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Acting ICE Director Albence on Trump sanctuary city crackdown: They leave us 'no choice'

Acting Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director Matt Albence praised the Trump administration's crackdown on sanctuary policies as the battle between the president and the left-leaning jurisdictions continue.
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Japan’s coronavirus strategy ‘barely holding up’ after surge of new cases
The country has seen a surge of untraceable infections in recent days, an early indication that the virus is past the point of controlling without extreme measures.
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nypost.com
New Jersey block partiers live it up while social distancing
Cocktail party etiquette calls for everything we’re not supposed to do during the coronavirus crisis: pass around appetizers, refill wine glasses, hug each other, stand close so we can gossip. But that doesn’t mean that we can’t bend the rules to fit the times — and tight-knit neighbors in Montclair did just that, determined to...
nypost.com
Trump, Esper Wish Bon Voyage To Hospital Ship Bound For New York City
The president and defense secretary said the USNS Comfort would offer its roughly 1,000 hospital beds as surge capacity for non-coronavirus sufferers in the New York region, freeing up space on land.
npr.org
Mount Everest trekkers flown to safety amid coronavirus lockdown
There are 174 foreign tourists and four Nepali nationals left the mountain by air in 12 small planes and two helicopters, Dhurba Shrestha, an official at the Tenzing Hillary Airport in Lukla, Nepal, told The Associated Press.
nypost.com
UK would do 'well' to keep deaths below 20,000, as deaths top 1,000
Britain will have done “very well” to keep deaths from coronavirus below 20,000, a senior health official said Saturday.
foxnews.com
Elton John to host coronavirus benefit concert with remote performances
The Rocket Man is set for take off! Superstar Elton John will host a star-studded benefit special Sunday night on FOX, honoring the health care heroes and first responders battling the coronavirus pandemic. The “iHeart Living Room Concert for America” will feature remote performances from Alicia Keys, Backstreet Boys, Billie Eilish, Green Day’s Billie Joe...
nypost.com
California Is Latest State to Be Hit With Lawsuit Over COVID-19 Gun Restrictions
Around 25 states have taken steps to limit or shutter operations at all non-essential businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.
newsweek.com
Russia closing its borders to combat coronavirus spread
Russia will close its borders Monday in an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus, Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin said Saturday. The order is among several restrictions Russian officials rolled out this week as COVID-19 began to overtake the world’s largest country. International passenger flights were grounded Friday, and Moscow’s mayor shuttered all non-essential...
nypost.com
"I don't even like the sound of it," Cuomo says after Trump says he's considering quarantine
President Trump said Saturday he is considering an "enforceable" quarantine affecting residents of the metro New York area amid the coronavirus pandemic. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said shortly afterward that he doesn't "even like the sound of it" and said he had not spoken to the president about it.
cbsnews.com
Another U.K. Cabinet Member Has Developed COVID-19 Symptoms
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson tested positive for the virus just a few days ago
time.com
Twitter deletes Rudy Giuliani's tweet for violating rules in attack against Michigan governor
Twitter reportedly cracked down on a tweet made by Rudy Giuliani for an apparently false attack on Democratic Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer. 
foxnews.com
Trump promised coronavirus testing at national retailers. Weeks later, it still isn’t in place.
