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Australians warned of possible deadly spider "bonanza"

Experts say weather conditions in bushfire-battered eastern Australia could bring "super dangerous" funnel-webs out in droves.
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Join Jamelle Bouie to discuss how Donald Trump is no F.D.R., and anything else on your mind
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nytimes.com
Patrick McEnroe, ESPN tennis commentator, tests positive for coronavirus
Patrick McEnroe, ESPN tennis commentator and younger brother of John McEnroe, tested positive for coronavirus. He says he feels fine.        
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usatoday.com
Family haunted by secret legacy of notorious Nazi Horst Pilarzik: 'By hiding him, they carried his guilt'
Christiane Falge, born in 1970, never met Horst Burkhart who died five years before her birth, but the image of this playboy relative – her father’s uncle – who drove a sports car and wore expensive clothes is engraved in her mind.  
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foxnews.com
Why I watch Trump's daily coronavirus briefings (and no, it's not because I'm a masochist)
When the coronavirus crisis is over, many people will claim they didn't know what Trump was saying or doing. I will remember, and I will speak up.        
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usatoday.com
LA County Sheriff Will No Longer Order Closure Of Firearms Shops
Sheriff Alex Villanueva said gun shops in Los Angeles County were nonessential during the coronavirus outbreak. Then the federal government updated its list of essential industries.
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npr.org
Koreatown ramen shop burglarized during restaurant shutdown
Saikai Ramen on Western Avenue was burglarized on Saturday.
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latimes.com
Trump’s coronavirus poll bump, explained
Win McNamee/Getty Images He’s up about 5 points; foreign leaders are up by much more. To progressives, America’s flailing response to the coronavirus pandemic is everything that’s been terrifying about a Donald Trump presidency since his candidacy started gaining steam — dishonesty, disrespect for expertise, lack of focus and attention to detail, all colliding with a genuinely difficult policy problem to create a lethal catastrophe. It’s sobering, then, to realize that Trump’s approval ratings, while not exactly good, have been steadily rising since mid-March to reach the highest point since the earliest daysof his presidency. After an up-and-down associated with the impeachment process followed by the recent decline, he’s now up to about a 45 percent approval rating from around 40 percent at the beginning of November. But to contextualize this a bit, essentially all incumbent leaders appear to be benefiting from a coronavirus-related bump. Compared to the governors of hard-hit states or the presidents and prime ministers of hard-hit foreign countries, Trump’s bump is actually quite small, amounting to maybe 2 or 3 points. Compare that with foreign leaders like France’s Emmanuel Macron or Germany’s Angela Merkel, who have seen double-digit increases in their approval ratings. A Siena College poll released Monday showed New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) enjoying a 20-point boost in his approval rating. To whom it may concern: If you would like to see an actual polling bump for handling a crisis well, see this morning’s @SienaResearch poll of NY voters: pic.twitter.com/nhK9d2IoGD— Nick Gourevitch (@nickgourevitch) March 30, 2020 That same poll showed a 1-point bump for Trump in New York state, a bit lower than what national averages show but not far out of line with them. It’s not really clear what this portends for the future. But it does mean that explanations for Trump’s approval bump that focus on things like his performance at the daily staged newscasts are probably missing the forest for the trees. Trump is faring far worse than other similarly situated leaders, and the thing to explain is not why his numbers are going up but why they are going up so little. Trump’s polling bump is small in global terms Italy has become the poster child for the coronavirus’s global spread, and the Italian government’s handling of the outbreak is widely cited as a cautionary tale of mistakes to avoid. But the public gives high marks to Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte and his cabinet, a hastily composed coalition government that was formed last year in a desperate