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Amazon Alexa auditors could reportedly access user locations

It emerged earlier this month that thousands of Amazon employees are reviewing some Alexa recordings (which are captured after you've said the wake word). The auditors transcribe, annotate and analyze a selection of commands to help improve Alexa. Bu...
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Bryce Harper belts 466-foot home run to propel Nationals
PHILADELPHIA — Bryce Harper delivered a powerful swing and Aaron Nola provided the punchouts. Harper homered over the batter’s eye in center field, Nola tied his career high with 12 strikeouts while pitching into the seventh inning and the Philadelphia Phillies defeated the Colorado Rockies 2-1 on Saturday. Harper also doubled for the NL East-leading...
New York Post
NASA's Astrobee cube robot completes first hardware tests in space
NASA just inched closer to having robots take care of spacecraft. The agency recently completed its first hardware checkouts for Bumble (above), one of three Astrobee robots that will research automated caretaking aboard the International Space Stat...
Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
How Brooks Koepka morphed into best golfer in the world
Other than the hulking PGA Tour player with the Popeye biceps bursting from his golf shirts, the intimidating, stoic Terminator expression piercing from under the brim of his cap and the guy who’s going to win the PGA Championship Sunday at Bethpage Black, who is Brooks Koepka? He’s a late bloomer who bravely took a...
New York Post
Boeing admits to flaw in 737 MAX flight simulators
Boeing has reportedly admitted for the first time that there was a flaw in its 737 MAX flight simulators. “Boeing has made corrections to the 737 MAX simulator software and has provided additional information to device operators to ensure that the simulator experience is representative across different flight conditions,” the manufacturer told the AFP news...
New York Post
Donald Trump wants exceptions for rape, incest in abortion laws
In a series of tweets Saturday, Trump seemed to suggest the Alabma law might have gone too far.        
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USATODAY - News Top Stories
NASCAR driver throws punches after end of All-Star Race
CONCORD, N.C. — Clint Bowyer had a lot more to say to Ryan Newman after the checkered flag flew at the NASCAR All-Star Race. He made sure his fists sent that message. Bowyer rushed Newman’s car after the cool-down lap, frantically trying to land blows through the window while Newman had his helmet on after...
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New York Post
Australia's Pentecostal PM rides miraculous wave back into office
Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison thanked his fellow Pentecostal churchgoers on Sunday after a miraculous election victory that defied years of unfavorable opinion polls and bruised a Labor opposition that had been widely expected to win.
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Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Deontay Wilder Promises Anthony Joshua Fight, Tyson Fury Rematch Will Happen
Deontay Wilder said he will fight Anthony Joshua and face Tyson Fury in a rematch following his first-round knockout win against Dominic Breazeale on Saturday. Per the Guardian 's Bryan Armen Graham , he said: "I understand what Tyson Fury did...
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bleacherreport.com
China wants us to forget the horrors of Tiananmen as it rewrites its history | Louisa Lim and Ilaria Maria Sala
The state is enforcing a collective amnesia about not only recent political events but those that happened thousands of years agoRemembering the deaths of 4 June 1989 is no neutral task. It is a civic duty, a burden and an act of resistance in countering a state-level lie that risks spreading far beyond China’s borders.On that day the Communist party sent tanks to clear protesters from Tiananmen Square in the centre of Beijing, killing hundreds of people, maybe more than a thousand. In the intervening years, China has systematically erased the evidence and memory of this violent suppression using its increasingly hi-tech apparatus of censorship and control. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Why a good Ofsted report can be bad for GCSE results
Children whose families receive positive news about their school perform significantly worse in exams, according to studyHealth warning: positive Ofsted ratings may damage GCSE results.This is the shock finding of a study conducted by four universities and two thinktanks which found that parents with children in schools that have received a better-than-expected Ofsted report are much more likely to reduce how much they help their children with their homework. This, in turn, could have a damaging impact on their children’s GCSE results. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Ruth Hunt: ‘We had a moral responsibility to fight for trans people’
She took Stonewall into a bitter battle despite loud internal dissent. As she prepares to leave, she remains sure she was rightRuth Hunt hasn’t had an easy ride. The outgoing chief executive of Stonewall has been accused of driving away donors. She has been charged with running “a militant trans agenda” by one former supporter and “[losing] what the big principle was” by another. Earlier this year the Times and Daily Mail claimed her resignation as a victory in the face of “growing protest by leading gay and lesbian supporters”.For the head of a charity campaigning for lesbian, gay, bi and – under Hunt – trans rights, it might have been crushing. But Hunt, 39, is unflappable and unapologetic. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