A drive-through coronavirus testing site near Dodgers Stadium in Los Angeles on March 26, 2020. | Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images Between Walmart, CVS, and Walgreens, there are only 4 drive-through sites running. Four national retailers touted at a White House press conference earlier this month as future coronavirus testing sites still have not rolled out their drive-through test centers, according to reporting from the Washington Post. At a Rose Garden press conference on March 13, days after he declared Covid-19 to be a national emergency, President Donald Trump appeared with leaders from CVS, Target, Walgreens, and Walmart and said those chains would provide space in their parking lots for drive-through testing to take place. The “goal is for individuals to drive up and be swabbed without having to leave your car,” Trump said at the time. But according to the Washington Post, there are only four drive-through testing sites as of last week among the 26,400 stores those retailers operate: two at Walmart locations near Chicago, one each at a CVS in central Massachusetts and a Walgreens in the Chicago area, and none at Target. Rite-Aid, which was not represented at the press conference, has also opened one drive-through site in Philadelphia. As Vox’s Alex Ward has reported, drive-through testing is one critical component of the fight against novel coronavirus, because it maintains isolation for potentially infected people and expedites the process of collecting data about who is infected. Experts have pointed to the large-scale rollout of free drive-through testing in South Korea as contributing to that country’s decline in coronavirus cases. Some local governments, including New Rochelle, a suburban community north of New York City, have implemented such testing regimens themselves. At least 19 states have some mobile testing sites, most outside of hospitals. But “an array of logistical challenges, ranging from a shortage of testing supplies to funding” has stymied the promised public-private partnership with some of America’s largest retailers, write the Post’s Elizabeth Dwoskin, Abha Bhattarai, Juliet Eilperin, and Ashley Parker. They report that a nationwide lack of testing kits led the White House to downgrade its plans, limiting tests at the retail sites to first responders and health workers. Testing is only available for those who meet specific criteria, so although the US just reached the grim milestone of having the most confirmed coronavirus cases in the world, that number is almost certainly an undercount. The CVS site can administer about 200 tests a day, according to the Post, and Walmart can administer about 150 per day at each of its two sites. Target said it is waiting on local officials before it can open up its parking lots. On March 13, Trump promised 500,000 testing kits would be available by the following week, and 5 million by April. To date, 672,449 tests have been administered nationwide, according to the Covid Tracking Project. Mobile testing units around the country are primarily operated at health care sites, such as hospitals and clinics, because the FDA has only approved nostril swabs to be administered by professionals. However, Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Health Brett P. Giroir told the Post that the administration has supported the launch of about 30 mobile sites, and will support retail-driven testing sites going forward. “We are working closely with these retailers now to explore the expansion of testing sites across the county, now further enabled by the nasal self-swabbing technique recently approved by the FDA,” said Giroir. Trump says he wants to lift social distancing measures, but lack of testing undercounts US cases The announcement that there would soon be widespread, easily accessible testing was greeted with optimism. As one pandemic expert, Dr. Dena Grayson, told Vox’s Alex Ward, “The key to containing a highly infectious, deadly virus is you have to identify who’s infected, track down all their contacts, and quarantine them. If you can’t even detect who’s infected, then you’re done.” Grayson added that such measures would be especially effective in less-dense places, where early detection can halt the spread sooner. At the time of the White House announcement, it was already clear that a lack of testing was contributing to an undercount of how many active Covid-19 cases were in the United States. And although testing has ramped up significantly in the last several weeks, with states and municipalities unrolling their own testing programs, these programs have been affected by an ongoing lack of tests and backlogs in authorized testing centers. This lack of tests, and the resulting undercounted number of cases, contributed, in part, to delayed enforcement of social distancing measures. In the absence of widespread tests, people are encouraged to behave as though they already have the virus, staying inside to prevent the virus’s spread. Experts have said that for some people, the low reported numbers communicate less of a risk, reducing compliance rates. But Trump has recently said he wants to relax social distancing requirements in the coming weeks in order to rejuvenate the economy. If measures encouraging people to stay at home are relaxed, and people begin interacting and gathering in groups again, it will be especially important to know who actually has the virus. To be sure, drive-through testing won’t solve the need for every American to clearly understand their coronavirus status. Almost nine percent of American households don’t own cars, and younger people, city residents, and low-income people are all less likely to own cars and be served by these measures. But at a moment when asymptomatic people can spread a powerful disease to vulnerable people, implementing innovative and widespread testing programs is an important tool in mitigating this virus’s spread.
vox.com
Best star snaps of the week: Reese Witherspoon, Jared Leto and more
nypost.com
California chief justice uses new powers to revise courtroom rules during pandemic
With state's courts largely shut down, 1st Amendment groups worry the public won't have access to documents and proceedings conducted electronically.
