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India says it will ship hydroxychloroquine to U.S. after Trump threatens retaliation
The Indian government lifted a ban on the export of hydroxychloroquine, which President Trump has touted as a possible "game changer" in the fight against the coronavirus despite a lack of conclusive evidence.
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latimes.com
Chris Cuomo Opens Up on Fight With Coronavirus, Says Trump Will Never Escape Accountability For Handling Outbreak
Broadcasting from his home, the CNN anchor described how he was urged by a medical expert to actively fight the disease.
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newsweek.com
Inside a nurse’s life battling coronavirus: Supply shortages, body bags, and endless patients
Here’s what it looks like to be shipped to New York City from the Midwest to work as a nurse on the front lines of the coronavirus battle. A 40-year-old recruited healthcare worker takes The Post through his days at a Brooklyn hospital, where he finds chaos, death — and hope. March 27, 8:44 a.m.:...
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nypost.com
U.K. Says Millions of Coronavirus Test Kits Bought From China Are Unreliable for Most Patients
It was hoped that the finger-prick blood tests could identify who had developed an immunity to the virus, allowing them out of lockdown.
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newsweek.com
Cam Newton acknowledges uncertainty of free agency: 'I'm a fish out of water'
NFL quarterback Cam Newton acknowledged Monday he is a bit out of place in the free-agent waters as he looks for a new team to play for after his run with the Carolina Panthers ended last month.
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foxnews.com
Help! Weeks of Quarantine and a Little Xanax Led Me and My Friend to a Very Bad Decision.
“Should we tell her boyfriend or is this better left a secret till we die?”
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slate.com
Wisconsin holds its primary election in the middle of a pandemic
Wisconsin on Tuesday is holding its primary in the middle of a pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Nursing home presuming all 800 patients, staff have COVID-19
Facility outside Pittsburgh says 52 patients and staff have tested positive and three patients have died
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cbsnews.com
UFC fighter Anthony Smith describes encounter with intruder: 'My entire computer room is covered in blood'
UFC fighter Anthony Smith said Monday he was forced to take down an intruder in his Nebraska home over the weekend in what he described at a “terrifying” encounter.
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foxnews.com
Mayors take lead in states where governors fight stringent stay-at-home orders
Steve Benjamin, the Democratic mayor of Columbia, South Carolina, was fed up as he waited for his state's Republican governor to follow in the footsteps of states up and down the East Coast and issue a statewide stay-at-home order.
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edition.cnn.com
Prince Andrew accuser says she's being tested for coronavirus
Prince Andrew accuser Virginia Roberts said on Tuesday that she's been admitted to the hospital and is being tested for coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
Golf locks in its 2020 major schedule amid postponements and cancellations
The bulk of the men's major golf calendar has been moved to the second half of the year as the coronavirus outbreak has forced events to be postponed or canceled.
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edition.cnn.com
Coronavirus live updates: Donald Trump hints at second stimulus check; US deaths near 11K; Wisconsin faces election amid stay-at-home order
While federal health officials have warned Americans of a grim week ahead, there are "positive signs" emerging in coronavirus hot spots.       
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usatoday.com
Former FDA chiefs outline plan to reopen the economy — when broad testing in place
Mark McClellan and Scott Gottlieb write that Congress has "no time to lose" in building public health capacity.
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politico.com
Column: Coronavirus has turned Republican politics upside down. Will that last?
Trump planned to run as a foe of socialism. Now he's handing out direct cash payments to millions of Americans.
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latimes.com
L.A. County tells residents to stay inside this week as coronavirus hits new milestone
L.A. County tell residents to stay inside this week as coronavirus hits new milestone
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latimes.com
Scoop: Trump’s ‘shadow coronavirus czar’ will now advise Larry Hogan
And a lack of racial data is obstructing the coronavirus fight.
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politico.com
The Trump administration is raising the application fee for U.S. citizenship. That will cost the U.S. later on.
