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Why Some Doctors Are Now Moving Away From Ventilator Treatments for Coronavirus Patients
The concern from some medical professionals is that the machines could be harming certain patients
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time.com
Naomi Campbell says she’s wearing Elizabeth Taylor’s caftans during quarantine: ‘I’m not counting days’
Naomi Campbell is keeping things glamorous while practicing social distancing.
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foxnews.com
Investment firm dangled up to 175% returns to investors using US aid programs
A New York investment firm pitched wealthy investors in recent days on a way to make returns of 22 percent to 175 percent using US government programs designed to help Americans keep their jobs.
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nypost.com
Forecast Map Predicts Counties at Greatest Risk from Surge in COVID-19 Cases
The Columbia University map shows which parts of the country will exceed the number of beds they have for critical care over the next six weeks.
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newsweek.com
Coronavirus pandemic forces funeral homes, morgues into the frontline fight
In the hardest-hit coronavirus crevices of the country, funeral homes and morgues are being vanquished and exhausted in the quest to keep up with the number of victims succumbing to the novel pathogen, officially termed COVID-19.
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foxnews.com
Oil prices pare earlier gains as OPEC+ works on output cut deal
Oil prices were up almost 2% on Thursday, pulling back from an earlier surge as OPEC and other crude producers work on a deal to drastically cut output in response to a collapse in global demand from the coronavirus.
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reuters.com
New York's coronavirus outbreak came from Europe and other parts of the United States, research projects suggest
Two separate research projects suggest that the novel coronavirus may have been circulating in New York City earlier than thought and the earliest cases likely originated with travelers coming from Europe and other parts of the United States, not Asia.
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edition.cnn.com
Andrea Bocelli on Easter quarantine concert: ‘Music can become a prayer’
The coronavirus crisis may prevent you from going to church on Sunday, but you can still worship the talent of Andrea Bocelli when he brings an Easter concert directly to your home.
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nypost.com
'Pokémon Sword and Shield:' Zarude's Signature Attack Jungle Healing Revealed
Jungle Healing will restore HP and heal status effects.
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newsweek.com
Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake team up for a funky quarantine remix
It was only a matter of time before Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake made a duet about being stuck at home.
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edition.cnn.com
UK, Spain, India and More Live Coronavirus World Coverage
In the global scramble for equipment, poor countries are being outbid. European finance ministers will try to agree on emergency steps to reduce the economic devastation caused by the epidemic.
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nytimes.com
Can mosquitoes spread coronavirus?
As the weather warms and many move their stay-at-home orders to their backyard, the question of whether you can contract COVID-19 through a mosquito bite continues to surface.
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foxnews.com
The best designer bag sales: Louis Vuitton, Chloe, Valentino and more
With stores closed due to the coronavirus quarantine, online sales continue to heat up — including some incredible deals on designer bags from past and present seasons. Here are our top 10 picks of luxury handbags to snag for a steep discount. Or just scroll through for an eye-candy escape from the real world! Louis...
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nypost.com
New York City’s coronavirus death toll passes 4,400
More than 4,400 people have died from the coronavirus in New York City as both fatalities and total cases continued to rise, according to new statistics released Thursday morning. The Big Apple’s death count from COVID-19 stood at 4,426 as of 9:30 a.m, up from 3,602 on Wednesday morning, data from the city Health Department...
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nypost.com
My year of free mattresses
Natalie Nelson I slept on a new one every 100 nights, but I couldn’t scam my way to self-care https://www.curbed.com/2020/4/9/21214157/mattress-casper-purple-leesa-story
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vox.com
Shirtless Shawn Mendes sets up a basketball hoop and more star snaps
Shawn Mendes makes sure he can play hoops, Sam Smith goes for a full 80's workout fantasy and more...
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nypost.com
Chris ‘Mad Dog’ Russo almost at a loss for words over ‘totally different’ WFAN
Chris “Mad Dog” Russo, alongside Mike Francesa, helped build WFAN into a sports-talk giant, having the No. 1 afternoon drive-time show in the area for years. Now, watching from a distance, he isn’t sure what to make of the station’s direction. So many of its big names are gone, Russo pointed out, from Don Imus...
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nypost.com
Justin Timberlake: 24-hour parenting is ‘just not human’
Timberlake and Biel are doing their best in quarantine, even if their son doesn't think so.
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nypost.com
Jeff Bezos makes surprise visit to Amazon warehouse, Whole Foods
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos visited one of his company's warehouses as well as a Whole Foods grocery store on Wednesday, making rare public appearances as employees have raised complaints about working conditions.
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nypost.com
Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee calls for WHO chief to testify
“I’ve been ... outraged by the responsiveness and the performance of the World Health Organization," Sen. Todd Young says.