latimes.com
Biden holds 9-point lead on Trump in new Fox News Poll
The findings — outside the Fox News poll's margin of error — show Trump's numbers against Biden virtually unchanged from January.
nypost.com
Young Medical Graduates Find Themselves on the Front Lines of Italy’s Coronavirus Fight
On the morning of March 8, Francesca Tamburelli was in her apartment in Heidelberg, Germany, when she learned that part of Italy was entering lockdown due to the spread of the novel coronavirus. Upon hearing the news the 25-year-old, who graduated from medical school just last summer, quickly boarded a bus to her hometown of…
time.com
Trump raises idea of quarantines for northeast US
US President Donald Trump said Saturday that he was considering a type of enforceable quarantine to prevent people in New York and parts of New Jersey and Connecticut from traveling. (March 28)       
usatoday.com
New York presidential primary moved to June 23, Cuomo announces
New York is the hardest-hit state in the nation, with over 52,000 reported cases of the total 110,000 confirmed cases in the country as of Saturday.
cbsnews.com
Coronavirus shutdown won’t hurt economy in long run, Fed study says
Shutting down schools and workplaces when a pandemic strikes doesn’t hurt the economy — and actually could get things back to normal faster when the threat tapers off, according to a new study by Federal Reserve researchers. The closures, quarantines and restricted business hours — what the Fed researchers call “nonpharmaceutical interventions” — lessen economic...
nypost.com
Trump Considering Enforceable Quarantine on New York, New Jersey and Connecticut
Trump said he spoke with state governors, but Gov. Cuomo denies hearing about a quarantine
time.com
Coronavirus-panicked dad locks son out of house after spring break trip
A father bans his son from his house, after the kid was away on a germy Spring Break.
nypost.com
New York may be weeks from a peak in coronavirus cases. Now other states are preparing for surges
Several states are reporting spikes in coronavirus cases, raising fears more hot spots will emerge in the US beyond New York as soon as next week.
edition.cnn.com
Lady Gaga’s dad slammed for asking for donations to pay restaurant staff
Joe Germanotta created a GoFundMe account asking the public to donate $50,000 to cover his staff's wages amid the coronavirus shutdown.
nypost.com
Rhode Island Police Hunt Down Travelers From New York to Force Quarantine
The governor issued a stay-at-home order and said anyone who arrives from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days.
slate.com
Trump Says He May Quarantine New York, Connecticut, New Jersey: 'It's A Hot Spot'
The president's comments Saturday came as news to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. "I don't even know what that means," Cuomo said at a briefing.
npr.org
Anna Koiman shares at-home workouts for coronavirus lockdown
Americans can no longer use lack of proper equipment as an excuse for not working out during the coronavirus pandemic, certified women's fitness specialist and former "Fox & Friends Weekend" co-host Anna Kooiman said Friday.
foxnews.com
Woman murdered by same person who murdered her mother 23 years ago: Police
The daughter was killed in the same house where her mother was killed.
abcnews.go.com
Is ‘Epicenter’ the Wrong Word for New York?
Some worry that the go-to headline word actually hurts our ability to fight the disease.
politico.com
National Parks Service modifying park operations in greater Washington D.C. area
NPS has tried to emphasize the importance of social distancing – both while visiting parks, and just when going outdoors.
foxnews.com
17-year-old dies of coronavirus, was turned away for lacking insurance
A Los Angeles teen — who tested positive for the coronavirus — died of septic shock after being turned away from an urgent care facility because he didn’t have health insurance. While the 17-year old’s positive COVID-19 test didn’t arrive until after his death, residents of the LA neighborhood of Lancaster are outraged. Lancaster Mayor...
nypost.com
86 UN staffers have tested positive for COVID-19 worldwide
Most of the cases are in Europe, but others also are popping up in the United States, Asia and Africa, U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.
