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Dean Skelos seeks early release over coronavirus fears, but prosecutors push back
Former New York state senator Dean Skelos is seeking to end his federal prison sentence early because of fears over coronavirus — but prosecutors are arguing that he may well be safer behind bars than heading back to New York. Skelos filed a sealed emergency motion seeking to finish his term in home confinement, according...
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nypost.com
Here’s What the Subjects of Netflix’s Tiger King Are Up to Now
From Joe Exotic and Carole Baskin to Bhagavan "Doc" Antle
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time.com
Riverside County opens third coronavirus drive-through testing site
Riverside County plans to open its third coronavirus drive-through testing site
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latimes.com
Lawmakers call on ICE to free more immigrants amid pandemic
A federal judge said not releasing sick immigrants could lead to "unconscionable and possibly barbaric result."
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cbsnews.com
Coronavirus is only making Jeff Bezos and Amazon more powerful
The world’s richest man, at this moment, may also be the most hated. Tuesday marked the first mass “sick out” in Whole Foods’ 40-year-history, with workers all-too-credibly claiming the company, owned by Jeff Bezos, doesn’t care about its workers and is doing nothing to protect them from COVID-19. This came one day after workers at...
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nypost.com
Opinion: Amid coronavirus uncertainty, NFL resolute in staying the course for 2020 season — for now
The NFL has made it clear that it wants to forge ahead with the 2020 season, though the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic could force changes.        
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usatoday.com
350 more hospital beds for NY fight against virus
New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Tuesday an additional 350 hospital beds will be made available next week at the tennis center that hosts the U.S. Open to help fight the spread of the coronavirus. (March 31)       
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usatoday.com
Many states are helping renters avoid evictions during coronavirus pandemic. These 12 are not
With millions of rent payments due on April 1, some states have issued eviction moratoriums. Meanwhile, landlords are worried about their future.       
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usatoday.com
See the epic ways people are celebrating Dr. Fauci
Dr. Anthony Fauci's steady guidance on the coronavirus pandemic has turned him into a social media sensation.
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edition.cnn.com
'FBI' Season 3 Release Date: Will There Be Another Season of the CBS Show?
"FBI" Season 3 could be coming soon, with a potential release date in 2020, after the CBS series airs its most current season finale.
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newsweek.com
Always the salesman, Trump touts products and promises at coronavirus briefings
After decades of slapping his name on skyscrapers, steaks, bottled water and silk ties, Trump knows how to sell things, and he's turned the pandemic briefings into a platform to tout unproven remedies and make grand promises.
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latimes.com
Why are airlines still flying in and out of US coronavirus hot spots and will they continue?
U.S. government officials are imploring people to stay home amid the coronavirus crisis, yet airports remain open, if eerily empty.       
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usatoday.com
New York man hid coronavirus symptoms to visit wife in maternity ward: hospital
A New York man with coronavirus symptoms hid them so he could get into the maternity ward as his wife gave birth last week, Fox News has confirmed.
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foxnews.com
CNN10 - 4/1/20
Is the spread of coronavirus slowing down in New York? How safe is takeout food? And what does an "eastern capital" offer? These are some of today's topics.
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edition.cnn.com
‘Zoom-bombing’: FBI warns some teleconferences, online classrooms vulnerable to hackers
The FBI on Monday warned of a nationwide rise in so-called “Zoom-bombing,” or video hacking, as more people have turned to video-teleconferencing amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Lemon Breadcrumb Chicken Piccata
Classic chicken piccata, breaded and shallow-fried in butter, is served with arugula and lemon.
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latimes.com
Mark Meadows officially enters chief of staff job amid national crisis
Mark Meadows has officially resigned from Congress, and began his first official day on the job Monday.
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cbsnews.com
You can save on best-selling beauty at Kiehl's, Tarte, and Ulta right now
Kiehls, Tarte, and Ulta are just a few brands with discount beauty products up for grabs, so now's the time to stock up and save.       
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usatoday.com
Jack Black dances shirtless in cowboy hats and boots: 'Quarantine Dance'
Jack Black is spending his time dancing during self-isolation.  
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foxnews.com
Penguin visits whales at closed Chicago aquarium
A Rockhopper penguin named Wellington took a field trip this week to visit the beluga whale exhibit at Chicago's shuttered Shedd Aquarium. (March 31)       
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usatoday.com
Stuart Weitzman takes 30% off sitewide for flash sale
You can upgrade your shoe game with ease by shopping Stuart Weitzman’s latest flash sale. For a limited time, the popular luxury shoe brand is taking 30% off sitewide. Which means you can pick from a stylish selection of pumps, sandals, sneakers, and more. You can stun in these elegant Leya 95 bead sandals or...