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politico.com
Dr. Siegel: Economy cannot reopen without rapid COVID-19 testing capability
America's economy cannot reopen without rapid COVID-19 testing capability, Fox News medical contributor Dr. Marc Siegel said Thursday.
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foxnews.com
Lady Antebellum's 'Islands in the Stream' rendition will lift your spirit
Isolation is not stopping Lady Antebellum from creating beautiful music together.
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edition.cnn.com
Taiwan hits back at World Health Organization chief's claims of racism
Taiwanese officials on Thursday pushed back strongly on allegations from World Heath Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus that the Asian island off the coast of China was involved in a months-long racist smear job against him. 
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foxnews.com
Chef-recommended must-haves for grilling season
Grilling season is right around the corner. Though you can't have a cookout just yet, that doesn't mean you can't start flexing your grilling skills at home. We asked chefs about their all-time favorite grilling tools.
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edition.cnn.com
Florence Pugh hits back at cyberbullying about boyfriend Zach Braff's age
Actress Florence Pugh, 24, shamed trolls on Instagram for criticizing the age gap between her and boyfriend Zach Braff, 45. Said Ariana Grande: You go, girl.
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latimes.com
Margiela's latest collaboration
Director Reiner Holzemer discusses his project -"Martin Margiela: In His Own Words" - which offers an intimate portrait of the elusive fashion designer. (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
'Be the light': Why high schools across America are burning stadium lights
There's nothing like those Friday night lights.
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus in NY: De Blasio to make decision on fate of school year this week
The fate of the city school year will be determined in a matter of days, Mayor de Blasio said Thursday morning. “I think we are a couple of days away — two, three days away — from getting to that decision,” Hizzoner said during a press conference at City Hall. With the nation’s largest school...
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nypost.com
Live Coronavirus US News and Updates
6.6 million U.S. workers joined the jobless rolls last week. The virus is ravaging the Navajo Nation. A sailor assigned to the Theodore Roosevelt is in intensive care in Guam.
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nytimes.com
Internal Senate memo warns Zoom poses ‘high risk’ to privacy, security
Two federal overseers have also advised agencies not to use Zoom’s free or commercial service.
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politico.com
Can Pets Contract the Coronavirus? What About the Tiger?
Here’s what to do if your cat starts coughing.
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slate.com
'This Is Not Humanity's First Plague,' Pope Francis Says Of Coronavirus
The pope says the COVID-19 pandemic is exposing hypocrisy and misplaced priorities in the modern world, as he calls on people to remember their shared humanity.
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npr.org
Grassley, in bipartisan letter, seeks 'detailed' explanation from Trump on IG firing
GOP Sen. Chuck Grassley and a bipartisan group of fellow senators are calling on President Trump to provide a "detailed" written explanation for his decision to remove the intelligence community inspector general from his post, in an effort to protect watchdog independence.
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foxnews.com
British reality star launches alcohol free spirits line
Alcohol isn't the only option: British reality TV star and entrepreneur Spencer Matthews talks about his journey to sobriety and his 'Clean Liquor' drinks company, in an interview conducted before the coronavirius lockdown in the U.K... (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
Social distancing isn’t a personal choice. It’s an ethical duty.
A social distancing sign on the floor of a post office on April 9, 2020, in Penarth, Wales. | Stu Forster/Getty Images Why we should foreground our commitment to the common good in the fight against coronavirus. Social distancing is inconvenient at best, truly burdensome at worst. What hasn’t helped matters is the confusing messaging of why we should social distance at all. We’ve been conditioned to think social distancing is only about us — lowering the risk to one’s self and one’s family. And yet we’ve also been told that this is something we need to do to protect others. While not necessarily incorrect, both ways of thinking about it are not equal to the task before us. What we need is an exhortation to act that is grounded firmly in an ethical foundation, one that not only gets at the deeper purpose of social distancing, but that also lays the groundwork for a more resilient society on the other side of this crisis. We as a global society need to see social distancing as nothing less than an act of solidarity, an intentional choice that binds us in a common cause. Some US leaders have started making this rhetorical shift. In one of his daily press briefings on the coronavirus, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) leaned into the message: “We are united, and when you are united there is nothing you can’t do.” This echoed what former Vice President Joe Biden said after the Democratic primaries when calling for social distancing; this is “a moment where the choices and decisions we make as individuals are going to collectively impact on what happens, make a big difference in the severity of this outbreak.” Biden added, “It’s in moments like these we realize we need to put politics aside and work together as Americans. ... We are all in this together.” Both statements implicitly appeal to solidarity. Last week, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy (D) appealed to solidarity outright, embracing the claim that social distancing is another name for social solidarity, “because by staying apart we are actually coming closer together in common cause to defeat Covid-19.” Cuomo, Biden, and Murphy are onto something: framing the need for social distancing as solidarity in action is much more meaningful and motivational than wonky (if accurate) discussions of “community mitigation strategies” and “flattening the curve.” Appealing to solidarity gives us a better chance of convincing people to practice social distancing. It is