Citizens make more than permanent residents -- and therefore pay more taxes.
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washingtonpost.com
Meet the ‘Weird Al’ Yankovics of our social-distancing era
Everyone from YouTube stars to amateurs are creating parody songs about coronavirus and social distancing.
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washingtonpost.com
It’s not easy for ordinary citizens to identify fake news
And fake coronavirus news is no exception.
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washingtonpost.com
Editorial: This could be the first worst week of many worst weeks to come. Prepare yourselves
This may well be the nation's "hardest, saddest" week yet of the coronavirus pandemic. But it may not be the last "worst" week.
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latimes.com
Op-Ed: How living through the siege of Sarajevo prepared me for coronavirus
In Sarajevo, a woman asked me how Americans would survive a siege. Now, with coronavirus, I've gotten a glimpse.
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latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: Joe Biden's quiet campaign raises questions about his fitness for the job
Is the 77-year-old former vice president up for the job of president? Unless he starts speaking up and acting like a candidate, we'll never know.
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latimes.com
Rep. Roger Marshall: China's coronavirus reckoning – act now to end US dependency for drugs, medical supplies
I have seen how foreign dependence, specifically on imports from China, harms the medical supply chain and our readiness for an outbreak firsthand.
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foxnews.com
This creamy chicken poblano soup recipe reminds Joanna Gaines of early dates with husband Chip
"This recipe is a nod to the memories of our first dates," Joanna Gaines writes in her new cookbook, "Magnolia Table, Volume 2," of husband Chip.        
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usatoday.com
With games on hold, sports doctors and trainers are joining the coronavirus treatment effort
John Tabacco, a team physician for the Washington Redskins and George Washington University, is among those who have undergone a major professional transition over the past month.
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washingtonpost.com
Op-Ed: Feed and comfort ER workers and save your favorite restaurant at the same time
Being useful to others, such as delivering meals to emergency room staff during the coronavirus pandemic, can also give us a measure of comfort.
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latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: If a federal stockpile isn't for states, then what is it for, President Trump?
In a war, are the states supposed to buy their own weapons? Similarly, in a national emergency, they should expect help from a federal stockpile.
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latimes.com
As America Grapples With Coronavirus Outbreak, Officials Must Prepare for Hurricanes, Tornadoes
The outbreak has been a lesson in the importance of early preparation, and experts say that now is the time to get ready for natural disasters.
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newsweek.com
Telehealth, Not the ER, Must Be the Front Line in the War on Coronavirus | Opinion
America's dangerous dependence on emergency rooms is increasing the risk of rationing. We must ready the future of medicine to fight today.
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newsweek.com
A Couple Split by the Border Faces a Choice in the Coronavirus Lockdown
Travel restrictions have pulled many families apart.
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slate.com
The federal government, stressed by the coronavirus, seeks to hire and retain workers through incentives
Personnel officials have opened a tool kit of exceptions to standard policies on hiring, assigning and paying federal employees.
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washingtonpost.com
Fashion will survive. But many of the designers at the heart of the industry might not.
For the fashion business, the coronavirus crisis is a test of whether society believes that self-expression is worth preserving.