The week in TV: Years and Years; The Virtues; Mum and Game of Thrones
Russell T Davies’s state of the nation drama traces the Lyons family fortunes with wit and thrills, while Stephen Graham is shockingly good as a traumatised man seeking his pastYears and Years BBC One | iPlayerThe Virtues Channel 4 | All4Mum BBC Two | iPlayerGame of Thrones Sky AtlanticIn Years and Years, the sheer gleeful inventiveness of Russell T Davies is allowed to run right off the leash and bounce like a lolloping puppy over the hills and far away. Among its many virtues, the drama has the power to splenetically enrage the most swivel-eyed outposts of both left and right. It is Davies’s state-of-the-nation attempt to distil, via a sharply clever timeline and a cast to die for, our unhinged times. It works, with splendour. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Home Grown: How Domestic Violence Turns Men Into Terrorists – review
Joan Smith examines the roots of terrorism, but fails to address the complexities of social inequalityKhalid Masood, 52, born Adrian Russell Elms, drove across Westminster Bridge in 2017 mowing down pedestrians and stabbing to death PC Keith Palmer. He had a string of criminal convictions for offences involving violence but since 2003 he had done little to attract police attention. Instead, in Home Grown, Joan Smith argues that Masood had chosen to “privatise his aggressive behaviour, hiding it behind closed doors”, controlling and beating a succession of women.Smith, a feminist and human rights activist, contends that if victims were believed, domestic abuse was better recognised, policed efficiently and addressed appropriately in court, then numerous acts of terrorism, committed in the name of religion, extreme ideology and misogyny, could – and can – be avoided. So why is this link ignored? Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
'Instant calm to the soul': the magic of Cape Clear, Ireland
Whether in search of peace, or adventure, this tiny County Cork island is a haven for escapistsCape Clear, Ireland’s most southerly island, has been my getaway for almost 30 years. It is the place where I forget which day of the week it is. It’s where I go to imagine a world without Brexit and Trump. The island has a spirit that brings instant calm to the soul. I once had the good fortune to live there for four months. It was then that I first began to write, finding the serenity to hone the craft that would eventually lead to my first novel. Related: Hot tubs, saunas and seaweed soaks on Ireland’s west coast Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
The WhatsApp spyware story tells us that nothing is secure | John Naughton
The attack on the messaging app showed us spying is a thriving businessWhen Edward Snowden broke cover in the summer of 2013 and a team of Guardian journalists met up with him in his Hong Kong hotel, he insisted not only that they switch off their mobile phones but also that they put the devices into a fridge. This precaution suggested that Snowden had some special insight into the hacking powers of the NSA, specifically that the agency had developed techniques for covertly taking over a mobile phone and using it as a tracking and recording device. To anyone familiar with the capabilities of agencies such as the NSA or GCHQ, this seemed plausible. And in fact, some years later, such capabilities were explicitly deemed necessary and permissible (as “equipment interference”) in the Investigatory Powers Act 2016.When Snowden was talking to the reporters in Hong Kong, WhatsApp was a four-year-old startup with an honest business model (people paid for the app), about 200m active users and a valuation of $1.5bn. In February 2014, Facebook bought the company for $19bn and everything changed. WhatsApp grew exponentially to its present ubiquity: it has more than 1.5 billion users and has spread like a rash over the entire planet. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Who’s that girl? Queen Victoria as we’ve never seen her before
To mark 200 years since her birth, previously unseen photographs of the young, chic monarch have been released to the ObserverFor many, the enduring image of Queen Victoria is of a monarch in mourning, stern-faced and bereft in her black gown and white headpiece after the death of her beloved husband, Albert.Very few pictures capture the young, vibrant woman she had been – when she ascended the throne in 1837, aged 18, photography had barely been invented. But such images do exist, and to mark the 200th anniversary of her birth this Friday, the Museum of London has unveiled exclusively for the Observer two rare photographs never before seen by the public. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Trump tweets about abortion days after Alabama ban passes
The tweets come just days after after Alabama passed the country's most restrictive abortion law​, which bans the procedure unless "abortion is necessary in order to prevent a serious health risk" to the woman
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CBS News - Breaking News, U.S., World, Business, Entertainment & Video
Lamar Odom admits using fake penis to pass Olympics drug test
It may not be the weirdest thing Lamar Odom has ever done, but in 2004, the NBA champ wore a prosthetic penis to pass a drug test for the upcoming Olympics in Athens. Odom, 39, makes the revelation in his new memoir, “Darkness to Light,” according to People magazine. “There was no way I was...