bid to keep the far right out of power. Polls show a sky-high 71 percent approval rating for a formerly unpopular team. Italy, Demos & Pi poll:Conte II Cabinet Approval RatingApprove: 71% (+27)Disapprove: 29% (-27)+/- vs. 10-13 Feb. '20Fieldwork: 16-17 March 2020Sample size: 1,028#Conte #Coronavirusitalia— Europe Elects (@EuropeElects) March 20, 2020 Smaller but still large approval bumps are also evident for Merkel and Macron. Germany, Forschungsgruppe Wahlen poll:Angela Merkel (CDU-EPP) Job ApprovalApprove: 79 (+11)Oppose: 18% (-11)+/- vs. 3-5 MarFieldwork: 23-26 March 2020Sample size: 1,473#Politbarometer #btw21 #COVID19deutschland— Europe Elects (@EuropeElects) March 27, 2020 France, Ifop poll:President Macron Approval RatingApprove: 43% (+11)Disapprove: 56% (-10)Field work: 19-28 Mar. '20Sample size: 1,930— Europe Elects (@EuropeElects) March 29, 2020 UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s approval ratings have also soared into the high 70s, despite a policy approach characterized by a confusing back-and-forth on whether to even try to contain the virus, leading to a situation where the prime minister himself has been infected. Indeed, if anything, European data seems to suggest bigger bounces for leaders with less effective responses, though we’ll probably want to wait and see on an approval poll out of Spain — which has been one of the hardest-hit countries — before making that conclusion firmly. Rally-’round-the-flag effects are common In the United States, meanwhile, gubernatorial polling has been scant, but what’s out there suggests huge boosts for governors of both the hardest-hit states and states that thus far seem to have been largely spared. Not a ton of data out there for individual states, but here's change in net job approval ratings for a few govs + Trump.Whitmer (MI): +30Cooper (NC): +31Cuomo (NY): +55**Trump (US): +5(MRG polls for Whitmer, PPP for Cooper, Siena for Cuomo; for MI/NC initial poll in 2019)— Will Jordan (@williamjordann) March 30, 2020 It’s of course long been observed that presidents benefit from a rally-’round-the-flag effect in wartime. Franklin Roosevelt’s numbers went up after Pearl Harbor, Jimmy Carter’s rose in the initial phase of the Iran hostage crisis, and George W. Bush’s soared after the 9/11 attacks. One common thread in all of this is that voters seem to discount the question of presidential conduct before the crisis hit. The hostage crisis, for example, was precipitated by the Carter administration’s decision to admit the recently deposed shah of Iran into the country after a lobbying campaign led by Chase Manhattan Bank. The Bush administration ignored warnings about al-Qaeda during its first nine months in office and sidelined plans it inherited from the Clinton administration for more aggressive action. But in both cases, the incumbent president played the role of national leader on television very effectively in the early days of the crisis; only later would public support eventually wither. When Democrats praise Cuomo’s response in contrast to Trump’s, they are largely doing something similar. The governor has been a steady presence on television and a clear crisis communicator. But he was slower to take action than West Coast governors like Washington’s Jay Inslee and California’s Gavin Newsom, and the actual situation in New York seems to be quite a bit worse, perhaps as a result. But precisely because things are so bad, Cuomo is on television very frequently discussing the emergency and his efforts to cope with it — and he’s doing a good job of that, regardless of what mistakes may have been made two weeks ago. If you’re looking for information about likely consequences for November, the most important thing to remember is that to the extent that voters change their minds, they tend to do so in the very short term — the border wall government shutdown tanked Trump’s numbers and then they bounced back right away. The most striking thing about Trump’s approval rating bump, however, is simply that it’s very small. Compared to other politicians in the US and abroad, he’s very bad at playing a unifying figure. As a politician, that weakness is offset by the way the Electoral College overweights his coalition. But given the public opinion equivalent of a layup, he’s falling far short of the hoop.
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vox.com
Coronavirus Chronicles: Lyft driver has close call with COVID-19
As coronavirus leaves many service workers without jobs, they are forced to struggle with the new reality of life in the COVID-19 pandemic.        
