Generally
General
1369
unread news
unread news
Here's the latest list of Orange County communities with coronavirus cases
Orange County continues to see a gradual increase in coronavirus infections, as its overall case count hit 931 Tuesday.
1m
latimes.com
Watch live: Trump and Coronavirus Task Force give update on COVID-19 response
The death toll from the coronavirus in the U.S. now tops 10,000.
1m
cbsnews.com
PETA on the hunt for bargain stocks
Animal rights group PETA is on a shopping spree — for cheap stocks. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals scooped up shares in nearly two dozen apparel companies, including Ralph Lauren, Urban Outfitters, Guess and Ugg owner Deckers Outdoor Corporation for the right to attend their shareholder meetings and pressure them into giving up...
1m
nypost.com
Volunteers fixed 20,000 N95 masks for Memphis hospital in a weekend
A group of volunteers has been working to repair 27,000 desperately needed N95 protective masks for a Memphis, Tennessee, hospital battling the coronavirus pandemic -- and they got most of them done in a weekend.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Hulu gives away one-month trial of streaming service
You can max out on all your favorite Hulu programming with the streaming service’s free trial deal. Subscribers can sign up for a free first month of the ad-supported or ad-free versions of Hulu. When your trial ends, the ad-supported version will renew at $5.99 per month and the ad-free plan will cost $11.99 per...
1m
nypost.com
Op-Ed: Desperate small businesses are being pushed to the back of the coronavirus relief line. Why?
Lenders are accepting applications from small businesses they already do business with, a move that could leave your favorite food truck behind.
1m
latimes.com
Jose Andres is on a mission to feed Americans in need during pandemic, and today that meant turning Washington DC's baseball stadium into a community kitchen.
Chef Jose Andres joins The Lead.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Doctor who recovered from coronavirus returns to treat more patients.
Dr. Barron Lerner joins The Lead.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Third cougar captured amid Chilean city’s coronavirus lockdown
A third cougar has been captured in the Chilean capital Santiago amid the city’s coronavirus lockdown. In a Facebook post on Monday, Zoologico Nacional de Chile explained that the cougar was captured in a home. “The cougar is in good condition and is moved to our Rehabilitation Center for a medical assessment and subsequent release,”...
1m
nypost.com
Make Disney Parks' famous churro bites at home with this recipe
Churro bites are a highlight of any visit to Disney theme parks. This Disney churro bites recipe is going viral online and is a breeze to make at home with just a handful of ingredients
1m
edition.cnn.com
Oilers’ Colby Cave in medically induced coma after brain bleed
Colby Cave, the Oilers’ young forward, was taken to the hospital overnight and placed in a medically induced coma due to bleeding from the brain, the team’s general manager said. Cave, 25, is in the critical care unit of an Ontario hospital after suffering from serious headaches Monday night. “I talked to Colby’s wife [Emily]...
1m
nypost.com
Killings fall in El Salvador as gangs enforce lockdown, with a baseball bat
Street gangs in El Salvador have turned from extortion and killing to enforcing social distancing restrictions, often with threats and baseball bats.
1m
latimes.com
U.S. appeals court allows abortion curbs in Texas during coronavirus outbreak
A U.S. appeals court on Tuesday ruled that Texas can enforce limits on the ability of women to obtain abortions as part of the state's policy requiring postponement of non-urgent medical procedures during the coronavirus pandemic.
1m
reuters.com
Tired of the mainstream? An alternative guide to watching movies at home
If the coronavirus quarantine has you tired of your usual cinematic menu, here's our guide to watching more adventurous films at home.
1m
latimes.com
Gary Bettman says it might not be possible to complete NHL season normally
NHL commissioner Gary Bettman acknowledges finishing the regular season and playoffs might not happen because of COVID-19 outbreak. A third Avalanche player tests positive.
1m
latimes.com
The Roberts Court Will Not Ensure the Constitution’s Most Fundamental Right
This ruling was par for the course for John Roberts’ Supreme Court.
