a grain of salt. Another report from a robocall blocking service called YouMail reported 28.5 billion spam calls occurring in the US within the first eight months of this year, a figure that vastly exceeds Truecaller’s numbers and seems more in line with the multiple-calls-per-day nuisance many of us are contending with.
7 h
The Verge
Use a Slo-Mo Video to Calculate How Fast Glass Shatters
Using footage shot by The Slow Mo Guys, you can get a pretty good estimate of the speed at which cracks travel through a sheet of glass.
7 h
WIRED
AT&T's 5G+ Service Will Only Kinda Sorta Be What We Hope For
AT&T's new 5G+ service won't be as fast as the emerging network has been heralded, and it will only be available in very limited areas at first.
7 h
WIRED
Jezebel I Rewatched Love Actually and Am Here to Ruin It for All of You | Deadspin Cubs Owners Discu
Jezebel I Rewatched Love Actually and Am Here to Ruin It for All of You | Deadspin Cubs Owners Discussed Moving Team Out Of Chicago During Beef With Mayor | Splinter What the Fuck Is Sarah Huckabee Sanders Even Talking About Anymore? | The Root #BankingWhileBlack: Bank Calls Cops on Man Because His Paycheck Was Too…Read more...
7 h
Lifehacker
What it means that the Surgeon General now calls vaping an ‘epidemic’
The US Surgeon General just declared youth vaping an epidemic, and called out e-cigarette giant Juul as part of the problem in an advisory today. The Surgeon General’s declaration isn’t a new policy or enforcement action against vape companies or retailers. But it is a call to action that follows news that teen vaping is skyrocketing. Surgeon General Jerome Adams’ advisory lays out why teen vaping is a public health concern: nicotine can mess with the developing brain, it may get people hooked on nicotine products — including cigarettes, and the chemicals in e-cigarette vapor may be unhealthy to inhale. The advisory says a recent surge in teen vaping “has been fueled by new types of e-cigarettes that have recently entered the market,” and calls out vape giant Juul for its high nicotine doses. “They are only issued rarely, when immediate action is called for.” The Surgeon General’s power is more about influence, and less about enforcement: the real regulatory power over vaping comes from the Food and Drug Administration. So this advisory doesn’t have any legal force, Micah Berman, a professor of health services management and policy at The Ohio State University, tells The Verge in an email. “They are a tool used by the Surgeon General to call attention to an issue and to provide guidance to the public,” Berman says. “They are only issued rarely, when immediate action is called for — which is what makes them so noteworthy.” The advisory asks parents, teachers, and health care providers to talk to teens about vaping, and why it’s risky. It also urges state, local, and tribal governments to create clean air policies, curb the sale of flavored e-cigarette products, and prevent advertising campaigns aimed at young people. “Our nation’s doctor sees this as a problem,” says Brian King at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Office on Smoking and Health, who worked on today’s advisory. “We ultimately hope [this] will galvanize folks at multiple levels, particularly at the state and local level.” Juul was specifically name-dropped in the report because of its dominance over the e-cigarette market. “We’ve seen skyrocketing rates of sales of Juul within the past several years,” King says. The advisory notes that Juul’s sales climbed 600 percent between 2016 and 2017. The company’s market dominance combined with a spike in teen vaping leads to an alarming conclusion, according to King: “These specific USB-shaped products, including Juul, are helping to drive this marked increase we’ve seen among our nation’s youth,” he says. That’s in part because Juul uses a form of nicotine that’s less harsh, and therefore less unpleasant to people who aren’t used to inhaling the stuff, King says. “That’s particularly problematic when we’re talking about young people,” he says. In response to the Surgeon General’s advisory today, Juul spokesperson Victoria Davis says in a statement that Juul wants to prevent young people from vaping. “We cannot fulfill our mission to provide the world’s one billion adult smokers with a true alternative to combustible cigarettes if youth use continues unabated.” “Using the e-word, epidemic, takes it to a higher level.” The advisory adds the Surgeon General’s voice to a growing chorus of alarm-sounding from public health agencies. It refers to e-cigarette use among young people as an “epidemic,” which echoes language used by the FDA. It also follows in the wake of back-to-back reports of skyrocketing rates of teen e-cigarette use. Last month, the CDC and the FDA reported a 78 percent increase in vaping among high school students compared to last year. And yesterday, the nationwide Monitoring the Future survey reported that 21 percent of high school seniors say they vaped nicotine in the past 30 days — up from 11 percent last year. “These are simply unprecedented increases that we’re seeing,” King says. That’s why it’s particularly significant that the Surgeon General is using the word “epidemic,” says Kathleen Hoke, a professor specializing in public health law at the University of Maryland: “Using the e-word, epidemic, takes it to a higher level. From a public health perspective, we try not to use that word unless it’s warranted — otherwise you have the boy cried wolf,” she says. But she says, according to these health officials, youth vaping has reached that level: “It’s broad, vast in its impacts, and of deep concern about its lasting effects.”