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nypost.com
Mother-to-be Alex Morgan is OK with Olympic postponement
Alex Morgan was planning to be back with the U.S. Women’s national soccer team in time for the Olympics this summer, mere weeks after giving birth to her first child. The 2012 gold medalist and two-time World Cup champion supports the International Olympic Committee’s decision last week to postpone the 2020 Japan games until July...
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nypost.com
He never missed a visit despite her memory loss. Then the coronavirus scare ended visits forever
Isabel Costales of Spain, who had tested positive for the coronavirus, died March 20 at age 86. Her husband wished for one more kiss.
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latimes.com
Dr. Fauci a social media sensation with donuts, socks and other swag
CNN's Jake Tapper reports.
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edition.cnn.com
Maryland GOP Gov. Hogan says Trump’s COVID-19 testing claims ‘just not true’
WASHINGTON — Maryland’s Republican governor on Tuesday dismissed President Trump’s claims there were no coronavirus testing issues in the US, saying, “That’s just not true.” Larry Hogan, who is also the chair of the National Governors Association, slammed Trump’s claims that he hadn’t heard about COVID-19 testing shortages for “several weeks” during an interview with...
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nypost.com
Today’s coronavirus update: US deaths pass China, virus could travel 27 feet
The coronavirus death toll in the US on Tuesday surged passed 3,500, surpassing China’s — as well as the number of people who died in the 9/11 terror attacks. The Empire State remains the nation’s virus epicenter with 75,795 cases, 43,139 in New York City. Most of the state’s 1,500 deaths have been in the...
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nypost.com
8/10/17: Red and Blue
President Trump renewed his threat to the North Korean regime on Thursday, telling reporters his warnings of "fire and fury" may not have gone far enough. Rachael Bade of Politico and Hunter Walker of Yahoo News join "Red & Blue" to discuss.
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cbsnews.com
8/23/17: Red and Blue
Trump and McConnell downplay fight; what Trump left out in his retelling of Charlottesville response
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cbsnews.com
8/15/17: Red and Blue
President Trump on Tuesday doubled down on his initial statement about the violence in Charlottesville, saying people "on both sides" were responsible for violence; Congresswoman Gwen Moore (D-WI) is calling for President Trump's impeachment following his comments on Saturday's attack in Charlottesville.
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cbsnews.com
8/16/17: Red and Blue
Trump faces more fallout from Charlottesville remarks
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cbsnews.com
2020 Daily Trail Markers: Campaigns get creative as fundraising deadline looms
It's the last day of the first quarter, which means candidates are facing FEC fundraising deadlines while navigating the growing financial hardships caused by the coronavirus pandemic​.
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cbsnews.com
8/9/17: Red and Blue
State Dept.: We are speaking in "one voice" on North Korea
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cbsnews.com
8/24/17: Red and Blue
President Trump had no public events Thursday, but he kept Americans updated by tweeting frequently; Where in the world is Jared Kushner?
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cbsnews.com
WATCH: Coronavirus daily update: March 31, 2020
The latest news and biggest developments to keep you informed about the deadly pandemic.
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abcnews.go.com
It's warming up, but don't venture out: Health officials issue virus reminder
The warm weather may make it tempting to congregate outdoors, but L.A. County is asking residents to stay home to avoid spreading the coronavirus.
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latimes.com
HGTV's Jamie Durie sells his verdant hideaway in Hollywood Hills
Following four price cuts, landscape designer Jamie Durie sold his Hollywood Hills home for $2.222 million.
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latimes.com
NJ Gov: We're fighting virus with one arm tied behind our back
Governor Phil Murphy (D-NJ) joins The Lead.