also the right move philosophically. But what exactly do we mean by solidarity? In one sense, when we say we are in solidarity with others, we are foregrounding a common purpose and describing an empathetic response based on the recognition of mutual needs and shared identity. We are one human family, whatever our national, racial, ethnic, economic, and political differences. Inherent in human nature is not only our interdependence as finite beings but our need to form associations for emotional and economic welfare. Appealing to solidarity in this sense is not novel. Not too long ago, Barack Obama called on people in the US to commit to mutual flourishing. In his farewell speech as president, he said that “democracy does not require uniformity.” However, he added, “democracy does require a basic sense of solidarity — the idea that for all our outward differences, we are all in this together; that we rise or fall as one.” Cuomo hit this note when he said: “Black and white and brown and Asian and short and tall and gay and straight. New York loves everyone. ... And at the end of the day, my friends, even if it is a long day … love wins. Always. And it will win again through this virus.” In the context of the coronavirus pandemic, the term gains even greater urgency. Solidarity becomes nothing less than an ethical stance. It speaks to a reorientation of an individual’s will to commit to doing what will protect and promote the common good (not to be confused with the greater good, a term from utilitarian philosophy that can call for the sacrifice of fundamental needs of some for the good of all). Solidarity as an ethical virtue doesn’t just depend on feelings, but on a deeper sense of commitment to a cause bigger than yourself. By grounding social distancing in an ethical posture, we don’t just increase the likelihood of buy-in to deal with the present crisis — we cultivate a virtue that ensures we’ll stay the course. The virtue of solidarity also includes a commitment to social justice. The vulnerable and marginalized among us need particular care and attention to make sure that the common good is being met. So when we ask people to practice social distancing for the good of those who are most likely to get seriously ill, we are asking them to see their social responsibility in light of the many overlapping communities to which they belong (families, friends, neighbors, New Yorkers, Americans, humans, etc.), and to appreciate that the vulnerable have a particular ethical claim on all of us to promote their well-being. Why solidarity is an enduring basis for social distancing Recent articles have discussed the ethics of social distancing, but in terms of altruism. By definition, altruistic acts typically entail personal sacrifices that are considered “above and beyond duty,” with no ulterior motivation or benefit. But rooting social distancing in altruism isn’t as robust a motivation as you might think as framing it as an ethical duty. Social distancing really can save lives and protect long-term health. In other words, we really shouldn’t think of it as an optional act that we perform out of the kindness of our hearts. The downsides of not social distancing can be so severe that we need to think of it as an ethical duty to our fellow human beings. Then there’s the second type of appeal: to our self-interest. We’ve been told to stay in for ourselves and for our families. While it’s not untrue that staying in will obviously redound to our and our families’ benefit, such appeals fail to get at the interconnected nature of the problem we face. If we decide to take the risk of not sticking with social distancing, it’s not just ourselves we’re putting at risk — it is also our neighbors, our grandparents, our friends who might get hurt. We are seeing this with the tragic rise in numbers of sick and dying within extended families and within local communities. The health care system has been overwhelmed and the economy is suffering precisely because we are all vulnerable to each other. Solidarity then is a more apt foundation for social distancing than either altruism or narrow self-interest. And the fact is the impulse of pulling together is already there — we just need to articulate it more explicitly. The reality of our shared fight and plight has drawn those of us practicing social distancing together, closer with loved ones, neighbors, and in many instances strangers, even as we are physically apart. We are finding alternative ways to connect to build and maintain our emotional and economic bonds. In addition to social distancing, collaborative efforts to aid those who are in social isolation and the economically vulnerable are growing across the country. When we return from social distancing, it is up to us to make this inchoate commitment to our fellow human beings and the common good the new normal. Some skepticism is certainly in order. Individualism is encoded in Americans’ national DNA. But solidarity is just as central to American identity as individualism. “Live Free or Die” co-existed with “Join or Die.” When I was young, my grandfather shared stories of his experiences after the US entered World War II. One of the memories he shared was living through a period of gas shortages. The rubber supply for the US military was critically low. Despite great pressure from the business sector, FDR in 1942 instituted strict gas rationing, meaning less driving and therefore less wear and tear on tires. It amounted to a de facto ban on pleasure driving, a popular leisure activity. Many Americans who are now over the age of 80 remember having to give up all the joys associated with pleasure-driving as part of the war effort. Efforts to increase public support included posters with messages such as “When you ride ALONE, you ride with Hitler! Join a Car Sharing Club TODAY!” (similar to today’s more encouraging #togetherathome and #stayhomesaveslives). It wasn’t until the war was over when people could take to the open roads again. We were all in it together, my grandfather said, speaking to the sense of shared sacrifice and purpose that defined the time. We face a common threat in Covid-19. Few of us will remain untouched. We are all in this together. Solidarity demands we do our part by holding each other accountable, as we hold each other dear (but not too near). Sarah-Vaughan Brakman is a professor of philosophy at Villanova University. Sign up for the Future Perfect newsletter and we’ll send you a roundup of ideas and solutions for tackling the world’s biggest challenges — and how to get better at doing good. Future Perfect is funded in part by individual contributions, grants, and sponsorships. Learn more here.