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New York Post
Madonna’s Eurovision Performance Somehow Fails to Solve Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Well, at least she made a little money on the deal.
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Slate Articles
Brexit mess is about to get much, much worse
On May 23, the UK's Brexit mess gets even more complicated.
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CNN.com - RSS Channel
News Analysis: It Was Supposed to Be Australia’s Climate Change Election. What Happened?
On Saturday, in a result that stunned most analysts, voters re-elected the conservative coalition that has long resisted plans to sharply cut down on carbon emissions and coal.
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NYT > Home Page
'SNL' closes season with a song for Trump
"You can’t subpoena him, he’s going to obstruct," sang Aidy Bryant as White House press secretary Sarah Sanders.
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NBC News - Breaking News & Top Stories - Latest World, US & Local News
Joe Maddon’s delivery protest draws ire of Nationals’ closer
WASHINGTON — Cubs manager Joe Maddon said he was seeking fairness when he questioned the legality of Washington Nationals closer Sean Doolittle’s delivery in the ninth inning Saturday night and ultimately protested the game. That wasn’t Doolittle’s interpretation. “He’s not trying to do anything other than rattle me,” Doolittle said. “And it was kind of...
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New York Post
NHS England loses 6,000 mental health nurses in 10 years
Recruitment and training crisis ‘hits the most vulnerable in society’, says Royal College of NursingThe number of mental health nurses in England has slumped by more than a tenth over the past decade, new figures have revealed. This is despite commitments from both Theresa May and her predecessor, David Cameron, to boost resources for mental health services, which many medical professionals say are now in crisis.The total mental health nursing workforce has decreased by 10.6% since 2009, according to the Royal College of Nursing (RCN). Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Women's World Cup 2019: Abby Wambach's neat goal from 2015 - 19 days to go
BBC Sport remembers Abby Wambach's final competitive goal for the USA in a 1-0 win over Nigeria at the 2015 World Cup.
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BBC News - Home
Adam Scott just couldn’t replicate excellence
Adam Scott slept on the best round of the second day at the PGA Championship, but awoke Saturday and just couldn’t replicate it. The 38-year-old Australian could not carry momentum from his 64 on Friday and shot a third-round 72 at Bethpage Black, dropping him to 3-under for the tournament and nine shots back of...
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New York Post
Fantasy owners must exercise caution when adding rookies
When the baseball season began, the rookie talk was abundant. The White Sox signed Eloy Jimenez to a long-term deal so he could begin the season in the majors, the Rays did the same with Brandon Lowe, Chris Paddack made the Padres Opening Day roster, and we were all just counting the days until Vladimir...
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New York Post
Draymond Green posts triple-double as Warriors grab 3-0 series lead
PORTLAND, Ore. — Draymond Green had 20 points, 13 rebounds and 12 assists, and the Golden State Warriors beat the Portland Trail Blazers 110-99 on Saturday night for a 3-0 lead in the Western Conference finals. Green had his seventh career postseason triple-double and Stephen Curry scored 36 points for Golden State, which moved a...
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New York Post
Michigan Congressman first Republican to call for Trump’s impeachment
A Republican Congressman on Saturday became the first in his party to publicly call for the impeachment of President Trump. Justin Amash, of Michigan, tweeted Saturday that impeachment “should be undertaken only in extraordinary circumstances,” but that Trump has committed “impeachable conduct.” He also said Attorney General William Barr intentionally misled the public about the...