1m
slate.com
Suffolk County may store coronavirus victims’ bodies in farm fridge if morgues fill
Plans to convert the processing center on the Suffolk County Farm in Yaphank into a makeshift morgue come as the death toll in the county reached 266 and the number of confirmed cases topped 14,500.
1m
nypost.com
Today’s coronavirus update: NYC deaths top 9/11, panic shopping hikes prices
More people have now been felled by the coronavirus in New York City than were killed in the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks. The grim milestone was reached Tuesday, when the Big Apple saw it’s biggest one-day jump in fatalities from the virus, pushing the death toll to 3,202. “Each passing day brings more tragedy...
1m
nypost.com
How to spice up your sex life during the coronavirus quarantine
Quarantine doesn’t have to put a damper on your sex life.
1m
nypost.com
Stress eating and coronavirus: WW, formerly known as Weight Watchers, rolls out Zoom virtual workshops
Stress eating and COVID-19 are common as is eating when bored. Here are some tips and how WW, formerly Weight Watchers, is trying to help.       
1m
usatoday.com
86-year-old and three sons die after contracting COVID-19
The mother and three sons all died within days of each other, the New Orleans Coroner's Office confirmed.
1m
cbsnews.com
Tuesday's "pink moon" will be the largest supermoon of the year
CBSN Philly's Janelle Brown speaks with Derrick Pitts, chief astronomer at the Franklin Institute, about what we can expect with Tuesday night's "super pink moon" and other celestial events this week.
1m
cbsnews.com
Earl Graves Sr., founder of Black Enterprise magazine, dies at 85
His business, formed in 1970, was the first African American-owned magazine focusing on black entrepreneurs.
1m
washingtonpost.com
60,000-year-old underwater forest uncovered, and it may help pioneer new medicines
Nearly 60,000 years ago, as prehistoric humans just started venturing out of Africa, a forest of cypress trees grew on the banks of a river near the Gulf of Mexico. As the trees grew old, they fell and were buried under sediment. When the sea level rose, the remains of the forest were covered once again.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Wisconsin's messy primary could foretell a messier run up to the November election in the coronavirus era
Wisconsin is the first state to hold a primary when much of the country is under stay-at-home orders – including the Badger State – amid the coronavirus pandemic.        
1m
usatoday.com
What Covid-19 is showing us about the South
Issac Bailey says the patchwork coronavirus response across the South, including in his native South Carolina, reveals persistent Old South attitudes still prevalent among some in his home state and region.
1m
edition.cnn.com
In Another Pushback Against Oversight, Trump Removes Pandemic Inspector General
President Trump removed the head of a group charged with overseeing the Coronavirus package passed by Congress. Trump has bristled at the oversight actions of several inspectors general.
1m
npr.org
D.C. Superior Court Judge Robert E. Morin announces retirement
Morin was named chief judge of D.C. Superior Court in 2016 and served one four-year term
1m
washingtonpost.com
No changes to toilet and faucet standards despite Trump criticism
The Trump administration says it will not dump toilet, faucet and sink regulations down the drain.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Sony unveils its new PlayStation 5 controller, the DualSense
Sony revealed more details about its new PlayStation 5 controller on Tuesday and said that it's starting to ship the controller to game developers. That means game developers can think about how to use the new controller's features in their games.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Sony unveils its new PlayStation 5 controller, the DualSense
Sony revealed more details about its new PlayStation 5 controller on Tuesday and said that it's starting to ship the controller to game developers. That means game developers can think about how to use the new controller's features in their games.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Coronavirus in NY: Amazon pilots disinfectant fog at Staten Island warehouse
Amazon.com Inc told Reuters it is piloting the use of disinfectant fog starting on Tuesday at a warehouse on Staten Island, New York, within days of protests at the worksite over health concerns during the coronavirus pandemic. The world’s largest online retailer said it is testing the practice commonly used by airlines and hospitals to...