7 h
The Verge
Google updated its Street View Trekker to look slightly less dorky
Over the years, Google has loaned out its Street View camera to photographers, travelers, and organizations to bring 360-degree imagery of cultural landmarks to Google Maps. Today, the company announced it’s taken the feedback from partners who have used the Trekker, as the camera rig is called, around the world and updated it with their suggestions. The new Street View Trekker is lighter, sleeker, and the cameras have been updated with increased aperture and higher-resolution sensors. The Trekker is versatile enough to be worn like a backpack, or placed on top of everything from cars to boats to zip-lines. It’s especially useful for exploring areas that might otherwise be difficult to travel to with a Street View-equipped car, as well as for building maps for developing countries and cities. Below, you can see what the Trekker used to look like on the left, and the updated version on the right. Google’s Street View camera loan program is open to organizations like tourism boards, nonprofits, government agencies, universities, and research groups. You can also apply to borrow the Trekker here, if you’re interested in promoting areas of “cultural, historic, or touristic significance.” In the meanwhile, check out all the other places the Trekker captured, like scientist Jane Goodall’s office in Tanzania, and the view from the inside of the Eiffel Tower.
7 h
The Verge
2019 will be a pivotal year for Southeast Asian tech startups
With a rising middle class and a booming tech startup scene, Southeast Asia (SEA) sits where China did 10 years ago — on the cusp of a major economic boom fueled by the tech industry. The only questions over the last few years have been: When will the tipping point be reached, and when will SEA mature from a promising regional market into the next big world economy? I’ve seen promising signs that in 2019, our region may finally reach that tipping point. The 10 nations in SEA — Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand, Brunei, Laos, Myanmar, and the… This story continues at The Next Web
7 h
The Next Web | International technology news, business & culture
Apple sent iPhone owners unwanted push notifications to promote Carpool Karaoke 
Apple is starting to send unwanted push notifications to iPhone users, including ones designed to promote its own Carpool Karaoke show — even though Apple’s TV app never expressly asks for permission to send promotional notifications, and even though Apple’s App Store guidelines forbid developers from sending unsolicited promos. We’re not sure how many iPhone users received the notifications, but it looks like Apple has tried plugging its show at least twice in recent weeks: once on December 7th for an episode where Kendall Jenner and Hailey Baldwin grill each other using a lie detector test, and once on December 14 for an episode featuring joint singalongs with comedian Jason Sudeikis and the Muppets. Some people aren’t happy: Hey @Apple if I ever get a notification like this again I’m switching to Samsung pic.twitter.com/mpGKYXiSka— Lex (@Just_John10) December 8, 2018 Why did Apple just send me a notification about an all new carpool karaoke, something I've never watched and have absolutely no interest in?— Mark Fletcher (@wingedpig) December 14, 2018 Why did my phone just send a notification via the TV app that a new carpool karaoke episode featuring Kendall Jenner is out?? 1) I have never watched an episode of carpool karaoke2) I give no fucks about any Kardashian or Jenner.3) I have never used iPhone’s tv app— (@meagan_wilcox) December 8, 2018 With regard to the developer rules, Apple would appear to be violating the section of its App Store Guidelines — Section 4.5.3 —that expressly informs developers not to “spam, phish, or send unsolicited messages to customers.” Apple did not respond to multiple requests for comment. pic.twitter.com/UlESkew75z— John Lagomarsino (@johlag) December 15, 2018 Of course, this is just a notification setting issue that can be resolved rather quickly. You can either turn off all TV app notifications by swiping on the notification itself and tapping “manage,” or you can dig into your notification settings through the general settings app and tailor them further from there. The notification spam is not isolated to TV, either. If you’re part of the iPhone Upgrade Program, you may have received a push notification you never expressly signed up for informing