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New York Post
Good gardening is also about good eating | Allan Jenkins
It’s time to grill sausages and talk about hopes and plans for the plotSpring barbecue, the tribal gathering. The collecting together of the allotment community after winter. Much strimming and sweeping of sheds and paths, cutting back overgrown spillage, sorting through the compost bays. With sausages, spicy chicken, vegetarian options.It is the busiest day of the year so far. Tables are laid with an oilskin cloth. Chairs are cleaned, early summer flowers gathered for a jug: borage, dandelion, bluebells and forget-me-nots. There is a carpet of them, the beauty of benign neglect from a neighbour no longer with us. This was a favourite plot, a couple of fruit trees, a few cardoons, a quiet sitting space against a warming wall. It is more productive now, feeding a family, vines and yellow marigolds, a different beauty. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Red ahead: the lip colour for everyone
Red lipstick will suit you, if you find the right one. Plus, skincare for pigmentation problems, and body treatments to make you glowI accept – as sacrilegious as it is – that some women simply don’t like red lipstick. What I won’t accept is that it doesn’t suit you. They come in a plethora of undertones (orange, pink, blue, wine) and textures (matte, velvet, satin, glossy) and somewhere, there, trust me lurks your ultimate red lip. I could do a “how to choose” – a bluey-red will make your teeth look whiter, a pencil stops the colour from bleeding – but ultimately, like relationships, you may have to try a few to find the right one.1. Givenchy Le Couture Edition No 304 Mandarine Bolero £32, debenhams.com 2. UOMA Beauty Badass Icon Matte Lipstick in Sade £21.50, selfridges.com 3. Mac Lip Pencil in Ruby Woo £14, maccosmetics.co.uk 4. Christian Louboutin Velvet Matte in Altressa £70, net-a-porter.com 5. Laura Mercier Rouge Essentiel Crème Lipstick £26, spacenk.com Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
I’m 70, but I can’t stop my new partner from talking to other people | Dear Mariella
If age teaches us anything, it’s that you can’t change other people, says Mariella. You may be wrong for each other, or you may need to adapt your behaviour The dilemma I am in my early 70s and met a wonderful man three years ago. He is a Spanish national and we have been away together on winter holidays, which have been marvellous. He is very outgoing and strikes up conversations with passers-by, fellow customers in a restaurant – anyone around when we are out. In Spain, although my Spanish is improving and I understand most of what is being said, I cannot make much of a contribution. These conversations can last up to 10 or 15 minutes and happen three or four times during any outing.He says I am “wrong” to have a problem with this and it is my British background that makes me reserved. I often feel these exchanges are more fascinating to him than any conversation the two of us have. Besides feeling left out, I cringe when he interrupts people. He accuses me of being jealous and says I have a “psychological problem” if I cannot embrace this part of his character. He has no inhibitions, for instance, asking people how much they paid for their holiday accommodation so he can compare our deal. Most disturbing, he will not even consider that these conversations can be annoying, boring or embarrassing to me. I’m an outgoing person, but I’m more interested in connecting with my partner than with strangers. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Citroën C5 Aircross: ‘An SUV that’s determined to smooth out your drive’ | Martin Love
A uniquely effective suspension means this easy-going family car will cope with all of life’s little bumpsCitroën C5 AircrossPrice £23,8300-62mph 10.5 secondsTop speed 117mphMPG 44.2CO2 118g/kmIn these bruisingly divisive times, there is one thing, at least, that we can agree on: potholes. “Craters”, as the tabloids call them, are a source of neverending dismay for drivers and cyclists. According to the Asphalt Industry Alliance, almost 1.7m potholes were filled in England and Wales last year – an astonishing one every 19 seconds. Sadly, the gaping cavern I have to swerve round each morning has so far evaded their attentions. And with all this rain, it’s now become a water feature. Green Flag estimates that dropping into potholes causes our cars an average of £230 per year on repairs – mostly to tyres and suspension. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Dolomites Bike Day: ‘Europe’s biggest traffic-free cycle ride’ | Martin Love