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usatoday.com
Kate Middleton and Prince William broke up before marriage and kids
Kate Middleton met Prince William in college, but she wasn’t sure if the royal life was for her. In this episode of “Hooked Up To Hitched,” Page Six takes a deep dive into the royal pair’s relationship timeline. Hosts Brian Faas and Eilieen Reslen discuss cheating rumors and why Kate broke up with Prince William...
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nypost.com
The Latin-Pop Boom of ’99 Made Ricky, J.Lo, Enrique and Shakira Household Names.
At the turn of the millennium, Ricky Martin, J.Lo and Shakira changed the game—but it took another two decades to change Latin crossover’s native tongue.
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slate.com
The History of Smallpox Shows Us Nationalism Can’t Beat a Pandemic
Policymakers in Washington should think about the history of smallpox as they craft the longer-term response to COVID-19.
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slate.com
Trump administration eases Obama-era regs on vehicle fuel emissions
The Trump administration on Tuesday moved to ease Obama-era regulations on fuel emissions, the latest rollback of the previous administration’s regulatory agenda -- and one that officials say strikes a balance between economic, safety and environmental factors.
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foxnews.com
New York Gov. Cuomo: Don't expect coronavirus crisis to end soon or you will be 'disappointed every morning'
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is calling on his state’s residents Tuesday to soften their expectations of when the coronavirus crisis will end because its “not going to be soon.” 
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foxnews.com
Mommy blogger gets backlash for loading family in RV, taking them across country during coronavirus pandemic
“We are all living in such uncertain times and I’m just as scared as anyone else. I don’t know if this explanation helps, but I am trying to do my best to take care of my kids and my family," she said.
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foxnews.com
State-by-State Coronavirus Projections Show How COVID-19 Could Impact U.S. Over Next Four Months
Modeling from the UW Medicine Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation suggests U.S. cases of COVID-19 could peak around April 15, 2020.
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newsweek.com
The Collapse of Community During the Spanish Flu
When officials in Seattle announced a citywide lockdown, 15-year-old Violet Harris was overjoyed that she no longer had to go to school. “Good idea? I’ll say it is!” she wrote in her diary, excerpted at length in USA Today. “The only cloud in my sky is that the [School] Board will add the missed days on to the end of the term.” But as the reality of quarantine set in, Harris grew bored. Unable to leave home, she whiled away the hours by sewing a dress to wear to school when it reopened and experimenting with new recipes from the local paper, producing a particularly dreadful batch of fudge, half of which she ended up throwing out. It seems that the full weight of the crisis dawned on her only when she received the startling news that her best friend, Rena, was sick with the Spanish Flu. A week later, after Rena had recovered, the two spoke on the phone. “I asked [Rena] what it felt like to have the influenza, and she said, ‘Don’t get it.’”If history repeats itself, it’s only because human nature stays relatively constant. Reading through newspaper articles and diaries written during the 1918 influenza pandemic, I felt an eerie flash of recognition. The dark jokes, anxious gossip, and breathless speculation reminded me of scrolling through Twitter over the past few weeks, watching people wrestle with life under quarantine by memeing through the crisis. Despite many similarities to the present moment, lockdown in 1918 was nevertheless a much lonelier experience than it is today. Lacking the many communication technologies that have allowed us to stay in contact with friends and family, early-20th-century Americans also struggled with the sudden loss of strong community ties, an experience that, to many, even outweighed the fear of a deadly and contagious disease.As hospitals filled with patients and American cities went into lockdown, many people alternated between alarm and amusement, panicking about the pandemic one moment and joking about it the next. Harris was especially entertained by a directive requiring Seattle residents to wear masks in public. “Gee!” she wrote. “People will look funny—like ghosts.” She drew doodles of people in face masks in the margins of her diary and pasted in an article about the latest face-mask fashions.Many people quickly grew furious with the inconveniences of isolation. “We were quarrentined [sic] on account of the Spanish Influenza and everyone is mad,” reads a letter written by a soldier stationed in South Carolina. Another soldier was annoyed that the quarantine prevented him from sending his family a Christmas gift. In St. Louis, Health Commissioner Max Starkloff made the controversial decision to order the closure of schools, movie theaters, bars, and—most devastatingly—public sporting events. The papers were in an uproar: “INFLUENZA THREATENS FOOTBALL HERE,” blared the St. Louis Globe Democrat. “MEASURES OF THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT CAUSING THE TEAMS MUCH UNEASINESS.” The St. Louis Post-Dispatch dedicated article after article to the subject: “QUARANTINE MAY LAST FOUR WEEKS; FOOTBALL SET BACK,” read one headline. “THE FOOTBALL GAMES ARE ALL OFF. THE SPANISH ‘FLU’ HAS PUT A DAMPER ON THE GRIDIRON,” read another.