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edition.cnn.com
A coronavirus recession will mean more robots and fewer jobs
Automated delivery bots are already working in the small town of Milton Keynes, England. | Leon Neal/Getty Images All economic downturns increase automation. This one will be worse. The novel coronavirus pandemic is certainly not good for the labor market. Recent weeks have seen unemployment claims surge to record levels as businesses and entire industries shutter in order to stop the spread of the novel coronavirus. As a result, the economy has plummeted, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 down more than 20 percent from their February highs. While social distancing measures may be temporary, this economic downturn’s effect on the labor market will have long-lasting effects. In a joint post with his colleagues, Mark Muro, a senior fellow and policy director at the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program, recently wrote, “any coronavirus-related recession is likely to bring about a spike in labor-replacing automation.” Economic downturns, he argues, bring about increased levels of automation, which is already an existential threat to many jobs. And a coronavirus recession, due to its breadth and scale, could cause even more automation. This interview has been lightly edited for clarity and brevity. Rani Molla It feels counterintuitive to me that automation would spike in an economic downturn, because automation is expensive, at least in the short term. Why do you expect the rate of automation to increase? Mark Muro It might seem that in hard times, in a downturn, human labor would be cheaper and therefore automation would go down. But in fact, it’s the opposite. What happens is that, because of the crisis of the bottom line and a crash in revenue, humans become relatively more expensive compared to automation. So a firm that might have been thinking about automating is under a whole lot of pressure to do that, especially in the first two years of a new downturn. And that’s what a lot of research over the last few recessions has shown. People are relatively more expensive, including with their benefits. Meanwhile, you can restructure your business using new technology that increases productivity. So the typical move is to replace less-skilled workers with a fewer number of more-skilled workers or retain higher-skilled workers but then to bring in new technology. The other thing is that new technology, meaning automation but also enterprise software, is no longer nearly as expensive as it was a decade ago, say around the financial crisis. The cost curve has been declining. We think there’s a lot of new high-quality technology on the shelves waiting for deployment, including a more “turnkey” standard offering, often from the big tech companies. So I think a lot has happened to sharpen what was already a highly visible dynamic in the last turndown, the financial crisis. “What can be automated, likely will be” Rani Molla And machines don’t get sick or stay home when there’s a pandemic. Mark Muro Right. Viruses may be transferred from one to another, but it’s not the same kind of virus. Rani Molla So what exactly has the research shown? Mark Muro Nir Jaimovich and Henry Siu found that, in three recessions over the last 30 years, 88 percent of job loss took place in routine highly automatable occupations. And that was essentially all of the jobs lost in the crises. So, these crises have historically inordinately been visited on workers whose work actually was automatable. Another finding by Brad Hershbein and Lisa Kahn of the University of Rochester looked at something like 100 million online job postings and found that firms in the hardest-hit metros were steadily replacing workers who performed automatable routine tasks with this mix of tech, yes, but also more skilled workers. So there’s a kind of sorting that occurs: you get more automation but also upskilling, both of which will be tough for already jittery workers. Rani Molla What makes this economic downturn different than the last recession? Mark Muro The thing that is different this time is that all that I’ve said about already less educated, lower-skilled workers is beginning to apply more to middle-skill and even higher-skill professional and white-collar work, which may become more susceptible given the improvement of things like AI. Our recent research has shown that AI is disproportionally utilized in white collar, middle management, or upper management areas. It’s also used by line workers and in administrative functions. So it could be that all of this use of telecommuting technologies and communication gear may be pointing to the readiness for more wholesale reorganization of offices that may well put more pressure on not just workers in more routine, traditionally automatable occupations, but more professional ones, I think, are very real possibility. I think the big takeaway here is that downturns drive more, not less, dislocation through automation. And all bets are off about how that will work through this cycle, where the event is huge and there may be more ready to go automation, AI, or remote work platforms. Rani Molla What jobs were automated after the last recession? Mark Muro The initial event had a lot to do with finance, but it was tied up with a substantial crisis in the auto and manufacturing sector. Those were kind of the poster children of the financial crisis, and I think we do have a different picture of the most affected sectors this time. Rani Molla So what will be most affected this time? Mark Muro Food service and accommodations have already been under a lot of pressure, including through the kind of kiosk ordering. But also the middle-skill administrative positions and offices have been under a lot of pressure. And then, of course, manufacturing has been at the forefront for 30 years. For those who think that manufacturing is as automated as it can be, we still see very high exposures there, and I think the kind of suite of AI susceptible middle management occupations — whether it’s bookkeeping, financial analysis, even things like software development — may see pressure. “We’re not just losing a job-rich decade, we’re likely diving back into a period of tech-driven structural change” Rani Molla Can you spell out what it means to be susceptible to automation or AI? Mark Muro Given existing technologies, a total of about 36 million jobs in multiple categories and industries and occupations could be replaced by machines. Now, that doesn’t mean they will. But that gives us a sense of the size of the exposed jobs. It’s not a huge share of the whole economy, but it’s a substantial number of people obviously. That means their work is relatively predictable — or what’s called routine — and therefore susceptible to replacement, either by robotics or office software, for instance. Rani Molla Which jobs are safe? Mark Muro Health, education, government — those will be under relatively less