1m
nypost.com
What US hospitals are really going through versus how Trump has described the situation
1m
edition.cnn.com
Court backs Texas pandemic abortion ban, citing emergency powers
A divided three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals threw out a lower court ruling blocking the ban.
1m
politico.com
Rikers Reports First Coronavirus Death as Legal Aid Calls for Prisoner Release
With social distancing impossible, public defenders call on the state to release more people.
1m
slate.com
Hal Willner, longtime music producer and 'SNL' veteran, dies of COVID-19 complications at 64
Hal Wilner, Grammy-winning record producer and longtime "Saturday Night Live" sketch music producer, has died from complications from COVID-19. He was 64.
1m
latimes.com
Why we’re not making masks and other commentary
From the right: Why We’re Not Making Masks Despite “a dangerous shortage of special protective masks” amid the pandemic, a group “trying to make such masks in the United States” has “run up against serious regulatory barriers,” reports The Washington Free Beacon’s Charles Fain Lehman. The Open PPE Project “cannot even begin” to produce N95...
1m
nypost.com
Hal Willner, ‘SNL’ music producer, dead at 64 from coronavirus
Hal Willner — the respected producer who worked with Lou Reed and Marianne Faithfull, was a long-time “Saturday Night Live” staffer and compiled a series of eccentric all-star tribute albums — died Monday at the age of 64. A rep for Willner confirmed the producer’s death to Rolling Stone. While a cause of death has...
1m
nypost.com
Tennessee travel-center stabbing kills 3; deputy kills suspect
Three people were stabbed to death and a fourth injured after a man went on a violent spree at a travel center in Tennessee, police said Tuesday. 
1m
foxnews.com
Long lines and frustration as Wisconsinites brave voting amid pandemic
Despite a last-minute court battle and a stay-at-home order, thousands of Wisconsin voters on Tuesday braved the coronavirus outbreak to wait six feet apart in lines for hours and cast ballots in the state's presidential primary and local elections.
1m
reuters.com
D.C. Council freezes rent hikes, but omits undocumented immigrants from covid-19 relief bill
The bill also makes it easier for inmates to win release and bans Internet service shut-offs.
1m
washingtonpost.com
Is the coronavirus airborne? It’s complicated.
Getty Images How a quirk of scientific jargon is confusing and endangering us. A single case of measles can cause 12-18 other cases, because measles is “airborne” — particles of the virus linger in spaces for hours after sick people breathe or cough them out. This characteristic is uncommon, and it makes the measles virus one of the most infectious known to humans. Because airborne diseases spread so quickly, civilians and scientists alike have been nervously wondering: Is the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus airborne? The answer, however, is complicated. First, not everyone agrees on what airborne means. The WHO and many infectious disease researchers use a highly specific definition for “airborne” that’s not intuitive to most people. This leads to situations such as this: The CDC has recommended Americans wear face masks in certain public settings to prevent catching or spreading the disease, even though the coronavirus might not meet the CDC’s definition of airborne. Second, the evidence needed to declare the coronavirus officially “airborne” could take years to gather, while possibly endangering people. After a large choir in Washington rehearsed together, 45 of the 60 members got sick, even though nobody was symptomatic at the time. On an episode of Reset, host Arielle Duhaime-Ross spoke to science writer Roxanne Khamsi about the origins of the “airborne” debate, and whether we should stop using the term altogether. Below, we’ve shared a lightly edited transcript of their conversation. Subscribe to Reset on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Arielle Duhaime-Ross What exactly does airborne mean? Roxanne Khamsi So there is not a great answer to that question. I think that you can take a very simplistic view, which means airborne means something is in the air. I mean, if you open the dictionary, that’s what it means. … But a lot of virologists and especially a lot of public health officials have the idea that something is airborne if it is spread by aerosol and not by droplet. Now, you’re wondering, like, what is the difference between droplets and aerosols, right? Arielle Duhaime-Ross Yeah, that is 100 percent what I’m thinking