nypost.com
Spain's Princess Maria Teresa becomes first royal to die from coronavirus
Spain's Princess Maria Teresa of Bourbon-Parma has become the first royal to die from the novel coronavirus, her family announced on social media.
foxnews.com
Buccaneers' Tom Brady offers tips to stay healthy amid coronavirus threat: 'We're going to get through this'
Tom Brady, fresh off the heels of his departure from the New England Patriots, took to social media on Friday to offer tips on how to stay healthy in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. 
foxnews.com
AOC demands another coronavirus stimulus bill, urges Congress to return
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says the $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill passed by Congress this week is not enough and the federal government should reconvene to pass even more far-reaching measures. “I will be frank — I believe working families deserve far more. I am urging Congress to return to D.C. as soon as possible to...
nypost.com
Principal surprises valedictorian at job in drive-thru
Amidst the coronavirus pandemic, a Michigan high school principal wanted to keep with tradition and notify the valedictorian and salutatorian in person.
edition.cnn.com
New York to move presidential primary election to June 23
New York joins several other states that have decided to push their elections back over coronaviurs fears.
foxnews.com
49ers star Richard Sherman on gaming and Twitch Stream Aid
San Francisco 49ers cornerback Richard Sherman tells Coy Wire why he's so into gaming and why his participation in Twitch Stream Aid for coronavirus charity is so important.
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edition.cnn.com
Researchers studying monkeys for a coronavirus vaccine facing challenges
Dr. Skip Bohm hopes his research at the Tulane National Primate Research Center will help save thousands from COVID-19.
1 h
abcnews.go.com
Black marketeers cash in on the coronavirus crisis
Unseasonably warm weather, Champions League football and other major events, homes on the beach and the café culture: just a few of the factors that may have helped carry an insidious virus across southern Europe -- from country to country and city to city, from Italy to Spain and Portugal.
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edition.cnn.com
They used to make MLB uniforms. Now they're making medical masks and gowns
Major League Baseball is teaming up with a sports apparel retailer to help with a national shortage of personal protective equipment for health care workers.
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edition.cnn.com
Firefighter, six others injured in Brooklyn basement blaze
The blaze broke out at about 4 a.m. inside a two-story house on Legion Street near Sutter Avenue in Brownsville, Brooklyn.
1 h
nypost.com
Krispy Kreme is giving out a free dozen doughnuts to healthcare workers
Mondays may have just gotten a little sweeter, particularly for healthcare workers battling the ongoing coronavirus epidemic.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
Cuomo says New York concerned CDC coronavirus crisis guidelines for PPE are not adequate
These comments come after the governor went out of his way Friday to emphasize his state's need for tens of thousands of ventilators after President Trump questioned the number that New York would need to deal with its coronavirus patients.
1 h
foxnews.com
Canada to ban passengers with Covid-19 symptoms from domestic flights, trains
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canadians "need to continue to do what is necessary to prevent the spread of Covid-19.”
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politico.com
Watch Live: Trump Speaks at Naval Station Norfolk Send Off for USNS Comfort
President Donald Trump is traveling to Norfolk, Virginia, on Saturday to say bon voyage to USNS Comfort, the U.S. navy hospital ship departing for New York City to aid in the city's response to the coronavirus.
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breitbart.com
Trump rips 'unappreciative' governors as Michigan governor gives plea for more supplies
President Trump told reporters that certain governors are not appreciative enough of his administration's response to the coronavirus pandemic.        