you about upgrading to the newest iPhone. Apple did that earlier this month, seemingly to promote the iPhone XR, although some users report having seen the notification last year too. While that is more understandable — if you’re part of the program, it’s helpful to know that you’re eligible for an upgrade — the language around the notification and its suggestion that “your new iPhone is ready” seems specifically designed to get you to buy something. It’s an ad disguised as a helpful tip. Both of these new examples are less obtrusive than the most famous Apple push notification, which informed more than 500 million people that Apple had purchased and given them a free copy of U2’s Songs of Innocence. That move, which reportedly cost Apple more than $100 million, proved so unpopular that Apple created a special removal process and support website to help angered users get rid of it for good. But it’s these types of actions that undermine the trust Apple has built with its customers. If getting spam push notifications from @Apple about new episodes of Carpool Karaoke is a sign of the company’s tv strategy, we’re in for a rough ride. — Tim Schmitz (@TimSchmitz) December 7, 2018 Now, it’s understandable that Apple might want to plug its own show. Over the last couple of years, Apple CEO Tim Cook has said the company’s services business is its future, as iPhone sales stagnate. Clearly, Apple wants to sell customers not just hardware that works in its ecosystem — like Airpods, the HomePod, and the Apple Watch — but also a bundle of software services it can charge a monthly subscription for. It’s already got Apple Music as a viable Spotify competitor, but Apple is years late to streaming TV, a market it’s been trying to crack since it started selling TV shows and movies through iTunes. But I’d be curious if Apple is actually helping itself with these plugs. Even if these notifications are easy to dismiss, people tend to hate unsolicited junk on their phone.
7 h
The Verge
Facebook Uses IP Address and Other Info to Deliver Location-Based Ads Even When Location Options are Disabled
If you've noticed Facebook continuing to deliver location-based ads even with all location services disabled, you're not alone, and that's because Facebook continues to use data like your IP address to determine your location for ad delivery purposes. Facebook's lack of an option to disable location tracking for ad targeting was highlighted in a Medium post shared today by Aleksandra Korolova, assistant professor of Computer Science at USC. Korolova noticed that Facebook was continuing to provide location-based ads even after she disabled Location History, turned off the location services option for Facebook on her iOS devices, and removed her city from her profile. She didn't upload photos, tag herself at certain locations, or check in, nor does she allow WhatsApp, Instagram, and Facebook Messenger to access her location.Nevertheless, Facebook showed me ads targeted at "people who live near Santa Monica" (which is where I live) or "people who live or were recently near Los Angeles" (which is where I work). Moreover, I have noticed that whenever I travel for work or pleasure, Facebook continues to keep track of my location and use it for advertising: a trip to Glacier National Park resulted in an ad for activities in Whitefish, Montana, a trip to Cambridge, MA -- in an ad for a business there, and a visit to Herzeliya, Israel -- in an ad for a business there.As it turns out, and as Facebook explains on its ads page, it is collecting location data based on "where you connect to the Internet" and "where you use your phone," aka your IP address, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth data. As Korolova points out, Facebook does not explain that turning off all location services will not stop Facebook from "going to great lengths to obtain and use location data for advertising." Facebook does not make it a secret that it is using IP addresses and other information for ad targeting, but most people are likely not aware that their locations are still being tracked in this way even after disabling location tracking settings. Facebook, Korolova argues, should do better, because the locations that a person visits and lives in can reveal a lot about them, and that's info that any Facebook advertiser can take advantage of through ads. Facebook should be providing "meaningful" tools over the location information that it's collecting, rather than options