Twisting roads, mountain scenery, great atmosphere – and not a car in sight. This is the best time of year to see the Dolomites by bikeDolomites Bike DayWhen 16 June, 9am to 3pmWhere Alta Badia, ItalyPrice Free, open to allDetails dolomitesbikeday.itAt the back of every cyclist’s mind is the worrying thought: ‘What if there is a car around the next bend?’ It’s no surprise, therefore, that the most popular bike events usually take place on closed roads. The biggest and best of these is the annual Bike Day held in the Dolomites. You can pedal along an astonishing 108km of blissfully traffic-free tarmac. The event, now in its third year, is the largest in Europe. It’s very much a celebration of the joys of all things two-wheeled and it prides itself on being inclusive. Riders of every age and any experience are welcome. It’s totally free and you don’t even have to register – just turn up, pedal and enjoy yourself. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
The Home Office shames us all by its callous attitude to child refugees | Barbara Ellen
This country can easily afford to offer sanctuary to many vulnerable youngstersAnyone horrified in 2017 by the government’s shamefully inadequate response to helping lone child refugees trapped in makeshift camps in France should know that the situation has become even worse, with reports that the Dubs scheme (to get unaccompanied minors safely to the UK) is to be stopped.The government has been relentlessly criticised, not least by Lord Dubs, after whom the scheme is named, for offering to help only 480 children, when in 2016 local authorities in the UK pledged to help thousands more if government funding was made available. (In short, it wasn’t.) Now it’s reported that only nine more children are to be helped via the Dubs scheme, closing the only direct legal route for unaccompanied child refugees to the UK (apart from a lengthy, complex process where children can apply to have their case transferred to another EU country where they have family). Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
TV tonight: Sally Wainwright's irresistible queer period drama
Suranne Jones swaggers back on our screens in the beguiling Gentleman Jack. Plus: a hilarious deadpan comedy about dandy vampires. Here’s the best TV to watch this eveningJack Whitehall’s done it. AJ Odudu’s done it. And Romesh Ranganathan is doing it too. Seeing the parents of TV presenters invited to share the limelight with their offspring is often entertaining; this time, the battles of the Ranganathan dinner table are replayed in public as Romesh and his mum explore current affairs. They will be joined by a diverse focus group, comprising 25 members of the public, who’ll be casting their eyes across the week’s no-doubt infuriating and dispiriting news and giving their verdicts. Phil Harrison Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
May I have a word about… Pegasus spyware | Jonathan Bouquet
Is the powerful virus that infected WhatsApp a flying horse or a Trojan horse? Don’t ask the woman who developed itThe unsavoury revelations about the hacking of WhatsApp by software developed by Israeli company, NSO Group, raised some interesting imagery. NSO has developed a powerful smartphone virus called Pegasus, described by NSO co-founder Shalev Hulio as the company’s Trojan horse that could be sent “flying through the air” to infiltrate devices.Right, let’s get this straight. Pegasus was the son of mortal Medusa and Poseidon, god of the sea. Pegasus and his brother Chrysaor were born from the blood of their beheaded mother, who was tricked and killed by Perseus. Pegasus was represented as a kind-hearted, gentle creature, somewhat naive but always eager to help. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Penny Mordaunt’s amnesty is incoherent and could shield governments’ nefarious actions | Nicholas Mercer
Putting a statute of limitations on charging soldiers means justice may not be served for families of victimsIn 2003, Baha Mousa was beaten to death in an illegal interrogation facility operated by the Queen’s Lancashire Regiment. He was found to have 93 sites of injury on his body, including fractured ribs and a broken nose. No one has yet been held to account for his death.At the public inquiry, Sir William Gage said his death “was avoidable and preventable and there can be no excuses. There is no place in our armed forces for the mistreatment of detainees. And there is no place for a perverted sense of loyalty that turns a blind eye to wrongdoing or erects a wall of silence to cover it up.” He added that it was “a very great stain on the reputation of the British army”. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Derided before its launch, BBC Scotland has silenced the critics with its excellence | Kevin McKenna
The many naysayers, including myself, were wrong – it’s the best channel on TVA shoestring revolution is happening beneath the noses of most of Scotland’s population. It’s why I watched a Glaswegian hairdresser last night discussing sex, religion and politics as he bobbed and weaved with scissors around his customer’s salt and pepper hair.I came to bury this show but I am enchanted. The revolution is unfolding nightly on the BBC’s new Scotland channel, launched three months ago amid industry pessimism and the wide-angle cynicism of commentators like me. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