[Read: I miss sports so, so, so much]During the initial stage of the crisis, people worried loudly about the ways in which public-health measures were rupturing their daily routines, unwilling or perhaps unable to anticipate the more severe ramifications of the crisis. But in certain places, as the death toll began to rise, a sense of desperation set in, resulting in dark consequences for human relationships.Because of the isolated nature of quarantine, the 1918 pandemic was suffered largely in private. Unable to lean on their friends and neighbors for support, people experienced the crisis alone in houses with shuttered windows. “I stayed in all day and didn’t even go to Rena’s,” Harris wrote in her diary. “Mama doesn’t want us to go around more than we need to.”These individual feelings of loneliness compounded, in some cases eroding once-strong community bonds. “People were actually afraid to talk to one another,” said Daniel Tonkel, an influenza survivor, during a 1997 interview for PBS’s American Experience. “It was almost like Don’t breathe in my face; don’t look at me and breathe in my face, because you may give me the germ that I don’t want, and you never knew from day to day who was going to be next on the death list.”[Read: Photos of the 1918 flu pandemic]John M. Barry, the author of The Great Influenza, told me that feelings of loneliness during the pandemic were worsened by fear and mistrust, particularly in places where officials tried to hide the truth of the influenza from the public. “Society is largely based on trust when you get right down to it, and without that there’s an alienation that works its way through the fabric of society,” he said. “When you had nobody to turn to, you had only yourself.” In his book, Barry details reports of families starving to death because other people were too scared to bring them food. This happened not only in cities but also in rural communities, he told me, “places where you would expect community and family and neighborly feeling to be strong enough to overcome that.” In an interview in 1980, Glenn Hollar described the way the flu frayed social ties in his North Carolina hometown. “People would come up and look in your window and holler and see if you was still alive, is about all,” he said. “They wouldn’t come in.”By December 1918, the number of new cases tapered off, and American society began to return, gradually, to normal. (“PUBLIC WILL GET ITS FIRST LOOK AT 1918 FOOTBALL, WHEN BAN LIFTS, TOMORROW,” read a headline in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.) However, the solitary aspect of the epidemic also affected the way that it was memorialized. As the disease stopped its spread, the public’s attention quickly shifted to the end of World War I, undermining the cathartic rituals that societies need to get past collective traumas. In the decades after the sickness, the flu lodged in the back of people’s mind, remembered but not often discussed. The American writer John Dos Passos, who caught the disease on a troop ship, never mentioned the experience in any detail. “It never got a lot of attention, but it was there, below the surface,” Barry said. More than 80 years later, the novelist Thomas Mullen wrote The Last Town on Earth, a fictional account of the 1918 flu. In an interview after the book’s publication, Mullen commented on “a wall of silence surrounding survivors’ memories of the 1918 flu,” which was “quickly leading to the very erasure of those memories.” The historian Alfred W. Crosby deemed it “America’s forgotten pandemic.”In many places, the loneliness and suspicion caused by the flu continued to pervade American society in subtle ways. To some, it seemed that something had been permanently lost. “People didn’t seem as friendly as before,” John Delano, a New Haven, Connecticut, resident, said in 1997. “They didn’t visit each other, bring food over, have parties all the time. The neighborhood changed. People changed. Everything changed.”[Read: The coronavirus is no 1918 pandemic]However, Barry reassured me, this was not universally the case. In his research, he found that communities came together in places where local leadership spoke honestly about the danger of influenza. “There was certainly plenty of fear … nonetheless, you didn’t seem to find the kind of disintegration that occurred in other places,” he said. In cities where proactive public-health commissioners exhibited strong leadership, he argues in his book, people maintained faith in one another.Seattle Commissioner of Health J. S. McBride, for instance, rapidly imposed firm public-health measures and even volunteered his services at an emergency hospital. In November 1918, he commended Seattle residents for “their co-operation in observing the drastic, but necessary, orders which have been issued by us during the influenza epidemic.” McBride’s actions may have been what allowed Seattleites like Violet Harris to remember the epidemic as a somewhat boring time.After six weeks of lockdown, public gathering spaces in Seattle finally reopened for business. “School opens this week,” Harris wrote in her diary. “Thursday! Did you ever? As if they couldn’t have waited till Monday!”