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vox.com
With USS Theodore Roosevelt Crew Member in Intensive Care, General Says Coronavirus Outbreaks Likely to Strike More Navy Ships
416 USS Theodore Roosevelt crew members are now infected with COVID-19 while 1,164 others are awaiting results
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time.com
Scientists successfully reversed stroke damage in rodent tests
Over the years, doctors and healthcare professionals have learned a lot about what increases the risk of a person having a stroke. Things like high blood pressure, smoking and heart disease can all play a major role in whether or not a person will suffer a stroke during their lifetime, but treatment after a person...
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nypost.com
Tom Brady explains why he left the Patriots for Tampa Bay
SportsPulse: USA TODAY Sports Nancy Armour analyzes a recent interview between Tom Brady and Howard Stern where the pair discussed the quarterbacks departure from New England.        
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usatoday.com
Pink details her ‘terrifying’ experience with coronavirus
"At one point I was crying, praying ... I thought they told us our kids were going to be ok."
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nypost.com
Ryan Young: Detroit hospitals are in 'dire circumstances'
Detroit hospitals are in dire need as ventilators and bed space become scarce due to Covid-19. Two people have died while waiting in emergency room hallways. CNN's Ryan Young reports.
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edition.cnn.com
Tyler Perry pays grocery bill for thousands of high-risk shoppers
Hollywood star Tyler Perry footed the grocery bill for thousands of senior citizens and other high-risk shoppers while the coronavirus pandemic stretches peoples’ wallets thin. Shoppers at dozens of Kroger’s and Wynn Dixie stores in Atlanta and New Orleans were delighted and relieved to hear their bill was taken care of when they were checking out. Perry also tipped $21,000 to the out-of-work employees of his favorite Atlanta restaurant.
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cbsnews.com
Donald Trump's secret theory about Barack Obama's endorsement
President Donald Trump is, at heart, a provocateur. One of his favorite tools to stir up trouble is by embracing of conspiracy theories -- and sometimes even starting ones of his own.
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edition.cnn.com
Lockdowns shouldn't be fully lifted until vaccine found, study warns
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edition.cnn.com
Snake party busted for not social distancing
“It looks like more than a party of 10,” a park manager joked after stumbling upon more than a dozen snakes huddled together in North Sioux City, South Dakota. The self-proclaimed nature lover, Jody Hartnett, couldn’t help but notice the garter snakes, which are mostly harmless, weren’t “social distancing,” as the rest of the world...
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nypost.com
How to Make a DIY Face Mask for Coronavirus
Amid a shortage of medical-grade face masks, such as surgical masks (loose-fitting, disposable masks that block large droplets but don’t filter small particles) and N95 respirators (tight-fitting face coverings that filter out small particles), the U.S. federal government recently changed its recommendations, suggesting now that all residents wear homemade facial coverings when they have to…
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time.com
Self-Isolating 97-Year-Old Veteran Plays Harmonica to Wife Through Glass Door
Lou serenaded his wife Jackie while they were separated because of social distancing. They have been married for 38 years and reside at the Soldiers' and Sailors' Home in Erie.
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newsweek.com
Nevada man stole hundreds of masks from VA facility: feds
An ex-Marine from Nevada is accused of stealing about 200 surgical masks from a Veteran Administration hospital, federal prosecutors said. Peter Lucas, 35, appeared in court Wednesday after allegedly ripping off at least four boxes containing 50 masks apiece from the Ioannis A. Lougaris VA Medical Center in Reno over a five-day span late last...
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nypost.com
These doctors work for free on coronavirus front line: 'You step up to the plate'
A non-profit doctors' group is going above and beyond to help frontline first responders, who are being drowned by an unprecedented volume of 911 calls, amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com