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washingtonpost.com
Trump Brings the Imperial Presidency to a Halt
President Donald Trump has sometimes used the executive powers of the American presidency with ruthless aplomb. In an administration not conspicuously adept at working the machinery of government, he has effectively circumvented it. He has moved money appropriated by Congress to unauthorized purposes, paid no heed to proscriptions against emoluments, peopled the government with acting department heads unconfirmed by the Senate. He has revealed how many perceived constraints on the presidency are normative rather than statutory or constitutional—thereby dramatically increasing the powers of the executive branch.Yet in the first real crisis to befall his presidency, Trump is utilizing virtually none of the powers of his office. Rather than bring the slippery inventiveness his team took when building the border wall or enacting the travel ban, he’s settled for ineffectual bluster. In an ironic turn, Trump is now acting much more like the kind of tightly constrained executive whom the authors of the Constitution had in mind. The United States could use a vigorous president right now—if not necessarily the imperial president that historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr. famously described—but the incumbent suddenly retreated at the worst possible time.This passivity, this failure of creative administration, is not at all what the president’s critics feared. They feared executive overreach—and with some justification. The only American presidents with the temerity to argue that the president’s actions are by definition legal have been Richard Nixon and Donald Trump. Even Andrew Jackson only argued that the Supreme Court had no ability to enforce its decisions, not that it had no basis to judge.President Trump’s failures during the COVID-19 pandemic have been legion, but they have not been the result of executive overreach. In fact, he has been incredibly slow to use those powers available to a president. He has not organized governors or international efforts or driven legislation, all traditional presidential actions during crises. When Surgeon General Jerome Adams, a political novice, tells the public, “these guidelines are a national stay at home order,” he sounds more like an imperial president than Trump does.It’s mysterious that the president wouldn’t take a more activist role, since executive actions redound to presidential credit. Alexander Hamilton argued in Federalist 70 that “energy in the executive is a leading character in the definition of good government.” Crises expand executive power; in such moments, presidents typically assume that they should do more—and the public usually agrees. That is why biographers and historians tend to focus disproportionately on wars and other calamities. Trump is showing no such inclination to take charge. He summarized his reaction at the White House lectern: “Governors are supposed to be doing a lot of this work.” So timid has been the president’s action that the head of the U.S. Conference of Mayors complained, “This situation is insane. It’s insane. Can you imagine in World War II everybody trying to outbid each other for what they need? We need to have one person, one operation that facilitates this whole thing.”Except during national emergencies, the more common complaint is that the White House is too strong relative to the other branches. Fear of a presidency burgeoning beyond its constitutionally-prescribed role took root in the Nixon years, with Schlesinger, a historian of the Kennedy era coining the phrase imperial presidency and capturing the anxiety of the times. Schlesinger worried that America’s persistent involvement overseas permitted the president to leapfrog over the Founders’ central preoccupation, which was circumscribing the arbitrary exercise of executive power.America’s Founders expected Congress to be the dominant branch of government, established separation of powers to allow the president and the courts as checks on the Congress. Schlesinger, too, argued that a more activist Congress is the constitutional port of first resort—that is, the place where those seeking to change public policy should begin their efforts. After Watergate, Congress enacted legislation constraining the executive branch so effectively that Nixon’s successor, Gerald Ford, complained that the United States risked an “imperiled presidency.”And yet the power of the president still grew and grew. Early last year—which is to say, long before impeachment happened or the coronavirus occurred—the scholars Kevin Kruse and Julien Zelizer argued that Trump, because of consistently low approval ratings, was “a shockingly weak president.” Nevertheless, they contended, because of the expansive emergency powers available to any American president, “Mr. Trump has illustrated that even a feeble commander in chief can impose his will on the nation if he lacks any sense of restraint or respect for political norms and guardrails.” Three important scholars of the presidency recently concluded “the balance of power on foreign policy isn’t shifting back toward the legislative branch.”But that was before the pandemic, during which the President has proved manifestly unwilling to use the executive powers of the Presidency. Nor have the President’s men capitalized on the opportunity of a crisis to expand executive power. Quite the contrary: the president is forgoing what powers the office does have in order to avoid responsibility for outcomes. Alexander Hamilton and James Madison did not see that coming. Into the vacuum this un-imperial president has left, desperate governors from states hard hit—including Jay Inslee of Washington, Gavin Newsom of California, Phil Murphy of New Jersey, and Andrew Cuomo of New York—are rushing in, and to good effect. The Founding Fathers would admire that, because the devolution of power from the president is how the American political system was designed to work. Departments have wide latitude to take administrative action without presidential authorization. Congress has the ability to check the president, as do the courts. And state governors’ independence provides the laboratory of leadership and policy experimentation on which the federal government draws.Of course, governors can’t engage in deficit spending, waive federal regulations, invoke the Defense Production Act, or enlist the Federal Emergency Management Agency to distribute needed. In practice, Congress is sloppy and often solves the wrong problem. The courts work slowly and redress only specific grievances. The system the Constitution dictates is not as efficient as a unitary executive directing action. It wasn’t designed to be efficient. It was designed, though, to prevent exactly the kind of aggregation and abuse of power that President Trump’s critics fear him capable of.Still, devolution is easier to defend when states aren’t competing with one another and the federal government for a limited supply of ventilators. The imperial presidency should lose power over time—just not abandon it abruptly when hundreds of thousands of lives are at risk.