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theatlantic.com
Russian Doctor Who Shook Hands With Vladimir Putin Last Week Tests Positive for Coronavirus
Dr. Denis Protsenko gave Putin a tour of a new hospital in Moscow set up to treat coronavirus patients.
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newsweek.com
Fed Up With Their Government, Brits Are Taking the Coronavirus Response Into Their Own Hands
A different kind of anarchy in the U.K.
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slate.com
Tom Brady, Peyton Manning eyed as partners in second Tiger Woods-Phil Mickelson match: report
Tom Brady and Peyton Manning are reportedly being eyed as partners for Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson for their rematch on the course.
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foxnews.com
Cop gives doctor masks instead of ticket after stopping her for speeding
Lead-footed cardiologist Sarosh Ashraf Janjua wrote that a Minnesota state trooper stopped her for speeding on I-35 last week.
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nypost.com
New York governor: Virus is "more dangerous than we expected"
More than 75,000 people in New York state have been infected with COVID-19.
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cbsnews.com
India police punish coronavirus lockdown-evaders with sit-ups
“Think before you step out during lockdown," one Indian tweeted along with a video of cops in Andhra Pradesh making people do sit-ups, according to The Economic Times.
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nypost.com
Lindsay Lohan announces comeback with eerie video
She's back — again.
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nypost.com
As the Pandemic Spreads, Battles Over Abortion Play Out In Court
Judges have blocked orders in three states suspending abortions during the pandemic.
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npr.org
Coronavirus Diaries: I’m a College Student Still Living on Campus. It’s Weird.
About a week ago, I received an email from university housing recommending I reconsider my living situation.
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slate.com
Coronavirus Diaries: Worst Senior Year Ever!
No more lively class discussions, no more Royal Ball.
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slate.com
Steven Montez: 5 things to know about the 2020 NFL Draft prospect
Steven Montez is a quarterback who is looking to make the jump from college to the pros.
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foxnews.com
How Do COVID-19 Swab Tests Work? Unpleasant Illustration Reveals All
This type of test is currently the most effective way to determine whether or not someone is infected with COVID-19.
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newsweek.com
Protests Among ICE Detainees Grow As Four Test Positive for Coronavirus
Five ICE workers at detention facilities have also tested positive for COVID-19.
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newsweek.com
Bolsonaro balks against more coronavirus protections as cases in Brazil near 5,000
Brazil’s president has continued to refuse to extend his country’s protections​​​​​​​ against the novel coronavirus, claiming more quarantine measures would destroy more jobs and impact the poor disproportionately.
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foxnews.com
Chris Cuomo Confirms He Has Coronavirus as Brother Andrew Calls CNN Anchor His ‘Best Friend’
The CNN anchor said he will continue to broadcast while quarantined in his basement
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time.com
Family recreates trip to Disney after parks close due to coronavirus pandemic
The coronavirus wasn't stopping this Texas family from feeling the Disney magic from their own home.       