pressure in some ways, at least of immediate layoffs. But we may also see moves to remote learning, for instance, in education changing the mix of workers or government under fiscal pressure, needing to bring in new technology. I think this episode seems broader. It will likely touch all kinds of occupations, but there’s no doubt that direct face-to-face interactions for personal health, for instance, will probably be pretty safe. But there will be the need to reduce some of them, so I think that becomes difficult too. Rani Molla Your research has also found that automation will increase existing inequality in the United States. How so? Mark Muro Because the exposure to automation is shaped heavily by the industries in which particular occupations are situated, we have all kinds of variation across the board. Because the gender or ethnic mix of a particular occupation or industry varies, we see extreme variation there. You have clear vulnerability of younger workers who may be more concentrated in food service or accommodations — jobs that have always been a driver of exposure to automation and that, clearly, is in the forefront under social distancing. Men are a bit more exposed because of their involvement in the fulfillment and trucking sector, which is showing hiring now because of the huge shift to ecommerce. But it’s also a highly automatable area. So we look for a lot of flux in that area. Then Latinos and black Americans are also in heavily exposed industries and occupations, whether it’s again food service or mid-level office work. So this plays out across all of these occupational mixes. The pandemic pressure then will have its own patterns, but these exposure levels are pretty well known. This doesn’t mean that the jobs will necessarily go away, but it’s a mapping of the shape of exposure and where the pressure may be. Rani Molla The fact that this is a global event means it could have an even broader impact than a typical recession. Is that right? Mark Muro The scale of the event is largely going to multiply or compound the overall tendency for automation to surge during downturns. We know the cyclical pattern is a historical fact. The sheer scale of this event is going to exacerbate that. You have to think that what can be automated, likely will be now, given that we’ve had a lot of inertia through the good times. The good times aren’t the time when the pressure is applied. Now, the pressure will be felt by business organizations. And with more technology having arrived and being on its way, I think we will see more pressure, not just in the standard kinds of automation that we’ve seen in the past, whether robotics and factories or kiosk-ordering in restaurants. Retail with cashierless checkouts, such as the Amazon Go stores, may spread. Then I do think we will see more and greater use of AI in the middle class and professional workplace in offices. I think that we’re going to see much more automation than we have even in recent downturns. Rani Molla What will the work landscape look like after this? Mark Muro The potential scale of this event isn’t just going to bring an end to the plentiful supply of jobs we’ve had. It’s also going to bring, because of this automation link, a new round of much more structural change again, in both what the demand for skills is and what the labor market looks like. So we’re not just losing a job-rich decade, we’re likely diving back into a period of tech-driven structural change. That’s going add complications for workers, and it’s going to really, really ratchet up the anxiety that I think people feel. Because it’s not like there’s going to be a return to the same normal. There’s likely going to be the insertion of new technological platforms that will change and really alter what normal is.
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vox.com
Here’s Everything New on Netflix in April 2020—and What’s Leaving
From 'Nailed It!' to 'Tigertail'
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time.com
Democracy 2020 Digest: Biden charges Trump has ‘been very slow to act’
Joe Biden isn’t going as far as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in slamming President Trump’s steering of the federal government’s response to the coronavirus pandemic -- but he’s certainly criticizing the Republican incumbent.
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foxnews.com
NYC paramedic says coronavirus patients brought to hospitals ‘to die’
“We’re pretty much bringing patients to the hospital to die.” That’s how city paramedic Megan Pfeiffer summed up the increasingly grim local coronavirus situation to The Post, while described her grueling work as a first-line emergency worker treating patients in Queens while responding to 911 calls. “It’s been crazy the past few days,” Pfeiffer, 31,...
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nypost.com
Read the White House’s new coronavirus guidelines: ‘30 days to slow the spread’
The White House on Tuesday released its updated coronavirus guidelines. Read them here:
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foxnews.com
16 States Restrict Access to Voting by Mail—How That Could Change 2020 Presidential Election During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Government watchdog group Common Cause has called on all states to "expand vote-by-mail programs and absentee voting wherever possible."
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newsweek.com
Savage X Fenty takes 50% off sitewide during Spring Sale
Savage X Fenty is rolling out all the savings during its Spring Sale. And you can get your hands on all of your favorite lingerie styles for super low prices. Whether you’re looking for something flirty or bossy, you’re sure to find something you love. Plus, the brand is also offering a 2 for $29...
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nypost.com
Sen. Portman wants to hold off on new coronavirus aid bill until we 'see how this one works'
Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, joined "Your World" Tuesday to discuss the prospect of another multi-trillion-dollar coronavirus aid bill, which has been floated by members of both parties as well as President Trump.
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foxnews.com
Scientists develop AI that can turn brain activity into text
Are we moving a bit closer to the day when machines can read our minds?
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foxnews.com
Editorial: Enjoying the clean air? Trump weakens car emissions standards just when we need them the most
It's especially galling that the Trump Administration chooses this very moment, in a pandemic, to rollback car emission standards.
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latimes.com
Coronavirus crashes the Wisconsin primary
The pandemic has led to a shortage of poll workers, a potential turnout dip and several lawsuits, but the April 7 vote is still going ahead.
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politico.com