right now. Roxanne Khamsi So traditionally, public health officials, at least recently, have been defining the droplet as something that’s like a ball of mucus and virus and salts that is larger than five microns in diameter that you’re kind of coughing up or spewing out. And anything smaller than that could be an aerosol that floats around … in the air because it’s lighter. Imagine like a feather or like floating in the air. Arielle Duhaime-Ross Okay, so there are large droplets that can float around in the air, and there are fine aerosols that last longer in the air. That’s the distinction? Roxanne Khamsi Right. And if you trace back where they came up with this, it goes back to these equations from the 1930s where people were trying to figure out tuberculosis and how it spread. So we’re talking about a really antiquated point of view on these things. I asked the WHO, how do you know that this [coronavirus] isn’t airborne? How do you know it’s only in droplets? And I did not get a good answer from them. Arielle Duhaime-Ross So why are some scientists still saying that we don’t know if the virus that causes Covid-19 is airborne? Roxanne Khamsi Because we don’t. The thing is, we actually don’t have evidence to say whether it’s airborne or not. In a normal setting, I mean, in settings where people are getting intubated and that’s kind of spewing this thing into the air, even the WHO says there is a risk of it being airborne in those situations, but we’re operating in an absence of evidence. Arielle Duhaime-Ross What I’m getting from you is that … you can’t tell me right now whether it is or it’s not. We just don’t know. Roxanne Khamsi Exactly. So the people I spoke with who witnessed SARS almost 20 years ago and dealt with that public health disaster, they’re saying that we should operate on the precautionary principle, that this is more easily airborne than we’re saying it is or assuming it is because it technically does travel in the air. So it is, quote unquote, airborne. Arielle Duhaime-Ross So is this just a language thing? Is it just that most virologists think of something being airborne as being transmitted through fine aerosols as opposed to large droplets? Roxanne Khamsi Completely. We’re talking about a failure of language, in my opinion. So we’re talking about a word that is failing us because it can’t really capture all the nuances of the different situations. If you’re standing in front of an ocean and you feel the splash of the huge droplets of Seaspray, those are pretty big droplets, but it’s the wind that’s carrying it to your face. So could we not consider those airborne? I think that’s what a lot of the people that study this type of transmission are saying. Arielle Duhaime-Ross Why do you think understanding this whole airborne situation when it comes to Covid-19 — and the virus that causes it — why do you think that’s important? Roxanne Khamsi I think it’s important to understand how easily transmissible this virus is in the air, first and foremost for public health workers. If we say, as the CDC said, it’s okay to wear bandanas in some … situations if you’re encountering patients or whatnot, I think that’s a problem. [Note: The CDC has advised health care professionals on contingency plans for personal protective equipment, saying that workers may use homemade masks such as a bandana or scarf “for care of patients with COVID-19 as a last resort.” The CDC adds that homemade masks are not considered protective equipment.]
1m
vox.com
Tracy Morgan defends Trump, calls for unity during national crisis: 'Now is not the time to blame'
Comedian Tracy Morgan defended President Trump from critics on Tuesday and called for national unity amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. 
1m
foxnews.com
Company creates affordable version of ventilators
1m
edition.cnn.com
Firefighter buys food for elderly called in need
1m
edition.cnn.com
Commentary: Remembering the man whose landmark 1976 exhibition insisted: Black art matters
David C. Driskell, who died from COVID-19 at age 88, curated a LACMA bicentennial show that changed how we would see art for decades to come.
1m
latimes.com
Food meant for Olympic athletes donated to Colorado food banks
The Olympics in Tokyo have been postponed until July, 2021 due to the coronavirus health crisis, causing a mass surplus of food that was meant to feed the athletes at Colorado’s Olympic Training Center, KKTV reported.
1m
nypost.com
Weinstein’s ex-assistant describes how he tried to rape her in new documentary
Weinstein was convicted earlier this year.
1m
nypost.com