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theatlantic.com
Celebrating Passover during a modern-day plague
Rabbi Shai Held writes that celebrating Passover, which is about bringing together families, will sadly have to be observed apart. But times of immense difficulty can also be times of profound growth. Let's try, in the face of fear and anxiety, to let our vulnerability help us to love more fully.
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edition.cnn.com
Ex-Fed Chair Janet Yellen Thinks Thursday's Jobless Claims Could Break Last Week's 6.6 Million Record
The former chair of the Federal Reserve made the suggestion during a conference call with House Democrats on how the coronavirus pandemic is hurting the economy.
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newsweek.com
Live updates: Officials warn D.C. region could be next virus hot spot; deaths disproportionately concentrated among black residents
See the latest coronavirus news and developments Tuesday in the Washington region.
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washingtonpost.com
USNS Comfort crew member tests positive for coronavirus: report
A crew member aboard the USNS Comfort, the Navy hospital ship docked in New York City, has tested positive for coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
Dear Care and Feeding: My Neighbor Keeps Complaining My Housebound Toddler Is Too Noisy
Parenting advice on noisy toddlers, elderly parents, and BFFs.
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slate.com
Man Who Claimed He Had Coronavirus Arrested on Terrorism Charges for Coughing on Shoppers in Walmart
The man was charged with violating the terrorism hoax act, disorderly conduct and reckless endangerment.
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newsweek.com
But Are You Watching Out for This Symptom of COVID-19?
We have more answers than data.
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slate.com
'Manifest' Season 3 Release Date: Will There Be Another Season of the NBC Show?
The show has just released a finale that seems to set up Season 3—and the showrunner has previously said he has a multiple season plan for the NBC show.
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newsweek.com
Deborah Birx says she couldn’t treat her ill grandchild due to social distancing — and a fear of infecting Trump
"You can’t take that kind of risk with the leaders of the country," Birx, a physician, said Monday, explaining her decision to stay away from her sick 10-month-old granddaughter.
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washingtonpost.com
Pandemic Kitchen: What’s Cooking During the Coronavirus Like for a Family of Four in New York City?
Dwindling grocery delivery options and limited stockpiling space are forcing some changes, like no more forgotten vegetables.
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slate.com
Passengers on the Coral Princess cruise ship are still trying to get home
After nearly a month at sea and two days in port, Americans onboard the Coral Princess cruise ship are still trying to get home in the wake of the global coronavirus pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Civil rights icon John Lewis endorses Joe Biden
Civil rights icon and Democratic Rep. John Lewis is endorsing Joe Biden, promising to campaign for the former vice president and saying that "we need his leadership now more than ever before."
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edition.cnn.com
A man feared his longtime girlfriend had covid-19, which she didn’t. They died in a murder-suicide, police say.
In the U.S., advocates are bracing for an increase in domestic violence incidents as quarantine measures fall into place nationwide.
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washingtonpost.com
Nancy Pelosi Says Supreme Court Is Forcing People to Choose Between Voting and Being Sick in Wisconsin Primary
The Supreme Court is "undermining our democracy," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said.
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newsweek.com