to disable location services that don't actually mean anything because location data is still being collected over IP address. In statements provided to Gizmodo, Facebook confirmed that it's using IP information for location tracking purposes and that there's no way for users to turn off location tracking entirely. "There is no way for people to opt out of using location for ads entirely," a Facebook spokesperson told Gizmodo. "We use city and zip level location which we collect from IP addresses and other information such as check-ins and current city from your profile to ensure we are providing people with a good service--from ensuring that they see Facebook in the right language to making sure that they are shown nearby events and ads for businesses that are local to them." If you use Facebook, there is no way to prevent Facebook from tracking location, except perhaps by enabling a VPN at all times. Quitting Facebook and deleting the app entirely is the only way to make sure the site isn't tracking you, and even then, Facebook has "shadow profiles" with data on people who don't even use the social network.Tag: FacebookDiscuss this article in our forums
7 h
Mac Rumors: Apple Mac iOS Rumors and News You Care About
Chrome may stop websites from hijacking your browser's back button
Surf the web for long enough and you'll invariably run into a site that refuses to acknowledge your browser's back button, usually because it wants to force ads down your throat. Google might soon put a stop to those shady redirects, though. Recent...
8 h
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
'Fresh Prince' star Alfonso Ribeiro sues Fortnite over the Carlton dance
Ribeiro made a name for himself with his moves, which were then apparently copied by a video game. Now, the actor is suing.  Read more...More about Mashable Video, Lawsuit, Fortnite, Fresh Prince, and Entertainment
8 h
Mashable
Netflix's ‘Roma’ Rollout Teaches the Company Some Lessons
Alfonso Cuarón's epic is the biggest theatrical release Netflix has undertaken—and the process has laid bare some weaknesses in the company's offline strategy.
8 h
WIRED
Uber fired Anthony Levandowski. Now he's back with a self-driving truck startup.
A name that came up often during the Uber v. Waymo trade secrets trial is back in the headlines: Anthony Levandowski. The former Google-engineer-turned-autonomous-truck-startup-founder-turned-Uber-self-driving-executive announced his latest startup, Pronto. Its "intelligent driving" system for commercial trucks, Copilot, was released Tuesday. It's similar to Tesla's Autopilot, featuring Level 2 autonomous features that require a fully attentive and alert driver, but it's for truckers. Levandowski worked for Google's Waymo before he left to start his self-driving truck company, Otto, which was almost immediately purchased by Uber. He was then fired from Uber after Waymo said he stole proprietary information about self-driving tech like LiDAR, which uses light and lasers to help vehicles "see." Levandowski refused to cooperate with the investigation leading up to the trial, and Uber ended its driverless truck testing this summer. Read more...More about Autonomous Vehicles, Driverless Trucks, Anthony Levandowski, Uber Vs Waymo, and Semi Autonomous
8 h
Mashable
T-Mobile denies lying to FCC about size of its 4G network
T-Mobile says it provided accurate network information to FCC.
8 h
Ars Technica
Hollywood execs really love this Snapchat movie script
A fictionalized docudrama about the creation of Snapchat was crowned the most-liked script to make the rounds in Hollywood this year, as it earned the top spot on the Black List. Read more...More about Mashable Video, Snapchat, Evan Spiegel, Tech, and Movies Tv Shows
8 h
Mashable
How future forward are you?
Ad content from Bank of AmericaThink about the world 10 years ago. Smartphones were just adding GPS location services. SLR cameras were just getting video capabilities. The first app store came on the scene. Doesn’t it seem like these inventions have already been around forever? Can you imagine the world without them?The future catches up with you — and today’s digital future is already taking shape around us. Today’s vanguard tech will be tomorrow’s everyday, must-have conveniences. Are you already living in that future, or are you taking it a day at a time? Read on to discover how far into the future you’re already living. Read more...More about Supported, Tech, Innovations, and Consumer Tech
8 h
Mashable