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usatoday.com
Walmart deploys temperature checks, masks and gloves to workers
As essential workers strike across the country, Walmart is implementing stricter guidelines to keep its employees safe.
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cbsnews.com
Ford VP on collaborative effort to ramp up ventilator production: Goal is 60 per hour
Ford Motors' partnership with General Electric (GE) and Airon Corp. to build 50,000 new ventilators in the fight against coronavirus is in service to the first responders and their patients, Vice President of Enterprise Product Line Management Jim Baumbick said Tuesday.
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foxnews.com
'Bar Rescue' host Jon Taffer: Restaurants will face new challenges no one is talking about
“Bar Rescue” host Jon Taffer said on “Fox & Friends” on Tuesday that the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting restaurant temporary closures will present challenges that have not yet been addressed.
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus fight creates alliance between health care workers, tattoo artists
Personal piercings and permanent ink aren't the only things coronavirus heroes and tattoo shops have in common these days.
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foxnews.com
Las Vegas homeless forced to sleep in painted squares for 'social distancing requirements'
Homeless on the streets of Las Vegas are sleeping in boxes painted on the asphalt of a soccer stadium parking lot – many of them without padding.        
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usatoday.com
Vatican City is protecting the Pope, but keeping employees at work
While Rome imposes stringent social distancing rules, reports from inside Vatican City suggest the Holy See is doing far less than the rest of Italy to stop the spread.
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edition.cnn.com
China halts sporting events over coronavirus fears just as basketball players were set to return: report
China reportedly issued an order restricting the resumption of team sports on Tuesday just weeks after the Chinese Basketball Association sent a memo announcing plans to resume play in early April. 
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus and Mental Health—How to Deal With Fear and Anxiety During the Pandemic
Anxiety is the most common mental illness in the U.S. and the coronavirus pandemic is adding extra stress into our lives.
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newsweek.com
NFL draft prospects to take part in 'virtual' experience due to coronavirus: report
The 2020 NFL draft will no longer be in Las Vegas due to the pandemic, but the league reportedly has a plan in place to make the experience worthwhile.
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foxnews.com
Anthony Fauci says social distancing is ‘dampening’ coronavirus spread
Dr. Anthony Fauci, the infectious disease expert on the White House task force, said mitigation efforts like social distancing are having a “dampening” effect on the spread of the coronavirus outbreak. “If you look now we’re starting to see glimmers that that is actually having some dampening effect,” he said Tuesday on CNN but cautioned...
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nypost.com
Massachusetts Democrats cancel state convention, endorse Markey for Senate
The party also agreed that Joe Kennedy III would reach the 15% threshold necessary to appear on the ballot.
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cbsnews.com
Andy Cohen reunites with his son after quarantine and more star snaps
Andy Cohen has his best reunion ever, Selena Gomez gets cooking and more...
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nypost.com
Hospital construction ramps up around the world in response to coronavirus pandemic
With the number of coronavirus patients around the world growing at a rapid clip, construction of hospitals and hospital beds has also ramped up around the world.
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latimes.com
Chris Cuomo tests positive for coronavirus
"My brother Chris is positive for coronavirus," Governor Cuomo said in his briefing Tuesday. "He is young, in good shape, strong — not as strong as he thinks — but he will be fine."
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cbsnews.com
Games to Play Online with Friends: How to Play Cards Against Humanity, Houseparty, Board Games, Poker and More
As well as an online version of Cards Against Humanity, you can also play online versions of classic board games like Monopoly and Scrabble.
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newsweek.com
Justice Department IG: FBI routinely failed to document FISA warrant claims
The Justice Department’s inspector general revealed Tuesday that in each of more than two-dozen cases his office reviewed, the FBI routinely failed to document evidence for claims made in secret surveillance-court requests. The significant findings indicate the problem extends beyond those identified last year by the office of IG Michael Horowitz, which concluded that FBI...
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nypost.com