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usatoday.com
How schools are (and aren’t) providing meals to children during coronavirus
Siblings Alexander Francisco, 6, and Jovani Francisco, 8, pick up meals in Reading, Pennsylvania, on March 26, 2020. | Lauren A. Little/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images Parents rely on schools for children’s meals. Coronavirus has exposed the vulnerabilities of these programs. In an effort to keep children safe from the coronavirus pandemic, schools in the United States have shut down. Teachers have had to adapt by going online with classes to keep kids on schedule with their education, and other forms of distance learning — teachers holding office hours by phone, the distribution of learning packets, etc. — are being implemented. Essentially, educators are finding ways to ensure kids don’t need to go to a physical building to get schooled. But there’s at least one big problem this presents. Many students around the country rely on schools to provide free or low-cost meals.These meals — which speak to the country’s larger problem of income inequality — are a necessary staple for many families across the country. On a typical school day, the National School Lunch Program provides low-cost or free lunches to 29.7 million children. In New York City, the Department of Education offers free breakfast, lunch, and after-school meals to public school students during the school year. These low-cost and free options are even more imperative considering the record-shattering unemployment spike in the US. With the shutdown of physical school, that option is gone and the US is scrambling to address this problem, on top of all the other problems the coronavirus pandemic presents. During this pandemic, the White House has signaled that states need to take care of themselves without relying on the federal government when it comes to vital medical equipment, with Trump picking fights with Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and saying New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is exaggerating his state’s need for ventilators. On Friday, his administration signaled that state and local officials may, similarly, need to handle the issue of school meals themselves. “The truth is, many underprivileged kids would not be getting school meals, apart from the fact that, as we stand here today, our administration has approved waivers for all 50 states to give them flexibilities to work with local partners to get meals to children that are in need, and also a nationwide waiver to allow parents to pick up meals,” Vice President Mike Pence said at the briefing. Pence was at Friday’s presidential briefing, joined by Sonny Perdue, the US secretary of agriculture, and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. “The federal government can’t do it all, but we got great partners out there in the food supply chain, as well as our food nutrition services, and our partners in our school nutrition services doing a great job to continue to get these meals to kids there,” Perdue said. Perdue specifically addressed getting meals to kids. He cited a program with McLane Global, the Baylor Collaborative on Poverty and Hunger, and Pepsi that would “pack a million meals a week to deliver to our rural kids who might not get to town.” According to the Baylor Collaborative, the meal delivery system will “contain five days of shelf-stable, nutritious, individually packaged foods that meet USDA’s summer food requirements.” Perdue also introduced an initiative between Panera Bread and the Children’s Hunger Alliance to deliver meals in Columbus, Ohio. That collaboration is expected to go into effect on April 6. While these programs sound great in theory, it is important to keep in mind that this administration has overpromised and underdelivered on a number of initiatives — particularly those involving corporate partnerships — during the coronavirus pandemic, including promoting a Google virus testing website that Google itself did not seem to be aware of and announcing testing centers at big-box retailers, something that has yet to come to fruition in any meaningful way. Food pickup and delivery is a stopgap solution — but it’s all that’s available at the moment The country’s focus on meal delivery highlights the bigger problem, which is schools providing meals via a grab-and-go process. In New York City, meals are available at public schools to go. The same goes for Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Atlanta, and major metropolitan public school systems. The issue therein is that the farther you get from these areas, the fewer options become available — hence the US involvement in promoting delivery programs. There also might be an unforeseen problem in the current grab-and-go method: parents not being able to go to these meal stations at all. According to the City, an independent nonprofit news agency covering New York City, the number of parents taking advantage of free meals has dropped: The program peaked at 199,483 meals distributed on March 19. Then it dropped to 159,635 last Friday, before hitting a low of 81,050 on Monday, when it rained. The figure rose to 111,887 Tuesday and 115,865 on Wednesday. In perspective, around 600,000 meals are distributed daily when school is in session. The lack of demand might not be that parents feel their children don’t need these meals, but that they are opting to social distance and keep their kids safe. Depending on the school district, some grab-and-go stations in the country require that a child be present or paperwork be required to obtain a meal. These free meal stations and deliveries also put those who come in, make the food, and possibly deliver it at risk for exposure. In Fayette County in Kentucky, a public school employee involved in delivering meals recently tested positive for Covid-19 — an example of how fragile these solutions are.
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vox.com
NYPD detective becomes first NYC office to die from coronavirus
The first death of a NYPD officer from the coronavirus was reported Saturday.
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foxnews.com