130,000 trees to be planted in English cities and towns
As part of efforts to tackle global heating, grants will be available for planting and three years’ careMore than 130,000 trees are to be planted in English towns and cities over the next two years as part of the nation’s battle against global heating.The environment secretary, Michael Gove, will announce on Sunday that grants for the plantings will be made available through the Urban Tree Challenge Fund. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Coconut Tree, Cheltenham: ‘laid-back and on point’ – restaurant review
Cheap and full of charm, the Coconut Tree captures the vivid flavour of Sri LankaThe Coconut Tree, 59 St Paul’s Road, Cheltenham GL50 4JA (01242 465 758). Also in Bristol and Oxford. Dishes £2.50-£8; wines from £17Eating well is an expression of normality. When we’re not in crisis, we eat well. When we’re not at war, we eat well. It’s also a way of reclaiming normality: of refusing to let the darkness win. It’s why I went to the Coconut Tree in Cheltenham, the original outpost of a small group of places serving what they describe as Sri Lankan street food. A few weeks ago, the island made headlines for the most terrible of reasons: a grim narrative of suicide bombs and body counts. Countries are not defined by atrocity, but by the good things. Great cooking is always one of the good things. A restaurant review cannot defeat terror but, at the very least, talking about the country’s vivid food – its way with coconut, turmeric, cardamom and chilies – is so very much better than talking about all the other stuff we’ve heard from Sri Lanka recently. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Nigel Slater’s vegetable stock and soup recipes
A flavoursome broth to lift both soup and spiritsI have been in need of a good vegetable stock for some time. Not one of the delicate, vegetal liquids the colour of hay but something altogether deeper, richer and more ballsy. In other words, more like a brown meat stock. Such a broth would be immensely useful in my kitchen as a base for the heartier non-meat recipes that form the backbone of my daily eating, but also as something restoring to drink as you might a cup of miso. My gran would have had Bovril. The colour must be dark and glossy, the flavour deeply, mysteriously herbal with a hint of mushroom and there should be a roasted backnote, the sort you find in a long-simmered meat stock.And so the kitchen slowly filled with the smell of onions, celery and carrots, which we roasted with miso then removed from the oven and simmered for a good hour with thyme, bay and shitake. We slipped in a sheet of kombu for an extra layer of depth. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
The Brexit party reflects our hollowed-out, tired politics | Kenan Malik
Its success reveals how Labour and the Tories have failed votersWill British politics be upended in the European elections on Thursday? Certainly, the traditional faultlines may be recast, at least for this election.The Brexit party will no doubt emerge triumphant, the Tories crushed, Labour humiliated and the Greens and the Lib Dems will make sufficient gains to claim a modicum of success. Whatever the results, they will leave untouched the fundamental problems that have created the chasm between large sections of the electorate and mainstream parties. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Deontay Wilder eyeing big fights after destroying Dominic Breazeale
Deontay Wilder believes they are coming, the mega matchup with Anthony Joshua and the rematch with Tyson Fury. Until then, he moved onto some business with Dominic Breazeale. He took care of it quickly and emphatically. Wilder got back into the win column Saturday night at Barclays Center, knocking out Breazeale with an overpowering right...
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New York Post
Colombine shooting survivor found dead, family cites opioid addiction
A survivor of the 1999 Colombine shooting was found dead in his Colorado home at 37, local media reported Saturday. Austin Eubanks had struggled with an opioid addiction since days after the mass shooting, which claimed the life of his best friend as they cowered together under a table in the library. In the 20...
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New York Post
Texas church targeted in mass shooting opens new sanctuary
SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, Texas — A South Texas church begins a new chapter of worship on Sunday as it unveils a new sanctuary a year and half after a gunman opened fire and killed more than two dozen congregants in the deadliest mass shooting in state history. Worshippers, elected leaders and relatives of those killed or...
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New York Post
'Game of Thrones' finale: A poisoned chalice?
The world is set to look like a very different place for millions of people on Monday, May 20.
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CNN.com - RSS Channel